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A BIOLOGICAL APPROACH TO THE PROS-
LEM OF ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR, by Mil-
ton Harrington, M.D. Science Press Printing
Co. 459 pp. Price $4 postpaid of Survey Mid-
monthly.

CINCE its purpose is to study ways
and means for^ the prevention and
cure of mental ills, Dr. Harrington's
book should be of interest both to Freudi-
ans and non-Freudians. An unbeliever in
the psychoanalytic procedure, the author
explains why he thinks these methods are
unsound and at the same time builds up
a theory that he feels harmonizes the
facts of anatomy, physiology, medicine
and general biology with those of nor-
mal and abnormal psychology.

Seeing all forms of behavior produced
by the action of an anatomical mechan-



ism, Dr. Harrington holds that abnor-
mality of behavior occurs because of the
inadequacy of the mechanism to meet the
needs of the situation. Thus abnormal
fear is simply fear occurring under con-
ditions in which it should not exist. In
order to understand why it occurs in such
cases, it is necessary to understand the
laws which govern the production of all
fear. In similar fashion, delusional think-
ing is thinking which is faulty because it
does not correspond with objective reality
and so leads to wrong forms of behavior.
An understanding of such behavior rests
on an understanding of the thought pro-
cesses. The author analyzes, compares and
discusses each phase of his approach with
the methods used by the analyst, but such
details are unimportant in comparison
with the principles which he stresses.

The significant point in this theory of
mental health is the need to bring the
organism and the environment into har-
mony. The most effective means of bring-
ing about this desirable human state are,
in Dr. Harrington's judgment: the breed-
ing of a race of potentially healthy and
efficient people; educating and training
these people so that they may make the
most of their abilities; teaching them to
develop and maintain bodily health; giv-
ing them an environment suited to their
needs. EMILY BURR

Vocational Adjustment Bureau

Early Steps

THE ADOLESCENT COURT AND CRIME
PREVENTION, by J. G. Brill and E. G.
Payne. Pitman Publishing Company. 230 pp.
Price $2.50 postpaid of Survey Midmonthly.

HTWO THIRDS of this volume, six
chapters, attempts to give some gen-
eral picture of the special problems which
the adolescent has to meet; five other
chapters recapitulate the development of
the two predecessors of the Brooklyn
adolescent court and then describe that
court itself, its structure and procedure.
There is widespread belief that the ado-
lescent (defined by the authors as being
between the ages of sixteen and twenty-
one) has family, educational, industrial
and social problems entirely different
from those confronting the juvenile.
Probably the adolescent thinks within a
framework of social and personal con-
cepts that differs materially from that
of his younger brother. Workers with
young children find that they have to
build an absolutely different approach to
the friendship and cooperation of the
adolescent. All of these matters are i
hinted at by the authors but at no place
do they really bite into these immensely
important problems.

The part that deals with the various
courts is simply and clearly informative.
Magistrate Brill and Dr. Payne are at
pains to admit the inadequacies of the
Brooklyn court. They are, however, on
solid ground when they point out that,
despite the relatively small number



364



touched, despite a selective method which
chooses only those who have the best
chance of succeeding, despite the neces-
sity of hurried judgment based on in-
adequate data, there is in this court the
beginning of a valuable and far-reaching
development.

The methods and approach of the
juvenile court will some day be extended
to those up to twenty-one years and be-
yond. The social forces of our time
press with peculiar cruelty upon the ado-
lescent; this group mayhap even more
than any other needs understanding
rather than blind retaliation. When these
are understood and when these
dreams are realized, the volume under
review will be seen as a description of
some of the early uncertain and stag-
gering steps on this road.
Newark, N. J. JAMES S. PLANT, M.D.

Recreation Pioneer

CHARLES B. STOVER 1861-1929, by J. K.
PauMing. International Press. 192 pp. Price
$2 postpaid of Suncy Midmontkly.

A PIONEER in recreation, Charles
B. Stover gave his life to public
service in New York City. Privately
and through social and civic organiza-
tions he promoted playgrounds; fought

for subways as against the elevated ; se-
cured Sunday opening of the Metropoli-
tan Museum; fostered park music;
championed beach recreation; and later,
as park commissioner, created a bureau
of recreation in the Park Department.
In his day he was sharply criticized
and feared. He died with bitterness in

his heart at the seeming lack of apprecia-
tion of his service. Today there is a
monument to his memory in Central
Park. E. C. WORMAN

National Recreation Association

Challenging Textbook

IKiW TO BE A RESPONSIBLE CITIZEN", hy
Roy V. Wright and Eliia G. Wright. Associa-
i'ress. 203 pp. Price $2 postpaid of Sun-ty
Midmonthly.

""THIS textbook is nearly everything
that it ought to be well arranged,
comprehensive, replete with information,
suggestive in the questions at the end
of each chapter. The quotations at the
he. ul of each chapter are admirable and
inspiring and the whole book is a strong
argument in defense of that form of gov-
ernment known as representative democ-
racy and a fervent plea that each citizen
should take an intelligent and effective
interest in good government.

The book is well documented. The
bibliography is rich and almost up-to-
date, and the chapter on Books is filled
with illuminating reviews of books re-
lating to democracy and practical poli-
tics. Altogether it is a sharp challenge
to all citizens of a democracy and a valu-
able textbook for all teachers of civics.
The authors stress the importance of



BOOKS FOR THE SOCIAL WORKER



YOUR COMMUNITY: Its Provision
for Health, Education, Safety and Welfare

By JOANNA G. COLCORD

A STUDY OUTLINE, intended as suggestions for groups of persons social
workers, civic clubs, school classes, women's associations, and others desiring
to secure a rounded picture of their community, especially in its provisions to con-
serve the health and safety and promote the education and general welfare of its
inhabitants. Coming late November. 18)9 advance orders already received.
Price, 8} reals.

RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION, " EA t T 22 C d * TREET

Nw York



10 BEST SELLERS

for Social Workers

NOVEMBER

MORE THAN ONE DOLLAR

THE FAMILY A DYNAMIC INTERPRETATION, by W. Waller $3.25
NEW TRENDS IN GROUP WORK, by Joshua Lieberman 2.00

PERSONALITY IN FORMATION AND ACTION, by William Healy 2.00
SHORT CONTACT VOL. I - II, by Robert Wilson 2.50

SOCIAL AGENCY BOARDS, by Clarence King 1.25

ONE DOLLAR OR LESS

CASE WORKER'S DESK MANUAL, by E. F. Young 1.00

HOW TO INTERPRET SOCIAL WORK, by Baker and Routtahn 1.00

PSYCHIATRIC WORK BOOK, by Richard T. Hutchings 1.00

PUBLIC ASSISTANCE WORKER, by Russell H. Kurt* 1.00

SOCIAL WORKERS' DICTIONARY, by Young and McClenahan 75

Listing Based on Orders Received by THE SURVEY
You May Now Order These Books Sent to You Postfree from

SURVEY ASSOCIATES, 112 EAST 19 STREET, NEW YORK CITY



joining a regular party organization but
unfortunately show scant respect for in-
dependent or reform organizations such
as voters' leagues, men's and women's
city clubs and civic committees, which
are bringing about real progress.

Some space might well have been given
to the Citizens' Leagues of Detroit and
of Cleveland, the Philadelphia Commit-
tee of Seventy, the Cincinnati City Char-
ter Committee, the Toledo City Man-
ager League, and the Citizens Union of
New York. It is hard to find in the
index or elsewhere any reference to New
York in its struggle for good govern-
ment, which, after over fifty years, cul-
In answering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDIIONTHLY

365



minated in electing a reform adminis-
tration for its second term.

In their endeavor to be impartial and
non-partisan, the authors omitted the
narrative, intensely interesting and in-
spiring, full of color and courage, of the
overthrow of Tweed, the victory of Dr.
Parkhurst and Jerome over commercial-
ized vice and police corruption ; the rev-
elations by Judge Seabury; the defeat
of Tammany by La Guardia, and the
successful crusade against racketeers by
Dewey. This exciting story should be
repeated in every classroom throughout
the country.

The book does refer to the cleansing



of Cincinnati and speaks well of the city
manager plan, but the authors appear to
know nothing about proportional repre-
sentation, the most important factor in
the redemption of Cincinnati and other
boss ridden cities. P.R. is given but the
briefest mention four lines and even
these contain the misstatement that P.R.
makes it possible for minorities to be
represented in administrative groups,
whereas of course P.R. is used chiefly
to elect legislative groups. Therefore,
teachers using this textbook should not
fail to use with it the little book by
George H. Hallett, Jr. Proportional
Representation: The Key to Democracy.
New York WILLIAM JAY SCHIEFFELIN

Goldilocks and the Big Bears

NEW TRENDS IN GROUP WORK, edited by
Joshua Lieberman. Association Press. 229 pp.
Price $2 postpaid of Survey Midmonthly.

T.TERE we have Goldilocks Group
Work wandering among the Big
Bears of Progressive Education, Case
Work, Guidance, the Drama, Social Ac-
tion, Discipline, and the Virtues, ap-
parently in search of a parking place.

If the reader is not too intimidated
and this one was not by the intellectual
fagade given to the book by such names
as John Dewey, William H. Kilpatrick,
Eduard C. Lindeman, Arthur L. Swift,
Jr., and fifteen other contributors of es-
says, nor too burned-up by its semantic
heat, he is sure to ask himself why group
work does not escape from erudition and
make its own contribution to distinction.
Must group workers bespeak for their
goal all the objectives of education, re-
ligion, psychiatry and democracy? Is it
possible that the aim of group work
might be simply to impart social skills
for better living?

The original publication dates of the
essays which make up the volume, and
the group organization connections of
the authors are not given, an unfortunate
omission it seems to this reviewer.

It is fervently hoped that this volume
will generate enough cerebral friction
among group work practitioners to
arouse them to their professional re-
sponsibility to produce a book setting
forth group work aims, procedures and
techniques, evolved from their own ex-
periences in group work practice.
Chicago, III. JOSEPHINE STRODE

Everybody Reads

WHO USES THE PUBLIC LIBRARY, by
William Converse Haygood. University of Chi-
cago Press. 137 pp. Price $2 postpaid of Survey
Midmonthly.

DERHAPS it is reasonable to say that
librarianship becomes a profession
when its practitioners no longer know
just what is inside and outside of books
and begin to know what is inside readers.
Are they satisfied? And why not? The
New York public library system con-
ducted a survey of its patrons two years



ago, and now Mr. Haygood of the Grad-
uate Library School of the University of
Chicago has interpreted the facts and
compared them with other similar data.
It is hoped that librarians will not be
the only persons to read this book. It
shows that statistics can be presented
without stuffiness, and that technical facts
can be made humanly interesting. Pro-
vided, of course, that one writes as well
as Mr. Haygood.

Everybody uses the public library. Stu-
dents, naturally, do more than a normal
share of reading. Men come more often
than women, especially to the reference
room. Housewives read, but they don't
study. Skilled tradesmen and skilled
laborers are least well represented in
proportion to their numbers.

What do they come for? About one in
four wanders in and finds a book on an
open shelf; 20.6 percent know what they
want and find it; 14.6 percent read a book
there; 11.25 percent look up something;
11.15 percent ask a librarian's advice;
10.45 percent read a magazine; 2.15 per-
cent read a newspaper; a few others are
diverse in their desires.

But do not suppose they were all satis-
fied. More than half (56.2 percent) find
the book supply inadequate in some way.
But the librarian can blame that on
stingy city budgets. Only .6 percent said
the librarians did not know how to help
them.

These and other illuminating facts about
the sociology of reading are in Mr. Hay-
good's little book. They are facts that
everyone concerned with the quality of
American living should ponder well.

LYMAN BRYSON
Teachers College, Columbia University

The Churches' Opportunity

NEW FRONTIERS OF RELIGION A CHAL-

LENGE TO THE CHURCH IN THE CHANGING COM-
MUNITY, by Arthur L. Swift, Jr. Macmillan.
171 pp. Price $2 postpaid of Survey Midmonthly.

r ~T* HE Non-Progressive Christian Church
* at Clarksville, Ark., self-styled, and
others not so frank, would scarcely be
roused by this study. But some religious
leaders will be challenged first to interest,
then to action by its interpretation of the
social facts of religion, their historic
origins and the influence of change on
organized religion and of religion on so-
cial change. Professor Swift writes of the
church as a social institution both with
the inside viewpoint and with the objec-
tivity of one skilled in social surveys.

Churches with staunchest creeds, com-
pact in organization and buttressed by
endowment, he finds least modified in the
evolution of the church in America. All
are affected by changes in other social
institutions, and these changes should be
recognized and realized by the church as
its opportunities upon the shifting social
frontier.

Having at hand such new instruments,
as the rising education level, the expanded



leisure of the masses, knowledge of the
inner nature of man and new ways to
inform and release his mind and will, the
church finds its persistent contributions
in reality in worship, group work with
adults and children, and the counselling
of individuals distressed by personal
problems.

A church as honest and discerning as
these chapters would not fail to find itself
a strong social factor in its service on
the new frontiers.

PHILIP GORDON SCOTT
Church of the Redeemer
New Haven, Conn.

Brief and Clear

SOCIAL AGENCY BOARDS AND HOW TO
MAKE THEM EFFECTIVE, by Clarence
King. Harper. 102 pp. Price $1.25 postpaid
of Survey Midmonthly.

TN fifteen well organized chapters, Clar-
ence King has presented an admirable
handbook for the members of boards and
the executives of social agencies. What
he has to say is practical and to the point
and is stated briefly and simply. There it
a delightful absence of cumbersome ter-
minology.

Mr. King discusses the function of the
board and the ways in which this func-
tion can be carried out most effectively,
He answers with a "yes" the question:
Are boards always necessary? Various
types of boards, methods of organization
and spheres of activity are described cov-
ering the boards of both public and pri-
vate agencies.

There is much to agree with and littlt
with which to disagree. One exception
in this respect is the statement: "Rarelj
does the most skilled staff that can b(
hired have as mature insight or as mud
resourcefulness and sound business judg-
ment as leading citizens of experiena
who will volunteer their services." Ma-
turity and resourcefulness or even busi-
ness judgment are not the property ol
any group. The value of citizens 01
boards is not necessarily superior ability
It is differences in background and e*
perience. The best relationship betweei
board and staff is that of mutual respecl
for each individual in terms of his owi
special contribution.

Mr. King has not attempted an exhaufr
five treatise, but has given us the essea
tials about the purpose and operation ol
boards. His brevity and clarity will a*
sure him readers.

KARL DE SCHWEINIB
Philadelphia, Pa.

A Brief for Technique

PSYCHOTHERAPY, by Paul Schilder, M.B.
Ph.D. Norton. 344 pp. Price $3.50 postpaid o!
Survey Midmonthly.

\\7 ITH the technique used in the lab
^ oratories of physical sciences,
author attempts to crystallize psycho'
therapy from its present rather elusivi
and unclarified state. He is convinced tha
"psychotherapy is not an art but a tech



366



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Survey Midmonthly
112 E. 19th Street New York



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from THE SURVEY



A S a convenience to our readers,
-L JL we accept orders for all books at
publishers' prices delivered anywhere
in this country postfree. Payment with
order preferred, though COD orders
are also welcomed.



SURVEY ASSOCIATES, INC.

112 East 19 Street New York City



In answering advertisements



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP. MANAGEMENT. CIRCULA-
TION. ETC., REQUIRED BY THE ACTS OF CONGRESS OF
AUGUST 24, 1912. AND MARCH 3, 1933. of THE SURVEY
MIDMONTHI.Y, published monthly at New York, N. Y., for Oc-
tober 1, 193b.

State of New York. \

County of New York, J "'

Before me, a Commissioner of Deeds, in and for the State and county
aforesaid, personally appeared Walter F. Grueningcr, who, having been
duly sworn, according to law, deposes and says that he is the Business
Manager of THB SURVSY MIDIIONTHLY, and that the following is, to the
best of his knowledge and belief, a true statement of the ownership, man-
agement (and if a daily paper, the circulation), etc., of the aforesaid pub-
lication, for the date shown in the above caption, required by the Act of
August 24, 1912, as amended by the Act of March 3, 1933, embodied in
section 537, Postal Laws and Regulations, printed on the reverse of this
form, to wit:

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, editor, managing
editor, and business managers are: Publisher, Survey Associates, Inc., 112
East 19 Street, New York. N. Y.; Editor, Paul Kellogg, 112 East 19
Street, New York, N. Y.; Managing Editor, Gertrude Springer, 112 East
19 Street, New York. N. Y.; Business Manager, Walter F. Grueningcr,
112 East 19 Street, New York, N. Y.

2. That the owner is: (If owned by a corporation, its name and address
must be stated and also immediately thereunder the names and addresses
of stockholders, -jwning or holding one per cent or more of total amount of
stock. If not owned by a corporation, the names and addresses of the in-
dividual owners must be given. If owned by a firm, company, or other
unincorporated concern, its name and address, as well as those of each
individual member, must be given.) Survey Associates, Inc., 112 East 19
Street, New York, N. Y., a non-commercial corporation under the laws of
the State of New York, with over 1,700 members. It has no stocks or
bonds. President. Richard B. Scandrett, Jr., 30 Pine Street, New York,
N. Y. : Vice-presidents, Joseph P. Chamberlain, Columbia University,
New York. N. Y. ; John Palmer Glvit, 112 East 19 Street, New York.
N. Y. ; Secretary, Ann Reed Brenner, 112 East 19 Street, New York, N. Y.

3. That the known bondholders mortgagees, and other security holders
owning or holding 1 per cent or more of total amount of bonds, mort-
gages, or other securities are: (If there are none, so state.) None.

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving the names of the own-
ers, stockholders, and security holders, if any, contain not only the list of
stockholders r.nd security holders, as they appear upon the books of the
company but also, in cases where the stockholder or security bolder appears
upon the books of the company as trustee or in any other fiduciary relation,
the name of the person or corporation for whom such trustee is acting, is
given ; also that the said two paragraphs contain statements embracing
affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the circumstances and conditions
tinder which stockholders and security holders who do not appear upon the
books of the company as trustees, hold stock and securities in a capacity
other than that of a bona fide owner; and this affiant has no reason to be-
lieve that any other person, association, or corporation has any interest direct
or indirect in the said stock, bonds, or other securities than as so stated
by him.

[Signed]

WALTER F. GRUENINGER, Business Manager.
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 28th day of September, 1938.

[Seal] MARTHA HOHMANN,

Commissioner of Deeds. City of New York,

New York Register's No. 17H8.
Commission expires April 14, 1939.

please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY
367



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS

Civic, National, International



National Red Cross



THE AMERICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS

Administered through Nation al Headquar-
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Services of the Red Cross are : Disaster
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Saving, Home and Farm Accident Preven-
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Industrial Democracy




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