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sectarian neighborhood-house: organized to
make effective in the community better ways
of living and working together thru co-
operative effort. Social, educational, recrea-
tional activities for men, women, and chil-
dren. Health work: Athletics; Neighborhood
Theatre; Mental Hygiene clinic. Supported
by voluntary contributions and memberships.

JOINT COMMITTEE ON METHODS OF
PREVENTING DELINQUENCY

Graham Romeyn Taylor executive director,
50 East 42nd Street, New York. To pro-
mote the adoption of sound methods in this
field, with particular reference to psychiatric
clinics, visiting teacher work, and training
for these and similar services; to conduct
related studies, education and publication;
and to interpret the work of the Common-
wealth Fund Program for the Prevention of
Delinquency.

LEAGUE FOR INDUSTRIAL DEMOC-
RACY Promotes a better understanding
of problems of democracy in industry
through its pamphlet, research and lecture
services and organization of college and
city groups. Executive Directors, Harry W.
Laidler and Norman Thomas, 70 Fifth
Avenue. New York City.

THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS NON-
PARTISAN ASSOCIATION -6 E. 39th
Street, New York City. Charles C. Bauer,
director. An Association supplying factual
information about the League of Nations.
World Court and the International Labor
Office, in an effort to give Americans a true
picture of the effectiveness of these organi-
zations. Literature, educational material, a
speakers' bureau, a film, slides, exhibits, anp
a reference library, are available to the r/i'u-
lie. Memberships which include subscription
to the Association's monthly publication,
range from $1.00 to $100.

NATIONAL BOARD OF THE YOUNG
WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA-
TIONS Mrs. Robert E. Speer, president;
Miss Mabel Cratty, general secretary, 600
Lexington Avenue, New York City. This
organization maintains a staff of executive
and traveling secretaries to cover work in
the United States in 1,034 local Y. W.
C. A.'s on behalf of the industrial, business,
student, foreign born, Indian, Colored and
younger girls. It has 159 American secre-
taries at work in 49 centers in the Orient.
Latin America and Europe.

NATIONAL CHILD LABOR COMMIT-
TEE Wiley H. Swift, acting general sec-
retary, 215 Fourth Avenue. New York. To
improve child labor legislation; to conduct
investigation in local communities; to advise
on administration; to furnish information.
Annual membership, $2, $5, $10. $25 and
$100 includes monthly publication, The
American Child."

NATIONAL CHILD WELFARE ASSO-
CIATION, INC._(et. 1912. incorp. 1914),
70 Fifth Ave., N. Y. C. (tel. Chelsea 8774).
Promotes as its chief object the building of
character in the children of America through
the harmonious development of their bodie,
minds, and spirits. Its method is, in co-
operation with other organizations, to ong-
inate and disseminate educational material in
the form of posters, books, bulletins, charts,
slides, and insignia. Through its Knight-
hood of Youth it provides homes, schools
and church schools with a method of char-
acter training through actual practice. Offi-
cers: Dr. John H. Finley, Pres.; Charles
F. Powli-ion. Gen. Sec'y.

THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR
MENTAL HYGIENE, INC Dr. WillU-

H Welch, honorary president; Dr. Charles
P. Emerson, president; Dr. Frankwood E.
Williams, medical director; Dr. Clarence J.
D'Alton, executive assistant; Clifford W.
Beers secretary; 370 Seventh Avenue, New
York City. Pamphlets on mental hygiene,
mental and nervous disorders, feebleminded-
ness, epilepsy, inebriety, delinquency, and
other mental problems in human behavior,
education, industry, psychiatric social serv-
ice, etc. "Mental Hygiene," quarterly, $3.00
a year; "Mental Hygiene Bulletin," month-
ly, $.50 a year.



us, it identifies you.}



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL AGENCIES



NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THE
PREVENTION OF BLINDNESS

Lewis H. Carris, managing director; Mrs.
Winifred Hathaway, associate director; Dr.
B. Franklin Royer, medical director, and
Miss Eleanor P. Brown, secretary; 370
Seventh Ave., New York. Objects: To fur-
nish information, exhibits, lantern slides,
lectures, personal service for local organiza-
tions and legislation, publish literature of
movement samples free, quantities at cost.
Includes New York State Committee.



NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL
WORK John A. Lapp, president, Chicago,
111.; Howard R. Knight, secretary, 277 E.
Long St., Columbus, Ohio. The conference
is an organization to discuss the principles
of humanitarian effort and to increase the
efficiency of social service agencies. Each
year it holds an annual meeting, publishes
in permanent form the Proceedings of the
meeting, and issues a quarterly Bulletin.
The fifty-fourth annual meeting of the Con-
ference will be held in Des Moines, Iowa,
May 11-18, 1927. Proceedings are sent free
of charge to all members upon payment of
a membership fee of frve dollars.

NATIONAL CONGRESS OF PARENTS
AND TEACHERS-Mrs. A. H. Reeve,

President, Mrs. A. C. Watkins Executive
Secretary, 1201 Sixteenth Street, N. W..
Washington, D. C. To develop cooperation
between home and school, and an informed
public opinion which will secure highest ad-
vantages for all children.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF WOMEN

370 Seventh Ave., N. Y. C. Clearing house
for 35 women's organizations. Valeria H,
Parker. M.D., President.

NATIONAL COUNCIL, CHURCH MIS-
SION OF HELP 1133 Broadway, New

York. Acrency of the Eoiscopal Church
dealing with problems of unadjusted youth
through social case work method. Fifteen
units have been established, maintaining
staffs of trained case workers in nine states.



NATIONAL HEALTH CIRCLE FOR
COLORED PEOPLE, Inc. -370 Seventh
Avenue, New York City. Col. Theodore
Roosevelt, Honorary President; Dr. Jesse E-
Mooreland, Pres. ; Dr. George C. Booth,
Treasurer ; Miss Belle Davis, Executive
Secretary.

To organize public opinion and support

for health work among colored people.
To create and stimulate health conscious-
ness and responsibility anion^; the colored
people in their own health problems.
To recruit, help educate and place young
colored women in public health work.
Work supported by memberships and
voluntary contributions.

THE NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL
FOR INSTITUTION EXECUTIVES
AND OTHER WORKERS-At the Chil-

dren's Village, Dobbs-Ferry-on-Hudson, New
York. To furnish adequate training to
properly qualified people wishing to engage
m, or already engaged in, institution work.
Provide opportunity for carefully guided
study in all phases of institution manage-
ment and activity. Aims to furnish a
trained personnel for child caring I nstitta-
tions. The first and only school of its kind
in the country. For further information
address Calvin Derrick, Dean.

NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE -For social

service among Negroes. L. Hollingsworth
Wood, pres. ; Eugene Kinckle Jones, exec.
sec'y: 127 E. 23rd St., New York. Estab-
lishes committees of white and colored people
to work out community problems. Trains
Negro social workers. Publishes "Oppor-
tunity" a "journal of Negro life."

NATIONAL WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN
TEMPERANCE UNION Anna A. Gor-
don, president; Headquarters, 1730 Chicago
Avenue, Evanston, Illinois. To secure ef-
fective enforcement of the Eighteenth Amend-
ment, to advance the welfare of the Amer-
ican people through the department of Child
Welfare, Women in Industry, Social Moral-
ity, Scientific Temperance Instruction, Amer-
icanization and other allied fields of en-
deavor. Official publications "The Union
Signal" published at Headquarters.



NATIONAL WOMEN'S TRADE UNION

LEAGUE Mrs. Raymond Robins, hon-
orary president; Miss Rose Schneiderman,
president; 247 Lexington Ave., New York;
Miss Elizabeth Christman, secretary. 311
South Ashland Blvd.. Chicago, 111. Stands
for self-government in the work shop
through organization and also for the enact-
ment of industrial legislation. Information

PLAYGROUND AND RECREATION
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA

315 Fourth Avenue, New York City. Joseph
Lee, president; H. S. Braucher, secretary.
Special attention given to organization of
year-round municipal recreation systems. In-
formation available on playground and com-
munity center activities and administration.

THE RELIGIOUS MOTION PICTURE
FOUNDATION, Inc. William E. Har-
mon, Pres.; W. Burke Harmon, Vice-Prea. ;
Mary Beattie Brady, Treas.; Estelle Merrill,
Sec.; 140 Nassau Street, New York. Pro-
ducers and distributors of simple, short
motion pictures designed strictly for church
use as part of a regular service. One of
the activities of the Harmon Foundation.

RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION -For the

Improvement of Living Conditions John M.
Glenn, dir.; 130 E. 22nd St., New York.
Departments: Charity Organization, Delin-
quency and Penology, Industrial Studies,
Library, Recreation, Remedial Loans, Statii-
tics, Surveys and Exhibits. The publications
of the Russell Sage Foundation offer to
the public in practical and inexpensive form
some of the most important results of it*
work. Catalogue sent upon request.

TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE -An institution for
the training of Negro Youth; an experiment
in race adjustment in the Black Belt of the
South; furnishes information on all phase*
of the race problem and of the Tuskegee
idea and methods; Robert R. Moton, prin-
cipal; W. H. Carter, treasurer; A. L. Holsejr,
secretary, Tuskegee Institute, Ala.

WORKERS' EDUCATION BUREAU OF

AMERICA a cooperative Educational
Agency for the promotion of Adult Educa-
tion among Industrial Workers. 476 West
24th Street, New York City. Spencer Miller.
Jr., Secretary.



the Entente Powers had planned to smash Germany and divide
the spoils of war according to the ancient rules were exposed
to the public gaze. In all its naked horror the sordid and
grimy diplomacy which had precipitated the bloody conflict was
revealed; and by way of supplement memoirs, papers, treaties,
and articles on the background of the war began to flow
from the presses. Though cautious editors long ignored the
researches of scholars, though aged clubmen and embattled
women continued to fight the war along canonical lines, the-
task of keeping alive the old reverie was beyond their powers.

And after a while misgivings leaked into the very Senate
of the United States. In the chamber that three short years
before had carried the war resolution in a tempest of en-
thusiasm, the question was now calmly asked, "Why after all
did we enter the war?" To most Democrats this inquiry was
worse than indecent; it was profane. But Republicans pressed
it and Senator Harding answered. 'Referring to the preamble
of the measure declaring hostilities against Germany, he recited
the acts of violence committed by the German government
against the people of the United States. Then he closed
laconically: "There is the whole story. Nothing there es-
pecially proclaiming democracy and humanity." This he said
in no captious mood; at bottom it expressed his mature con-
viction. A little later in his speech accepting the presidential
nomination, Harding took pains to state formally that "we
asked the sons of this republic to defend our national rights"
rather than to "purge the Old World of the accumulated ills
of rivalry and greed."

So the politicians seemed to blow mists of doubt athwart the
sunlight that streamed down on the poppies in Flanders
fields, bringing anguish to those who felt with Wilson that the
heart of humanity would break if the United States did no*
enter the League of Nations.

The League question, of course, made some difficulties for



the Republican candidate because he had to conciliate men
absolutely opposed to ratification in any form or manner what-
soever and to keep in the same step ardent supporters of
an international union. But if the task had its perils, Hard-
ing ingeniously surmounted them by condemning the League
of Nations devised at Paris and proposing instead "a free
association of nations." There he cautiously stopped, declining
to make it clear just what kind of association he had in mind
or how it was to be brought into existence. The precaution
was after all unnecessary as the election returns proved. Be-
sides a popular plurality of seven millions, Harding received
404. out of 531 electoral votes.

ONCE safely installed in the White House, President
Harding flatly refused to revive the Versailles treaty
and eventually he came to the conclusion that the American
people had settled this issue forever. To invite the other
countries of the world already bound together in the League
to join the United States in forming another "association of
nations" on a new American model, as he had suggested, was
evidently out of the question if not comical.

Having finally arrived at a specific conclusion, the Harding
administration placed the Versailles pact in the official waste-
basket and Congress, hearing news of this action in the White
House, by a joint resolution, signed by the President on July
2, 1921, declared the war with the late Central Empires at
an end expressly reserving to the United States and its citi-
zens all the rights and privileges to which they were entitled
under the armistice and the final settlement. Thereupon sep-
arate treaties of peace were negotiated with Germany, Austria,
and Hungary and duly ratified by the Senate. Thus in an un-
expected fashion "the war to end war" was formally brought
to a close, as far as the United States was concerned, nearly
three years after the fighting ceased on the battlefield.



(In ansvi'rina advertisements please mention THE SURVEY. It helps us, it identifies you.)

61



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS






WORKERS WANTED


WORKERS WANTED


WANTED: Social Caie Worker; Col-
lege graduate for a General Hospital in
Eastern part of country. Hospital exper-
ience not essential. 5704 SUXVET.


EXAMINATION CHIEF PROBATION
OFFICER, COOK COUNTY. Unassem-
bled examination salary $7,500.00 open
to men and women 25 to 50 years of age
who have completed four years high school
or equivalent and have experience in
social agency recognized standing. Appli-
cations must be filed not later than April
i6th with Secretary Judge's Committee for
the Selection of the Chief Probation Offi-
cer, 2240 West Roosevelt Road, Chicago,
Illinois.


WANTED: At once a medical social
worker by a Jewish Hospital in Eastern
city. One with case work experience pre-
ferred. 5698 SURVEY.


SUPERVISOR of boys for Chicago
Home for Jewish Orphans, 6208 Drezel
Avenue. State Age, qualifications and
salary expected. 5758 SURVEY.


NURSE for position in New York City
Settlement from June isth to September ist
five days a week, preferably experienced
public health worker with knowledge of
Yiddish. Must be able to conduct daily
hygiene clinics for play school children
and assist in physical examinations and
home visiting. 5769 SURVEY.


LARGE Jewish Family Care Agency of
Philadelphia always ready to consider
applications of college graduates interested
in social case work, both experienced and
those, wishing training. Opportunity for
study at the Pennsylvania School for Social
Work or graduate work at the University
of Pennsylvania. Address Jewish Welfare
Society, 330 S. 9th St.


GYMNASIUM AND BOYS WORKER
of high standards and ideals wanted to
assist in Boys Department of large New
York City settlement. Student in Physical
Education Department of Teachers College
preferred, with cultured Jewish back-
ground. 5768 SURVEY.


WANTED: Married couple, one or both
of whom is qualified to teach Grammar
School Grades. Resident position, salary
and maintenance. Small private school for
problem boys about thirty-five miles from
New York. New cottage unit. Duties in-
clude those implied in the term "house
father and mother". Apply by letter only,
giving full personal data and references.
A. E. Wakeman, 72 Schermerhorn Street,
Brooklyn, N. Y.


ATTRACTIVE GIRLS WORKER of
experience and cultured background (Ger-
man Jewish worker preferred), for Girls
Department large New York City Settle-
ment. Applicant must be college graduate
with experience not theories. Opportunity
for development of original ideas backed
by thought and high standards. Can begin
June first or September first. 5770 SURVEY.


GRADUATE NURSES, dietitians, labor-
atory technicians for excellent hospital
positions everywhere. Write for free book
now. Aznoe's Central Registry for Nurses,
30 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois.


WANTED: Experienced matron for Old
Ladies' and Children's Home. Forty resi-
dents. Address, Old Ladies' Home, Mead-
ville, Pennsylvania.


SETTLEMENT of New York City in-
vites applications from Jewish women and
men of experience for directorsip of
girls' work and boys' work. 5752 SURVEY.


WANTED: by Jewish agency, Western
New York, experienced family case work-
er; some psychiatric training desirable;
also child placing agent, one able to organ-
ize and develop home finding. 5780 SURVEY.


COOPERATIVE PLACEMENT SERV-
ICE. Social workers, secretaries, super-
intendents, matrons, housekeepers, dieti-
tians, cafeteria managers. The Richards
Bureau, 68 Barnes Street, Providence, R. I.


ATTRACTIVE
OPPORTUNITIES


BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA need
men with leadership and administrative
ability and experience for executive posi-
tions. Thirty-day Training Schools before
or after placement. Further information
BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA, 200 Fifth
Avenue, New York.




Your Summer Vacation may
be pleasantly and profitably
spent at a Summer Camp.

Positions open, Directors, Head
Counselors, Physicians, Nurses, Dieti-
tians. Handcraft, Swimming, Athle-
tics, Dramatics, Music, Dancing, etc.

No charge for registration

Executive Service Corporation
Summer Camp Division

GERTRUDE D. HOLMES, Director
Pershing Square Bldg., New York City


WE HAVE OPENINGS in Sales De-
partment for several men of vision and
personality. Dignified work with annually
increasing income. Isadore Fried, General
Agent, New England Mutual Life Ins.
Company, 1440 Broadway.


"Home -Making as a Profession"

Is a SO-pp. 111. handbook It's FREE. Home-stud;
Domestic Science courses, for teaching. Institution
management, etc., and for home-making efficiency.
Am. School if Home Economics. 849 E. 58th St., ChloaM



The Collegiate Service, Inc.

437 Fifth Avenue
New York City

Occupational Bureau for College
Women

We supply settlement, institution,
and organization executives, case
workers, field agents, recreation lead-
ers, teachers, dietitians, personnel
managers, publicity directors, statisti-
cians, and others, to meet all needs
of social institutions.



Professional solution of Employment
Problems

High grade workers in all professions*.
Many Summer Camp Instructors needed. All
references rigidly investigated and approved
applicants will meet the employer's most ex-
acting requirements.

No charge to the employer, and
No registration fee for the applicant
For further information address

The Appointment Bureau
NASHUA VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE
28 Park Street, Nashua, New Hampshire



GERTRUDE R. STEIN, Inc.

Vocational Service

We are here to help you find social workers,
research workers and secretaries to fill your
particular jobs.

18 East 41st Street New York City



SITUATIONS WANTED

YOUNG WOMAN, headworker of set-
tlement, also experienced executive in other
branches of social work available for posi-
tion May or next October. 5748 SURVEY.

EXECUTIVE: Capable young man,
proven ability on previous projects, desires
connection where an agricultural program
can be made part of boys' training. De-
pendable, sincere. 5688 SUEVEY.

EXECUTIVE: Thorough knowledge all
phases institutional work. Experienced in
athletic activities. Experienced director of
agricultural projects. Eight years practi-
cal experience in child welfare work. 5672
SURVEY.

YOUNG WOMAN, sincerely interested
in welfare work, capable, experienced, de-
pendable, possesses initiative, desires posi-
tion as supervisor. Institutional experience
covering 3 years. 5709 SURVEY.



RESIDENT SCHOLARSHIPS

are available October 1, 1927

at
East Side House, New York City

to young women wishing to fit them-
selves for responsible positions in social
settlement or community work.

Definite training under expert super-
vision in neighborhood surveys, group
activities and work with adult immi-
grants of many nationalities.

Address,

EAST SIDE HOUSE, 540 East 76th Street,
HELEN HART, Head Worker



(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY. // helps us, it identifies you.)

62



SITUATIONS WANTED



EXPERIENCED SECRETARY-STEN-
OGRAPHER, Protestant, desires part time
non-commercial position, mornings pre-
ferred. Full time considered. 5777 SURVEY.

MAN AND WIFE, middle aged, protes-
tant, for past four years engaged as super-
intendent and matron of children's home,
desire a change. Man, all-around mechanic,
wife, graduate nurse, Penna. Registered.
Location, secondary consideration. 5774
SURVEY.

YOUNG LADY, well educated, desires
position, as a companion, here or abroad.
5775 SURVEY.

CAMPAIGN DIRECTOR: Successful ex-
perience money raising and organization
work Boston and New England. Will make
survey, compile report, supply names
special contributors and general mailing
lists. Available for full or part time ser-
vice. 5776 SURVEY.

JEWISH WOMAN, executive, with a
broad and varied experience in all phases
of social work, desires connection. 5734
SURVEY.

WANTED: Position as secretary with
scientific expedition by young college grad-
uate, who is a competent and experienced
stenographer and typist. 5778 SURVEY.

SEWING TEACHER, refined, well edu-
cated, capable, seven years teaching ex-
perience, desires position in an institution.
Can furnish good references. 5771 SURVEY.

HEAD WORKER settlement wishes
change during summer. New York or
vicinity. Companion, secretary, clerical ;
useful to literary-social worker, artist.
Competent, resourceful, cheerful. Nurse
training. No child-care. 5772 SURVEY.

WOMAN, State Normal graduate wishes
position: tutor, governess, companion dur-
ing vacation. Experience: principal schools,
past three years supervisor grades. 5773
SURVEY.



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giioHiniiiiiiiBii! in

ST. ANDREW'S CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL

237 EAST 17th STREET
NEW YORK CITY

The Episcopal SISTERS OF ST. JOHN BAPTIST offer hospitality to con-
valescent or tired busisess girls and women.

Rest, good food, and refined surroundings are provided. Roof-sun-
porch overlooks park. Guests are free to attend outside Clinics and may receive
visitors daily.

Condition on admission must not endanger or annoy other guests.
Chronic or aged patients are not eligible.

Rates: dormitory, $5.00 a week; private rooms, $10.00- $20.00 a week;
or adjusted according to circumstances. Season, October to May.
Apply to Sister in Charge. Telephone Ashland 4728.

ST. ANDREW'S REST, Country Branch, Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey. Open,
May 15 to October. Telephone, Park Ridge 152.

iiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiu



BOOKS



See Your National Parks

All beautifully illustrated in

Picturesque America

By John Francis Kane

Write for special offer for those planning
trips to parks this year. $10.00 edition.

RESORTS AND PLAYGROUNDS OF AMERICA

51 East 42d St., New York City



Delinquent Girls on Parole

A Study of Girls Paroled from Cedar Knolls
School, Hawthorne, N Y., 1909-1925

by AUCE D. MENKEN

Vice-President, Jewish Board of Guardians,

228 East 19th Street, N. Y. C.

"Reprint from Jewish Social

Service Quarterly, Sept. 1926."



MISCELLANEOUS



The Iowa Family Tree

(California Branch)

a directory in preparation for Southern
Californians who formerly lived in tile State
of Iowa.

For ready reference this directory provides
a double index so that each name shows
the present California address, and also the
former Iowa address.

Registration is without charge, and no obli-
gation is intended or implied.
A post-card addressed to us will bring you
registration cards in convenient form for
your use.

The Iowa Family Tree

3702 Magnolia Boulevard



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