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Western Region

940 S. Figueroa St.

Los Angeles



SOCIAL WORKERS ARE INVITED TO

AVAIL THEMSELVES OF THE

SERVICES OF THE BUREAU

Clinical Service Staff of 16 women physicians and 11
nurses and social workers.

Information and Educational Service relating
to sociological, medical and legal aspects of birth
control.

Assistance in the Establishment of Birth Control
Clinics through Headquarters and Field Staff.

Special Service to Affiliated Clinics.

Instruction Center for physicians and medical students.



Lecture Department

Medical Films on
Contraception



Library Service

Posters and
Charts



THE JOURNAL OF CONTRACEPTION

Abraham Stone, M.D., Editor

The only scientific periodical devoted to the
biological and clinical aspects of human fertility
and its control.

The Birth Control Clinical Research Bureau, through its
experience in advising over 64,000 patients, has had a
unique opportunity to develop clinical standards and
techniques, to promote research, and to encourage recog-
nition of birth control in all public health programs.

America's Pioneer Birth Control Clinic
1923 - 1938



(Continued from page 185)

they deserve. She met the mother in our sewing room, in
a perfectly natural way. Do you know, I think one of om
greatest difficulties comes right there. It's important that
the contact between the volunteer and the family should
be a natural and gracious one. You can't just dump an-
other person into the family circle, which already has had'
to assimilate one stranger in the case worker."

"Could you make more opportunities of this kind?"
"We could, and we should. It takes imagination and
patience and time, but I know it's important. And it's
perfectly possible. Our cases aren't all the kind that nobody
can touch."

... sit down together and plan . . .

EVELYN K. DAVIS, assistant director, National Organization
for Public Health Nursing; vice-chairman, National Committee
on Volunteers in Social Work.

HAVING worked with both professionals and laymen for
nine years trying to develop joint participation, I recognize
many of the problems Mrs. Farlow raises.

Unwillingness to give the volunteer interesting and
challenging jobs or to explain why a job needs to be done,
and a complete unawareness that the board member and
volunteer are not familiar with professional verbiage are
characteristics too prevalent among the professional
workers.



1912 SIX SIGNIFICANT BOOKS 1937

Public Health Nursing

Listed by DOROTHY DEMING

National Organization for Public Health Nursing

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, by Mary Sewall Gardner, R.N.,
M.A. Macmillan. Third Edition. 1936.

Because it remains the most comprehensive discussion of
the evolution, principles and practices of public health
nursing.

INDUSTRIAL NURSING, by Florence Swift Wright, R.N.
Macmillan. 1919.

Because it was the first recognition of the possibility of
using the nurse in industry.

BOARD MEMBERS' MANUAL, by the National Organization
for Public Health Nursing. Macmillan. Second Edition.
1937.

Because it implements the fundamental principle that
public health nursing shall be sponsored by a representa-
tive community group.

SURVEY OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, by the National Or-
ganization for Public Health Nursing. Commonwealth
Fund. 1934.

Because it was the first comprehensive attempt to evaluate
existing practices.

SCHOOL NURSING, by Mary Ella Chayer, R.N.,A.M. Put-
nam. Revised. 1937.

Because it interprets the newer concept of school nursing
as a contribution to health education.

1937 BOOK

PERSONNEL POLICIES IN PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, by Marian

G. Randall, R.N. Macmillan.

Because it analyzes personnel practices in official agencies
at a time of unprecedented expansion of public health nursing.



In answering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

186



On the other hand, the professional's lack of enthusiasm
;iv>i(;nin}; responsible jobs to volunteers is due some-
mes to previous poor luck with them. The serious and
lallenging jobs that the layman would like to do require
uch more time and definite continuous service than a
ilunteer may wish to give.

In the field of social welfare, we two, layman and pro-
ssional, seem to have lost the art of sitting down together
id working out the program jointly. Laymen comprise
ic group most concerned as to whether the community is
-rrved and their neighbors are being given adequate
ire. Dealing with welfare problems requires people with
aining and skills. Agencies to employ skills need support,
jpport comes from the whole community through the
forts of the laymen. If laymen do not have a vital part

an agency program, it is up to the board and staff to sit
>wn together and plan ways in which they can participate.

. horseback opinions . . .

.NN\ F. McGLOTHLAN, former president, Missouri Asse-
rtion for Social Welfare

RANTING that the American Association of Social Work-
's may have attempted to gain professional status a bit too
pidly, I think Mrs. Farlow has not made the point she
ems to have set out to make ; that whatever is wrong
ith a community's social program is the fault of social
orkers. Before discussing reasons for what she considers

breakdown in contributing to community funds, she
ould have looked at the records of Community Chests
id Councils, Inc. She would have found several errors in
:r horseback opinions, an important one being that the
neral trend of giving is now upward instead of down-
ard. To be sure the chest in Mrs. Farlow's city may

an exception.

Of course it is true, as she says, that social work and
icial agencies began with laymen, that eventually com-
iunity needs became too numerous and their treatment

complicated for Mr. and Mrs. Average Citizen to
-al with as a leisure time project. Therefore, persons
ere employed on a full time basis to do the actual work.
Tiese persons arc gradually learning to approach the prob-
ms of human need and their treatment from a scientific
andpoint. But in many communities the lay people were

1 too eager to shift responsibility for treatment to the paid
nployes and to forget the problems though they remained
ic common problem of all the citizens.

Thank God not all citizens were so willing to let
3eorge" do all the thinking and planning, as well as the
:tual day-by-day labor. In communities where the citizens
ere concerned with the causes of human distress, the best
ethods of prevention and the development of a healthy
sponsible citizenry, the laymen and the social workers
ined hands for a community program.
Communities and states are becoming aware more and
ore that the prevention and cure of human ills are every-
te's concern, that the social agencies are the machinery
hich the citizens set up to do their work and that the
xrial workers are the servants whom they employ to share
i the planning and to keep the machinery working smooth-
and effectively.

No layman who ever has worked in a cooperative ven-
ire of social planning for his community doubts that
lere are certain principles underlying the various processes
(Continued on page 189)

In annvering advertisements please

187



to- Seattle



for National Conference of Social Workers

Leaving New York June 22; Chicago
June 23. Via the Burlington water-level
route between Chicago and St. Paul,
thence over the Great Northern with
stopover at Glacier National Park.

Write for full details including informa-
tion on return routings via Yellowstone,
Colorado, Black Hills and Dude Ranches
without additional /are.

M. J. FOX

District Passenger Agent
500 Fifth Ave. New York City

S. J. OWENS

General Agent
179 W. Jackson Chicago



Burlington



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mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS



SITUATIONS WANTED



FINANCE & PUBLICITY SECRETARY

A man who. during the past "recession" year
has added largely to the membership and Income
of a leading and long-established state welfare
organization, seeks new connection.
Highest professional references. Including those of
present employers, testify to his ability success-
fully to Interpret social work activities and ob-
jectives fnd to enlist support for such work
7505 Survey



Woman with M.A. Degree, teaching, social, sec-
retarial, housekeeping experience, wishes work
in institution for girls or women. 7495 Survey.

CASEWORKER. Six years public agency. Five
quarters Social Service training. Family Wei-
fare and Child Guidance Field Work. Desires
private agency opening anywhere in Cook
County, Illinois. 7501 Survey.

SECRETARY-STENOGRAPER, cultured, re-
sourceful, adaptable ; capable assuming respon-
sibility, routine; college graduate; writing
ability ; attractive personality ; thorough, varied
experience; social service, industrial, publish-
ing, literary. 7604 Survey.

House-Director, Dietitian, Purchasing Agent
available. Ten years institutional experience.
Highest credentials. 7503 Survey.

Graduate Nun,: Public Health, Social Service
training and experience (at present superin-
tendent of "Home for Aged"), desires change.
Highest references. Protestant. 7497 Survey.



RATES



Classified Advertising

Display 2Ic per line

Non-<lisplay . . . . 5c per word

Minimum Charge . $1.00 per insertion

Discounts . . 5% on three insertions

CASH WITH ORDER

Survey Midmonthly
112 E. 19th Street New York



Your Own Agency

This ia the counseling and placement agency
sponsored jointly by the American Associa-
tion of Social Workers and the National
Organization for Public Health Nursing.
National, Non-Profit making.




(Agracr)
122 East 22nd Street, 7th floor, New York



CANNED CHICKEN

[toneless, skinless. Fresh killed corn fed farm
stock. Packed Home Style. Can contains 11 02.
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Families bought our Chicken 1917 still buying
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COTTAGE FOR RENT

FLANDERS. NEW JERSEY Stone Cottage.
Gentleman's Estate, 42 miles from N. Y. C.
New, built in the antique manner for modern
living, all improvements, two bedrooms, bath,
gas stove, electric refrigerator, fireplace. Pub-
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Go to Seattle on the SURVEY SPECIAL

With the assistance of several railroads, arrangements have been made for
special through trains to carry social workers, their friends and associated
groups to the Seattle Conference in June.

The first schedule permits a one-day visit to GLACIER NATIONAL PARK,
arriving at Seattle on the opening day of the Conference. The second
provides special cars for the use of Associate Groups, scheduled to arrive at
the Conference city at 8:00 A.M., Friday, June 24.

These services offer an attractive opportunity to friends and fellow workers
to renew old friendships and make new acquaintances while traveling
through several of America's most beautiful states.

For full particulars regarding the "SPECIAL" write to
Mollie Condon, Survey Associates, 112 East 19 Street, New York City.



TRAVEL



SEATTLE CONFERENCE

Alaska, Hawaii Mexico

National Parks
Ideal Tour Sweden, Norway, Denmark

TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS

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LITERARY SERVICE



Special articles, theses, speeches, papers. Re-
search, revision, bibliographies, eU. Over
twenty years' experience serving busy pro-
fessional persons. Prompt service extended.
AUTHORS RESEARCH BUREAU. 511
Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y.



PAMPHLETS AND PERIODICALS



The American Journal of Nursing shows the part
which professional nurses take in the better-
ment of the world. Put it in your library. $8.00
a year. 50 West BO Street, New York, N. Y



SUPPLYING INSTITUTIONAL TRADE



SEEMAN BROS., INC.

Groceries

Hudson and North Moore Streets
New York




OTIS ION
Of THE
- WORKS PROGRESS
; ADMINISTRATION



In ansiverinq advertisements flease mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

188



(Continued from page 187)
smploycd to prevent and to treat human ills that are under-
stood better by the professional than by the layman, and
that there are certain things that laymen cannot do. Such
i layman knows, too, that the social agencies of his com-
nunity get results because, in partnership with the pro-
fessional, he is on the job to see that they do.

It U my private opinion, publicly expressed, that if Mr.
ind Mrs. Average Citizen had been one-hundredth part
is alert to the needs of their fellow citizens as the social
workers have been, or as sincere and diligent in carrying
their share of the planning, our present social problems
might be much nearer solution.

Haven't you noticed, Mrs. Farlow, that when a person
or a community fails it is human nature to lay the blame
at somebody's door other than our own? Let's not any of
lothe realities" in "nicely turned phrases."



League; secretary of



. . mce or men . . .

MARY K. DABNEY, Cleveland Junior
board, Goodrich House. Cleveland.

MRS. FARI.OW makes a serious charge against social work;
at least it would be serious if the conditions she describes
so amusingly were generally characteristic. No doubt some
of the evils she sees exist in some communities, but cer-
tainly not all of them in all communities. Am I wrong,
Mrs. Farlow, in suspecting that you indulged in a little
conscious exaggeration the better to expose occasional evils ?

In our community we see no "shrinking opportunity for
active lay participation" in social work; on the contrary
the field broadens all the time. There is no limit to what
an interested volunteer can do. To be sure it is a different
kind of participation in many ways than that engaged in
by our parents years ago, when they fought and bled over
their pet charities, ran them, supported them, and paved the
way for modern social work.

Today, as I see it, we are faced with a different but
equally provocative opportunity. We no longer think in
terms of building up one agency but of the whole com-
munity. Social planning is needed, with elimination, com-
bination, and initiation of services. It seems to me that this
must be done largely by lay people, who are naturally
more disinterested than the executives. As a necessary
training for this kind of participation in social work, the
average volunteer needs personal experience in various
types of agencies.

Mrs. Farlow's friends seem to have had very discour-
aging volunteer experiences, but the fault must lie partly
with themselves. Are they "mice or men"? Any volunteer
can go to her agency and ask for more interesting work.
It can't be possible that a community of many agencies,
such as Mrs. Farlow's seems to be, has nothing more
stimulating to offer than clerical jobs and motor service.
But an intelligent volunteer will not allow herself to be

iick with such jobs indefinitely. I have been a volunteer
for more than ten years, and I've never had to do either
of them except where they were incidental.

Being a very new profession social work still has grow-
ng pains, and its highest standards are not everywhere
established. Furthermore, human nature being what it is,
there are some social workers whom we all could wish
had gone into some other field of activity. But on the whole
I don't know of any profession which shows such a char-
(Contlnueii on page 191)




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Always avoid "acid indigestion" discom-
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Keep a bottle of genuine Phillips' Milk
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Single Copies of this Special

ANNIVERSARY ISSUE OF
SURVEY MID MONTHLY

Are Available at 30$ each

Send your order and payments to SURVEY MID-
MONTHLY, 112 East 19 Street, Ne York City.



In answerinq advertisements please mention SUSVEY MIDMONTHLY

189



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS

Civic, National, International



Library Service



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, 620

North Michigan Ave. , Chicago. To aid in
the extension and improvement of library
service.



Child Welfare



BOYS' CLUBS OF AMERICA, INC., 381 Fourth
Avenue, N.Y.C. National service organization
of 309 Boys' Clubs located in 171 cities. Fur-
nishes program aids, literature, and educa-
tional publicity for promotion of Boys' Club
Movement ; field service to groups or individ-
uals interested in leisure-time leadership for
boys, specializing with the underprivileged.

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA, 2 Park Avenue.
New York City. Incorporated in 1910 and
chartered by Congress in 1916 for the pur-
pose of developing the character of boys and
training them in their duties as citizens.
Cubbing, younger boys' program, 9-11 ;
Scouting, 12 and upward ; Senior Scouting,
16 years and up. Scouts are organized in
patrols and Troops. Cooperates with schools
and churches, fraternal orders and other
civic groups. Walter W. Head, President ;
Dr. James E. West, Chief Scout Executive.



BERKSHIRE INDUSTRIAL FARM, Canaan,
New York. A national, non-sectarian farm
school for problem boys. Boys between 12
and 14 received through private surrender
or court commitment. Supported by agreed
payments from parents or other responsible
persons, in addition to voluntary contribu-
tions. For further information address Mr.
Byron D. Paddon, Superintendent, or the New
York Office at 101 Park Ave., Tel:Lex.2-3147.

CHILD WELFARE LEAGUE OF AMERICA

C. C. Carstens, director, 130 E. 22nd Street,
New York City. A league of children's agen-
cies and institutions to secure improved
standards and methods in their various fields
of work. It also co-operates with other chil-
dren's agencies, cities, states, churches, fra-
ternal orders and other civic groups to work
out worth-while results in phase of child
welfare in which they are interested.

GIRL SCOUTS, INC., 14 West 49th Street, New
York City. A non-sectarian, recreational
character-building organization for girls.
Programs for three age groups Brownies,
7-10; Girl Scouts. 10-14; and Senior Girl
Scouts, 14-18 have common objectives and
methods, and activities suited to needs and
interests of different ages. Functions through
volunteer committees who supervise and pro-
mote Girl Scouting locally.

NATIONAL FEDERATION OF DAY NURSER-
IES 130 East 22nd Street, New York City.
To federate day nurseries in the U. S. and
assist them to establish and maintain ap-
proved standards of care.

NATIONAL CHILD LABOR COMMITTEE 419

Fourth Ave., N.Y.C. Promotes child labor
legislation, state and federal ; conducts in-
vestigations ; advises on administration ;
maintains information service.

AMERICAN LEGION NATIONAL CHILD WEL-
FARE DIVISION, 777 North Meridian Street,
Indianapolis, Ind. Three-phase program : Ed-
ucation ; legislation for benefit of all chil-
dren ; temporary material relief to children
of veterans of World War. Emma C.
Puschner, Director.

THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR CRIP-
PLED CHILDREN, Elyria, Ohio. Paul H.
King, President ; E. Jay Howenstine, Execu-
tive Secretary. Promotoes organization of
national, state, provincial and local societies
for crippled children. Aids in development
of their programs. Assists in drafting and
securing the passage of legislation in behalf
of cripples. Maintains a Bureau of Informa-
tion with loan library service. Conducts
yearly an Easter Crippled Children Seal
Campaign. Bulletins. "The Crippled Child"
magazine, bimonthly, $1 a year.



Health



THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR MENTAL
HYGIENE, INC. Dr. Arthur H. Ruggles,
president ; Dr. C. M. Hincks, general direc-
tor ; Clifford W. Beers, secretary ; 60 West
50th Street, New York City. Pamphlets on
mental hygiene, child guidance, mental
disease, mental defect, psychiatric social
work and other related topics. Catalogue of
publications sent on request. "Mental Hy-
giene," quarterly, $3.00 a year.

NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR PUBLIC
HEALTH NURSING 50 W. 60th St., New
York. Dorothy Deming, R. N-, Gen. Dir.
Advisory service, statistics, monthly maga-
zine.

NATIONAL TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION
50 West 60th Street, New York, Dr. Kendall
Emerson, managing director. Pamphlets of
methods and program for the prevention of
tuberculosis. Publications sold and distributed
through state associations in every state.
American Review of Tuberculosis, medical
journal, $8.00 a year ; and Monthly Bulletin,
house organ, free.

AMERICAN BIRTH CONTROL LEAGUE A

clearing house cooperating with social work-
ers in referring indigent mothers to medically
directed birth control clinics in 42 states, in-
cluding 19 centers in Greater New York. In
areas lacking centers, qualified physicians
are available. Phone or write: 515 Madison
Avenue, New York City. WIckersham 2-8600.
President: Richard N. Pierson, M.D. Medi-
cal Director: Eric M. Matsner, M.D.

THE WOMEN'S FIELD ARMY OF THE AMER-
ICAN SOCIETY FOR THE CONTROL OF
CANCER, 1250 Sixth Avenue, New York
City. An educational group of lay women
active in forty-three states under the super-
vision of physicians representing state
medical societies. Information, literature,
speakers, newspaper articles may be secured
without charge.



New York City



THE BIRTH CONTROL CLINICAL RESEARCH
BUREAU, 17 West 16th Street ; MARGARET
SANGER, Director ; has added evening ses-
sions, Wednesday and Thursday evenings
from 7 to 9 P.M., for the benefit of mothers
who work and cannot come to the Clinic
daily from 9 to 4.



Negro Education



TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE, Tuskegee Institute,
Alabama. Founded by Booker T. Washing-
ton. High school and college both ac-
credited. Curricula designed to prepare
Negro students to meet the vocational and
social needs of successful living. F. D.
Patterson, President.



Recreation



NATIONAL RECREATION ASSOCIATION

316 Fourth Ave., New York City. To bring
to every boy and girl and citizen of America
an adequate opportunity for wholesome,
happy play and recreation.



Penology



THE OSBORNE ASSOCIATION, INC., 114 East
30th Street, New York, N. Y. Telephone
CAledonia 5-9720-9721. Activities: Collects
information about penal institutions and
works to improve standards of care in penal
institutions. Aids discharged prisoners in
their problems of readjustment by securing
employment and giving such other assistance



Online LibrarySurvey AssociatesSurvey midmonthly : journal of social work (Volume 74) → online text (page 51 of 109)