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and unreserved" comments of various
members of the IERC staff on Survey \
Midmonthly in general and content of the
May special issue in particular. Com-
mentators included field representatives
in different parts of the state, and mem-
bers of the staff of the information ser-
vice and of the division of certification
and service. A few quotations from their
comments will indicate their quality:

For twenty-five years Survey Graphic
and Survey Midmonthly, with their im-
aginative presentation, vivid style, and
attention to new and current, as well as <
traditional, ideologies have served to '
pool and make articulate day by day ex-
periences and happenings on the many
fronts of social work. Particularly sen-
sitive to new winds of change blowing in
from beyond the traditional and accepted
horizons, this alive, responsive leader-
ship is effectively demonstrated by the
May 1938 issue of the Midmonthly.

The sweeping achievements of the
past twenty-five years have their place
in such an anniversary issue. In itself
Paul Kellogg's review of things past
makes the issue one to be preserved for
reference and a reminder of the rocky
roads behind and the powerful wills that
overcame them. But what about the
salients not won at all, or only half won,
or about to be lost because of the strength
of the enemy or, perchance, because as
yet undreamed of tactics and techniques
have not been developed and will not be
developed until social work faces its fu- '
ture with a new flexibility and a new
imagination? Perhaps Mr. Kellogg will '
keynote on this subject at some future
date, going onward from the historical
summary which he lays as backgroun

in his twenty-fifth anniversary issue.

it be heretical if need be. It can be no



ncai

j

L- no



250



SURVEY MIDMONTHLY



stronger than many of the old winds
that have blown along the roads behind.
This is not the time for entrenchment
of vested interests and viewpoints. Rath-
er, the real firing line lies ahead in a
social work philosophy and technique
suitable for the morrow.

William Haber's is the most timely
and pertinent article in the issue. In its
entirety it might well be set into a field
manual for public assistance workers. So-
cial workers should be directed in giving
thoughtful consideration to the function
of the politician in the very democratic
process of effecting compromise wherever
there is a clamor for improvement in our

1 institutions.

The battle appears to be not so much
between social work and a group antag-
onistic to it as it is a war between our
traditional belief that success is the al-

uitomatic reward of an individual's
thrift, hard work, resourcefulness and
ambition, and the disagreeable facts of
the present situation. It is helpful to find
that Mr. Ernst feels that there has been
a change in the popular attitude, that
"the inability of man to sustain himself
and his family is no longer connected in
some vague way with the fall from
grace. The care of the poor no longer is
a sort of home missionary enterprise to
save as well as to succor."

It is interesting to find running
through the entire issue a desire to view
the present situation, including the status

al work, frankly and courageously.
There is a willingness to recognize mis-
itj^es and to begin over again, if neces-
sary, with such techniques and philoso-
MM* as have stood the test of mass at-
tack. This desire for self-analysis indi-
cates a growing maturity in the profession.

Mr. Hollander is one of the few per-
sons in the past four or five years to
state specifically what our next move must
'. His remarks are clear, definite and
ogical in that they consider the situation
rom the public point of view. The plan
ic presents is not new but he has encour-
aged a facing of activities heretofore
jreatly neglected that of including the
<ublic as a full participant having a place
n the plan's direction.

Finally, Mr. Martini, summing up,
ays: "Especially was there widespread
appreciation, on the part of these com-
>nentators, of the anniversary issue's gen-
ral emphasis upon the need of interpre-
tation to the public, of the attempt made
o define more clearly and realistically
the role of social work in the public wel-
fare field, and of the admission that em-
>hasis in the future very probably will
lave to be shifted, to include mass as well
is individual techniques in treating those
n need."



THE PAMPHLET SHELF



Public Service



GOVERX.MKXT IN SMALL COUNCIL-
MAN AUK K CITIES. Price $1 from the
International City Managers' Association,
1313 East 60 Street, Chicago.

Results of an inquiry by the association
on certain basic data on administrative
and financial situations in cities of less
than five thousand population.

REPORT SERIES, SECOND ANNUAL
ROUND TABLE CONFERENCE Amer-
ican Public Welfare Association. Price 20
cents for each of ten pamphlets or $1.50
for the scries, from the AI'WA, 1313 East
60 Street, Chicago.

Sections reporting include state public
welfare administrators, local public wel-
fare administrators, state and local pub-
lic welfare board members.. Panel dis-
cussions cover administration of public
assistance, financing public welfare, pub-
lic medical care. Round table discussion
subjects are in-service training, personnel
procedures, relationship between assist-
ance and social insurance, interstate prob-
lems.

Children

CHILD NUTRITION IN CAMP AND IN-
STITUTION, hy Victoria Kloss Ball. 300
pp. Price $1.50 postpaid from the Welfare
Federation, 1001 Huron Road, Cleveland.

A manual prepared as the result of the
federation's experience in advising chil-
dren's camps and institutions.

SPECIAL SERVICES UNDER JEWISH
AUSPICES IN CHILD GUIDANCE,
PROTECTIVE AND ALLIED FIELDS.
Frnm the Council of Jewish Federations
and Welfare Funds, 165 West 46 Street,
New York.

Report of a special study of activities
and volume of service in these fields dur-
ing 1937.

THE HOME SITUATION AS A DIRECT
CAUSE OF BOY TRANSIENCY, by
George E. Outland. Reprinted from The
Journal of Juvenile Research. From the
author, Santa Barbara, Calif.

A study of a year's case records of boys
who were cared for by the Boys' Welfare
Department, Federal Transient Service of
Southern California, 1934-5.

Various and Sundry

AMERICAN FOUNDATIONS FOR SO-
C1AL WELFARE, compiled by Bertha F.
Hulseman. Russell Sage Foundation Lib-
rary. Price 50 cents from the foundation,
130 East 22 Street, New York.

A new edition of an important direc-
tory which includes careful and complete
factual material on the plan and purpose
of the foundations listed.

A SURVEY OF METHODS OF CARK.
TREATMENT AND TRAINING OF
THE FEEBLEMINDED, MADE AT
LETCHWORTH VILLAGE, together
with a program for the future. Printed at
Letchworth Village, Thiells, N. Y.

A comprehensive survey of every as-
pect of the institution by a committee of
experts, Dr. C.-E. A. Winslow, chairman.

MY COMMUNITY. MY CHURCH AND

ME! by Wilbur C. Hallenbeck. Friendship

Press, New York. Price 35 cents direct
from the press.

The church and its influence on its
community. A guide for an appraisal of
opportunities and a program of action.



Against Crime

HANDBOOKS OF AMERICAN PRIS-
ONS AND REFORMATORIES. Series
of five, divided regionally. Price 75 cents
each. The Oshorne Association, 114 East
30 Street, New York.

The current edition of the association's
surveys of institutions is published in a
series of paper-bound volumes, covering
the country by U.S. census regions.

FEDERAL PROBATION QUARTERLY,
Juvenile Number, April 1938. Editor, Eu-
gene Zemans. From the U.S. Probation
System, Washington, D.C.

An issue devoted to child welfare and
juvenile delinquency in their relation to
the federal system of justice.

TREATMENT OF THE MISDEMEANANT
IN INDIANA. 1816-1936. by Helen Wilson.
University of Chicago Press. 114 pp. Price
75 cents direct from the press.

Tracing the history of jails and their
problems in Indiana, from early terri-
torial days to the present.

Case Work



CASE WORK WITH THE AGED. Re-
printed from The Family. Price 15 cents
from the Family Welfare Association of
America, 130 East 22 Street, New York.

A symposium of articles by Gordon
Hamilton, Ruth Hill and Francis H. Mc-
Lean.

THE ATTITUDES AND ADJUSTMENTS
OF RECIPIENTS OF OLD AGE AS-
SISTANCE IN UPSTATE AND MET-
ROPOLITAN NEW YORK, by Christine
M. Morgan. Price $1.50 from The 1880
Fund for Old Age Welfare, Vassar Col-
lege, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.

The full text of a study reported in
brief in Suruty Midmonthly, December
1935, page 360.

CASE WORK FUNCTIONS AND JUDI-
CIAL FUNCTIONS, THEIR COORDI-
NATION, by Thomas D. Eliot. Reprint
from National Probation Yearbook, Coping
With Crime. Price 15 cents from the as-
sociation, 50 West 50 Street, New York.

A lively and clarifying discussion of
what is and what is not the function of
the juvenile court.

Education

THE CONTRIBUTION OF PROGRES-
SIVE EDUCATION. Proceedings of the
Third Conference on Education and the
Exceptional Child. From Child Research
Clinic, The Woods Schools, Langhorne, Pa.

AVONCROFT COLLEGE. FOR RURAL

WORKERS
THE RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE

Reprints of articles by James Dudley in
Bulletin VIII (second series), World As-
sociation for Adult Education. From the
British Library of Information, 270 Madi-
son Avenue, New York.

Describing the "working people's resi-
dential colleges" of England.

SOME EXPERIENCES IN THE EDUCA-
TION OF ADMINISTRATORS, by Mich-
ael M. Davis. Reprint from Hospitals, Jan-
uary 1938.

A discussion of hospital administration
as a career, and the special education and
training involved.



JULY 1938



251



Book Reviews



The "Talented Tenth



I UV (lit- lll^t.1 1 l_ I I U I

THE NEGRO COLLEGE GRADUATE, by

Charles S. Johnson. University of North Caro-
lina Press. 399 pp. Price $3 postpaid of Sur-
vey Midmonthly.

PHIS exhaustive analysis is the first
thorough study of the Negro college
graduate since the work of W. E. B. Du
Bois in the Atlanta Studies series three
decades ago. The family background,
professional and geographic distribution,
economic status and general achievements
of nearly 26,000 Negro college graduates
have been compiled and analyzed. With
the competent statistical treatment that
is characteristic of Mr. Johnson's stud-
ies, we can be assured, then, of a very
reliable index of trends with regard to
this important upper segment of Negro
life and its relation to the life of the
masses.

Only a few of the most important
trends can be mentioned here. The most
significant, it seems to me, are these:
that limited vocational opportunities are
responsible for a serious displacement of
trained Negro leadership from the areas
of dense southern population which most
need such services (only 20 percent of
these college graduates have settled
down permanently in their home towns
and relatively few others in the lower
South) ; that even with this diversion of
leadership to more favorable areas, 55
percent of the whole body of male Negro
college graduates are still living on in-
comes at or below the "minimum com-
fort or decency level," which means that
the leadership service of the Negro edu-
cated classes is perforce missionary ser-
vice, irrespective of intention, and that
in spite of such poor returns on the capi-
tal investment of energy, time and mon-
ey, the Negro educated classes are show-
ing rapid increase both from the group
whose parents are college graduates and
from the group whose parents have lacked
such opportunities.

FACTORS OF PRESTIGE, AMBITION AND OF
group service undoubtedly operate to sus-
tain this cultural advance; but obviously
it cannot continue indefinitely without
proper and proportionate economic sup-
port and returns. In addition to the pres-
ent alarming problem of the geographic
maldistribution of trained Negro leader-
ship there looms, then, the danger of de-
creasing economic returns unless the oc-
cupational range for trained Negro men
and women is markedly and rapidly ex-
tended. Social work seems to have been
the sole new avenue of any considerable
significance, and the technical profes-
sions and business which would normally
be expected to offer expansion still lag



seriously, even though they do show
some recent improvement.

Obviously Negro advance is threatened
by an economic backwash from the bar-
rier of prejudice and the low income lev-
el of the masses. The 1930 ratio of one
physician to every 728 persons in the white
population and only one Negro physician
to every 3125 Negroes; one white teach-
er for each 110 white persons, but one
Negro teacher for each 218 of the Negro
population, tell the story graphically and
in terms of a general social indictment.
Against the advance of the so-called ''tal-
ented tenth" such general odds prevail,
therefore, that any considerable improve-
ment in the future must come from a
wholesale lifting of the economic level
of the whole racial group. Mr. Johnson's
book draws significant lessons for the
careful reader who has the patience to
read an objective, detailed and sound
study, especially if he can separate soci-
ological wheat from statistical chaff.

ALAIN LOCKE
Howard University, Washington, D.C.

On Industrial Morals

RIGHT AND WRONG IN LABOR RELA-
TIONS, by William M. Leiserson. University
of California Press. 86 pp. Price $1 postpaid
of Survey Midmonthly.

AFTER more than twenty years of ar-
bitrating and mediating labor dis-
putes William M. Leiserson, now a
member of the National Mediation
Board, has come to certain conclusions
regarding the questions of conscience and
morality involved in industrial conflict.
These conclusions are briefly formulated
in this little book, Right and Wrong in
Labor Relations.

Mr. Leiserson is convinced that no sin-
gle labor problem can be solved by for-
mulae. To him, capital and labor are not
entities but personalities bound together
in a close relationship. Rather than a so-
lution for an abstract labor problem there
must be found methods of adjusting the
innumerable differences arising from the
human relationship of managers and
workers.

He is also convinced that the attempt
to solve problems of industrial strife by
appeals to conscience and the old morali-
ties is futile. "As in the case of interna-
tional wars," the author observes, "strikes
and lockouts (labor wars) are carried
on in defense of things that the comba-
tants hold dear and for which they are
willing to make great sacrifices." He
argues that the mainspring of improved
labor relations is not individual regenera-
tion but public enlightenment.

In these days when warring factions in
labor disputes impute inferior ethics and

252



conscience to their opponents, Mr. Leiser-
son's book should be particularly illumi-
nating. He indicates clearly that the
charges and countercharges hurled by
each side usually are irrelevant to the
real issues. These issues cannot be re-
solved by moral principles, 'but he holds
that there are methods and policies in .
labor relations known to laymen as well
as to experts which could establish and
maintain industrial peace.

Originally a lecture given at the Uni-
versity of California as one of a series
on the morals of trade, Mr. Leiserson's
discussion is a first-rate chapter on ap-
plied philosophy, with many suggestions
which may be developed by independent
thinking. FRANK M. KLEILER

Washington, D. C.

Favorites of the Calendar

SEASONS OF BIRTH, by Ellsworth Huntington.
Wiley. 473 pp. Price $'3. SO postpaid of Survey
Midmonthly.

^^O obstetrical calendar, this, nor yet
a plan for baby-spacing to guide that
minority of newly-weds who may retain
some part of the racial urge that domi-
nated the begetting of homo sapiens of :
the ice age.

The thesis of two optima based on
temperatures, for man's physical and
mental excellences, seems a bit too sim-
ple to be convincing, and it will take a
of persuading to satisfy those concei
and born in the less favorable seas
that they are really less eminent than
February and March babies. Nevertheless
we have a statistician to deal with who is
no novice in the broad fields of human
biology nor one to whom the relationship
of man to the earth's aerial envelope is
unfamiliar.

Many nations and races are analysed
to disclose those factors of sex, season >
and climate, of survival and heritance,
upon which much of what we view as an-
accident of individual human experience
has seemed to depend.

That leadership in the popular sense,
genius, insanity and crime are season-
linked to date of birth is hard to believe;
yet here are reasonable arguments and
much erudition to persuade us by the
familiar necromancy of figures. A sort of
glorified fortune telling might be pre-
dicated upon the revelations of factors,
age-old and deeply scoring the manner of
human breeding, which may even guide
the eugenically inclined to some refine-
ment of inheritance. Nurture will still
correct many of the minor handicaps of '
Nature. Sanitation and preventive medi-
cine have apparently abolished the hazard
of the first summer's heat which seems to '
have dominated the survival curve of our i
prehistoric ancestors, but there are evi-
dently patterns so deeply drawn as to out- ]
last even the most striking contemporary \
reductions in infant mortality.
There is balanced judgment to correct



the thoughtless reader's too hasty con-
clusions, and one should ponder well the
sense of the chapter on Seasons and Hu-
man Progress before accepting or con-
demning the author's quite objective
philosophy. The range of those who will
be tempted to dip, then to plunge, and
finally to swim broadly in the deep
waters of this book will surely include
most of those who are intellectually as
well as practically concerned with exact
data on human survival and superiority.
New York HAVEN EMERSON, M.D.

Keystone of Planning

PERSONNEL POLICIES IN PUBLIC
HEALTH NURSING, by Marian G. Randall.
Macmillan. 170 pp. Price $2 poctpaid of Sitr-
rty



ANYONE concerned with selecting or
directing personnel will find useful
information and stimulating suggestion in
this volume, prepared by Miss Randall
for the National Organization for Pub-
lic Health Nursing as a "report of cur-
rent practice in a sample of official health
agencies in the United States." The study
was well planned, the findings are treat-
rd sympathetically and the recommenda-
tions presented with an eye to future
needs and development as well as to the
present situation.

The first two chapters present briefly

the method, purpose and scope of the

study, a general summary and recom-

mendations, which at the outset place the

total picture before the reader. The se-

lection of personnel, when based both on

present needs and on future plans, is

shown convincingly to be the keystone of

personnel and program planning. Policies

relative to personnel administration are

discussed. Relevant chapters review the

i history of public health nursing in official

agencies, civil service in the United States,

legislation and public health nursing un-

der civil service. These provide a setting

.to which the data of the study can be re-

lated and indicate the quality of the

book. At no point has a body of facts

been treated in an isolated fashion but

always with understanding of its rela-

tion to the total picture.

The book is clear and interesting and
has a dynamic quality. The NOPHN
and Miss Randall have done a service to
a wider field than the official public health
agency, important as that is.

LILLIAN A. QUINN
Joint Vocational Service, Inc.

For Planned Evolution

SOCIAL SAGA OF TWO CITIES, by Calvin F.
Schmid. The Minneapolis Council of Social
Afencie*. 418 pp. Price 13. SO postpaid of Survey
jtidmontUy.

'EVER, I think, have I seen so many

fascinating charts and. maps (218 of

them) bound between the covers of a

single book. The inconvenient and unin-

rormat (8J4 x 11, planographed)

In answering



Jn me uteut ftaditum

Tin- 1, <'ii in* of the UronchoHcopvTf UH Hiit OirnStorg

THE LIFE OF
CHEVALIER JACKSON

An Autobiography

Says PERCY HUTCHISON in THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW:

"Dr. Jackson's autobiography it a book which appeals both to the mind and
to the imagination. A perusal of its crammed pages will not only broaden
one's outlook, it will also deepen every human feeling. Dr. Jackson's is a
record not only weighted at every point with inspirational enlightenment for
the layman, but a record of which every American should be proud."

Says JOSEPH HENRY JACKSON in THE SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:

"Doctors everywhere, of course, will pounce on Chevalier Jackson's story of
himself. Laymen who would like to learn the stuff of which great doctors are
made will do well not to miss the book."

3.50

At all bookstores, or from

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY



60 Fifth Avenue



New York, N. Y.



10 BEST SELLERS

for Social Workers

JULY

MORE THAN ONE DOLLAR

1. SOCIAL AGENCY BOARDS AND HOW TO MAKE THEM

EFFECTIVE, by Clarence King $1.25

2. NEIGHBORHOOD, by Mary K. Simkhooitch 2.50

3. PERSONALITY AND THE CULTURAL PATTERN,

by James S. Plant. M.D 2.50

4. SOCIAL CASE RECORDING, by Gordon Hamilton 2.50

5. NEUROTIC PERSONALITY OF OUR TIMES,

by Karen Homey. M.D 3.00

ONE DOLLAR OR LESS

1. PSYCHIATRIC WORD BOOK, by Richard H. Hatchings. M.D $1.00

2. EDUCATIONAL EXPERIMENTS IN SOCIAL SETTLEMENTS,

by Gaynell Hawkins 1.00

3. THE PUBLIC ASSISTANCE WORKER, by Russell H. Kurt* 1.00

4. THE CASE WORKER'S DESK MANUAL, by Erie Fiske Young 1.00

5. EXPLORING GROUP WORK, by Coyle, Dimock. Kaiser, and Swift .50

Listing Based on Orders Received by THE SURVEY
You May Now Order These Books Sent to You Postfree from
SURVEY ASSOCIATES, 112 EAST 19 STREET. NEW YORK CITY



advertisements please mention SUHVEY MIDMONTHLY
253



is amply compensated by the use of nearly
200 of the 418 pages for graphic presen-
tation of a wide range of data of pro-
found social significance to Minneapolis
and St. Paul. Especially interesting are
the seventy-eight maps showing the
spatial distribution of physical and demo-
graphic characteristics of these two inter-
esting communities. Most of the maps
are drawn not according to wards but
with a much smaller enumeration district
as a unit, which makes them especially
illuminating.

The book contains a detailed analysis
of housing, which appears to be one of
the important connecting links between
the social and economic evolution of a
community. Interesting devices developed
in this analysis are a combined index of
housing comprising ten measures of bad
housing, and partial and multiple corre-
lations between some of these measures
and two selected indices of socio-economic
conditions mean rental and overcrowd-
ing.

The more recent history of marriage
and divorce, crime, juvenile delinquency,
prostitution, venereal disease and suicide,
is analyzed, and some of the connections
pointed out between these phenomena and
the basic economic, physical and demo-
graphic trends to which the major part
of the book is devoted.

Because of the great variety of chart-
ing devices employed and the wide range
of data utilized, Professor Schmid's
book should prove a valuable source of
suggestion to any executive responsible
for planning either business or social
activities in terms of the evolutionary
trends of his community, even though the
specific facts here presented are applica-
ble almost exclusively to the Twin Cities.
LEROY A. RAMSDELL
Council of Social Agencies,
Hartford, Conn.

The Daily Grind

HUMAN NATURE AT WORK, by Jean L.
Shepard. Harper. 218 pp. Price $'2.50 postpaid
of Survey Midmonthly.

*~PHE chief value of this small, very
readable volume lies in its practical
exposition of actual situations such as
are met daily in a personnel job. The
author, having served in the capacity of
personnel director in two large depart-
ment stores in New York City, has
acquired much firsthand knowledge of the
methods and principles that are desirable
in the selection, training and develop-
ment of employes. This knowledge she
shares with her readers.

We come to know John Gordon, han-
dicapped by a mother-fixation, whose vi-
cissitudes of employment read like a tale
of fiction. And we are intrigued by the
analyses of the work experiences of
Mary, Alice, David, Mr. Prior and the
rest, for connected with each case are
salient points that strikingly illustrate
ways and means which are shown to have



Online LibrarySurvey AssociatesSurvey midmonthly : journal of social work (Volume 74) → online text (page 68 of 109)