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of public information and education, Welfare
Council, New York City. Mr. Resnick will
begin work May 1 on a part-time basis.

Ross W. SANDERSON, for seven years executive
secretary, Wichita Council of Churches and
vice-president, Wichita Community Chest, a<
administrative secretary of the Council of
Churches and general secretary of the Y.M.
C.A. The Council of Churches adds a director
of religious education.

HARRIETT SEELY as executive secretary of the
Red Cross, Aberdeen, Wash.

SAMUEL SILUKIN as executive director, Jewish
Big Brother Association, Cleveland.

BERTHA J. SOUTHWICK. formerly general secre-
tary, Family Welfare Association, Portsmouth,
N.H., as Family Engineer, Extension Service,
Loyal Order of Moose, Mooseheart, 111.

LILLIAN STEVENS as assistant Camp Fire Girls

executive, Long Beach, Calif.
DOROTHY STEWART, granddaughter of Robert W.
deForest, president of Survey Associates, as
volunteer worker, Charity Organization Society,
New York City.

JAMES G. STONE, formerly junior staff member
National Tuberculosis Association, as publicity
secretary, Onondaga Health Association, Syra-
cuse, N. Y.



April 15, 1927



LITERATURE



CHILD HEALTH fN SMALL COMML

ITIES Bulletins describing the Comn
wealth Fund child health demonstration

two in small cities, two in rural coun

No. 1, Program and Policies. No. 2. Marion
County, Ore. No. 3, Athens, Ga. No. 4,
Progress Keport. Mailed free on application
to Director of Publications. Room 1648, 378
Seventh Avenue. New York.

THE SCHOOL PARENT Keeps in touch

with events in the New York Public Schools
and Parents Associations weekly in The
School Parent. Send subscription price of
$1.00 to the United Parent* Association of

Greater New York. 152 W. 42nd Street.
New York City.

UP-TO-DATE CHILD LABOR PUBLJ.

CATIONS Child Labor Facts, 1927;

Selected Bibliography on Child Labor (1920-
1927); Children Working in Missouri, 1927.
Price 10 cents each. National Child Labor
Committee, 215 Fourth Avenue. New York
City.

EAST BY WEST A special number of Sur-
vey Graphic devoted entirely to an inter-
pretation of the Japanese and Chinese in
America and at home. An excellent hack-
ground for the newspaper despatches of to-
day. Original price 50 cents now 25 cents
a copy. Survey Graphic, 112 E. 19th St.,
New "York.

A BIBLIOGRAPHY ON PSYCHOLOGY

by Helen G. Estey, Gardner, Mav
pages, $1.00 a copy. Obtained of author at
Gardner, Mass.

CARTER TAYLOR, formerly assistant to the director
Cleveland Welfare Federation, to the staff of
the Graduate School of Social Work of the
University of Chicago. Mr. Taylor will
organize and develop courses for practical
training in problems of Community Organiza-
tion and be supervisor of field training.

CATHERINE W. TAYLOR as registrar, Social Serv-
ice Exchange, Reading, Pa.

NANCY TOMLINSON, formerly with Memphis,
Tenn., Child Guidance Clinic, as executive
secretary, A.R.C. , Lewiston. Idaho.

CLARE M. TOUSLEY as chairman and T, uis
RESNICK as secretary. New York Committee
on Publicity Methods.

ARTHUR W. TOWNE, executive secretary of the
Onondaga Health Association, as president.
Social Workers' Club, Syracuse.

FRANCES C. VOGEL, R.N., as public health nurse,
Berks County Chapter, A.R.C., Reading, Pa.

BELLE WACINER, formerly director of nurses,
Tampa, Fla., Health Department, as nursing
field representative, A.R.C., for New Jersey.

ALICE WALDO as a member of the staff of the
Syracuse, N. Y., Department of Health.

MARY P. WHEELER as general secretary. T'nitrd
Charities of St. Paul, succeeding John R.
Brown, deceased.

EMILIE WILKINS. formerly executive secretary
Family Service Organization, Tampa, Fla., as
executive secretary. Family Welfare Awcia-
tion, Bethlehem, Pa.



Resignations



JOHN S. BECKA as execv'ive secretary, Catholic
Big Brothers, Cleveland.

CATHERINE CONCANNON as nurse in charge of
tuberculosis nursing, Syracuse. N. Y., Depart-
ment of Health, after nineteen years service.

BERTHA J. HOWARD as visitor. Social Welfare
League, Reading, Pa., to recuperate from
illness.

BARBARA JOY as director of the Department of
Outdoor and Health Activities, national head-
quarters. Camp Fire Girls.

BLANCHE H. LOWE as director, Bureau of Com-
munity Service. Portsmouth. Ohio.

DR. GEORGE M. RETAN as director of the Purrao
of Child Hygiene, Department of Health,
Syracuse, N. Y. Dr. Clara Pierce succeeds
Dr. Retan as acting director.

MARTORIE P. SANDERSON as a hospital *prial
worker at U. S. Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mas*.

LtlCY SWIFT as nutritionist at National Head-
quarters, A.R.C.

MRS. L. W. TnoMAS, formerly Bertha Friedman,
as a chapter correspondent, National Head-
quarters, A.R.C., to join her husband in New
York.

MARGARET THOMAS as a writer on the public
information staff. National Headquarters,
A.R.C.

M. EMETH TUTTLS as director, Children's
Bureau, State Board of Charities and Public
Welfare, North Carolina, for rest and further
study.

DONALD VANCE as director of publicity depart-
ment, Cleveland Community Fund, to join
Donald C. Dougherty Co., publicity counselors,
Cleveland.




pril 15, 1927



THE SURVEY



119



COMMUNICATIONS



Child Labor in Massachusetts

*o THE EDITOR: Mrs. Florence Kelley's review in your issue
if February 15 of Child Labor in Massachusetts by Raymond
C. Fuller and Mabel A. Strong states that the concept on
'hich the book rests is largely obsolete. For those interested
i the employed adolescent, it might clarify ideas if Mrs. Kelley
ould develop her contentions with a little more definiteness
lan this brief review. The writer, while director of school
ygiene in Fall River, Massachusetts, was intimately concerned
ith the problems presented in this study and fails to see the
pplication of the epithet "'belated leaders." In fact he is
iclined to agree with the reviewer of this book in The Na-
on's Health, who says: "After reading the entire book, one
|:els strongly that in the long run child labor is profitable
either to the employer, the child, nor society and should be
ispensed with in the modern state." As to Mrs. Kelley's im-
lications of neglect of accident problems, we should call atten-
on to the twenty-five pages on accidents and health hazards
1 1 this little book.

The writer asks for further exposition of Mrs. Kelley's

iews because his own experience in Massachusetts led to a

eady sympathy with Mr. Fuller's presentation for more edu-

ational and health service for the employed adolescent, more

ocational guidance, more attention to the subnormal child who

IBS ceased to profit from the schools and is fast developing

, abits of idleness, and more protection against industrial acci-

ients. Mr. Fuller's appeal for education of children of vari-

us kinds of ability as well as degrees of intelligence, his appeal

Dr education in skills, habits and attitudes, for education with

iterest, effort and self-direction [not merely coercive retention

i school to meet a chronological age law] are surely "tasks

nd problems" worthy of all reformers as well as social and

ublic health workers, educators, psychiatrists, economic, social

nd spiritual leaders.

No doubt, as Mr. Fuller as well as Mrs. Kelley has pointed

[jut, Massachusetts has yet considerable gains to make in the

jgislative field. However, the writer's experience has led him

p seek the welfare of this needy group of children in suitable

[find and amount of schooling, play and work as well as in

[he immediate tasks of abuse and neglect. When our schools

til to provide interest or suitable training for the lives of

Hhese restless adolescents, how much of our effort should be

evoted to more and more legislation to even higher and higher

.ge limits? We know of no satisfactory evidence that pro-

ibitory legislation alone will care for the problems presented

ly the authors of Child Labor in Massachusetts. "Child and

Education these together are the paramount concern of child-

abor reform and the indispensable means of social progress."

! American Child Health Association,

I New York HAROLD H. MITCHELL, M.D.

fo THE EDITOR: Dr. Mitchell asks for specifications for my
Itatement that "the concept on which the book rests is largely
Obsolete." Briefly they are:

I The assumption in Mr. Grafton Cushing's foreword, de-
|>eloped later in the book that
\[a) Massachusetts is an advanced state;

I*) In Massachusetts little new legislation is needed; and in
he opening sentence of Chapter VII,

Re) The child labor situation in Massachusetts is no longer
bpectacular or dramatic.



Since 1918 American industry has undergone a revolution.
The new high speed, electric-driven machines and the infinite
variety of new industrial poisons have given rise to a new
nation-wide consciousness of peril. It is seen that the intelli-
gence which has created mass production, and mass hazards,
for old and young must be constrained to make industry safe.

The advancing states, Wisconsin leading, apply to this new
situation new intensive publicity, and new efficiency in fixing
responsibility for injuries to the young directly upon negligent
and law-breaking employers. They do this through penalty
costs, and ever-lengthening lists of employments prohibited by
reason of extra hazards. How can Massachusetts be regarded
as "an advanced state" while she still cuts her list of prohibited
hazards at the i6th birthday? And while she does not yet,
like Illinois, print in her Monthly Labor Bulletin the deaths,
dismemberments, mutilations and lesser injuries suffered by
wage-earning minors in the preceding month?

According to the text of the authors, Massachusetts allows
children to leave school at the I4th birthday (p. 114) and the
6th grade (p. 112) to enter industry, 70.4 per cent of those
between 10 and 15 years of age being engaged in manufactur-
ing and mechanical industries, a proportion exceeded only by
Rhode Island with 81.4 per cent (p. 20).

"Recently the Federal Children's Bureau made a survey
[published 1926] of compensable accidents to minors under 21
in three states (p. 54). ... In Massachusetts more of the in-
juries to children were due to power-working machinery than
to any other cause. Not only is the number larger, but the
accidents are more severe. Proportionately twice as many
accidents due to machinery were suffered by minors as were
suffered by adults (p. 55).

"According to a report prepared under the direction of the
(Massachusetts) Commissioner of Labor and Industries
[Monthly Labor Review, Dec. 1925, p. 93] 2,965 tabulatable
accidents were suffered by working children between the ages
of 14 and 18. Of these 657 occurred to children 14 and 15
years old; 3 were fatal, and 14 resulted in permanent partial
disability. Of the accidents to children 16 and 17 years old,
7 were fatal, while permanent partial disability resulted in 73
cases." (p. 53)

Under these backward and extraordinarily hazardous con-
ditions Massachusetts has not even joined the trio of advanc-
ing states which award double or triple compensation f or ^ chil-
dren illegally employed. How then can the concept that "little
new legislation is needed" be regarded as anything but obsolete?
Certainly it is not advanced.

The dead are silent. The unfortunate young cripples cannot
revolt. The leaders are belated and their concept is largely
obsolete who write "The child labor situation in Massachusetts
is no longer spectacular or dramatic. . . . The achievement of
the past is cause for gratulation.

FLORENCE KELLEY

Why Are Teachers Outsiders?

To THE EDITOR: I felt interested decidedly in your article in
this March Midmonthly on "Why are Teachers Outsiders?"

Having been a social worker who tried to break into teach-
ing, I have discovered some years ago, that experience of a
business or social service character is not recognized as of
value, as a general thing, by our superintendents of schools.
Only in a very few specialties, such as manual training, dress-
making, typewriting and the like, are substitutes of academic
experience recognized. But not in such fields as history and
civics, though this latter should decidedly call for people who
have experientially participated in the social process, and not
only read about it. I have a feeling that our ideals are impotent
frequently because they are so bookish untranslated am
undramatized by experiential translation.

Chicago, III. OTTO WANDKR



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL AGENCIES



AMERICAN BIRTH CONTROL LEAGUE

President, Margaret Sanger, 104 Fifth
Avenue, New York City. Objects: To edu-
cate American people in the various aspects
of the dangers of uncontrolled procreation;
to establish centers where married persons
may receive contraceptive advice from duly
licensed physicians. Life membership $1.00;
Birth Control Review (monthly magazine)
$2.00 per year.

AMERICAN HOME ECONOMICS ASSO-
CIATION Alice I,. Edwards, executive
secretary, 617 Mills Bldg., Washington,
D. C. Organized for betterment of condi-
tions in home, school, institution and com-
munity. Publishes monthly Journal of Home
Economics: office of editor, 617 Mills Bldg.,
Washington, D. C.; of business manager,
1211 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md.

AMERICAN SOCIAL HYGIENE ASSO-
CIATION 370 Seventh Ave., New York.
To provide a better understanding of the
social hygiene movement; to advance sound
sex education; to combat prostitution and sex
delinquency; to aid public authorities in the
campaign against the venereal diseases; to
advise in organization of state and local
social-hygiene programs. Annual membership
dues $2.00 including monthly journal.

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR THE CON-
TROL OF CANCER-Dr. George A.
Soper, managing director, 25 West 43rd
Street, New York. To collect, collate and
disseminate information concerning the symp-
toms, diagnosis, treatment and prevention.
Publications free on request. Annual mem-
bership dues, $5.00.

ASSOCIATED GUIDANCE BUREAU,

INC 16 East 53rd Street, New York,
Telephone: Plaza 9512. A non-sectarian,
non-philanthropic child guidance bureau, em-
ploying highest social work standards. Sup-
plies, trains, and supervises carefully selected
governesses, tutors, companions, play leaders,
and psychiatric nurses. For information
address Jess Perlman, Director.

CHILD WELFARE COMMITTEE OF

AMERICA, Inc 730 Fifth Avenue, New
York. To secure home life tor normal
dependent children in preference to insti-
tutions; to secure Mothers Allowance laws
in states having none; to urge adequate ap-
propriations for home aid; to promote proper
laws affecting adoption, boarding out and
placing out of dependent children; to aid
in the enforcement of these laws. States
Council of Committee comprises volunteer
representatives in practically every state.
Sophie Irene Loeb, President; Governor
Alfred E. Smith, Honorary President;
Margareet Woodrow Wilson, First Vice-
President: Edward Fisher Brown, Executive
Secretary.

CHILD WELFARE LEAGUE OF

AMERICA C C Carstens, director. 130
E. 22nd Street, New York City. A league
of children's agencies and institutions to se-
cure improved standard* and methods in
their various fields of work. It also cooper-
ates with other children's agencies, cities,
states, churches, fraternal orders and other
civic groups to work out worth-while results
in phases of child welfare in which they are
interested.

THE CHILDREN'S VILLAGE, INCOR-
PORATED Dobbs-Ferry-on-Hudson, New
York. A national, non-sectarian training
school scientifically equipped for the study,
education and development of problem boys
and girls, on commitment and by private
arrangement age* 7 to 16. Supported large-
ly by voluntary contributions. For further
information address Leon C Faulkner, Man-
aging Director.

COUNCIL OF WOMEN FOR HOME

MISSIONS 156 Fifth Avenue, New York.
Composed of 22 Protestant national women's
mission boards. Florence E. Quinlan, Exec-
utive Secretary.

Work among Farm and Cannery Migrants,
Summer service for college students,
Laura H. Parker, Executive Supervisor.
Bureau of Reference for Migrating People,
follow-up of New Americans, Raymond
E. Cole. Executive.



EYE SIGHT CONSERVATION COUN-
CIL OF AMERICA L. W. Wallace,
President; Guy A. Henry, General-Director,
Times Bldg., New York. Conducts a na-
tional educational campaign to promote eye
hygiene. Urges correction of eye defects,
protection against hazards, proper lighting.
Comprehensive publications lantern slides-
lecture material. Cooperation of social
agencies invited.

FEDERAL COUNCIL OF THE
CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN

AMERICA Constituted by 28 Protestant
communions. Rev. C. S. Macfarland and
Rev. S. M. Cavert, Gen. See's; 105 E. 22nd
St., N. Y. C.

Dent, of Research and Education, Rev. F.

E. Johnson, Sec'y.

Commissions: Church and Social Service.
Rev. W. M. Tippy, Sec'y; International
Justice and Goodwill: Rev. S. L. Gulick,
Sec'y; Church and Race Relations: Dr.
G. E. Haynes, Sec'y.

GIRLS FRIENDLY SOCIETY IN
AMERICA 15 East 40th Street, New York.
Girls and women working together to uphold
Christian standards of daily living in the
home, in the business world, and in the
community. Numbers nearly 60,000, with
branches in 44 states.

HAMPTON INSTITUTE-Trains Negro and
Indian youth for community service. Ad-
vanced courses: agriculture, builders, busi-
ness, home-economics, normal. Publishes
"Southern Workman" and free material on
Negro problems. J. E. Gregg, principal.

JOINT COMMITTEE ON METHODS OF
PREVENTING DELINQUENCY

Graham Romeyn Taylor, executive director,
50 East 42nd Street, New York. To pro-
mote the adoption of sound methods in this
field, with particular reference to psychiatric
clinics, visiting teacher work, and training
for these and similar services; to conduct
related studies, education and publication;
and to interpret the work of the Common-
wealth Fund Program for the Prevention of
Delinquency.

NATIONAL BOARD OF THE YOUNG
WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA-
TIONS Mrs. Robert E. Speer, president;
Miss Mabel Cratty, general secretary, 600
Lexington Avenue, New York City. This
organization maintains a staff of executive



Choose Your Road

IN his Nonsense Novels, Stephen
L



Leacock has one of his characters
"jump on his horse and ride off madly
in all directions."

That is a temptation in social work
to ride off madly in all directions.
There are so many directions and the
objective at the end of each road is so
much worth while!

But those whose intelligence is as
large as their hearts will select one
road, after careful deliberation, and
travel straight along it.

Each organization on these pages
offers you a road to travel, like-minded
men and women as fellow travelers
en route, and a satisfying goal for your
effort. Each offers, too, to guide you
expertly.

Which road will you travel? Don't
attempt to use them all. Choose one
and ride down it with spurs at the
flanks of your enthusiasm.
(In answering advertisement! please mention THE SURVEY. // helps

1 2O



and traveling secretaries to cover work
the United States in 1,034 local Y. 1
C. A.'s on behalf of the industrial, tmsine
student, foreign born, Indian. Colored a
younger girls. It has 159 American sec
taries at work in 49 centres in the Oriei
Latin America and Europe.

NATIONAL CHILD LABOR COMMT1

TEE Wiley H. Swift, acting general sea
tary, 215 Fourth Avenue, New York. '
improve child labor legislation; to condu
investigation in local communities; to advi
on administration; to furnish information. A
nual membership, %2 $5, $10, $25 and $11
includes monthy publication, "The Amend
Child."

NATIONAL CHILD WELFARE ASSC
CIATION, INC. (est. 1912, incorp. 1914
70 Fifth Ave., N. Y. C. (tel. Chelsea 8774
Promotes as its chief object the building
character in the children of America throuj
the harmonious development of their bodh
minds, and spirits. Its method is, in c
operation with other organizations, to on
inate and disseminate educational material
the form of posters, books, bulletins, chari
slides, and insignia. Through its "Knigt
hood of Youth it provides homes, schoc
and church schools with a method of cha
acter training through actual practice. 01
cers: Dr. John H. Finley, Pres.; Charl
F. Powlison, Gen. Sec'y.

THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FO
MENTAL HYGIENE, INC.-Dr. Willia

H. Welch, honorary president; Dr. Charl
P. Emerson, president; Dr. Frankwood 1
Williams, medical director; Dr. Clarence
D'Alton, executive assistant; Clifford V
Beers, secretary; 370 Seventh Avenue, Ne
York City. Pamphlets on mental hygien
mental and nervous disorders, feeblemindet
ness, epilepsy, inebriety, delinquency, ar
other mental problems in human behavio
education, industry psychiatric social ser
ice, etc. "Mental Hygiene," quarterly, $3.f
a year; "Mental Hygiene Bulletin," mom
ly. $.50 a year.

NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR TH1
PREVENTION OF BLINDNESS-

Lewis H. Carris, managing director; Mr
Winifred Hathaway, associate director; DM
B. Franklin Royer, medical director, an
Miss Eleanor P. Brown, secretary; 37
Seventh Ave., New York. Objects: To fu
nish information, exhibits, lantern slide
lectures, personal service for local organiz:
tions and legislation, publish literature c
movement samples free, quantities at cos
Includes New York State Committee.

NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SOCIAI
WORK John A. Lapp, president, Chicagi
111.; Howard R. Knight, secretary, 277 I
Long St., Columbus, Ohio. The conferenc
is an organization to discuss the principle
of humanitarian effort and to increase tb
efficiency of social service agencies. Eac
year it holds an annual meeting, publishe
in permanent form the Proceedings of th
meeting and issues a quarterly Bulletir
The fifty-fourth annual meeting of the Cor
ference will be held in Des Moines. lowi
May 11-18, 1927. Proceedings are sent fre
of charge to all members upon payment o
a membership fee of five dollars.

NATIONAL CONGRESS OF PARENT.'

AND TEACHERSMrs. A. H. Reeve
President. Mrs. A. C. Watkins, Executiv
Secretary, 1201 Sixteenth Street, N. W.
Washington, D. C. To develop cooper.itiot
between home and -school, and an informet
public opinion which will secure highest ad
vantages for all choldren.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF WOMEN-

370 Seventh Ave., N. Y. C. Clearing housi
for 35 women's organiations. Valeria H
Parker, M.D., President.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISri

WOMEN Mrs. Joseph E. Friend, Presi

dent; Mrs. Estelle M. Stcrnberger, Execn
five Secretary, 2109 Broadway, New Yori
City. Program covers twelve department!
in religious, educational, civic and legislatiyi
work, peace and social service. Officia.
publication: "The Jewish Woman."

us, it identifies you.)



DIRECTORY



Department of Immigrant Aid and Immi-
grant Education, 799 Broadway, New York
City. For the protection and education of
immigrant women and girls. Maintains
Bureau of International Service. Monthly
bulletin. "The Immigrant." Fiorina Lasker,
Chairman; Cecilia Razovsky, Secretary.

Department of Farm and Rural Work,
Mrs. Elmer Eckhouse. Chairman, 5 Colum-
bus Circle, New York City. Program of
Education, recreation, religious instruction
and social service work for rural communi-
ties. Bulletin: "The Rural Voice."

mONAL HEALTH CIRCLE FOR
COLORED PEOPLE, Inc. -370 Seventh
Avenue, New York City. Col. Theodore
Roosevelt, Honorary President; Dr. Jesse E.
Mooreland, Pres. ; Dr. George C. Booth,
Treasurer; Miss Belle Davis, Executive
Secretary.

To organize public opinion and support

for health work among colored people.
To create ad stimulate health conscious-
ness and responsibility among the colored
people in their own health problems.
To recruit, help educate and place young
colored women in public health.

iE NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL
FOR INSTITUTION EXECUTIVES
AND OTHER WORKERS-At the Chil-

dren's Village Dobbs-Ferry-on-Hudson. New-
York. To furnish adequate training to
properly qualified people wishing to engage
in, or already engaged in, institution work.
Provide opportunity for carefully guided
study in all phases of institution manage-
ment and activity. Aims to furnish a
trained personnel for child caring institu-




tions. The first and only school of its kind
in the country. For futher information
address Calvin Derrick. Dean.

NATIONAL TUBERCULOSIS ASSO-
CIATION 370 Seventh Ave., New York.
Dr. Theobald Smith, president; Dr. Linsly
R. Williams, managing director. Pamphlets
on methods and program for the prevention
of tuberculosis. Publications sold and distri-
buted through state associations in every
state. Journal of the Outdoor Life, popular
monthly magazine, $2.00 a year; American



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