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as one who "brought to Cleveland ii
pioneer program of settlement work.,
and the benefits of a higher order n
citizenship." Mr. Bellamy also was give*
an honorary degree of doctor of human
ties by Western Reserve University.

Deaths

ADOLPH LEWISOHN, age 89, c<
** August 17 at his summer home c<
Upper Saranac Lake, New York. As
youth, Mr. Lewisohn emigrated from h
native Germany and made here an OU
standing business success. Essentially civ
minded, he was a leader in movemen
for prison reform and for good govern
ment. He also had a broad, imaginatn
interest in education, philanthropy am
the arts. Among his larger public benefa-
tions were the School of Mines buildir
at Columbia University; a notable librai
of German literature at the College <
the City of New York; a collection <
modern art in the Brooklyn Museurr'
Mount Sinai Pathological Laboratorj
gifts to a number of Jewish and non-set
tarian charities; and the magnified
Lewisohn Stadium where, for the pric
of a movie ticket, thousands of mus
lovers students, workers, housewives, !
well as seasoned concert-goers listen t
symphony programs on summer evening

The REV. FRANCIS A. WALSH, profes
sor of philosophy and former regen
of the seminary at Catholic University
Washington, D. C. He had served a
national director of the Confraternit \
of Christian Doctrine.

ELIZABETH ADAMS, director of the del 1
partment of adult education, Centra
Branch of the Young Woman's Chris,
tian Association, Brooklyn, N. Y., whl
had been connected with that organize
fioj) since 1927.



296



SURVEY MIDMONTHL 1 '



THE PAMPHLET SHELF



Social Economics

;IMKK (IK ECONOMICS. 1), the staff.
Council for Social Action, Congregational
ami Christian Churches. Price 25 cenU
(ram the council, 289 Fourth Avenue, New

A brief summary of basic economic and
social situations of today and the part
i church people may play in them.

KK II I AND. POOR PEOPLE, by Max R.
Whitr and Cecil L. Gregory. Research report
region III, Farm Security Adminis-
tration. I'.S. Department of Agriculture.
From the administration, Indianapolis, Ind.

Mimeographed report of a social and
economic study of seven counties of south-
east Missouri the people, their way of
and their land.

T1IK FARM BUSINESS, by Roman L.
Home. University of Chicago Press. 55 pp.
1'rice 25 cents fr<m the press.

One of a series prepared under the

American Council on Education, this

Kiklet discusses in popular terms the

interrelated problems of economics, crops

' and farm conditions.

A TOUR OF NOVA SCOTIA COOPER
ATIVES. a report of the conference tour
under the auspices of the Cooperative
League of the USA and the extension de-
partment of St. Francis Xavier University.
Price 20 cents from the league, 167 West
reel. New York.

H. .u a little Catholic University
[through its adult education plan began a
movement which has brightened the face
of eastern Canada; including descriptions
of the individual cooperatives which are
outgrowths of the original small study
groups begun by the university.

YOUR 1XCOME AND MINE, edited by
Maxwell S. Stewart. Public Affairs Pamph-
let No. 20. Price 10 cents from Public Af-
fairs Committee, 8 West 40 Street, New
York.

Summary of a study. The Income
Structure of the United States by Mau-
rice Leven, which was made for the
Brookings Institution under a grant from
' the Falk Foundation.

THE HULL TRADE PROGRAM AND
THE AMERICAN SYSTEM, by Raymond
Leslie Buell. Foreign Policy Association,
World Affairs Pamphlet No. 2. Price 25
cents from the Association, 8 West 40
Street, New York.

Prepared in cooperation with the Na-
tional Peace Conference in elucidation of
the U.S. trade program which was be-
gun in 1934 with the reciprocal tariff act
and is based upon trade agreements with
countries not discriminating against the
United States.



Changing World

SOCIAL FORCES AFFECTING THE

PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL WORK, by

H. M. Selekman. From the Massachusetts

Terence of Social Work, 41 Mount Ver-

non Street, Boston.

cussion of philosophy, community
relations, trade unions and news currents
in professional social work.

THE SOCIAL FORCES THAT SHAPE
R WORLD, by Arthur L. Beeley. Uni-
versity of Utah Press. Price 35 cents from
the press. Salt Lake City, Utah.

In an essay of twenty-four pages, the



author makes "a modest attempt at so-
cial diagnosis" and traces major social
forces which, he holds, have influenced
western civilization.

YOTTH IN THE WORLD OF TODAY,
by Maxwell S. Stewart. Price 10 cents from
the Public Affairs Committee, 8 West 40
Street, New York.

A diagnosis of the problems of Ameri-
can youth, found to be a reflection of the
present state of society. Though recom-
mendations are given in the form of pro-
posed legislation and organization, the
prognosis is considered doubtful because
of the dangers inherent in the combina-
tion of symptoms enforced idleness and
low cultural standards.

THE AMERICAN FAMILY IN A CHANG-
ING SOCIETY: The Average Family, a
Problem of Declining Population. A coop-
erative study directed by Harriet Ahlers
Houdlette, American Association of Uni-
versity Women. From the association, 1634
I Street, N.W., Washington D. C.

A carefully prepared study program, a
unit in a series arranged for the use of
club study groups.

Relief

THE IMPACT OF THE SOCIAL SECU-
RITY ACT ON THE RELIEF PROB-
LEM, by Eveline M. Burns. 8 pp. Reprinted
from the National Municipal Review. From
the author, Columbia University, New York.

A discussion of the change in concept
of categorical assistance since the social
security act and of the financial problem
caused by the earmarking of dispropor-
tionate welfare sums to those programs
which can obtain federal funds for the
states.

PROBLEMS IN THE COMPILATION OF
DATA ON TOTAL RELIEF AND WORK
PROGRAM EXPENDITURES, by Dorothy
Fahs Beck. 12 pp.

HiifSEHOLDS AND PERSONS RECEIV-
ING RELIEF OR ASSISTANCE, by
T. J. Woofter. Jr., and T. E. Whiting.
12 pp.

Reprints from the Journal of the Amer-
ican Statistical Association. Two of a
series of papers published by the joint
committee on relief statistics of the
American Public Welfare Association,
1313 East 60 Street, Chicago, and the
American Statistical Association, 722
Woodward Building, Washington, D. C.
Price S cents each.

WHAT TURNING RELIEF BACK TO THE
COMMUNITY MEANT IN CINCIN-
NATI, by Ellery F. Reed. Reprinted from
the Social Service Review. From research
department. Community Chest, Cincinnati,
Ohio.

The real story of a situation which re-
ceived some misleading publicity and
which is significant to social workers.
[See Survey Mid monthly, January 1938,
page 17.]

STANDARDS OF RELIEF: AN ANALY-
- OF ONE HUNDRED FAMILY
CASE RECORDS, by Anna Roselle John-
son. 153 pp. A dissertation presented to
the University of Pennsylvania towards
the Ph.D. degree. Price $2.15 from Associ-
ated Publishers. Inc., 1538 Ninth Street,
N. W., Washington, D. C.

A study of records from the Associ-
ated Charities of Washington. D. C.
measuring the adequacy of relief from



1923 to 1933, tracing the trends in re-
lief giving and case work treatment and
relating the findings to social and health
problems.

AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN, by
Ettienne Baldwin. Prepared for and pub-
lished by the Georgia State Department
of Public Welfare, Atlanta.

A series of case stories showing what
"mothers' aid" had meant to Georgia
families. "Only a moving picture camera
with sound attachments could portray
accurately what the visitor saw and
heard."

MINIMUM COST OF LIVING BUDGET
FOR HEALTH AND DECENCY IN
PITTSBURGH AND ALLEGHENY
COUNTY. 45 pp. Committee on Family
Budgets, Federation of Social Agencies of
Pittsburgh and Allegheny County. Price
50 cents from the federation, Pittsburgh, Pa.

A revision of the minimum budget for
the client family published in 1931, to
bring it in line with 1937 prices.

THEY STARVE THAT WE MAY EAT, by

Edith E. Lowry. Council of Women foi
Home Missions and Missionary Education
Movement. Price 35 cents from the coun-
cil, 105 East 22 Street. New York.

A vivid description of the migratory
laborer in the United States, his situation
in the community and his due from
that community.

Miscellaneous

THE MUSIC OF THE PEOPLE, by Wil-
liam Van de Wall. Price $1 from the
American Association for Adult Education,
60 East 42 Street, New York.

Basing its material on a nation-wide
survey, this small book discusses music
in the adult and community life of the
United States.

OCCUPATIONAL STUDIES: GENERAL

HOUSEWORKER, ADVERTISING ACCOUNTANT,

JOURNALISM. ARCHITECT. Series of pamph-
lets from the National Occupational Con-
ference. Price 10 cents each from the con-
ference, 551 Fifth Avenue, New York.

Brief but fundamental guides for the
seeker of authentic data on choice of a
profession.

PROPAGANDA. How TO RECOGNIZE IT ASP
DEAL WITH IT. Institute for Propaganda
Analysis, Inc., 132 Morningside Drive,
New York. Price 60 cents (50 cents for
orders of ten or more).

An experimental unit of study mate-
rials for use in junior and senior high
schools calculated to prepare young peo-
ple to meet propaganda which will be
brought to bear on their lives, by teach-
ing them to recognize what propaganda
is and how to distinguish between that
based on reason and that based on vague-
ness and emotional appeals.

WHY THE CIO?, by Alfred Baker Lewis.
Price 10 cents.

SHALL STRIKES BE OUTLAWED? by
Joel Seidman. League for Industrial Democ-
racy pamphlet series. Price 15 cents from
the league, 112 East 19 Street, New York.

The first booklet is a simple explana-
tion of the principle of the labor union
and the particular contribution and his-
tory of the CIO. The second presents the
case for voluntary collective bargaining
as a means to satisfactory industrial re-
lations in the United States.



SHTKMHKR 1938



297



Book Reviews



John Bull's Labour Party

THE POST-WAR HISTORY OF THE BRI-
TISH WORKING CLASS, by Allen Hutt.
Coward-McCann. 274 pp. Price $'2.75 postpaid
of Survey Midmonthly.

THIS is an absorbing account of events
on the British labor scene during the
past twenty years, interpreted from the
author's own angle of philosophic history,
which, as Harold J. Laski points out in
the foreword, is "an angle which only a
minority of the British Labour Party is
prepared to accept." However, the pres-
entation of the minority viewpoint has
its own special value.

Mr. Hutt looks back regretfully to
"the revolutionary years," just after the
World War, when "it seemed that an
explosion was inevitable . . . capitalism
was skating on thin ice." In spite of the
lack of a coordinated attack by labor, it
was "only by skilful maneuvering, by
employing fraud or force as required,
that the government was able to dispose
of its adversaries," he observes.

The reader will wish to test the valid-
ity of Mr. Hutt's interpretation against
the background of his own knowledge.
Certainly he will find much to merit his
interest. For instance, in the matter of
the first labor government, the author
says that because of pressing and danger-
ous problems, such as unemployment, a
rising militancy among the workers, a
rapid increase in the labor vote, the
British governing class in a daring poli-
tical maneuver forestalled a possible
labor majority by the immediate transla-
tion to office of a labor minority. Thus
the Labour Party was "in office but not
in power," and destined to suffer a loss
of prestige because of inability to achieve
its aims. Premier MacDonald, in failing
to provide a working class government
and choosing instead to be "a sort of
non-party party leader," set a pattern
which leaders have since followed, a
policy of cooperation rather than conflict.
In its attempt to keep peace with the
enemy, to proceed upon the theory of
"the inevitableness of gradualness," the
party was to fall upon difficult days.

As for the general strike of 1926, Mr.
Hutt takes the position that the govern-
ment was the aggressor, that the ground
had been well laid for the struggle. "The
ruling class needed to fight a decisive
frontal engagement with the forces of
labor in order to carry through the ra-
tionalization and reorganization of indus-
try that was urgently required if the
levels of profit and capital accumulation
were to be restored."

The second decade has witnessed the
gradual emergence of the movement from
the despair caused by the general strike
defeat, the loss of morale incident to the



"Great Betrayal" and the fall of the
labor government in 1931, and the rising
tide of unemployment in the early thirties.
Militant organizations of the unemployed
have sprung up and the rank-and-file
groups, having come to see the working
class struggle as a clearer issue, have
grown more articulate in their impa-
tience with a leadership occupied with
such pursuits as Red-hunting.

Mr. Hutt closes upon an optimistic
note. The unity campaign of the left-
wing movement scored a sensational vic-
tory in achieving certain reforms in party
organization. These are expected to pro-
vide new opportunities for putting the
left viewpoint within the party leader-
ship. He notes with satisfaction that "the
official line now demands opposition to
non-intervention, arms for the Spanish
government and no concessions to Fran-
co" an achievement of pressure from
the left.

The great lesson of the book, Mr.
Laski points out, is the lesson on which
William Morris used to insist half a
century ago that "it is the business of
the Socialist Party to be socialist." Mr.
Laski says further, "There is good evi-
dence that the book is having a vital in-
fluence upon labor opinion in Great Bri-
tain. I hope that its implication will save
the working class of the United States
from some of the mistakes we have
made."



Evanston, 111.



LISBETH PARROTT



Scientific Common Sense

THE ADOLESCENT, by Ada Hart Arlitt. Whit-
tlesey House. 242 pp. Price $2 postpaid of Sur-
vey Midmonthly.

"lyl7"RITTEN primarily for parents,
* this very readable book is equally
valuable for the teacher of adolescents
who needs to refresh his memory of his
own adolescent days. For, as the author
points out, nothing is a more frequent
cause of conflict and misunderstanding
than parents' forgetfulness of how they
felt and acted when they were adoles-
cents. The same is true of teachers.

The chief merit of the book is its com-
mon sense. One has the impression that
what the author says is such common
knowledge as to be almost self evident.
But, as everyone who has had any con-
tact with adolescents or their parents im-
mediately will recognize, there is a vast
difference between the common sense
of this book and what is taken for com-
mon sense in a great many families. The
book is full of the common sense of sci-
entific research reported and interpreted
in language that any parent can under-
stand. Without seeming to write down
to the non-professional reader, the author



removes the mystery and pretension*
from the relatively few technical term!
which she rinds necessary. This is some*)
thing of an achievement for a book deal
ing largely with psychological matter?
The personal relations between pa rent ]
and their adolescent offspring which th
author advocates are well supported b
facts, for, as she points out, "Nothing i
so much of a shock absorber as knowl
edge, and during the adolescent perioi
both the child and the parent will be ir
need of the shock absorbers which knowl
edge provides." W. B. FEATHERSTON
Teachers College
Columbia University

Salmon Lectures, 1937

PERSONALITY IN FORMATION AND AC
TION, by William Healy, M.D. Norton. 20
pp. Price $2 postpaid of Survey MidmontU)

IT is difficult to conceive of anyone bet

ter equipped than William Healy fo
the important task of defining the mod
ern psychiatric conception of the humai
being. This he has done in the fou:i
1937 Salmon lectures in a book fillei
with logical, graceful, stimulating sen.
fences. Dr. Healy's erudition, his scieir
tific soundness, and above all his open
mindedness have combined to enable hin
to answer the question, "In what sensn
do you psychiatrists use the word 'per
sonality'?"

From the standpoint of the readers o
Survey Midmonthly, it will be notewor
thy to indicate Dr. Healy's strong empha
sis on the importance of the interactioi
of the environment and the indivi
dual as compared with prenatal factors
He is highly skeptical of conclusion. 1
drawn from physiognomy or anthropo
logical measurements or the so-calle<
stigma of degeneration. Rather, he put
his faith, as do all psychiatrists, in a care 1
ful consideration of the main trends o
the personality as evidenced by behavior
attitude, energy patterns, effectiveness ant'
personal satisfaction, relating these as fai
as possible to their developmental origir
in the early experiences and the inter-
action of the instinctual impulses with
the forces of reality. In this, naturally
he gives full consideration to the knowl-
edge newly obtained from psychoanalytic
research.

The book is well integrated, systemat-
ically constructed, gracefully written.
From the scientific standpoint the re-
viewer can find little fault with it. His
experiences have not been the same asr
Dr. Healy's with reference to the unim-
portance of sibling position in the fam-
ily; he does not quite agree with the im-
plications that "a page from Freud" is 1
synonymous with taboo subject matter.

Social workers may object on princi-
ple to Healy's lack of sympathy with the
opposition to child labor; his idea is clear'
enough but it is questionable whether the r
selfish opponents of proper child labor '



298



gislation should be given even this
Crumh of scientific support. Healy fully
mnlcc-; up for possible ambiguity on this
point with his penetrating comments on
the subjective factors in the administra-
tion of thr law, the psychopathic ele-
ments in some business organizations and
the educational defect which produces
youth with a lack of social vision and
ny ambition for leadership.

KARL A. MENNINGER, M.D.
a, Kant.

Success Story

THE CONQUEST OF CHOLERA, by John S.
Chambers, M.I). MacmilUn. 366 pp. Price
94.7S postpaid of Sunty Midmoxtkly.

FROM the viewpoint of a nurse or
;al worker this story of "Ameri-

K' greatest scourge" is fascinating. Dr.
Chambers' style of writing is simple,
easy and attention-holding. He paints a
panorama of medical history leading up
to the year 1832 when cholera first in-
vaded the New World. Against this back-
ground he gives us a vivid picture of ship-
loads of human beings leaving Ireland
en route to the new homeland, hundreds
never to reach it but to have their bodies
dropped into the sea, victims of the
deadly pestilence.

Cholera came first to Canada, but it
soon traveled on. Down the Atlantic sea-
board, out into the interior of the con-
tinent, down into Mexico it went. Entire
families were wiped out overnight. Cities
and towns were laid low. Business

I Bued as business leaders fled. Prominent

r< "declared that cholera was not

catching." They told the people there was

no way of escape since "the disease was

f e d by some poison in the air from

h one could not run away."

The struggles of scientists and physi-

rians working under handicaps of ignor-

md superstition are described viv-

ilistory, biography and romance are

| interwoven in the story of this conquest
a story which follows through the last
cholera epidemic and shows clearly to
whom we owe thanks for its being the
last.

There are maps, photographs of men
and places and reproductions of descrip-
tive prints. It will not be surprising if
The Conquest of Cholera soon becomes
an international best-seller.

j Nftt- York BEULAH FRANCE, R.N.

Beautiful, Brainy, or Nice

LISTEN I.ITTI.E GIRL, by Munro Leaf. Stoke..
196 pp. Price $1.50 postpaid of Survry MM-
monthly.

\VfITHOUT being too discouraging
to the would-be career girl, this
timely book gives a true picture of what
girls may expect from New York in the
way of jobs. The big city has been almost
every girl's dream of romance and op-
portunity, and there have been just
enough spectacular stories of the home-
town-girl-makes-good type to create



BOOKS FOR THE SOCIAL WORKER



Salaries in Medical Social Work in 1937

By RALPH G. HURLIN

A detailed study of salaries in 1937 of 1,853 medical social
workers in 472 agencies. It will prove valuable beyond its
special field for purposes of comparison and as an example
of method.

34 Pages Price, 20 cents

RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION



130 East 22 Street



New York



10 BEST SELLERS

for Social Workers



SEPTEMBER



MORE THAN ONE DOLLAR

SOCIAL AGENCY BOARDS AND HOW TO MAKE THEM
EFFECTIVE, by Clarence King

HANDBOOK OF SOCIAL CASE RECORDING, by Margaret Bristol

SOCIAL CASE RECORDING, by Gordon Hamilton

THE SELF YOU HAVE TO LIVE WITH, by Winjred Rhoades

ALCOHOL ONE MAN'S MEAT, by E. A. Strecker, M.D. and
F. T. Chambers

ONE DOLLAR OR LESS

RETREAT FROM REASON, by Lancelot Hogben

THE CASE WORKER'S DESK MANUAL, by Earle Fiske Young

PSYCHIATRIC WORD BOOK, by Richard H. Mulchings, M.D

SOCIAL WORKERS' DICTIONARY, by Young Q McClenahan

THE PUBLIC ASSISTANCE WORKER, by Russell H. Kurt*



$1.25
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Listing Based on Orders Received by THE SURVEY
You May Now Order These Books Sent to You Postfree from

SURVEY ASSOCIATES, 112 EAST 19 STREET, NEW YORK CITY



many illusions about New York's real
opportunities. Mr. Leaf's book with its
illuminating analysis of jobs for women
in every field gives a realistic idea of the
opportunities, and a real, if somewhat
gloomy, picture of what these jobs de-
mand from those seekers of careers who
pour in every year with such high hopes.
Would-be workers in New York, says
Mr. Leaf, may be classified into three
general groups: the beautiful, the brainy,
and the nice. For each there are certain
possibilities, but there are also many dis-
illusioning handicaps. For the beautiful
there are glamorous jobs as models and
show girls, but the way is hard and real
rewards are for a favored few. What



these nicely reared small town girls have
tc "take" on such jobs would shock some
of the folks back home.

For the brainy girl there are jobs in
advertising, book publishing, and depart-
ment stores, where she may gain the ju-
nior executive class and where rewards
are lucrative, if she can take the fierce
competition and keep her nervous system
intact.

For the nice girl there is social service,
teaching, hostess or secretarial work.
These jobs lack glamour, but for those
who have a desire to do good in a wicked
world, they afford plenty of outlet. Mr.
Leaf settles, once and for all, the moot
question of whether or not to take a sec-



In answering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHI.Y

299



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS



WORKER WANTED



Field Secretary, woman, assistant to executive,
national child care and parent education or-
ganization, much travelling, graduate School
of Social Work $2400. Gertrude Stein Agency,
11 E. 44th St., New York.

SITUATIONS WANTED



Settlement boys' worker desires position in boys'
work. Seven years in Settlements, twelve
summers in Boys' Camps. 7527 Survey.

EXECUTIVE, thoroughly experienced in insti-
tutional and recreational fields desires con-
nection. Modest salary satisfactory. Excellent
references. 7528 Survey.



EXECUTIVE, experienced office administration,
budgets, statistics, publicity and fund raising ;
desires position with financial or group work
agency. Excellent references. 7529 Survey.



Order Your

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from
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As a convenience to our readers, we
accept orders for all books at pub-
lishers' prices delivered anywhere in
this country postfree. Payment with
order preferred, though COD orders
are also welcomed. Address Survey
Associates, Inc., 112 East 19 Street,
New York City.



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112 E. 19th Street New York



Your Own Agency

This is the counseling and placement agency
sponsored jointly by the American Associa-
tion of Social Workers and the National
Organization for Public Health Nursing,
National, Non-Profit making.



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