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LITERARY SERVICE



Special articles, theses, speeches, papers. Re-
search, revision, bibliographies, etc. Over
twenty years' experience serving busy pro-
fessional persons. Prompt service extended
AUTHORS RESEARCH BUREAU, 616
Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y.

PAMPHLETS AND PERIODICALS

The American Journal of Nursing shows the part
which professional nurses take in the better'
ment of the world. Put it in your library, $3.00
a. year. 60 West 60 Street, New York, N. Y.



SUPPLYING INSTITUTIONAL TRADE

SEEMAN BROS., INC.

Groceries

Hudson and North Moore Streets
New York

NEW YORK



FOR RENT Charming remodeled Colonial farm-
house (furnished), on 3-acre restricted plot.
All year commuting about hour to N. Y. 8
rooms, 2-car, 3^ baths, laundry, oilburner,
automatic hot water. On secluded, well kept
road ; schools, shopping convenient. Easy as
an apt. to manage. Concessions to prospective
buyer. $80.00 month. H. F., care of Survey
Graphic.

FLORIDA



Newly decorated and renovated home on corner
lot, in Seminole Heights, Tampa, Florida. Five
large live oak trees, porches. Near new school
development. Priced to settle estate. Write
Dr. Wm. C. Wells, McKnight Bldg., Medina,
N. Y.



FEDERAL THEATR


E PROJECT FOR NEW YORK CITY


ADELPHI THEATRE

54th Street East of 7th Avenue
Evenings 8:40
Circle 7-7582


8th MONTH

"ONE-THIRD
OF A NATION"


DALY'S THEATRE

63rd Street East of Broadway
Evenings 8:40
Circle 7-4297


6th MONTH

"HAITI"

By WILLIAM DU BOIS


MAXINE ELLIOTT'S
THEATRE

39th Street East of Broadway
Evenings 8:40
CHickering 4-5715


Opening Friday, September 9th

"BIG BLOW"

By THEODORE PRATT


RITZ THEATRE

48th Street West of Broadway
Evenings 8:40
Circle 6-0480


Reopening Monday, September 12th

"PROLOGUE TO GLORY"

By E. P. CONKLE


WORKS PR


3GRESS ADMINISTRATION



retarial course, by disclosing that a sec-
retarial job is a good wedge into anyyl
field. Once in a business in the disguise'
of secretary, the chances are good for de-
veloping into something else.

Finally, Mr. Leaf concludes that, event
after reading his book, few will be de-
terred from trying New York for them-
selves, and he hastens to give a little ad- 1
vice about where to live on the least;
amount, and where to buy clothes to
make an appearance on next to nothing.

He is most pessimistic on the possi-
bility of romance, and cites statistics tc
show that whether or not New York is
a good place to find a career, it is noi
the best place to find a husband.

JEAN L. SHEPARI
Director of Executive Personnel
New York

For Tomorrow's Educators

CHIXA THROUGH A COLLEGE WINDOW
by William G. Sewell. Friendship Press. 18.
pp. Price $1 postpaid of Survey Midmonthly

HpHERE has been some talk of com-
"- bining a number of the smaller Chris
tian colleges of China in a single univer
sity which could offer a wider choice
studies and better facilities for graduate'
work. In this little book, an English sci
ence teacher, by telling simply and sin-
cerely about his own experiences at otv
of these smaller inland colleges, make-
a good case for their continuance. A\
least, he shows that this more intimati'
contact between faculty members and stu
dents who more often are drawn frorn
the working population in small citier
than in large ones should not lightly br
given up.

Devoted western teachers who art
mainly concerned in an exchange of thi
higher values of eastern and western cul
tures need not, however, accept the man;
special problems of the missionary col-'
Itge built by foreigners. There is a wel
come for them in institutions under Chi-
nese administration if they are willing tc
accept positions on a basis of real equal
ity with their Chinese colleagues. Inci-
dentally, the author tells us much abou
the inner life of the Chinese student!
who once again are playing a valiant pan
in their country's emancipation.
New York BRUNO LASKEP-

Religion and Therapy

THE SOUL DOCTOR, by Charles Reed Zahni
ser. Round Table Press. 209 pp. Price $
postpaid of Survey Midmontlily.

OERE is a recognition of the fact that
ministers often are faced with ex-
treme problems of members of their
parishes with which they are not at all
equipped to cope, and yet with which,!
to some extent, they must deal if they
are to be of real service to their churches.
Theology as taught in most theologicali
seminaries does not fit a minister to re-'-
cognize mental and emotional difficulties-



In answering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

300



long his parishioners nor does it give
him wisdom with regard to his own atti-
tude toward such difficulties.

To judge from the number of books
or being written on this subject min-
^kn themselves as well as doctors and
social workers are becoming increasingly
aware that life in this complicated world
of today puts overmuch strain on the
hum.in personality. It is logical that the
minister is often the one who sees the
JMults of this strain when its evil ef-
fects are just beginning to show. A suf-
^^H| person will often seek help from
I lit minister before he will consider con-
sulting a medical specialist or a social
worker. If the minister were better pre-
pared to deal with such problems per-
haps much preventive work might be
done.

But there are many pitfalls in the way.
It may be that such a book as this, writ-
ten in the form of fiction and by a lay-
man in the field of psychiatry or clinical
psychology, does not take sufficient ac-
count of these pitfalls. On the other
hand the hero of this story, the pastor
of an important city church, had spent
some time not only in study of psycho-
logical problems of personality, but had
[worked in hospital and case work agen-
Up as a volunteer and so was in direct
Cooperation with those more skilled than

-If.

This reviewer rather deprecates the
(presentation of the material as fiction.
The direct account of a minister's ex-
[perience and success with religious therapy
would seem simpler and more impressive.
The subject is one of great importance
|and a clear recognition of possibilities in
khis field, cautions to be observed and
(skills which of necessity must be acquired,
is greatly to be desired on the part of
[doctors, religious training schools and
ministers themselves.

ELEANOR HOPE JOHNSON
Hartford, Conn.



NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

GRADUATE DIVISION FOR TRAINING IN PUBLIC SERVICE

Offers the Degree of Master of Public Administration to college
graduates who complete the course of specific training in public
service.

Courses for the Year 1938-1939

THE STATE AND MODERN SOCIETY

Tuesday, 6:00-7:45 Professor Rufus D. Smith

AND PROBLEMS OF PUBLIC ADMINIS-



PRINCIPLES
TRATION

Wednesday, 6:00-7:45



Mr. Glenn A. Bowers



PUBLIC PSYCHOLOGY AND OPINION

Thursday, 6:00-7:45 Professor Newman L. Hoopingarner

and Professor Ray E. Baber

GOVERNMENTAL RESEARCH TECHNIQUE AND STATIS-
TICAL METHOD

Thursday, 6:00-7:45 Mr. Frederick R. Ottman,

Mr. Lloyd Maxwell, and Professor Theodore H. Skinner

THE COMPOSITION OF PUBLIC PAPERS



Tuesday, 8:00-9:45 (first term)



Mr. Harry Shaw, Jr.



PUBLIC-WORKS ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION

Thursday, 8:00-9:45 (second term) Mr. Harold A. Lewis

PUBLIC FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION

Tuesday, 8:00-9:45 Professor Paul Studenski

PUBLIC-WELFARE ADMINISTRATION

Wednesday, 8:00-9:45 Mr. Robert T. Lansdale

PUBLIC PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION

Monday, 6:00-7:45 Mr. John J. Furia

For further information write to the Graduate Division for Training in
Public Service, 640 East Building

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

Washington Square New York, N. Y.



Good Religion; Good Drama

M ONE-ACT PLAYS, selected and edited by

Fred Eastman. Willett, Clark. 230 pp. Price

$2 postpaid of Survey UidmontUy.



emotional conflicts which strike close
home to the audience of today: how war
destroys human values; the choice be-
tween nationalism and religion ; the
struggle to keep beauty alive in sordid
surroundings; the struggle of modern
youth in a war-threatened world. They
ought to be worth examining by the har-
assed director of a church, school or
club dramatic group who is searching
r\OES a so-called "religious" play have tor a play that has ethical and spiritual

._ u- j.. j_> \x :.. .1 value without being preachy, hackneyed

or over-sentimental.

In a concluding chapter, Religious
Drama in the United States, Mr. East-
man presents some findings from a recent
study made by the religious drama depart-
ment of the seminary. The conclusions
are that religious drama today is high in
quantity and low in quality, and that un-
less the quality can be improved, drama
in the church will be scrapped, an irre-



OES a so-called "religious" play have
to be goody-goody? Must its theme
be coldly remote from the hot spots of
modern life? Must its characters wear
the flowing robes of antiquity and speak
in biblical language? Or might a play
built around some present day conflicts,
iwith its characters wearing modern dress
and speaking plain English, still qualify
as "religious"?

Fred Eastman, professor of biography,
literature and drama at the Chicago
Theological Seminary, thinks it might,



have the spiritual values of modern life
interpreted. What can do this better than
drama, which has reached its greatest
glory in the service of God?

The work of playwrights who have
written for the commercial stage as well
as for the church, these plays escape most
of the pitfalls into which amateur writers
often fall. The authors are not obviously
trying to get across a "message." Their
hrst idea has been to tell a story dram-
atically, with strong characterization,
natural dialogue and sustained action.
These plays can't be done in makeshift
f.-.shion, with a couple of rehearsals and
a prayer, but they would be well worth
doing well.
Chicago, III. BARBARA ABEL

Behavior Code

YOUTH AND SEX, A STUDY or 1300 COLLEGE
STUDENTS, by Dorothy Dunhar Bromley and
Florence Haxton Britten. Harper. 303 pp.
Price $3 postpaid of Survey itidmmthly.



parable loss, both to the church and to

and submits as evidence a collection of the drama. The church today, Mr. East- A PHASE of human existence of per-

ten one-act plays that he judges to be man holds, tends to direct its message sistent interest is the question of liu-

not only good religion but good drama. primarily to the intellect. Yet people in man happiness with its two great factors,

nflict is the heart of drama, and this industrial and mechanized civiliza- love and sex. At various periods these

these plays have as their themes some tion are emotionally starved and need to elements have been fused, at other times

In ansu-ering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

301



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS

Civic, National, International



Library Service



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, 520

North Michigan Ave., Chicago. To aid in
the extension and improvement of library
service.



Child Welfare



BOYS' CLUBS OF AMERICA, INC., 381 Fourth
Avenue, N.Y.C. National service organization
of 309 Boys' Clubs located in 171 cities. Fur-
nishes program aids, literature, and educa-
tional publicity for promotion of Boys' Club
Movement ; field service to groups or individ-
uals interested in leisure-time leadership for
boys, specializing with the underprivileged.



BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA, 2 Park Avenue,
New York City. Incorporated in 1910 and
chartered by Congress in 1916 for the pur-
pose of developing the character of boys and
training them in their duties as citizens.
Cubbing, younger boys' program, 9-11 ;
Scouting, 12 and upward ; Senior Scouting,
15 years and up. Scouts are organized in
patrols and Troops. Cooperates with schools
and churches, fraternal orders and other
civic groups. Walter W. Head, President ;
Dr. James E. West, Chief Scout Executive.



BERKSHIRE INDUSTRIAL FARM, Canaan,

New York. A national, non-sectarian farm
school for problem boys. Boys between 12
and 14 received through private surrender
or court commitment. Supported by agreed
payments from parents or other responsible
persons, in addition to voluntary contribu-
tions. For further information address Mr.
Byron D. Paddon, Superintendent, or the New
York Office at 101 Park Ave., Tel : Lex. 2-3147.



CHILD WELFARE LEAGUE OF AMERICA

C. C. Carstens, director, 130 E. 22nd Street,
New York City. A league of children's agen-
cies and institutions to secure improved
standards and methods in their various fields
of Work. It also co-operates with other chil-
dren's agencies, cities, states, churches, fra-
ternal orders and other civic groups to work
out worth-while results in phase of child
welfare in which they are interested.



NATIONAL CHILD LABOR COMMITTEE 419

Fourth Ave., N.Y.C. Promotes child labor
legislation, state and federal ; conducts in-
vestigations ; advises on administration ;
maintains information service.



AMERICAN LEGION NATIONAL CHILD WEL-
FARE DIVISION, 777 North Meridian Street,
Indianapolis, Ind. Three-phase program : Ed-
ucation ; legislation for benefit of all chil-
dren ; temporary material relief to children
of veterans of World War. Emma C.
Puschner, Director.



THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR CRIP-
PLED CHILDREN, Elyria, Ohio. Paul H.
King, President ; E. Jay Howenstine, Execu-
tive Secretary. Promotes organization of
national, state, provincial and local societies
for crippled children. Aids in development
of their programs. Assists in drafting and
securing the passage of legislation in behalf
of cripples. Maintains a Bureau of Informa-
tion with loan library service. Conducts
yearly an Easter Crippled Children Seal
Campaign. Bulletins. "The Crippled Child"
magazine, bimonthly, $1 a year.



Foreign Communities



NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF IMMIGRANT

WELFARE 1270 Sixth Avenue, New York.
A league of International Institutes, Citi-
zenship Councils and other local agencies
specializing in the interests of the foreign-
born. Gives consultation, field service, pro-
gram content to agencies engaged in any
form of constructive effort for the foreign-
born in local communities.



Health



THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR MENTAL
HYGIENE, INC. Dr. Arthur H. Ruggles,
president ; Dr. C. M. Hincks, general direc-
tor ; Clifford W. Beers, secretary ; 50 West
50th Street, New York City. Pamphlets on
mental hygiene, child guidance, mental
disease, mental defect, psychiatric social
work and other related topics. Catalogue of
publications sent on request. "Mental Hy-
giene," quarterly, $3.00 a year.

NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR PUBLIC
HEALTH NURSING 50 W. 50th St., New
York. Dorothy Deming, R. N., Gen. Dir.
Advisory Service, statistics, monthly maga-
zine.

NATIONAL TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION

50 West 50th Street, New York, Dr. Kendall
Emerson, managing director. Pamphlets of
methods and program for the prevention of
tuberculosis. Publications sold and distributed
through state associations in every state.
American Review of Tuberculosis, medical
journal, $8.00 a year ; and Monthly Bulletin,
house organ, free.



AMERICAN BIRTH CONTROL LEAGUE A

clearing house cooperating with social work-
ers in referring indigent mothers to medically
directed birth control clinics in 42 states, in-
cluding 19 centers in Greater New York. In
areas lacking centers, qualified physicians
are available. Phone or write: 501 Madison
Avenue, New York City. WIckersham 2-8600.
President: Richard N. Pierson, M.D. Medi-
cal Director: Eric M. Matsner, M.D.



THE WOMEN'S FIELD ARMY OF THE AMER-
ICAN SOCIETY FOR THE CONTROL OF
CANCER, 1250 Sixth Avenue, New York
City. An educational group of lay women
active in forty-three states under the super-
vision of physicians representing state
medical societies. Information, literature,
speakers, newspaper articles may be secured
without charge.



New York City



THE BIRTH CONTROL CLINICAL RESEARCH
BUREAU, 17 West 16th Street; MARGARET
SANGER, Director ; has added evening ses-
sions, Wednesday and Thursday evening
from 7 to 9 P.M., for the benefit of mothers
who work and cannot come to the Clinic
daily from 9 to 4.



Negro Education



TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE, Tuskegee Institute,
Alabama. Founded by Booker T. Washing-
ton. High school and college both ac-
credited. Curricula designed to prepare
Negro students to meet the vocational and
social needs of successful living. F. D.
Patterson, President.



Recreation



NATIONAL RECREATION ASSOCIATION

315 Fourth Ave., New York City. To bring
to every boy and girl and citizen of America
an adequate opportunity for wholesome,
happy play and recreation.



Penology



THE OSBORNE ASSOCIATION, INC., 114 East
30th Street, New York, N. Y. Telephone
CAIedonia 5-9720-9721. Activities :- Collects
information about penal institutions and
works to improve standards of care in penal
institutions. Aids discharged prisoners in
their problems of readjustment by securing
employment and giving such other assistance
as they may require. Wm. B. Cox, Executive
Secretary.



Religious Organizations



COUNCIL OF WOMEN FOR HOME MISSION

297 Fourth Avenue, New York City. Tl
Inter-Denominational body of 23 women
home mission boards of the United Stat- ';
and Canada uniting in program and finai
cial responsibility for enterprises which thf '
agree to carry cooperatively ; i.e. Christie
social service in Migrant labor camps ar
U. S. Indian schools. President, Mrs. Augu
tus Trowbridge ; Executive Secretary, Edil
E. Lowry ; Migrant Supervisor, Westei
Area, Mrs. F. E. Shotwell ; Migrant Supe ,
visor, Gulf to Great Lakes Area, Mrs. Kei !J
neth D. Miller.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOME1

INC. 1819' Broadway, New York City. Mr J |
Maurice L. Goldman, President ; Mrs. Bei
jamin Spitzer, Chairman Ex. Com. ; Mr >
Marion M. Miller, Executive Director. Orgai ;
ization of Jewish women initiating and d
veloping programs and activities in servii ]
for foreign born, peace, social legislatio '
adult Jewish education, and social welfar i
Conducts bureau of international servic I
Serves as clearing bureau for local affiliat* '
groups throughout the country.

NATIONAL BOARD, YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRI!
TIAN ASSOCIATIONS, 600 Lexington Av ,
New York City. An international Christie J
woman movement devoted to service f r
women and girls and the attempt to he '
build a society in which the abundant li: ,
is possible for every individual.



NATIONAL COUNCIL OF YOUNG MEN 1
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 347 Madisc :
Avenue, New York City, Eskil C. Carlsoi
President ; John E. Manley, General Seer i
tary. A federation of 1123 local association
through state and area councils, for Chri
tian character education among youth. Mee-i
annually to determine service projects an ;
budget for cooperation with local membf <
organizations in program, emphasis and ii I
terpretation, fiscal operations, etc. Emphr |
sizes lay-professional cooperation, group an
club activity, and self-governing prograir
of physical, social and religious educatioi
public affairs, international education an
special cooperative projects, citizenship, et
Specialized work among transportation, arm
and navy, student, colored, rural, and cei
tain other groups.



National Conference



NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL WOR!

Paul Kellogg, President, New York
Howard R. Knigrht, Secretary, 82 N. Hig |
St., Columbus, Ohio. The Conference is a |
organization to discuss the principles c
humanitarian effort and to increase th i
efficiency of social service agencies. Eac
year it holds an annual meeting, publishe
in permanent form the Proceedings of th
meeting, and issues a quarterly Bulletir
The sixty-sixth annual convention of th '
Conference will be held in Buffalo, Nei
York, June 18-24, 1939. Proceedings are sen ,
free of charge to all members upon paymen
of a membership fee of $5.



Racial Adjustment



NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE, INC., with it
44 branches improves social conditions o
Negroes seeking "not alms, but opportunity'
for them. Secures and trains social workers
Investigates conditions of city life as base,
for practical work. Publishes OPPOR
TUNITY, Journal of Negro Life. Solicit-
gifts. 1133 Broadway, New York, N. Y.



Community Chests



COMMUNITY CHESTS AND COUNCILS, INC ,

155 East 44th Street, New York. Informa-
tion and consultation about cooperative plan
ning and financing of social work through
chests and councils of social agencies.



In ansivering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

302



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS

Civic, National/ International



National Red Cross



THE AMKRICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS

Administered through National Headquar-
ters in Washington. l>. C.. and three Branch
Office* in San Francisco. St. Louis and
Washington. D. C. There are S711 local
chapters organized mostly on a county basis.
Service* of the Red Crow art: Disaster
Relief. Civilian Relief. Pint Aid and Life
Saving. Home and Farm Accident Preven-

tion Service. Home Hygiene and Care of the
Sick. Junior Red Cross. Nursing Service.
Nutrition Service. Public Health Nursing.
Volunteer Service and War Service.

Industrial Democracy

LEAGUE FOR INDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY

Promote* a better understanding of problems
of democracy in industry through its
pamphlet, research and lecture services and
urganixation of college and city groups. Ex-
ecutive Directors. Harry W. Laidler and
Norman Thomas, 112 East IVth Street. New
York City.



1 1 your
organization
lilted in
the Survey's
Directory of
Social Agencies?
If not
why not?
Rites are
thirty cents
per line



Foundations



AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR THE BLIND.
INC. 16 Wet 18th Street. New York. A
national organisation for research and field
service. Activities Include : assistance to state
and local agencies In organizing activities
and promoting legislation ; research in legis-
lation, vocations, statistics, and mechanical
appliances for the blind ; maintenance of a
reference lending library. H. C. Higel, Presi-
dent: Robert B. Irwin, Executive Director.



RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION For the Im-
provement of Living Conditions Shelby M.
Harrison. General Director: ISO E. 22nd St.
New York. Departments: Charity Organiia-
tion. Consumer Credit Studies, Delinquency
and Penology. Industrial Studies, Library.
Recreation, Social Work Interpretation,
Social Work Year Hook. Statistics, Surveys.
The publications of the Russell Sage Founda-
tion offer to the public In practical and
inexpensive form some of the most impor-
tant results of iU work. Catalogue sent
upon request.



separated, but always they are of prime
importance to the human race. The in-
dividual alone and unaided has never
been able to create a code of behavior
but a whole generation can modify the
old and create the new.

In this book the authors study a new
code of sex behavior slowly evolving un-
der the pressure of physical instinct and
i economic opportunity. They find it a proc-
ess, rather than an end, lacking the spir-
itual content necessary for a satisfying
and lasting code.

The facts are stated in the introduc-
I tory chapter: "A survey of the sex mores
i of 1364 college men and women furnishes
| the factual basis for this book . . . from
I forty-six colleges and universities of all
I BIN.* . . . from coast to coast. Half of
the men and one quarter of the women
> juniors and seniors in American colleges
I today have had premarital sex intercourse.
I One third of the virgin men had been
i restrained by standards and ideals, one
' third by various fears ... a higher pro-
' portion of the girls mentioned standards
and ideals. Yet as many as 64 percent of
these were prepared to break with con-
ventions. The majority felt that love
justified an intimate relationship."

The book presents a detailed analysis
of these generalizations. It is well writ-
ten, clear, dispassionate, valuable and
should be of service to all older people
dealing with youth today, although some
may feel a lingering doubt of the repre-
sentativeness of the students interviewed.
GULIELMA F. ALSOP, M.D.
Barnard College

No. 1 G-Man Looks at Crime

HttONS IN HI I) INC!, by J. Edgar Hoover.
Hlttle. Brown. 325 pp. Price $2.50 postpaid of
Surrey Midmontkly.

"~P HERE is no romance in a dead rat,"

remarked J. Edgar Hoover of the

late John Dillinger; nevertheless the

reader will find plenty in this collec-



tion of twice told tales. There is Eddie
Bentz, lover of rare books and good
country clubs when not engaged in bank
robbery; his preceptor, Eddie Doll who
married a virtuous woman and gave up



Online LibrarySurvey AssociatesSurvey midmonthly : journal of social work (Volume 74) → online text (page 81 of 109)