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been effective measures for improving
industrial relationships.

The author stresses the fact that the
approach to personnel problems should
not be sentimental and that it is impor-
tant for an executive to look objectively
at himself as well as at his subordinates.
The emotional disturbance of an employe
frequently may be traced to the tempera-
mental behavior of a poorly organized
executive, so the need for greater care
in the selection of persons who are to
serve in a supervisory capacity is espe-
cially emphasized.

All the case studies and comments fos-
ter the author's general conclusion that
it is not callous to discuss human prob-
lems in wholly practical terms. The final
paragraph points the general theme of
the advantage to the employer in helping
his employes develop their abilities to
the utmost. Thus both he and they 'benefit.
The book should be read by all those who
wish to gain a deeper understanding of
the interrelationships of human beings at
work. EMILY BURR

Vocational Adjustment Bureau
New York

Swallowed Whole

MEDICAL MAGIC, by David Dietz. Dodd,
Mead. 380 pp. Price $3.50 postpaid of Survey
Midmonthly.

ALTHOUGH Mr. Dietz has consort-
"^ ed with scientists he remains a jour-
nalist. Magic is to him an asset and not
a liability. Chapter titles such as Glands
of Mystery and The Magic in Liver will
appeal to the general public whatever
they do to the few doctors who may pick
up his book.

The author's excuse, if he needs one,
will be that his unsuspecting public is
swallowing inside the sugar coating a
sound core of knowledge. Most of his
facts are accurate. One may question
however what happens to the pellets af-
ter they are swallowed. Are the facts
digested and absorbed and reconstructed
into something useful? Or will the or-
gans of forgetfulness excrete them more
or less unchanged ?
Albany, N. Y. J. RoSSLYN EARP

Function and Process

THE JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WORK PROC-
ESS, VOLUME I, NUMBER I, NOVEMBER, 1937.
THE RELATION OF FUNCTION TO PROCESS IN
SOCIAL CASE WORK. Pennsylvania School of
Social Work. 150 pp. Price $2 postpaid of
Svrvcy Midmonthly.

T N its first issue The Journal of Social
Work Process offers nine articles on
the relation of function to process in so-
cial case work. The Journal is to be pub-
lished occasionally by the Pennsylvania
School of Social Work as a vehicle for
the presentation of the thinking of facul-
ty or students, with each issue focused
upon some fundamental problem or proc-
ess in social work.

The current Journal, under the editor-
ship of Jessie Taft, seeks to define the



function of various fields of private case
work and to examine within that defined
area what takes place "between the two >
participants in the activity of asking and ,
offering help." Following the Rankian
psychology, the emphasis is upon the dy-
namic quality of the immediate relation-
ship; the client brings his peculiar needs
up against the relatively stable function
of the particular agency. Over a period
of time he comes to terms with the limi-
tations of function and learns what he
wants to use in the agency situation. The
case worker, moving also within the
boundaries of agency function, examines
the ways in which professional skill may
help the client to use the agency accord-
ing to his personal need and capacity.

In these articles, function and process
are examined as they relate to each other
in specific private agency situations the
application interview of a family agency,
child placement, the temporary home as
an integral part of adoption procedure,
work with adolescents, probationary
authority vested in a private agency, and
medical social work. The authors, all pre-
senting their material from the same
point of view, frequently repeat explan
tions of the Rankian approach to ca
work. Where the focus is upon the analy
sis of function as it may be used in pro
ess, they have clarified a subject of
ticular concern to case workers toda
Washington University LEAH FEDB
St. Louis, Mo.

Stimulus to Study

MANUAL FOR SOUTHERN REGIONS (1
ACCOMPANY SOUTHERN REGIONS of THE UNI-
STATES BY HOWARD W. ODUM), by Lee
Brooks, in collaboration with Wayland J. Ha
Harry E. Moore, and Jennings J. Rhyne. L.
versity of North Carolina Press. 194 pp. Pri
$1 postpaid of Survey Midmonthly.

PHE authors have united in prepar
this manual as an aid to the study
Dr. Odum's Southern Regions, reviev
in Survey Graphic in September 1936.
is characteristic of the regional idea
study program that even this present pu
lication illustrates the cooperation
institutions and individuals. The
laborators are members of the staffs
the Universities of North Carolina
Oklahoma and of Vanderbilt Universit
at each of which important contributio
to the study of regional culture and
the regional idea are being made.

The manual is divided into "units"
that follow the major divisions of South-
ern Regions. Each unit includes a brief
textual introduction to the materials pre-
sented in Southern Regions, then an ap-
paratus of suggested aims for the study
of the given assignment, reading assign-
ments, definitions, questions on facts and
questions on policy and program. Some
pages are then left blank for suggestions
and notes. Such a device is necessarily a
little dull and complicated on first rea
ing, but the real test comes with use
teacher and student, and it will doubtless



254



be modified in the tight of experience and
[ *uggestions. The authors have wisely kept
; the reading suggestions few in number
1 and strictly relevant and complementary,
L a plan which really encourages the stu-
i dent to read, where an elaborate exhibi-
tion of bibliographic lore usually repels.

The scheme seems to be a useful one
for stimulating more productive study
of a book that deserves attention, not
only in southern regions but in other
parts of the United States, as a pioneer
educational venture. JOHN M. GAUS
Study of Department of Agriculture,
inqtnn, D. C.

Cooperation in Government

STATE AND FEDERAL GRANTS-IN AID.
by Ilfnry J. Bittermann. Mentzer. Bush and
Co. 550 pp. Price $4 postpaid of Survty Mid-
mmtUy.

/COOPERATION is coming into its
J own as a governmental mechanism,
whether between the federal and state
governments or between the states and
their own local units. Cooperation in its
various forms is also beginning to re-
ceive the written notice which is its due
M an arrangement to avoid the pitfalls of
centralization of administration on the
one hand and of isolated and independent

i action on the other.

Several recent books have turned their
attention to grants-in-aid as the most
important and influential of all the co-
operative arrangements. But Professor
Bittermann is the first to be concerned
with the financial and administrative
interrelationships between the states and
their local subdivisions, and at the same
time between the federal government
and the states as developed under grants-
in-aid. He sets himslf no small task, for
in both types of grants-in-aid there are
myriad threads which criss-cross in end-
less directions in a ceaselessly growing
pattern.

Professor Bittermann recognizes the
administrative significance of grants-in-
aid but his major emphasis is on the
financial interrelationships which they in-
volve. He shows the relation of the
grant-in-aid to financial structure, inves-
tigates the ways in which the grant-in-
aid has been used to direct the policy
and administration of the units of gov-
ernment which receive funds, and analy-

i ces the ways by which they have been
.'ivcn. He emphasizes the little known
tact that the federal grants-in-aid have

> played a less important role in public
finance than the state grants, for the

(federal government is not technically re-

.ponsible for state revenues, while the

arc responsible for many of the

t omission and commission of their

local subdivisions.

The valuable volume is marred by
numerous slips in proofreading and occa-
*ional infelicities of phrasing such as ref-
rences to "superior" and "inferior" units



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS



WORKERS WANTED



WANTED (al Social worker: municipal hos-
pital. 150 beds : newly-creati-d position ; South,
(bl Public health nurse ; work will be largely
in the schools ; pupil census about 1300: gen-
eralized service under supervision of county
health officer: Far West: about (150, includ-
ing car expenses, (c) College Infirmary nune:
college for young women : student enrollment
about 1,000: full-time physician in charge:
South. Idt Operating room supervisor: 325-
bed hospital : extremely busy department ;
surgical personnel consists of seven graduates,
seven students. No. 40-SM. The Medical
Bureau, M. Burnelce Larson, Director, Pitta-
fleld Building. Chicago.

WANTED: Qualified Executive Secretary for
Council of Social Agencies. Winnipeg. Apply :
Miss Florence RoberUon, 753 Wolseley Avenue.
Winnipeg, Manitoba.

SITUATIONS WANTED

Social Worker. Graduate S. S. training, mem-
ber of A.A.S.W. Family Welfare experience
and four years in public agency. First class
references. Desires work in private agency or
institution. 7514 Survey.

Successful Executive, unusual merit and experi-
ence available for the superintendency of an
Institution or Director of Community Center.
7515 Survey.

Man. Protestant, 38, married, wife graduate
nune, Masters Degree School of Social Work,
member A.A.S.W.. 8 years institutional and
social agency experience with boys in rural
and urban communities, desires position as
head of boy's school or supervisor in child
welfare agency. Excellent references. 7516
Survey.

AVAILABLE: Social Worker thoroughly trained
with 2 years experience in the Sheltered Work-
shop field. Will travel. Excellent references.
7517 Survey.

Physician wishes Social Hygiene or Venereal,
control position, publicity or institutional. Ex-
tensive post-graduate training Clinical. Pub-
lic Health experience. Capable medical writer.
7618 Survey.



Male worker four years experience as Relief
Investigator, M.A. in Vocational Guidance.
Interested in Delinquency and Family Case
Work. 7619 Survey.



SECRETARY-STENOGRAPHER Experience
social welfare publication, responsible, excel-
lent references. 7504 Survey.



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Your Own Agency

This is the counseling and placement agency
sponsored jointly by the American Associa-
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(Agency)
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LITERARY SERVICE



Special articles, theses, speeches, papers. Re-
search, revision, bibliographies, etc. Over
twenty yean' experience serving busy pro-
fessional persons. Prompt service extended.
AUTHORS RESEARCH BUREAU. 516
Fifth Avenue, New York. N. Y.

PAMPHLETS AND PERIODICALS



The American Journal of Nursing shows the part
which professional nurses take in the better-
ment of the world. Put it in your library, S3. 00
a, year. 50 West 50 Street. New York. N. Y.



SUPPLYING INSTITUTIONAL TRADE

SEEMAN BROS., INC.

Groceries

Hudson and North Moore Streets
New York

^JHEN IN NEW VORK

t He 23-Stoty Club Hotel

Centrally toeated

Free Swimmin? Pool, <Jyn>

Injoy Genial Social U

Separate Floors lor Men,
Women and Families

tiNGif I u> 3oouul
tf ,0 -14 WEEKLY

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In answering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

255



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS

Civic, National, International



National Red Cross



THE AMERICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS

Administered through National Headquar-
ters in Washington, D. C., and three Branch
Offices in San Francisco, St. Louis and
Washington, D. C. There are 3711 local
chapters organized mostly on a county basis.
Services of the Red Cross are: Disaster
Relief, Civilian Relief, First Aid and Life
Saving, Home and Farm Accident Preven-
tion Service, Home Hygiene and Care of the
Sick, Junior Red Cross, Nursing Service,
Nutrition Service, Public Health Nursing,
Volunteer Service and War Service.

Industrial Democracy

LEAGUE FOR INDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY

Promotes a better understanding of problems
of democracy in industry through its
pamphlet, research and lecture services and
organization of college and city groups. Ex-
ecutive Directors, Harry W. Laidler and
Norman Thomas, 112 East 19th Street, New
York City.



If your
organization
listed in
the Survey*!
Directory of
Social Agencies?
If not
why not?
Rates are
thirty cents
per line



Foundations



AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR THE BLIND,

INC. 15 West 16th Street. New York. A
national organization for research and field
service. Activities include : assistance to state
and local agencies in organizing activities
and promoting legislation ; research in legis-
lation, vocations, statistics, and mechanical
appliances for the blind ; maintenance of
reference lending library. M. C. Migel, Prej
dent; Robert B. Irwin, Executive Direct



RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATIpN For the In

provement of Living Conditions Shelby
Harrison. General Director; 130 E. 22nd f
New York. Departments: Charity Organiz
tion. Consumer Credit Studies, Delinquenc
and Penology, Industrial Studies, Librar;
Recreation, Social Work Interpretatio
Social Work Year Book, Statistics, Surve.
The publications of the Russell Sage Found
tion offer to the public in practical an
inexpensive form some of the most impor-
tant results of its work. Catalogue sent
upon request.



of government. In a field where there is
so much misunderstanding and prejudice
as where the rights and obligations of
different units of government are con-
cerned, it is important to differentiate
between the units but to refrain from
any implication of value judgments as to
the superiority of one government over
the other.
Barnard College JANE PERRY CLARK

Hygienic Play

THE WISE CHOICE OF TOYS, by Ethel
'Kawin. University of Chicago Press. 154 pp.
.Price $1.50 postpaid of Survey Midmonthly.

C*EW parents have cleaned up a post-
Christmas debris of wrappings and
string without wondering why Peter
pushed aside the handsome wind-up car
sent by Aunt Nellie in favor of a set of
unpainted hollow blocks. But it is re-
markable how seldom these thousands of
parents pursue their wondering to the
obvious conclusion. Toys which offer var-
ied and creative possibilities are more
attractive as well as more educational
than those which require nothing of the
child but a twist of the wrist.

Even in these days when education has
become a headline topic and most par-
ents and teachers have a speaking ac-
quaintance with psychology, a toy is re-
garded in many homes as something with
which to amuse the child. However, in-
creasing numbers of parents are coming
to understand the importance of toys in
the development of personality and
strength, due in part to the first edition
of Ethel Kawin's, The Wise Choice of
Toys, published three years ago.

In this enlarged second edition, Miss Ka-
win has added two valuable chapters. One
deals with the different age levels and
the classification and functions of certain
toys by age groups; the other with toys
for children with special handicaps



heart disease, defective hearing, defec-
tive vision, spastic paralysis, behavior
and personality problems.

The book is convincing to educators
and psychiatrists because of its sound
foundation in psychological research. But
it is not a textbook or a thesis based on
the analysis of the reactions of little hu-
man guinea pigs. Amusing and reassuring
to parents, it is practical in its sugges-
tions and entertaining in its anecdotes
and illustrations. Not merely advice on
the selection of toys, it is a practical
handbook on child training and develop-
ment, a palatable volume of "required
reading" for all parents.

MARGUERITE HURREY
Harriet Johnson Nursery School
New York

Run of the Shelves

OPIUM, ADDICTS AND ADDICTION, by
John A. Hawkins, M.D. Bruce Humphries, Inc.,
Boston. 156 pp. Price $2.50 postpaid of Survey
Midmonthly.

A STUDY of drug addiction, its causes,
treatment and cure, by one who has been
both doctor and patient.

SOCIAL WELFARE LAWS OF THE FORTY-
EIGHT STATES, compiled by Wendell Hus-
ton. Price $12.50 from the Wendell Huston Com-
pany, Seatt'.e, Wash.

A REVISED "master edition" bringing up
to date two earlier compilations of laws
relating, directly and indirectly, to social
welfare. Following this edition, annual
supplements will keep the work current.

YOUTH TELL THEIR STORY, by Howard
M. Bell. American Council on Education. 273
pp. Price $1.50 postpaid of Survey Midm&nthly.



other issues of present-day American
life. Highlights of the study were sum-
marized and interpreted by Martha
Bensley Bruere in an article, Youth Goes
Round and Round, in Survey Graphic for
April 1938. Here are youth's answers in
full, in a book as interesting in forma
as in content, illustrated with numerou
pictorial graphs.

SYPHILIS, GONORRHEA AND THE PUB-
LIC HEALTH, by Nels A. Nelson and Gladys
L. Grain. Macmillan. 359 pp. Price $3 postpaid
of Survey Midmonthly.

Two staff members of the Massachusetts
Department of Health have compiled a
methodical presentation of known facts
and going programs relating to the "so-
cial" diseases which should be useful to
physicians, nurses, health and welfare de-
partments in the current campaigns for
their control.

REPORT OF THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL
CONFERENCE ON SOCIAL WORK (Lon-
don, 1936). 685 pp. Le Play House Press, 35
Gordon Square, W.C.I, London.

PROCEEDINGS in French, German and
English of the last international confer-
ence, held in London in July 1936 on the
general theme, Social Work and the
Community. Main addresses are pre-
sented in this volume in their original
language, with resumes in translation.
Discussion material is summarized in
three languages.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE SEVENTH BIEN-
NIAL CONFERENCE. HEALTH SEC-
TION, WORLD FEDERATION OF EDU-
CATION ASSOCIATIONS (Aucust 1937.)
258 pp. Price $1 from the Health Section
Secretariat, World Federation of Education
Associations, 200 Fifth Avenue, New York.



BASED on personal interviews with 13,500
young people between the ages of sixteen
and twenty-four, living in Maryland,
this book is a report of how they spend
their time today, what they think of
their education, their homes, of war, suf-
frage, marriage, labor organization, and
In answering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

256



IN this volume are collected the thirty-
seven papers prepared by representatives
of seventeen countries for the meeting
of the federation last summer in Tokyo,
Japan. The subjects dealt with include
broad phases of health education, health
services and physical education, with par-
ticular emphasis on rural problems.



SURVEY MIDMONTHLY



SI KVEY ASSOCIATES, INC.

Publication and Editorial Office:
112 East 19 Street, New York, N. Y.



I R\ KY MIDMONTHLY Monthly $3 a year

SURVEY GRAPHIC Monthly $3 a year

SUBSCRIPTION TO BOTH $5 a year.

JULIAN W. MACK, chairman of the Board;
RICHARD B. SCANDRETT, JR., president; JOSEPH P.
CHAMBERLAIN, JOHN PALMER GAVIT, vice-presi-
dents; ANN REED BRENNER, secretary.

PAUL KELLOGG, editor.

BECLAH AMIDON. ANN REED BRENNER, JOHN
PALMER GAVIT, FLORENCE LOEB KELLOGG, LOU-
LA D. LASKER. GERTRUDE SPRINGER, VICTOR WEY-
MUGHT, LEON WnrppLE, associate editors; RUTH A.
LERRICO, HELEN CHAMBERLAIN, assistant editors.

EDWARD T. DEVINE, GRAHAM TAYLOR, HAVEN
EMERSON, M.D., MARY Ross, JOANNA C. COLCORD,
RUSSELL H. KURTZ, HELEN CODY BAKER, con-
tributing editors.

WALTER F. GRUENINGER, business mnager;
MOLLIE CONDON, circulation manager; MARY R.
ANDERSON, advertising manager.



AUGUST 1938



CONTENTS



VOL. LXX1V No. 8



The Social Security Board FRONTISPIECE

Security for Social Workers JOHN A. FITCH 259

Nineteen Thirty Eight CARL L. FLAXMAN 261

Marriages Insured Against Syphilis EDWARD A. MACY 262

Job Finding Joins Relief HERMAN A. SOMERS 263

The Common Welfare 265

The First Three Years Problem Calves

Grim Figures Hard Times

The Social Front 266

Relief Among the States Youth The
Public's Health Volunteers Professional

People and Things

Book Reviews 270

O Survey Associates. Inc.



Pungent publicity properly propagates
probation principles. Probation, organ of the
.\u!.'inal Probation Association.

. don't realize how lucky you are in
antrv until you live abroad (or awhile.

JOSEPH E. DAVIES, former ambassador to
Russia, now to Belgium.

v rapidly our modern psychologists,
sociologists and psychiatrists are becoming
human. DR. SAMUEL W. HARTWELL, profes-

sychiatry, University of Buffalo.

Summed up in very simple terms the need
today in labor relations throughout all indus-
rms to be the great need for better
ALVIN E. DODD, president, American
Cement Association.

'ury will say of our generation that we
fumbled the most challenging opportunities,
or it will say that we conquered the most
baffling of problems the search to satisfy

perpetual longing for a rich and secure
life. PHILIP LA FOLLETTE, governor of Wis-
consin.

The tyrants and the plutocrats and the
poor all need teaching, one of them no more
thin the others. All are in the warm dark
white man. black man. big man they are in
the dark together. None of them will ever
jet to day alone. JONATHAN DANIELS, in A
Southerner Discovers the South.

The problem of the American newspaper
today is to open its channels of cordial re-
ception to new social ideals and to insure fair
treatment for any reform or any reformer
no is obviously honest, reasonably intelli-
gent and backed by any considerable minority
pf the public. WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE in the
\ation.



So They Say

If we would have no public masters, we
must have no private ones. LLOYD K. GAR-
RISON, University of Wisconsin.

I have not much patience with those who
believe that crime can be prevented by a
campaign, or a parade or even a banquet.
SANFORD BATES, Boys' Clubs of America Inc.

Lucky indeed for us that an artist comes
along once in a while to laugh at us. Ideol-
ogy has made no place as yet for the sense
of humor. HENRY NOBLE MACCRACKEN,
president, fassar College.

It just seems inconceivable that conditions
can ever be right in this country again. Trade
and industry throughout the land are disor-
ganized. . . . The problem of unemployment
has become general. DANIEL WEBSTER, 1S37.

Teachers will have to be kept fresh. It is
stipulated in most leases that we should paint
our houses outside every three years and in-
side every seven years. But who ever heard
of doing up a school teacher? There are teach-
ers at work in this country that haven't been
painted inside for fifty years. H. G. WELLS
to British Association for the Advancement
of Science.

The new frontier is idle men, money and
machines, and all the resourcefulness, ingenuity
and courage that reside in twelve to thir-
teen million unemployed men is helpless to
take up this new frontier without tremendous
organization of productive forces such as
only government can supply when business is
in the doldrums. HARRY L. HOPKINS, If PA
administrator.



Social work is in politics to stay. The
late MRS. HENRY MOSCOWITZ, 1923.

Hysteria and malevolence are not the for-
mulae of democracy but the very meat upon
which Caesars feed. CHARLES E. MERRIAM,
University of Chicago.

We in America believe that society is
made by man for man. We want no philoso-
phy which merges him into nothingness.
CLARENCE A. DYKSTRA, president, University
of Wisconsin.

Reading has become a habit like chewing
gum. The patterns and conventions of reading
have been so stamped on us that we can read
by habit without appreciable registry in the
mind. LEON WHIPPLE in Journal of Adult
Education.

I'm for socialized medicine. We got to fix
it so in this country people can get sick be-
sides the ones who can afford it. Illness now



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