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standpoint and also as a human narrative.
Somehow there is a lack of warmth in
the development of the story, almost as
though the author were sketching the
scenario for a motion picture, rather than
weaving together human emotions, atti-
tudes and actions into a complete satisfy-
ing whole. Too often the author stops to
comment as a detached observer on the
changing philosophy of Sam and his de-
velopment as a labor leader, which tends
to destroy the sense of reality created by
the excellent dialogue. Yet this reviewer
finished the book with appreciation that
the story of the garment workers' strug-
gle had been told and told so convincingly,
as a chapter of industrial and labor his-
tory. Such a human record, with all its
implications for the modern labor move-
ment, is too often lost in the narrative
of United States history.
Washington, D. C. HILDA W. SMITH



Answer to Inadequacy



THE ^
CARE



[E COST OF ADEQUATE MEDICAL
?ARE, by Samuel Bradbury, M.D. University

of Chicago Press. 86 pp. Price $1 postpaid of

Survey Midmonthly.

T> EPEATED investigations have con-
firmed the fact that millions of the
American people are receiving entirely
inadequate medical care. Studies by Rog-
er I. Lee, M.D., and Lewis Webster
Jones, Ph.D., have aimed to determine
what is adequate medical care, how
much and what kind of medical care the
people should receive in view of the ad-
vances and facilities of modern medicine
in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.
But what would or should such medical
care cost?

This is the theme of Dr. Bradbury's
little volume. Combining the data of the
Lee-Jones report with a typical table of
charges and fees for all types of medical
care, the author arrives at estimates of
$75 per capita or about $300 per family
as the cost of complete and adequate an-
nual medical service.

But $300 is rather steep for the aver-
age American family income, especially
for the underprivileged and unemployed.
It is difficult to see how adequate medi-
cal care at that price can ever be avail-
able to all. This estimate of cost would
also explain the present inadequacy. The
answer to the puzzle is furnished by the
author himself, for his estimates are
based on typical medical fees and charges
as they obtain in private practice and hos-
pitalization. Medical care for all is
therefore, the author concludes, out of
the question on the basis of the present
private practice of medicine. Perhaps the

332



solution is to be sought in some other
method perhaps in socialized medicine.
Studies, experiments and experiences of
another sort would seem to indicate this.
But, then, that is not Dr. Bradbury's
subject.

Much information is compressed in
this small book, and the analyses of the
statistical data, tables and appendices
dealing with the costs of diseases per
case, per individual and per family, make
the volume a very valuable one.
Brooklyn, N. Y. JOSEPH SLAVIT, M.D.

High Pressure Debunking

THE BETRAYAL OF INTELLIGENCE, by
Joseph Jastrow. Greenberg. 170 pp. Price $1.50
postpaid of Survey Midmonthly.

TT is probably inevitable that what Mr.

Jastrow calls "high-pressure advertis-
ing" in the field of mental hygiene should
be followed by equally high-pressure re-
buttal. His attack on books concerning
the cure of certain ills of personality
which give pages of advice as to how to
live our lives happily and effectively is
so full of invective and scornful charac-
terization that one hesitates to accept it
as objective criticism. He speaks of
"books which dispense cheer-truth and
near-truth but never mere truth," and is
so handy with equally arresting phrases
and neat slogans that, perhaps too readily,
the reader may class his volume with
those he is set to "debunk."

There certainly is need to urge reflec-
tion and the use of logic; the human rac
seems more than usually needy in this
regard. It is a question whether heated
discussion is apt to result in the acquisi-
tion of calm consideration. The author's
arguments, however valid, seem to this
reviewer fairly heated. James Thurber
in his laugh-producing Let Your Mind
Alone has found the better way. And if
one would be serious, the study of what
growing-up should and sometimes does
mean is a constructive and positive attack
on the same conditions. Is it not time to
deal with positives rather than negatives,
with adjustment rather than maladjust-
ment, with adulthood rather than infan-
tilisms, by means of persuasion and
exposition rather than assertion and con-
tradiction? ELEANOR HOPE JOHNSON
Hartford, Conn.

A Prison Doctor Speaks

THE BIG HOUSE OF MYSTERY, by Patric
H. Weeks, M.D. Dorrance. 259 pp. Price *
postpaid of Survey Midmonthly.

IN a manner appealing to those who like
effortless entertainment, Dr. Week
recounts his experiences of eighteen years
as physician at the Indiana State Prison
with numerous 'case studies" so many,
in fact, that they become a little monot-
onous.

Although he is warned in the prefac
that "this book is not intended as a
scientific treatise on the subject of crime,"
the lay reader is apt to be disappointed



when he finds that nowhere does tne au-
thor attempt to relieve his craving for
knowledge of crime motivation. To any-
one professionally concerned with the
varied and complex problems of penal
institution administration, some of the
author's statements are open to discus-
sion. For example, he alludes to "flour-
ishing" prison industries. It is hard to
agree that industries within state prison
walls are "flourishing" when it is known
that well over half of all prison inmates
today are in absolute idleness.

Dr. Weeks also mentions his institu-
tion's high purpose of "remoulding hu-
man beings so that they will have the
determination, the energy, to seek a fresh
start on the outside." Newspaper accounts
of the number of escapes from the Indi-
ana State Prison within the last five years
might lead to a misunderstanding as to
just what kind of a fresh start his state-
ment refers. Overcrowded as it is, the
Indiana prison of which Dr. Weeks
writes has a Herculean task in instilling
wholesome influences.

True Crime Stories, the heading of one
of Dr. Weeks' chapters, might be used
as the title for the whole book. There is
nothing here to add to our knowledge of
the formidable and practical problems of
dealing with prisoners.

E. R. CASS
The American Prison Association

What Is It?

MODERN MOSEY, by Myra Curtis and Hugh
Townshcnd. Harcourt, Brace. 291 pp. Price
$2.50 postpaid of Survey MiJmmthly.

T~*HE object of this American edition
of a book by two English followers
of J. M. Keynes is to describe, simply
and in outline, how a modern monetary
system works. The purpose is laudable.
Monetary affairs present an extraordi-
nary maze to most people, perhaps never
more so than at present when there have
been so many breaks with past traditions,
so many innovations.

The performance, as contrasted with
the purpose, leaves a good deal to be
desired. While Modern Money has many
lucid paragraphs and pages, it does not
maintain a uniformly high standard of
simple exposition. The treatment of multi-
ple bank credit expansion always a diffi-
cult hurdle is particularly confusing. No
clear distinction is made between the
money of old and modern money, and we
are left without a clear idea as to what
we may expect of 1938 money that we
could not expect of, say, the 1929 model.
Unneeded digressions and weaknesses of
logic mar the book in many places, and
misstatements of fact regarding American
developments betray an unfamiliarity with
events on this side of the water.

To some extent the book bears the ap-
pearance of haste in preparation. But
more fundamentally than that, it seems to
this reviewer to be impaired on the one
hand by the immaturity of the Keynesian

In answering



LILLIAN WALD

CR USADER
and NEIGHBOR

by It. I- llni'i'iis

HE thrilling life story of our pioneer nurse whose zeal in help-
ing the poor was responsible for development of the world-
famed Henry Street Settlement and Henry Street Nursing Service.

With its lesson in tolerance and brotherhood, Miss Wald's career
has a message for all who despair of progress.

at all bookstores $3.50

THE MAGMILLAN COMPANY

60 Fifth Avenue, New York



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SOCIAL AGENCY BOARDS, by Clarence King

SUPERVISION IN SOCIAL CASE WORK, by Virginia P. Robinson 2.50



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SOCIAL WORKERS' DICTIONARY, by Young and McClenahan .75

THE PUBLIC ASSISTANCE WORKER, by Russell H. Kurt* 1.00

THE CASE WORKER'S DESK MANUAL, by Earle Fiste Young 1.00

PSYCIARTRIC WORD BOOK, by Richard H. Hatchings, M.D. 1.00

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333



monetary philosophy, and on the other
hand by the authors' failure to recognize
the experimental character of many re-
cent innovations. Symbolical of the un-
finished state of the modern monetary
edifice is the missing capstone to the
authors' description of what present-day
money is. Money say a Bank of England
note is now "merely a promise to pay,"
no longer a claim upon gold. But if money
is a promise to pay, it would seem vital
to provide an intelligible account of what
it is a promise to pay. The book does
not give it.
New York NORRIS O. JOHNSON

Patience Plus

COURAGE, by Mary Lindsey. Button. 176 pp.
Price $2 postpaid of Survey Midmonthly.

CO little is written about the handi-
capped that a new book on the sub-
ject should be eagerly welcomed. This
latest contribution is a mother's story of
her experiences with her daughter who,
from babyhood, was seriously handi-
capped by an orthopedic disability. It gives
a not unusual history of consultation with
one doctor, clinic and hospital after an-
other, a realization of the present limita-
tions of medical science and achievement
of a life of satisfaction in spite of
handicap.

Family means, which made possible a
resort to practically every known medical
aid, climate and manner of living, were
of no avail in preventing long periods of
pain and illness for this girl. The mother,
who assumed full responsibility for the
girl's physical care and training, showed
vision and courage enough to plan for her
daughter's education and future, and to
help her in attaining self-reliance. Even-
tually the girl was able to enter college
and look forward to a career. The mother
tells frankly of her own despair, her re-
sentment against other children who were
well and strong and the difficulties she
faced in accepting the situation.

The story is told simply. At points,
details of the family's doings become
somewhat tedious but they help to empha-
size the crippled girl's participation in the
life around her. The book illustrates the
part that patience, understanding and
resourcefulness can play in the adjust-
ment of a handicapped child to normal
recreation, education and usefulness.
New York LOUISE C. ODENCRANTZ

Flank Attack

LABOR CZARS, A HISTORY OF LABOR
RACKETEERING, by Harold Seidman. Live-
riirht. 317 pp. Price $2.50 postpaid of Survey
Midmonthly.

' I * HIS book is not primarily the study
of labor racketeering its title page
indicates, but a flank attack on the Amer-
ican Federation of Labor. Mr. Seidman's
thesis is that corruption among trade
union officials is due to the nature of the
AF of L and its leadership. He implies
that industrial unionism would destroy
dictatorship and presumably corruption,



and that the hope for a revived labor
movement is to be found in a labor party
and industrial union set-up supported by
the rank-and-file.

Like most liberals, Mr. Seidman great-
ly overestimates the nobility of the ob-
jectives and interests of the rank-and-file,
while underestimating the difficulties of
trade union management. This does not
mean that the CIO is not a necessary
and desirable type of organization, but
only that neither the officers of the CIO
nor the form of organization will have
much to do with the amount and nature
of labor racketeering.

Until the CIO appeared in 1935, there
was so little permanent organization out-
side the AF of L that nearly all labor
racketeering was of necessity among AF
of L unions. Perhaps the AF of L can-
not clean its own house ; but it is yet to
be proved that without dictatorship the
CIO can maintain order among the rank-
and-file in previously unorganized indus-
tries. A great deal, of course, of what
Mr. Seidman says about the AF of L
is true, perhaps most of it, but he offers
no evidence to show that an industrial
organization under Lewis will be less
dictatorial or even less corrupt than most
AF of L unions.
Wesleyan University NORMAN J. WARE

Stimulant to Disagreement

THE DAY NURSERY, by Ethel S. Beer. Dutton.
215 pp. Price $1.60 postpaid of Survey Mid-
monthly.

' I A HIS author is that rare phenomenon,
a board member who gives full time
to one organization, in work and in re-
lated courses of study. Since that organi-
zation works with children and their
families, the courses have been varied,
as shown by the chapters on the day nur-
sery and education, psychiatry, medicine,
dental hygiene, and social service. Other
subjects discussed are the nursery school
in the day nursery, staff, volunteers,
finances, the board.

Having long been associated with the
one type of organization, Miss Beer can
give clearly the history and changing em-
phasis in the purpose of the day nursery
though except in rare cases her enthu-
siasm for close attention to activities for
nursery children after they have gradu-
ated into school is hard to share. The
nursery should be a substitute for the
parent or parents only when absolutely
necessary. The nursery child graduates
into school as other children and some-
times has to return to a nursery after
school hours until called for by his work-
ing mother; but such a situation is not
ideal and the nursery should not expect,
even if it could, to take the place of set-
tlement houses or other community rec-
reational facilities for older children.
Miss Beer's suggestions for follow-up of
nursery children, in order to count re-
sults, are helpful; but this follow-up
should not tie the children to the nursery.



In spite of the many subjects covered
there are no chapters on intake and the
methods for arriving at decisions on ad-
missions, nor on the recognition of a nur-
sery child's ceasing to be a nursery child.
Intake is mentioned briefly but not with
the importance it warrants.

Since there is comparatively little pub-
lished material on the day nursery, this
book should be welcome if only for stim-
ulating disagreement. It is not the answer
for those who hope for a satisfying text-
book on day nurseries, but if it evokes
fresh material in the field no one, surely,
will be more delighted than the author.
If only all board members were as in-
terested in their job!
New York MILDRED SAWYER

Useful Facts

URBAN SOCIOLOGY, by E. E. Muntz. Mac-
millan. 742 pp. Price $3.75 postpaid of Survey
Midmonthly.

TPHE book is a useful compendium of
information about some aspects of
urban communities, particularly housing,
public health (including hospitals, sani-
tation, water supply, housecleaning, acci-
dents), education and recreational facili-
ties. The information is purely descrip-
tive and fairly elementary. There is little
else, except a few pages devoted to the
history of cities and their location. No at-
tempt is made to transcend a purely
"clerical" task. There certainly is no
sociology of urban centers included. For
this reason the title of the book is a mis-
nomer.
Harvard University PITIRIM A. SOROKIN

Bitter Fruit

THE FAMILY AND THE DEPRESSION, by
Ruth Shonle Cavan and Katherine Howland
Rar.ck. University of Chicago Press. 208 pp.
Price $2.50 postpaid of Survey Midmonthly.

'IpHIS "before and after" picture of
* how a hundred Chicago families
weathered the depression is well drawn.
The illustrative cases used are models
of condensed and relevant material and
the quotations from clients add life and
color to the book. In the case material
the effects of worry, discouragement, fam-
ily tensions, neglected health and delayed
dental care are shown; as are the effects
of moving from place to place in search
of cheaper and yet cheaper quarters; and
the loss of status felt when the first ap-
plication for relief is made.

Modes of adjustment to the depression
varied. Some families modified their ac-
tivities by resigning from clubs, or giving
up college plans ; in others the son or
daughter became the chief wage earner,
or the family accepted relief. Some fam-
ilies attempted an escape from their situ-
ation by excessive borrowing, by such
psychological mechanisms as day dream-
ing and living in the past. There were a
few cases of suicide.

While the general attitude towards the
depression was one of docile acceptance,
explanations of it differed. To some it



334



was an inevitable catastrophe. Others saw
in it religious or moralistic implications.
To many it was the fault of the "bank-
ers," the "capitalists" or the "rich"; to
others of ' dirty politics" or "the war."

The public welfare agency's part in
effecting family adjustments was fre-
quently apparent. However, it was upon
this agency that many families heaped
the blame for all their fear and depriva-
tion. Its shortcomings were viewed not
as defects in a system but as personal
affronts. Work relief and CCC camps,
however, were generally approved.

The young people's tale was pathetic
no telephones, no money for carfare, club
dues, clothes or dates. What wages they
had were given in the main to their fam-
ilies. The boys either remained at home,
discouraged and bitter, or joined the ranks
of transients, hitch-hiking across the
country. Dissatisfied girls stayed at home
with restricted social contacts, thwarted
educational ambitions and delayed mar-
riages.

The findings of this carefully planned
and executed work, although fairly ob-
vious, are undeniable and should serve as
groundwork for future studies.

CLARA PAUL PAIGE
Director of Family Service
Chicago Relief Administration

Run of the Shelves

I'HINA FICHTS BACK: Air AMMICAM WOMAN
WITH THE EIGHTH ROUTE ARMY, by Agnes
Smedley. Vanguard. 282 pp. Price $2.50 )K>st-
paid of Surtrj Midmonlhly.

THIS is the stirring diary of an American
newspaper woman who between August
1937 and January 1938 shared the tri-
umphs, the disappointments, the faith and
the hardships of her "beloved brothers
and comrades" in China's "Red Army."

LAHOR'S PROGRESS AND SOME BASIC
LABOR PROBLEMS, by Harry A. MillU and
Royal E. Montgomery. McGraw-Hill. 584 pp.
Price $3.75 postpaid of Surrey MidmontUy.

THIS book is the first of three volumes
on the subject of labor, and also the first
of a new series of publications on busi-
ness and economics which will emphasize
"the changing relationship between gov-
ernment and business." The second vol-
ume will be on Labor's Risks and Social
Insurance, the third on Organized Labor.

WERE WE G I' INF. A PIGS? by the Can of
1938, University Highschool. Ohio State Uni-
versity. Holt. 303 pp. Price $2 postpaid of Sur-
vey Midmottthly.

FIFTY-FIVE young people here collaborate
in describing their six-year experience,
from the seventh through the twelfth
grade, in a progressive school. The school
had a flexible program, developed co-
operatively by pupils and teachers, with
a wide range of choice in subjects, ma-
terials and methods of study. There were
no examinations in the generally accepted
sense, and no marks. A good time seems
to have been had by all, and the young
authors express general satisfaction with
the plan and product of the program.

In answering



REAL ESTATE



FOR RENT OR SALE



SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA. House for sale
iinfvirnished or rent beautifully furnished.
6 master bedrooms, dre.ssingroom. 5 baths,
large sleeping porch : 4 mnid's rooms with
running water, 1 bath ; library, living, din-
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lavatories, pantry, kitchen, laundry, dining-
sittinE room. 2-car garage, cold-laid tennis
court. 3% acres on high point looking directly
up the valley 60 miles to a 6,500' mountain,
across valley and mesa 130 miles to snow-
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t times. Near Francis W. Parker School. In-
formation, photoEraphs, plans on request. Mrs.
Clara Sturges Johnson, 26 East 93rd Street,
New York.



SITUATIONS WANTED



Settlement boys' worker desires position in boys'
work. Seven years in Settlements, twelve
summers in Boys' Camps. 7527 Survey.



Housekeeper, Dietitian, with executive ability ;
institution and school experience : typing ;
wishes connection. Can assume responsibility.
7531 Survey.



JUNIOR BOYS' WORKER. Six years experience
in Settlement Houses and private institutions.
Graduate Arts and Crafts School and Boy
Scout University. Executive ability to handle
volunteer workers. Available now. 7532
Survey.



Successful executive, excellent references, AASW
member, several years experience public and
private social work, available for suitable
position preferably institutional. 7533 Survey.



LITERARY SERVICE



.Special article*, theses, speeches, papers. Re*
search, revision, bibliographies, ttc. Over
twenty years' experience serving busy pro-
fessional persons. Prompt service extended
AUTHORS RESEARCH HUREAU. (1C
Fifth Avenue. New York, N. Y.



PAMPHLETS AND PERIODICALS



The American Journal of Nursing shows the part
which professional nurses take in the better-
ment of the world. Put it in your library. 18.00
a year. 50 West 50 Street, New York, N. Y.



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Two Interesting Openings

ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE SECRETARY

Member A.A.S.W., research-
minded, with case-work training
and community organization ex-
perience, will have opportunity
for rapid advancement.



PUBLIC RELATIONS SECRETARY

College graduate, with social work
background, editorial and publicity
experience, and ability to promote
sound financing through dignified
interpretation of program, will
have full-time staff position.



NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF DAY NURSERIES, INC.

122 East 22nd Street, New York City



FEDERAL THEATRE
PROJECT FOR



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335



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DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS



Civic, National, International



National Red Cross



THE AMERICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS

Administered through National Headquar-
ters in Washington, D. C., and three Branch
Offices in San Francisco, St. Louis and
Washington, D. C. There are 3711 local
chapters organized mostly on a county basis
Services of the Red Cross are: Disaster
Relief, Civilian Relief, First Aid and Life
Saving, Home and Farm Accident Preven-
tion Service, Home Hygiene and Care of the
Sick, Junior Red Cross, Nursing Service
Nutrition Service. Public Health Nursing,
Volunteer Service and War Service.

Industrial Democracy

LEAGUE FOR INDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY

Promotes a better understanding of problems
of democracy in industry through its
pamphlet, research and lecture services and
organization of college and city groups. Ex-
ecutive Directors, Harry W. Laidler and
Norman Thomas, 112 East 19th Street, New
York City.



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Foundations



AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR THE BLIND,
INC. IB West 16th Street, New York. A
national organization for research and field
service. Activities include : assistance to state
and local agencies in organizing activities
and promoting legislation ; research in legis-



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