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Review of Tuberculosis, medical journal,
$8.00 a year; and Monthly Bulletin, house
organ, free.

NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE- For social

service among Negroes. L. Hollingsworth
Wood, pres.; Eugene Kinckle Jones, exec
sec'y; 127 E. 23rd St., New York. Estab-
lishes committees of white and colored people
to work out community problems. Trains
Negro social workers. Publishes "Oppor-
tunity" a "journal of Negro life."

NATIONAL WOMEN'S TRADE UNION

LEAGUE Mrs. Raymond Robins, honor-
ary president; Miss Rose Schneiderman,
president; 247 Lexington Ave., New York;
Miss Elizabeth Christman, secretary. 311
South Ashland Blvd., Chicago, 111. Stands
for self-government in the workshop through
organization and also for the enactment of
industrial legislation. Information given.

PLAYGROUND AND RECREATION
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA

315 Fourth Avenue. New York City. Joseph
Lee, president; H. S.. Braucher, secretary.
Special attention given to organization of



year-round municipal recreation systems. In-
formation available on playground and com-
munity center activities and administration.

THE RELIGIOUS MOTION PICTURE
FOUNDATION, Inc.-William E. Har-
mon, Pres.; W. Burke Harmon, Vice-Pres.;
Mary Beattie Brady, Treas.; Estelle Merrill,
Sec.; 140 Nassau Street, New York. Pro-
ducers and distributors of simple, short
motion pictures designed strictly for church
use as part of a regular service. One of
the activities of the Harmon Foundation.

RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION- For the

Improvement of Living Conditions John M.
Glenn, dir.; 130 E. 22nd St., New York.
Departments: Charity Organization. Delin-
quency and Penology, Industrial Studies,
Library, Recreation, Remedial Loans, Statis-
tics, Surveys and Exhibits. The publications
of the Russell Sage Foundation offer to
the public in practical and inexpensive form
some of the most important results of its
work. Catalogue sent upon request.

TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE^-An institution for
the training of Negro Youth; an experiment
in race adjustment in the Black Belt of the
South; furnishes information on all phases
of the race problem and of the Tuskegee
idea and methods; Robert R. Moton, prin-
cipal; W. H. Carter, treasurer; A. L. Holsey,
secretary, Tuskegee Institute, Ala.

WORKERS' EDUCATION BUREAU OF
AMERICA a cooperative Educational
Agency for the promotion of Adult Educa-
tion among Industrial Workers. 476 West
24th Street, New York City. Spencer Miller,
Jr.. Secretary.



BOOTLEGGING OPIUM IN THE PHILIPPINES
(Continued from page 77)



eduction of the poppy, coca shrub and similar plants by
(vernment monopoly with a gradual limitation to medicinal
id scientific needs, eventuating in prohibition. This
rogram would probably extend over fifteen years or more,
easons for these conclusions cannot be compressed within
is article, but one thing must be said: that there is
ch a dearth of knowledge of the fundamentals under-
ing the whole question that a series of researches should

undertaken at once. Here, too, space does not permit

details.
The investigation now to be undertaken in the Philippines



at the request of the War Department will, it is to be hoped,
not be confined to mere figures, but will be a complete
study. C. H. Anderson, the man chosen as investigator,
has a knowledge of the situation and is not an impractical
idealist. Will the Department face the facts, or will it try
to satisfy the public demand for rhetoric and conscience-
salve by pretending that prohibition of opium-smoking is
working? If the facts are faced, then the next time our
representatives at an international meeting in Geneva are
questioned, they can avoid a situation which has been in
the past, to say the least, embarrassing.



WHAT IS A SOCIAL WORK EXECUTIVE?
(Continued from page 115)



oes to the public with a varied but constant interpretation
: his problems and the work of his agency in meeting them.
i order to interpret problems and policies your executive
lould be an able platform speaker and the commander of
t least a fair literary style. It is the constant astonishment
f visitors to the National Conference of Social Work that
o many apparently qualified social executives address audi-
nces, and so few leave more than a fleeting impression.

There is an old biological adage to the effect that all
oosters are chickens but not all chickens are roosters. There
.re many glib talkers who would by no means do for exec-
itive service, but it is nearly true that real leaders of exec-
itive quality are able to express themselves in public with
learness and force.

Thinking over the whole requirement which is here
(In answering advertisements please mention



labeled "leadership," it is difficult perhaps to see that
ability of such a high order is necessary in social work.
This is because the new profession is in a stage of meta-
morphosis out of efforts heretofore only philanthropic
principally the relief of suffering. In truth, remedial charity
is only the repair-shop of real social work. There is in
process of materialization a science of public welfare. It
calls for professional service of a high order. That present
pay is so meagre should not be disconcerting. This is al-
ways the case with nascent professions. The public must be
convinced of the real value of such service before they will
compensate it adequately.

The third and concluding article in Mr.
Kelso's series, on Efficiency, will appear in
The Survey of May 15.

THE SURVEY. // helps us, it identifies you.)



121



MEDICAL AND PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL
SERVICE TRAINING

Lectures by members of the staff of

JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICAL SCHOOL,

SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND

PHILOSOPHICAL FACULTIES

Supervised practice work FAMILY WELFARE
ASSOCIATION, JOHNS HOPKINS' SOCIAL
SERVICE DEPARTMENT, MEDICAL AND
PSYCHIATRIC CLINICS.

Two year course leading to M.A. Degree
For Social Economics circulars apply to Registrar

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
BALTIMORE, MD.



BREASTING THE CRIME WAVE

(Continued from page 71)



HOUSES SUPPLYING INSTITUTIONAL TRADE

Dry Goods

FREDERICK LOESER & CO.
Fulton Street Brooklyn. N. Y.

Groceries

SEEMAN BROS.
Hudson and North Moore Streets New York

Electric Clock System
LOCKWOOD & ALMQU1ST, Inc.
501 Fifth Avenue New York City



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, CIRCUIT
TION, ETC., REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF CONGRESS OF
AUGUST 24, 1912, of the Survey published semi-monthly at New York,
N. Y., for April 1, 1927.

State of New Yrk, I
County of New York, |

Before me, a Commissioner of Deeds, in and for the State and county afore-
said, personally appeared John D. Kenderdine, who, having been duly sworn
according to law, deposes and says that he is the business manager of The
SURVEY, and that the following is, to the best of his knowledge and belief, a
true statement of the ownership, management (and if a daily paper, the
circulation), etc., of the aforesaid publication for the date shown in the
above caption, required by the Act of August 24, 1912, embodied in section
411, Postal Laws and Regulations, printed on the reverse of this form, to
wit:

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, editor, managing editor,
and business manager are: Publisher, Survey Associates, Inc., 112 East 19
Street, New York City; Editor, Paul U. Kellogg, 112 East 19 Street, New
York City; Managing Editor, Arthur Kellogg 112 East 19 Street, New York
City; Business Manager, John D. Kenderdine, 112 East 19 Street, New
York City.

2. That the owner is: (If owned by a corporation, its name and address
must be stated and also immediately thereunder the names and addresses
of stockholders owning or holding one per cent or more of total amount
of stock. If not owned by a corporation, the names and addresses of the
individual owners must be given. If owned by a firm, company, or other
unincorporated concern, its name and address, as well as those of each indi
vidual member, must be given.) Survey Associates, Inc., 112 East 19
Street, New York City, a non-commercial corporation under the laws of
the State of New York with over 1,800 members. It has no stocks or
bonds. President, Robert W. deForest, 30 Broad Street, New York, N. Y.;
Vice-Presidents, Julian W. Mack, 1224 Woolworth Bldg., New York,
N. Y.; V. Everit Macy, "Chilmark," Scarborough-on-Hudson, N. Y.:
Robert Hallowell, 112 East 19 Street, New York, N. Y.; Secretary, Rita
W. Morgenthau, 112 East 19 Street, New York, N. Y.; Treasurer. Arthur
Kellogg, 112 East 19 Street, New York, N. Y.

3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders
owning or holding 1 per cent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages,
or other securities are: (If there are none, so state.) None.

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving the names of the own-
ers, stockholders, and security holders, if any, contain not only the list
of stockholders and security holders as they appear upon the books of
the company but also, in cases where the stockholder or security holder
appears upon the books of the company as trustee or in any other fiduciary
relation, the name of the person or corporation for whom such trustee is
acting, is given; also that the said two paragraphs contain statements em-
bracing affiant's full knowledge and belief, as to the circumstances and
conditions under which stockholders and security holders who do not
appear upon the books of the company as trustees, hold stock and securities
in a capacity other than that of a bona fide owner; and this affiant has
no reason to believe that any other person, associat on, or corporation has
any interest direct or indirect in the said stock, bonds, or other securities
than as so stated by him.

[Signed] JOHN D. KENDERDINE,

Business Manager.
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 16th day of March, 1927.

[Seal] MARTHA HOHMANN,

Commissioner of Deeds, City of New York.

New York County Clerk's No. 184; New

York County Register's No. 28079.

My Commission Expires May 25, 1928.

(In ansviering advertisements please mention



state commissions to meet the onset of crime by proraotij
a more efficient administration of criminal justice. This
proposes to achieve, first, by awakening public opinion throuj
the dissemination of information with respect to crime and I
treatment; second, by stimulating the organization of sta I
and local crime commissions and, third, through a comparatil
study of the criminal law of the several states to work out I
uniform program of legislation to be recommended to the bl
associations and, where such exist, to the crime commissioj
of the several states.

While the earliest statements as to the purposes of the Cor I
mission rested its case solely on the improvement of repressi'J
measures for dealing with crime, the organization has, in facl
developed two committees whose function it is to seek O'l
the causative factors of delinquency. One of these, the Con I
mittee on Education, as announced by its chairman, Newtcl
D. Baker, "will attempt to cover the influence of educations
industrial and social conditions upon the prevalence of crimi
while the other, the Committee on the Medical Aspects 1 1
Crime, headed by Mrs. Richard Derby, daughter of the 1*1
Theodore Roosevelt, "will study all matters regarding d
physical and the mental condition of criminals." Both the;
committees propose to gather together and to analyze tt
studies that have been made in recent years in the fields whk
they respectively cover.

Perhaps we may be pardoned for not taking these adumbri I
tions of purpose too seriously. The Commission is out to figl
crime in the good, old-fashioned way. It would be glad,
doubt, to throw light on the dim background of delinquen
but its real job is to cope with the problem in a more dir
forthright manner. This is clearly indicated by the fact
the only two committees that have reported and whose cor I
elusions have gone out to the world are Chancellor Hadley
Committee on Criminal Procedure and Judicial Administratioi
and the special Committee on Fire-arms Regulation. Thi
latter of these reports proposes both national and state legis
lation to restrict the transportation, sale and use of fire-arms
while the Hadley report submits an excellent draft of legis
lative changes in criminal procedure which, as was to be ex
pected from its source, embodies all the important recom
mendations made in recent years by the legal authorities t<
whose efforts the earlier part of this paper is devoted.

HOW shall I, in conclusion, evaluate this tremendous ef
of the bar and of the public to cope with the menace o
crime? The subject is one that gives me deep concern,
want, if I can, to share the optimism of those who see in thi
concerted drive a long step toward the solution of this gravi
problem.

What we can clearly see is a strong movement for th
purification of the wells of justice. What we may hop^full)
expect from this movement is a steady improvement of thi
criminal law with a slower and more irregular improvemenl
in its administration. This latter will come about only as anc
when our civic conscience becomes purged of its indifferenct
and its subservience to political considerations. But this, too
we may envisage as the result of the combined efforts of tht
legal profession and our civic crusaders.

What bothers me is the question of the bearing of all this
on the crime wave. What we shall have achieved, let us say,
is the mechanical perfection of the ancient instrumentalities of
criminal justice. But the criminal law is still to be divorced
from criminal science. In none of the proposed reforms,
whether emanating from the bar or from the popular move-
ment, is there any recognition of the criminological principle
of the individualization of treatment. Always the aim, the sole
aim, is stark punishment swifter and surer punishment not
THE SURVEY. It helps us, it identifies you.)



122



nderstanding and correction. This has always been the way
f "the amateur social doctors" as described by Professor
Villiam Graham Sumner: "They always begin with the ques-
ion of remedies and they go at this without any diagnosis or
ny knowledge of the anatomy or the physiology of society."
It would be absurd to deny the existence of a substantial
elationship between law-enforcement and crime but it is a
reater absurdity to accept the former as a sovereign remedy
or the latter. There are incalculable elements in the war-
lare of organized society against its criminal elements. Even
n the field of international war there are "imponderables"
vhich count for more than the heaviest battalions. Assuming
hat we may by these projected methods make crime twice as
irecarious as it is today, would we, even then, have made
nore than a dent in the present rate of criminality? I confess
! don't know. No one knows. We are blind leaders of the
>lind. We must go on in our present course. But let us not
ilink the fact that in the vast majority of cases, the bandit
>f today is the juvenile delinquent of yesterday and the in-
locent child of the day before yesterday. Tomorrow it will
)e too late. The only cure for crime is prevention.



THE NEGRO IN DETROIT
(Continued from page 73)



throughout the report and especially in the housing part, too
nuch responsibility is put up to the colored people themselves.
The removal of these appalling conditions is a task which the
nty as a whole must shoulder.

And that brings us to the main phase of the problem: Do
the white people of Detroit really want to see their colored
ellow-citizens prosper? Evidently they do, in the abstract,
mt they have failed these last few years in almost everything
that has brought their good intentions to a practical test.
Take this matter of better homes, for example. Here is a
minute examination of the relative desirability of the Negro
as a tenant and a neighbor, pages of evidence that, compared
with other nationality groups, and in those circumstances
where the maintenance of a decent home is physically and
psychologically possible, he is desirable in both respects, yet
everywhere white people permit themselves to be stampeded
into a wild scramble to get rid of their homes because a few
colored families have moved into the block. An unusually
full case-study provides the nearest approach of this survey to
Ian inquiry into the mind of Detroit on the Negro. It is
jnot a pretty picture. Back of all the things the committee
sets forth there looms a problem bigger. The channels for
(American habits of thought are being made, it seems, not by
experience but by special interests in this case quite clearly
certain real estate interests.

There is nothing in the report to assure a continuing vital
interest in race relations. Some of the recommendations,
addressed to municipal departments and to social agencies, no
doubt will be carried out. But, as in the case of the Chicago
commission, there is no provision for a real procedure to fol-
low up the work of the committee. If industrial depression
should come to Detroit, we do not know what will happen
to its colored citizens. They are the last hired and, in some
cases at least, will be the first fired; they live close to the
margin and cannot provide adequately for a rainy day. So
they will fight for their jobs and their homes. What then?

Because of that potential sharpening of conflict at some
future time, the present report has a value that exceeds the
total of its interesting findings and of the practical measures
that may spring from them. That value consists in the assur-
ance which it gives the colored community that, after all, they
do not have to fight their battle all alone; that influential
individuals and groups in the community are anxious to see
justice done them and to help them as friends and brothers.



MARRIAGE and CAREERS

A study of one hundred women who are wives, mother*,
home-makers and professional workers

by
VIRGINIA MacMAKIN COLLIER

Published by
THE BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL INFORMATION

Sold by

THE CHANNEL BOOKSHOP

279 Park Avenue Price $1.0O



QUESTION:

DOES PROHIBITION WORK?

J^= ANSWER:

"DOES PROHIBITION WORK?"

Edited by MARTHA BENSLEY BRUERE

The social workers of the entire country have
contributed the facts that make up this un-
biased, fascinating account of the United States
today under Prohibition.

AT ALL BOOKSTORES. $1.50

HARPER & BROTHERS W EAST 33o STREET, NEW YORK



for both



For Social Workers

And All Who Are Interested in Community
Health Programs

An attractive combination offer is now possible

THE SURVEY twice-a-month (in-
cluding Survey Graphic).
The ideal magazine for social workers.
The indispensable medium for informa-
tion on social welfare and progress.
Regularly $5.00 a year.
THE PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE
monthly.

The magazine for public health nurses
and for workers in allied groups. The
official publication of the National Or-
ganization for Public Health Nursing.
Regularly $3.00 a year.

. Whether or not you are a lay or nurse member of
the N.O.P.H.N. this bargain offer is for you, provided
you are a new subscriber to either magazine.

This coupon entitles you to the big saving. Mail
it today. Pay later if you wish, but enclose your
check if possible and have it over with.

THE PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE, 370 Seventh Ave., New York.
Enter me for a year of The Public Health Nurse and The
Survey. I enclose $5.50 (or will send within 30 days after
receipt of bill).

Name

Address



(In answering advertisement, please mention THE SURVET. It help, us, it identifies you.)

123



I CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS




WORKERS WANTED



WANTED: Matron Cottage of depend-
ent girls 9 to 14 years. Must be competent
to instruct and help in all household duties
Address, Superintendent, Sunnyside Home
Girard, Erie Co., Pa.



COOPERATIVE PLACEMENT SERV-
ICE. Social workers, secretaries, super-
intendents, matrons, housekeepers, dieti-
tians, cafeteria managers. The Richards
Bureau, 68 Barnes Street, Providence, R, I.

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA need
men with leadership and administrative
ability and experience for executive posi-
tions. Thirty-day Training Schools before
v o p r lacement Furtl >er information
BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA, 200 Fifth
Avenue, New York.

SUPERVISOR of boys for Chicago
Home for Jewish Orphans, 6208 Drexel
Avenue. State Age, qualifications and
salary expected. 5758 SURVEY.

GRADUATE NURSES, dietitians, labor-
atory technicians for excellent hospital
positions everywhere. Write for free book
now. Aznoe's Central Registry for Nurses,
30 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois.



WANTED: Social Case Worker; Col-
lege graduate for a General Hospital in
Eastern part of country. Hospital exper-
ience not essential. 5704 SURVEY.



WANTED: Experienced matron for Old
Ladies' and Children's Home. Forty resi-
dents. Address, Old Ladies' Home, Mead-
ville, Pennsylvania.



WANTED: Psychiatric social worker,
well trained and experienced, for juvenile
and adult case work in mental clinic, con-
stituting part of community-wide mental
hygiene program being developed by
Syracuse Health Demonstration and likely
to be linked up later with new State
psychiatric hospital. State age, training
and experience. Salary $2400 per year
Onondaga Health Association, Syracuse
New York.



WORKERS WANTED



WANTED: Catholic Social Case Work-
er, college graduate with at leas': one year
of experience in an approved agency <7oo
SURVEY.

CASE WORKER in Organization for
family Social Work, Eastern Pennsylvania
State training, experience and references
5789 SURVEY.



JEWISH FAMILY CARE AGENCY
always ready to consider applications of
competent young women interested in case
work Opportunity for further study at
School of Social Work or University.
working scholarships available. Jewish
Welfare Society, 330 S. Ninth St., Phila-
delphia, Pa.



WANTED: by Jewish agency, Western
New York, experienced family case work-
er; some psychiatric training desirable-
also child placing agent, one able to organ-
ize and develop home finding. 5780 SURVEY.



WANTED. Public health nurse inter-
ested in development of rural health pro-
grams as secretary of Rural Health Com-
mittee. Excellent opportunity for well-
trained and qualified person. State age,
training and experience. Onondaga Health
Association, Syracuse, New York.

EXPERIENCED GIRLS' SUPERVISOR
wanted for Jewish Children's Home, lo-
cated in the South. 5795 SURVEY.

WANTED: Woman resident in SettFe-
ment to give nine hours weekly in return
for room and part board. 5791 SURVEY.

BAND MASTER WANTED The
Pennsylvania Training School, Morganza,
Pa., will employ a high class Band Master
and Musical Director if satisfactory terms
can be agreed upon. Address W. F. Penn,
Superintendent.



Your Summer Vacation may

be pleasantly and profitably

spent at a Summer Camp.



Positions open, Directors, neau
Counselors, Physicians. Nurses, Dleti-



Head



nv*v, j. ujBiuittus. iNurses, uieti-
tians, Handcraft, Swimming, Athle-
tics. Dramatics. Music, Dancing; etc.

No charge for registration

Executive Service Corporation
Slimmer Camp Division

GERTRUDE D. HOLMES, Director
Fershing Square Bldg.. New York City



WANTED: For the months of July and
August, a young man and a young woman
as Recreational Directors for a group of
boys and girls respectively. Must both be
good swimmers. Apply Superintendent,
Home for Crippled Children, Newington
Connecticut.

DESIRED ORTHODOX JEWISH
WOMAN for Old Peoples Home in the
Northwest as superintendent. Capacity 50
beds. Outline educational and work ex-
perience. Woman's Occupational Bureau,
mi Nicolet Avenue, Minneapolis.



MOTHER'S HELPER WANTED

A REFINED Italian American family
(Presbyterian) offers desirable home and
some financial consideration to lone middle
aged woman, or young lady, qualified as
mother's helper. Address, Secretary, Com-
munity Councils, Municipal Building, New
York.



WORKERS WANTED
The Collegiate Service, Inc.






437 Fifth Avenue
New York City

Occupational Bureau for College
Women

We supply settlement, institution
and organization executives, case

orkers, field agents, recreation lead-
teachers, dietitians, personnel
managers publicity directors, statisti-
cians, and others, to meet all needi
of social institutions.




WANTED: Assistant headworker i
director of girls' work for a Jewish set"
mem. Experience essential. Dramatic""
handcraft training required. 5797 S URVE-

SITUATIONS WANTED

7f E .WING TEACHER, refined, well~e7u
cated, capable, seven years teaching e,
penence, desires position in an institution



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