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Do You Know the Need



-for trained executives and other



workers in institutions?

Do you realize the constant demand
from Boards of Directors for practi-
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positions?

The new National Training School
for Institution Executives and other
Workers at the Children's Village,
Dobbs Ferry, offers practical, techni-
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The first and only school of its type
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Warmly endorsed by State Depart-
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stitution Control.

Endorsed and partially financed by
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We are unable to fill continuous re-
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personnel.

For further information address

CALVIN DERRICK, Dean
THE NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL

Dobbs Ferry on Hudson

FOR INSTITUTION EXECUTIVES

AND OTHER WORKERS

New York



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In the Adirondack!



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Golf, 8 clay tennis courts, and abun-
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Commodious community buildings.

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(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY)

479



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Now One Dollar



Mind in the Making



By James Harvey Robinson

Printed from the plates of the original
$2.50 edition, on good paper, cloth bound

By return mail, postpaid in the U. S.



Surrey Associates,

112 East 19 St., New York City

I enclose $ for copies of the popular edition of

Robinson's "Mind in the Making" at $1 each.



Name



Street, No.
City, State



(Continued from page 475)

here is naturalistic reinstatement of the soils out of wbw
grew our American political doctrines, our substantial intP
lectual life, and our authentic "literature." America, i
these volumes, emerges out of its local, provincial interpn
tations, and becomes imbued with the dignity of a grtji
human story. Nature, experience, old doctrines and nc
institutions all combine in a common enterprise of conflft
and cooperation out of which come the main currents e
American thought and out of which will come, further, tl'
'future. If anyone wants to know what "Americanism
really has meant, and is still to mean when our hundred pt
centers have been gathered to their heaven, he must m
miss reading these volumes.

JOSEPH K. HART

MAIN CURRENTS IN 7 AMERICAN THOUGHT, by Venum Lft

Parrington. In three Toluir.es. Vol. 1, The Colonial Mind, 1 620-1 JO j
413 pp. Vol. 2, The Rrnnatttic Ke-'o'ution in America, 1800-1860, 4!
pp. (Third volume not yet published). Harcourt, Brace and Comptgl
Price $4.00 per I'olume. postpaid of The Survey.



A RELIGION WORTH FIGHTING FOR
(Continued from page 446)



was typical rather than unique. Whatever Christian idcalisi
the churches are developing is too naive to be of much use i
solving the problems of our complex civilization. Certain!
there is not enough ethical force in modern American life t
prevent American prosperity from becoming one of the chit,
perils of international peace in the next decades.

Yet I cling to the hope that religious idealism may be mail
socially effective in modern civilization. I cling to the hop
because I believe that what is necessary can not finally be in ]
possible. Whatever new technique for social and economi
life may finally be developed, the problem of living togetht
can not finally be solved if we can not develop in men the at
of trusting each other in spite of their weaknesses and forgh
ing each other's sins. Without such a spiritual quality t
human relations, which can be maintained only upon the basi
of religious affirmations about the universe itself, we mus
resign ourselves to the dubious fate of a civilization \vhic!
substitutes class conflicts for international warfare and per
suades us to hate our neighbors instead of strangers. It i
not easy to maintain this spiritual quality in life while wi
develop the intellectual astuteness necessary for the complex!
ties of modern life.

Love and intelligence need each other but they have som
difficulty in getting along together. The religion of th>
future must learn how to wed them in a union which will no
outrage the peculiar genius of either partner. That is a form
idable task. While I can not claim any particularly reveal
ing experiences in trying to accomplish it in my own humbli
sphere, I have gained the assurance to be able to assert tha
it can be done.



AFTER MUSSOLINI DIES
(Continued from page 455)



(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY)

480



Men of Federzoni's type believe that Fascism must immediate!)
confront important national problems with the collaboration o:
those thinkers whom Farinacci's faction condemns.

Under Mussolini both factions are united, although Fari-
nacci's is by far the stronger. If the Premier were to die ir :
the near future, Fascism would be confronted by the dangew
of an open break between the two factions, but it is almora
certain that Farinacci would win in any struggle, would carry
the bulk of the party members and would earn the right OB
succession to the dictatorship.

Upon his success in inviting the collaboration of his opijl
ponents or in changing his attitude to permit compromise witbi
them, the future of Fascism would depend. Until Farinacci
shows that he is growing to be a man big enough to fill
Mussolini's shoes, the moment of the Premier's passing wffl
continue to be in the minds of most intelligent Italians t
dreaded one.




The Qolden Touch

WHEN King Midas picked up his breakfast trout by
its crisp tail a miracle! The trout ceased to be a
succulent fish, and became instead a museum piece, its gills
and fins and tiny scales of purest gold.

That was the Golden Touch.

It was an inconvenient gift sometimes, King Midas
thought. Golden breakfasts are more valuable as objets
d'art than as food. And golden roses are brittle, and have
no perfume.

But they never wither. Each fragile rosebud, each curling
petal, is preserved unchanging to eternity.

The Golden Touch of Midas has not vanished from the
world. No author is great unless he possesses it. He must
preserve his tiptoe moods, the rainbow gold of his experience
in the eternal gold of literature.

The material in the Golden Book is chosen from the work
of authors with the Midas Touch. To read the Golden Book
is to catch the golden glimmer of life. It brings you a world
transmuted by the mysterious alchemy of genius into ever-
lasting beauty.

The QOLDEN BOOK MAQAZINE

contains the stories, plays, poems, essays, humor, philosophy
and epigrams that are best worth reading and re-reading.
The "Immortals" are there: The accepted masters, from
Montaigne to Thackeray, will be found there. And the men
of more recent times (Stevenson, Bret Harte, Mark Twain,
Owen Wister, O. Henry, and the like) whose work gives
promise of permanence. A monthly feast of the things one
ought to read and wants to read-
With such material to choose from, the magazine could
not help being truly entertaining. The Golden Book pro-
vides a range of entertainment attempted by no other
magazine.

And, while being entertained, the. reader of The Golden
Book is constantly adding to his knowledge of literature,
and to his general culture by his contact with the beautiful and the fine. Unquestionably,
The Golden Book educates while it entertains.



The trorfcs of authors such
as these show the Midas
Touch. That's why their
stories appear in the
Qolden Book.

WISTER

HARDY

TCHEKHOV

CONRAD

THEOCRITUS

MONTAIGNE

DU MAURIER

BIERCE

EMERSON

DAUDET

STEPHENSON

BALZAC

WILLA GATHER

O. HENRY

TOLSTOY

LEVER

MARK TWAIN



THE REVIEW OF REVIEWS CORPORATION, 55 Fifth Avenue, New York

Please send the GOLDEN BOOK MAGAZINE for 5 months to the following. Inclosed find check for Ji.oo.



Name.



Address

City and State.



Send this
coupon today



Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
1 Madison Avenue
New York City

Please mail without cost to me a copy of
the booklet, "Dyskinesia", which tells how
to avoid and how to overcome intestinal
sluggishness.




IT is safe to say that Dyskinesia prcc
nounced Dis-kiivees-ia causes distress
to more persons than any other phy
sical ailment.

Dyskinesia makes people old before their
time. It is a cause of dyspepsia, sick
headaches, colds and inflammation of the
intestines. When neglected it may induce
or aggravate rheumatism, gall-bladder
trouble, disease of the kidneys and other
serious maladies.

For the millions of sufferers from this ail'
ment here is good news

Dyskinesia is both preventable and curable,



but not by drugs, many of which at first
relieve but later make the condition worse
than it was.

The successful treatment for Dyskinesia is
based on an understanding of health habits
that can easily be acquired by al'
most anybody. In its splendid fight
for better health and less sickness,
medical science can be given credit
for another great victory.

Every family should send for a copy
of the helpful booklet, "Dyskinesia". t
It tells in plain English how a vast
amount of needless distress and seri-
ous illness can be prevented.



The booklet, "Dyskinesia", one of the latest printed by the
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, will probably be of
value to more people than any booklet this Company has ever
offered for free distribution*

The Metropolitan, since the inception of its welfare work, has
printed and distributed more than 4OO, 000,000 booklets and
pamphlets dealing with the cause and prevention of most of



-K&Dt-



-te



the common diseases which afflict the people of the United
States and Canada. The free booklet service is an important
part of Metropolitan work for the promotion of health and the
reduction of mortality.

The Metropolitan strongly advises all readers of this announce*
nii-nt to send for a copy of "Dyskinesia". It will be mailed
without charge. HALEY FISKE. Praidcnt.



*-



-It*



Published by



- i.r - i




METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY- NEW YORK

Biggest in the World, More Assets, More Policyholders, More Insurance in force, More new Insurance eachyear



HOOLS and EDUCATION




HE CHILD WHO IS A LEADER



A DOCTOR REMAKES EDUCATION

Alfred Adler



OPPORTUNITY NIGHT-F. Zfta Youmans

FORTY YEARS IN KINDERGARTEN
An Interview with PATTY SMITH HlLL

By Beulah Amidon

TRAINING FOR SOCIAL VfORK-Beulak Wddon





At Home




&> if

Can you touch the wall with the bacl( of your head, shoulders, hips, calves of your
legs and heels, and hold this position as you wal}^ away from the wall?

Or grasp the two )(nobs of a door and mafc every inch of your spine touch the edge
of the door?

Or touch the wall only with chest and toes then step bac\ and hold your body ir
the same position?

J^pw stand naturally and asl^ some candid member of the family whether or not you
stand correctly with head up, chin in, bacl^ straight, shoulders flat, abdomen in,
weight on the balls of your feet.



way in which you are carrying yourself.

Much of your nervousness, your fatigue
and your backaches, your "rheumatic"
pains and the possible poisoning that
comes from intestinal sluggishness, often
may be traced to faulty posture.

Your heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys,
liver working machinery of the body
are meant to be free and uncrowded.

When you "stand tall" and hold your
spine straight, these organs have suffi'
cient room to carry on their work.

When you slump over with rounded
shoulders or spine curved in at the waist,
you squeeze the organs together. The free
action of your heart is threatened. Your
stomach and liver cannot do uheir work
so well. The kidneys may be forced out
of place. Your blood cannot circulate so
freely some parts of your body may
get too little blood, others too much.

When your chest is contracted your
lungs cannot expand. Shallow breath-
ing starves your blood for the life-giving
oxygen which every part of your body
must have.



WHY stand straight? For better
appearance? Yes, partly. For
added poise and dignity?
That also. For the stimulating effect
upon self-confidence and courage?
Still another valuable benefit. But
most of all because erect posture is an
immediate tonic with no bad after-effect.
Good Posture makes one feel more buoy-
ant, gives a physical sensation of freedom
and ease in the body.



But there is more than that to be gained
from good posture. A straight body,
carried correctly, gives one better health
and added strength it frequently cor-
rects physical troubles that no amount
of medicine will cure.

Those headaches of yours, those spells
of indigestion, that dreadful feeling of
depression that the world is against
you may easily have resulted from the



The first lesson in singing, in
speaking, and in athletics
is correct posture to in-
sure deep breathing. It
is not necessary to have
a perfect figure to stand
or sit properly. But a
perfect body can be ruined
by bad posture.

Stand tall stand cor-
rectly stand straight.



public-



Progressive Boards of Education, all over the country, recog-
nize that pupils must sit properly during study hours. Curva-
ture of the spine is sometimes caused by desks and chairs which
do not permit the child to sit straight. Posture is taught in the
daily calisthenics classes. Fatigue and malnutrition are guarded
against, as frequent causes of bad posture.

Magazines and newspapers, more and more, are urging their
readers to learn not only the advantages of correct posture, but
also the dangers that attend bad posture.

In the Home Office of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Com-



pany striking physical improvement among our employees has
been brought about by our Director of Posture. Bent bodies
have been straightened. Headaches and other ailments of ob-
scure origin have been made to disappear. Low spirits have
been raised. Learning how to stand and sit correctly has added
to health and happiness.

A valuable booklet on the subject of posture has been prepared
and one copy will be mailed free to each person requesting it.
Send for "The Importance of Posture".

HALEY FISKE, President.




Published by

METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY -NEW YORK

Biggest in the World, More Assets, More Policyholders, More Insurance in force, More new Insurance each year



THE NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH

An opportunity for mature men and women to study and discuss contem-
porary problems under the leadership of distinguished authorities.

Fall Term: September 26 December 23

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

m 9n fc <en B U


HARRY E. BARNES

The Historical Back-
ground of Modern
Intellectual Life


DUDLEY D.
SHOENFELD

Conduct Disorders
in School Children
(4.30-6)


ELISHA M.
FRIEDMAN
AND OTHERS

Finance and Invest-
ments (3.30-4.50)

8 XO 9


HORACE M. KALLEN

Religion and Its
Philosophies

5O P M






HARRY E. BARNES

The Development of
American Society

JOSEPH JASTROW

Psychology of the
Emotions

ARTHUR F. PAYNE

Analysis of Individ-
uals for Guidance
Purposes

FRANKWOOD E.
WILLIAMS

Mental Hygiene
Its Personal and
Social Aspects


FRANZ BOAS
Anthropology and
Modern Life

WALDO FRANK

Modern Art

NORMAN J. WARE

Recent Develop-
ments in Economic
Thought and Prac-
tice

IRA S. WJLE
Determinisms in
Conduct

Ti^eli


SILAS BENT

The Power of the
Press

ALFRED KREYMBORG

Modern American
Poetry

EVERETT D. MARTIN
Some Applications
of Social Psychology

CARL SNYDER

Business Cycles and
Modern Industry

re lectures in each <

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HORACE M. KALLEN

Beauty and Use

GORHAM B.
MUNSON

Style and Form in
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AARON COPLAND

Evolution of Mod-
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HORACE M. KALLEN

Dominant Ideals of
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FREDERICK R.
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Principles of Statis-
tical Method

ARTHUR F. PAYNE
Psychology of the
Worker

s $15


JOHN A. RYAN

Social Economics


465 West 2T,rd Street


New York City



Northwestern University

announces amalgamation of the Recreation Training
School of Chicago, formerly part of the Chicago
School of Civics and Philanthropy.

Beginning September, 1927, courses will be offered in

RECREATION TRAINING AND GROUP
LEADERSHIP

Four year course leading to B.A. or B.S. degree.
Provision also for an additional year of graduate study
and research leading to M.A. degree.

Courses also in Case Work, Housing, and Organiza-
tion, Administration and Financing of Social Work.

Instuctional staff includes ARTHUR J. TODD, NEVA
L. BOYD, THOMAS D. ELIOT, WILLIAM L. BAILEY,
WILLIAM F. BYRON, CHARLOTTE CHORPENNING,
RICHARD T. ELY, JOELD. HUNTER, FERRIS F. LAUNE.

For fuller Information, bulletins,
and application blanks, address

The Dean of the College of Liberal Arts

Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois



Western Reserve University

SCHOOL OF APPLIED SOCIAL SCIENCES
CLEVELAND



A graduate professional school offering
preparation in social administration.

Family Case Work
Child Welfare
Group Service Work
Medical Social Work
Public Health Nursing

Supervised remunerative field work is avail-
able under certain conditions.

Application for admission must be made
in advance.

JAMES ELBERT CUTLER, Ph.D., Dean

2117 Adelbert Road
Cleveland, Ohio



THE 8UBVEY, published eml -monthly and copyright 1927 by SURVEY ASSOCIATES. Inc.. 112 East 19th Street, New York. Price, this copy (September 1, 1927; Tol. LVin,
No. 11) 30 ots. ; $5 a year; foreign postage, $1 extra; Canadian 60 Ota. Changes of address should b mailed to us two weeks In advance. When payment Is by check a
receipt will be sent only upon request. Entered as second class matter, March 25, 1909, at the post office. New York, N. Y., under the act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance
for mailing at a special rate of postace provided for In Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized June 26, 1918. President, Robert W. de Forest. Secretary,
Blta W. Morgenthau. Treasurer, Arthur Kellogg.



The

New



REPUBLIC



Not all Survey readers know as yet

about The New Republic's newest

venture a retail bookstore. It was

started just six months ago, on 34th Street not

far from the Community Church. You can

recognize it by the casement windows and the

black on gold ship swinging above the door.




BOOKSTORE



Fifteen hundred persons have al-
ready become patrons by mail in-
cluding many whose own books are
displayed on tables and shelves. Our hope, in
publishing this advertisement, is to meet others,
who, if they cannot come in person, will permit
us to come to them by prepaid parcel post.




per book



Six v o i u m e s , complete
short novels and stories

of Joseph Conrad



3



post
paid



A number of sets of the special six volume New
Republic Edition of the complete short novels and
stories of Joseph Conrad remain from our subscrip-
tion offer. The collection contains Youth, Typhoon,
Tales of Unrest (6 stories), 'Twixt Land and Sea
(3 stories), Within the Tides (4 stories), A Set of
Six (6 stories). There are in all 26 novels and
stories comprising all of Conrad's shorter works
six full sized books six volumes printed from the
original plates by Doubleday, Page and Company



on good paper and bound uniformly in attractive
red cloth. To lovers of Conrad this presents an
opportunity of having much of his most interesting
work at a fraction of the full price. We arc
disposing of these sets at a figure that is just
above cost and our cost was low because we
bought so many as a means of acquiring new
contacts for our bookstore. The price is
$3-75 P er set postpaid anywhere in the United
States. Canada $3.90, Foreign $4.00.



Everyman'' s Library

We have long wanted to promote the sale of Every-
man's Library. The bookstore gave us the chance.
During the past two months we have sold over 2,500
books from the list of 800 titles at the special price
of yoc each if bought in quantities of 5 or more.
Everyman's comprises almost everything which one
should have at hand for reference and rereading.
It is the world's greatest publishing achievement.
The uniform size and binding add to its attractive-
ness. A complete list of the 800 titles will be mailed
on request. The regular price is 8oc postpaid.



Anthony Comstock

Despite the extraordinary worth of this biography
it has so far failed to gain the reading it deserves.
People shy away from it through preconceived ideas
of its probable interest. To encourage the sale of
this $3.00 book we offer from our stock 25 copies
reduced to $2.00. Please see order blank below.



The Ne-w REPUBLIC BOOKSTORE
107 East 34th Street, New York City

For the enclose I 3 ' 75



please send postpaid
r



/Set of Conrad

} Anthony Comstock



Name .
Address



in full so



(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY)

482




Graphic Number



Vol. LVIII, No. 11



September 1, 1927



CONTENTS

OPPORTUNITY NIGHT . . F. Zeta Youmans 485
COMMONWEALTH VS. SACCO AND VANZETTI

A. A. Eerie, Jr. 489
A DOCTOR REMAKES EDUCATION ....

Alfred Adler, M.D. 490

THE CHILD WHO IS A LEADER

Miriam Van Wattrt 498
FORTY YEARS IN KINDERGARTEN . . . .

Beulah Amidon 506

TRAINING FOR SOCIAL WORK . Beulah Weldon 510

EDITORIALS 5

LETTERS & LIFE . . Edited by Leon Whipple 514



The Gist of It

NEITHER parenthood nor education is a seasonal
occupation, but September, when schools begin
and children are being launched on the year's
adventures, is a "peak time" for both jobs. This Sep-
tember Survey is therefore largely concerned with
educational affairs, (both inside and outside school-
house walls.

THE competition between the movies and the schools
for the attention of children in a large American city
and the responsibility of parents, teachers and com-
munity for what results, have been studied at first
hand by F. ZETA YOUMANS, Director of the
Child Labor Department of the Juvenile Protective
Association, Chicago. Page 485.

ANEW ENGLANDER, a lawyer and a liberal,
A. A. BERLE, JR., writes of the fate of Nicola
Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti out of a careful and
consecutive study of the case, page 489.

WHAT happens in 'both home and school when
public school teachers are trained in the principles
and the techniques of the "new psychology" is described
by ALFRED ADLER, M.D., page 490. Dr. Adler is
a Viennese psychiatrist, author of Individual Psychology
and founder of the famous behavior clinics in the public
schools of Vienna.

'""THE child who is a leader may be a "neighborhood
1 pest" or the chief prop of the teachers and parents
of the community who strive to keep young people
wholesome though happy. The perils and the possibili-
ties of adolescent executive ability are set forth by
MIRIAM VAN WATERS, Referee of the Los
Angeles Juvenile Court, page 498. Her book, of which
this article will form a chapter, is scheduled for
October publication by the New Republic with the title
Parents On Probation.



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