Survey Associates.

The Survey (Volume 58) online

. (page 30 of 130)
Online LibrarySurvey AssociatesThe Survey (Volume 58) → online text (page 30 of 130)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


t-an furnish good references. 578+ SURVBT

YOUNG WOMAN, Protestant, wish*
position as a traveling companion, or .,
a companion to an elderly lady Am
experienced practical nurse, best of refer
ences, good education, and some music,
ability. Would prefer Pennsylvania bu
not issistent. 5785 SURVEY.

YOUNG WOMAN, Protestant, experi-
enced teacher, desires position in settle-
mem, community centre, or camp for sun
mer. Can teach handwork, gardening,
swimming, nature study. 57 86 SURVEY

EXECUTIVE HOUSEKEEPER Hieh-
ade woman, 50, practical dietitian, with
' n """""" ' .school and private home ex-
5788 SURVEY.



perience, desires position



MIDDLE-AGED WOMAN of cultur,
and "Perience, desires position taking care
of children and housekeeper in private
home. Registered nurse in New York and
Pennsylvania. 5792 SURVEY.

JOURNALISM GRADUATE, Univer-
sity of Missouri, young man, 25 hours in
sociology, practical newspaper experience,
wants pubhcity work with social agenry
5793 SURVEY.

FAMILY CASE WORKER, who is also
expenenced public health nurse, at present

SURVEY ' WiSHeS t0 make 3 Change ' " 8 *

FOR THE HOME"



(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY. // helps

124



- Bradley, runout expert,
ahowa Just how to make boon
cooking, cake-making, candj-
making ilte blf proflta Row t*
*ter. run profitable TEA ROOMS
Jtr Inn, Cafeterias, etc. over 51 wan
Make Money I Write today tor IIIus
Deoklet "Cooking for Profit," It'i PREB.

Amrici. School of Hone Eco.oi.ks, 849 E. S8lb Sired, OJOM
us, it identifies you.)



SITUATIONS WANTED

XPERIENCED HOUSE MANAGER
ires position in a Settlement House.
York or Philadelphia. 5787 SURVEY.

iJNIVERSITY or college teacher, man,
\. degree. Wonderful ten year experi-
e record. Best references. Desires to
;h Social Work, Sociology, or do re-
rch. 5794 SURVEY.

iAMP DIRECTOR, experienced with
rish Social Service camps, also trained
a teacher and social worker, desires
jition this summer in the East. 5796

LVEY.

fOUNG WOMAN, college education,
feutive secretarial experience, excel-
correspondent, business training, or-
lizing ability, available to established
gressive organization. Permanent.
Hstian. References. 5757 SURVEY.

JCECTJTIVE: Capable young man,
ven ability on previous projects, desires
nection where an agricultural program

ei be made part of boys' training. De-

pidahle, sincere. 5688 SURVEY.

^^^^^^^^^^^

EDITOR'S ASSISTANT

POSITION WANTED as editorial as-
liant. Experienced in editing, proof read-
|;, stenography. Ability to do original
frrary work. 5783 SURVEY.

BULLETIN BOARD

lio STATE NURSES ASSOCIATION: Dayton. April
9-22. Secretary, Mrs. Elizabeth P. Augunt
1:15 Hartman Theatre Bldg., Columbus.

KTIONAL CONFERENCE Of THE FELLOWSHIP FOR

I CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ORDER: Dayton, Ohio.
Btpril 19-22. In charge Amy Blanche Greene,

47 Madison Ave., New York City.
INNKSSEE CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL WORK: Nash-
Eille. April 20-22. Secretary, William C.
lieadrick, Memorial Bldg., Nashville.
KANSAS CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL WORK: Little
.lock. April 20-23. Secretary, Charles Wick-
rd. Jr., 414 W. 2nd St., Little Rock.
KNECTICUT CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL WORK:
Hartford. April 24-26. Secretary, Miss Mar-

:aret K. Byington, 36 Trumbull St., Hartford.
IrrsBURGH GIRLS CONFERENCE: Pittsburgh.
jVpril 25-27. Charge of arrangements, Miss
Helen Harris, Kingsley House, Pittsburgh.
LIGIOUS EDUCATION ASSOCIATION: Chicago,
fcpril 26-29. Secretary, Laird T. Hites, 308

V. Michigan Ave., Chicago.

w ENGLAND DIVISION-AMERICAN NURSES Asso-
KIATION: Providence. April 27-29. Secretary,
Miss Edith Barnard, 425 Broadway, Provi-
Blence.

SSISSIPFI HOVE ECONOMICS ASSOCIATION:
t'ackson. April 27-29. Secretary, Miss Mary
Vilson, Mississippi State College, Columbus.

D-ATLANTIC NURSES ASSOCIATION: New York
fity. April 28-29. President, Mrs. A. Hansen,

81 Franklin St., Buffalo.

JFORNIA CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL WORK: Oak-
land. May 1-5. Secretary, Anita Eldridge,
iS New Montgomery St., San Francisco.
feciNiA STATE NURSES ASSOCIATION: Norfolk.
Way 3-5. Secretary, Lily W. Walker, Memo-
rial Hospital, Danville.

LIFORNIA STATE NURSES ASSOCIATION: Oak-
land. May 3-5. Secretary, Mrs. J. H. Taylor,
W 43 Call Bldg., San Francisco.
ecoN CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL WORK: Portland.
May 6-7. President, Jane V. Doyle, Fitzpatrick
Bldg., Portland.

SEICAN CHILD HEALTH ASSOCIATION: Wash-
ington, D. C. May 9-11. In charge, George T.
Palmer, 370 7th Ave., New York City.
ANNUAL CONFERENCE FEDERATION OF DAY
NURSERIES: Washington, D. C. May 12-13.
Secretary, Mrs. Arthur M. Dodge, Room 907,
[105 E. 22nd St., New York City.
TIONAL CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL WORK AND
KINDRED GROUPS: Des Moines, la. May 11-18.
Secretary, Howard R. Knight, Ohio Institute
for Public Efficiency, 277 E. Long St., Colum-
fcus, Ohio.

TiTUTg OF CITIZENSHIP AND GOVERNMENT:
Richmond, Va. May 17-20. President, Frank
Wane, State Board of Public Welfare, Rich-
i-nond, Va.



ST. ANDREW'S CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL

237 EAST 17th STREET
NEW YORK CITY

The Episcopal SISTERS OF ST. JOHN BAPTIST offer hospitality to con-
valescent or tired business girls and women.

Rest, good food, and refined surroundings are provided. Roof-sun-
porch overlooks park. Guests are free to attend outside Clinics and may receive
visitors daily.

Condition on admission must not endanger or annoy other guests.
Chronic or aged patients are not eligible.

Rates: dormitory, $5.00 a week; private rooms, $io.oo-$zo.oo a week;
or adjusted according to circumstances. Season, October to May.
Apply to Sister in Charge. Telephone Ashland 4728.

ST. ANDREW'S REST, Country Branch, Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey. Open,
May 15 to October. Telephone, Park Ridge 152.



FOR SALE



BRAYCO PROJECTOR, complete with
carrying case also translux daylight screen
size 25 x 28 with tripod. Original cost
$60.00. Perfect condition. Sell for $30.00.
Social Welfare League, 512 Cutler Bldg.,
Rochester, N. Y.

CURRENT PAMPHLETS

Fifty ctntl * line for four insertions, copy
to remain unchanged.

"WHAT EVERT WOMAN SHOULD KNOW
ABOUT CITIZENSHIP". Published in two
editions, English and English-Yiddish.
Booklet answers questions concerning
naturalization of alien and native wo-
men, interpreting Cable Act. 150 a copy.
Department of Immigrant Aid National
Council of Jewish Women, 799 Broad-
way, New York City.

COOKING FOR PROFIT, by Alice Bradley,
describes home-study course, which in-
cludes catering, tea room, cafeteria and
luch room management. "51 Ways to
Make Money" free. Am. School of Home
Economics, 5772 Drexel Ave., Chicago.
Easterly Ave., Auburn, N. Y.

DELINQUENT GIRLS ON PAROLE, A Study
of Girls Paroled from Cedar Knolls
School, Hawthorne, N. Y., 1909-1925, by
Alice D. Menken, Vice-President, Jewish
Board of Guardians, 228 East ioth
Street, N. Y. C. "Reprint from Jewish
Social Service Quarterly, Sept 1926."

PERIODICALS

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF NURSING shows
the part which trained nurses are taking
in the betterment of the world. Put it
in your library. $3.00 a year. 19 W.
Main St., Rochester, N. Y.

MENTAL HYGIENE: quarterly: $3.00 a year;
published by the National Comittee for
Mental Hygiene, 370 Seventh Avenue,
New York.

"Home -Making as a Profession"

I> a 30-pp. 111. handbook It's FREE. Home-studj

Domestic Science courses, for teaching. Institution

management, etc., and for home-making efficiency.

Am. School of Home Eoonomlci, 849 E. Wtti St.,



MISCELLANEOUS

Elizabeth Dawson Wonderful Chocolates

packed in a beautiful 5 Ib. box, $3.00. delivered
to your home. Allen & Andrews, Corning, N. Y.



TOURS



WORLD ACQUAINTANCE TOURS

PLEASURE
TOURS

Sailing each week

Beat Ships Low

M*tM

Snd for Booklti



STUDY TOURS
Exceptional oppor-
tunity for Students,
Teachers, Lectur-
ers.

Experienced Lead-
ers.

Student's Tour



Low Priced

Itineraries Specially Arranged
51 West th St., N. Y. City. Circle 1511



3?Daus



Save30%



ALLEN TOURS, be.
Ill LMt balfef. leHei



WHERE TO LIVE

Manhattan Beach Hotel, New York

Live in a modern fireproof hotel by the
seashore for leas than in the crowded city.
Home-like comforts. Moderate-priced res-
taurant; maid, valet and telephone service.
Winter rates: $ta per week for two, 37
minutes from Time* Square, B. M. T.
Telephone Sheepsbead 3000.

CAMP



RESEARCH: We '" in pp arin

special articles, papers,
speeches, debates. Expert, scholarly ser-
vice. AUTHOR'S RESEARCH BUREAU, 500
Fifth Avenue, New York .

(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY. It helps us, it identifies you.)

125




GREEN MANSIONS on TR1PP LAKE

Adirondacks' most beautiful adult camp
announces the opening of the first season with
a special Decoration Day week-end feature.

Par information address:

LENA BARISH

919 Woodycrest Ave., N. Y. City
Phone, Jerome 3718



Tear



ut th



list for refere



"I can't find time to eat"

EVER know anybody who couldn't find time to eat?
If you hope to keep fit, you manage to find time to
eat three times a day.

Isn't it just as necessary to feed the mind to feed it
with good reading?

Reading is a habit a necessary habit for people who
deal in the lives and happiness of others.

Start the reading habit now. Set aside a definite time
each day, each week, for reading and meditation.

Add a book a month to your library

Below are the ten books which sold best through The
Survey's Book Department from October i, 1926, to March
I, 1927. Of the first two there are only a few left. Better
order them first then a book a month thereafter. Tear out
this list for monthly reference.



10 Best Sellers



Postpaid

$1.00



1. The Mind in the Making

By JAMES HARVEY ROBINSON
Full text of the $2.50 edition, which was a belt seller
among non-fiction.

2. Psychology 2.00

By EVERETT DEAN MARTIN

Lectures-in-Print edition. Twenty chapters, each in
pamphlet form, yet all contained in the stiff covers of a
book. Originally $3.00.

3. Youth in Conflict (paper edition) 1.00

By MIRIAM VAN WATERS, Ph.D.
Written by the referee of the Los Angeles Juvenile
Court and based on the cases which come before her as
she helps young girls mend their lives.

4. The Gang 3.00

By FREDERIC M. THRASHER

A thorough-going study (with detailed map) of the
neighborhood gangs of a big city how they start, what
they do to young men and to a city community.

5. The Book of Marriage 5.00

By COUNT HERMANN KEYSERUNG
A new interpretation of marriage by twenty-four leaders
of contemporary thought, including Rabindrinath Ta-
gore, Beatrice Hinkle, Alfred Adler, Havelock Ellis.

6. Concerning Parent* (Paper edition) l.OO

A symposium on present day parenthood. Mirian Van
Waters and other leading thinkers contribute papers.

7. Meaning of Adult Education (Paper) l.OO

By EDUARD C. LINDEMAN

How education can be brought out of the college halls
into the lives of the people.

8. The Art of Helping People Out of Trouble 2.0O

By KARL DE SCHWEINITZ

The philosophy of case work. Every social worker
should be required by law to read it.

9. What is Professional Social Work? 1.50

By L. A. HALBERT

A clear, concise statement of the many aspects of social
work and their inter-relation. Illustrated by a chart.

10. Other People's Daughters 2.50

By ELEANOR ROWLAND WEMBRIDGE
Sketches which appeared in The Survey, written by
the present referee of the Cleveland Juvenile Court.



- START NOW
SURVEY BOOK DEPT.

112 E. 19th St., New York

I enclose $ for which please send me, postpaid :



Name .
Address



Analytic Index to This Number

April 15, 1927
Child Welfare:

What Makes Children Grow? p. 83

Report, Child Health, Ohio, p. 88

Child Farm Workers, p. 89

Help for feebleminded children, p. 96

Institutional histories, p. 98

Boy Scouts Camp, p. 106

Farm Clubs, p. 109
Family Welfare:

Housing, Crime and Social Work, p. 74

Old Age pensions, p. 81

Family Crowding, p, 83

Rural Dental Hygiene, p. 85

What Cottage Mothers Should Know, p. 98

Family recreation, p. 109
The Law and Law Breakers.:

Law and Citizens vs. Crime, p. 69

Bootlegging Opium in the P.I., p. 76

Sacco and Vanzetti, p. 78

Illegal Home Work, p. 94
The Conquest of Disease :

Rural Dental Hygiene, p. 85

Social Nurse and Social Worker, p. 86

Educating Doctors, p. 87

Slogan of Diphtheria Campaign, p. 87

British control of influenza, p. 88

Protective measures in Ohio, p. 88
Promotion of Health :

Price of Health booklets, p. 87

Fire-house antitoxins, p. 87

Chair of Nursing in Virginia, p. 87

Hourly nursing service, p. 88

Health supervision and child placement, p. 88

Pension plan for nurses, p. 88
Immigration and Race Relations:

Negroes in Detroit, p. 72

State division of aliens, p. 92

International Student Hospitality, p. 104
School and Community :

"Slow Clubs" of young people, p. 82

The "floating university," p. 82

High School Tries Project Method, p. too

Summer School at Manumit, p. 103

Vocational Guidance, p. 103

Negro intelligence tests, p. 104

Teaching methods assailed, p. 104
Education Outside the School:

Books for Trade Unionists, p. 94

Religion Through Motion Pictures, p. 105
Industrial Conditions:

New York's 48-hour law, p. 81

Rural Child Workers, p. $9

Industrial Home Work, p. 94

Working conditions a movie, p. 94
Industrial Relations:

United Mine Workers, p. 79

A.F. of L., p. 90

Minimum Wage in Arkansas, p. 94
Motives and Ideals :

Whither Social Work, p. 74

Chicago's new mayor, p. 80



on



ev
ev



WHITHER SOCIAL WORK?

(Continued from page 75)



motivate them to act in accordance with it? It means ind
trial democracy, cultural cooperation between races, and
international order bereft of war. The truth has been <
visaged by the social workers in their dealings with that m<
difficult human group the family. Upon its extension to 1
wider ranges of the social order depend our hopes for 1
future. If the ingenuity of man can lead him to sail withx
fear through the air and into the unknown regions that cir
the frozen pole, may we not hope that that same genius w
in time explore our social relationships, and help us to <
ganize them in the interest of progress.
(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY. // helps us, it identifies you.)



126



RING BOOK NUMBER



t



,-'/ ?*

-/ *




,T'S BACK OF
E HEADLINES




J. S.-S. F. BURGESS
ANNA L. STRONG



ADVENTURES IN PHILANTHROPY

By Olive A, Colton

IF DOCTORS DISAGREE by M. M. Davis

"GOLDEN RULE" NASH IN THE
EYES OF A UNION by. Robert W. Bruere



1O cents a coov



MAY 1, 1927



$5.00 a year



England Thanks God

that Elmer is

an American



"Sinclair Lewis's indictments of Western
civilization are terrible; they are absolutely
desolating. But 'Elmer Gantry' is about ten
times as readable as some scores of masterpieces
with which I am acquainted." ARNOLD BEN-
NETT in the Evening Standard.

"Elmer's life-story would be incredible if
it were not American. Mr. Lewis has never
made a finer effort of penetrative insight, a
more courageous and masterly exposure of
the banal and bogus element in American
national life." Liverpool Post and Mercury.

"We are convinced that Elmer intolerably
exists; and relieved that the Atlantic lies be-
tween us. There are times when one has a
ghastly impression that American cities have
become corrupt without ever having been ma-
ture; and this survey of religious conditions
does astonish the stranger." The Spectator

"If 'Main Street', 'Babbitt' and 'Elmer
Gantry' are forgotten before the end of the
present century it can only be because the young
Americans yet-to-be are ashamed to look their
grandparents in the face. Never within the
pages of a single volume was there such an ex-
posure of self-seeking, humbug, and smug de-
ceit." The Times



ELMER
GANTRY

By

Sinclair
Lewis




The most dis-
cussed novel of
the day

Everywhere
$2.50



AMERICA
COMES OF
AGE

By
Andre Siegfried

"The most uncannily
penetrating, and the
most exciting commen-
tary on America that has
been produced since this
country strode into the
center of the world's
attention." N. Y. Times
$3-00



THE WORLD
IN THE
MAKING

By

Count Hermann
Keyserling

Author of "The Travel^
Diary of a Philosopher"

This has been described
as the largest system on
human development that
has been dared since
Nietsche. Translated by
Maurice Samuel. $2.50



THE

REBELLIOUS

PURITAN

Portrait of Mr.
Hawthorne

By
Lloyd Morris

"Brilliant analysis, re-
vealing touches. Its sub-
ject stands out clear and
sharp like a rescued
Greek statue." N. Y.
Sun.

Illustrated, $4.00



Harcourt, Brace and Company 383 Madison Avenue New York




The sweet tooth as op-
posed to the keen mind.
In America per person we
spend $18.15 for candy,
ice cream and soda to
$1.10 for books; or over
16 times as much for
sweets as for books.




SMOKE

vs.
BRAINS



There are 500,000 tobacco
dealers in the United
States and only 1,500
bookstores, loo times as
much effort to supply
smoke as to supply brains.



50,000,000
BOOKS




In Russia nearly 5 times
as many books are sold
each year as in the United
States.Thefiguresarej.4o,-
000,000 to 50,000,000.



LITERATURE !

Not Just Books



EVERYTHING bound between two
covers is not literature.

There are thousands of books published
each year which are meant to be read in a
few minutes and forgotten. As things are
organized, these have to be put out in the
same form and bought at the same price
as really good books. It is the purpose of
the Literary Guild of America to have
nothing to do with that kind of book. Jt
is the aim of the Guild to choose only
books of permanent literary value, books
which you will read when you get them,
which will be important when they come
out, but which you will read again in six
months, in a year, which will be a per-
manent part of your life, which will be
the classics of the future.

To understand exactly what we mean,
imagine yourself living in the time of
Hawthorne, and imagine that there was



such a thing as the Literary Guild in ex-
istence then. In that day you would have
gone into a bookstore and as the result of
much talk bought a book by Mary Jane
Holmes. You would have had something
printed on paper, something of little real
worth, something of no permanent power.
But if the Guild had been in existence,
you would have received instead a copy
of "The Scarlet Letter," which your de-
scendants would have been reading today.

That is what the Guild is trying to do.
For the editors of the Guild, passing fads
do not exist. Its books will be perma-
nently important, either in content or in
literary value. Look over the list of
editors of the Guild.

They are sufficient promise of what
you will get. They are sufficient prom-
ise that books you might have missed
will reach you.



Reduced Price

You can get twelve books one each month
at much less than the twelve would cost in the
book stores. This is due to two things. First,
all members of the Guild must subscribe in ad-
vance, so that instead of twelve sales a year we
make one sale. Second, because by having this
advance subscription, we are able to get out
twelve books in definite editions in advance, so
that not one copy is wasted none lie idle on
booksellers' shelves, none are wasted in our
own stock rooms. Each copy goes to a definite
subscriber.

FREE

Send the coupon for
"Wings"



Sixteen lively pages of essays, dia-
grams, illustrations, cartoons, tell-
ing why books used to cost more and
why they are going to cost less.

Partial Contents of "Wings"

i. The Wall between Writer and Reader.
1. "The University of One Student," by Glenn
Frank

3. "Literature in Small Towns," by Zona Gale

4. "Special Value of the Literary Guild," by

Joseph Wood Krutch

5. "The Reading Years," by Elinor Wylie

6. Cartoon, by Hendrik Willera van Loon

7. Why the Low Price?

The next book of the Literary Guild is excit-
ing and important. Send the coupon now, so
that you will be a member in time to get it.



Literary
Guild

OF AMERICA



A Word About The Editors

from the St. Paul News

Carl VanDoren Editor-in-Chief, who, in the sanctums of
the Guild offices and mayhap even in his chair at Columbia
University, puffs at one of those cosmopolitan corncob and
clay pipes.

GlennFranlc Late Editor of Century, whose eyes, it is said,
have not been sullied by reading a novel in these now five years,
but whose taste in history, philosophy and such cannot be
sneezed at without stirring the placid waters of Lake Minnc-
tonka (Wis.)

Elinor Wylie Perhaps the best of our lady poets, even when
writing novels, and of whom James Branch Cabell said that
he headed the national parade in feminine erudition.

Hendrik Willem van Loon-Who has reduced mankind,
the Bible, et al., to words of one syllable, plus pictures.

Joseph Wood Krutch-Who writes in the Nation the most
penetrating of dramatic reviews and who played the "Liebcs-
traum" from Freud over the memory of the late Mr. Poe.



Zona Gale is the sixth editor. She is the author of Mis
Bett, Preface to a Life, and other widely read novels.



Lulu




LITERARY
GUILD OF
AMERICA, Inc.
55 Fifth Avenue,
New York

Send me free of charge and
without obligation to me
Wings with essays and por-
traits of your distinguished Edi-
tors. Also the story of The
Literary Guild of America.



MAIL
THIS,
NOW,



State .



I 3
IDT
19.

U'y.



SUBVEY published semi-monthly and copyright 192T by SUBYBY ASSOCIATES, Inc., 112 East 19th Street. New York. Prl '

l 30 cts a oopy; $500 a year; Canadian postage. ct.; foreign postal*. $1.H extra. Changes of address ah .uld ne maiwa u ^

check a receipt will be sent only upon reauest. Entered as second-class matter. March 25. 1909, at the post office. New Tore. n. i.. unaer LQ. ^ci ra Marcn

Acceptance for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for In Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on Jun. 26. 1!

Rita W. Morgenthau. Treas., Arthur Kellogg.



I.

Forest.



n

PEACE
CAME
THIS
WAY




soon as America stepped out of Euro-
pean affairs, Europe made peace. Why did
Locarno succeed where Versailles failed? What
have European statesmen been thinking, say-
ing, doing behind closed doors since America
withdrew? Here is the most important book
since "The Economic Consequences of the
Peace." It is a brilliant, frank and comprehen-
sive explanation of post-war conditions by an
internationally famous authority.



HOW EUROPE HADE
PEACE WITHOUT ANERICA

By FRANK H. SIMONDS

Author of "History of the World War"

DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & CO. *5.oo



The New Social Research $2.00 prepaid

By EMORY S. BOGARDUS, Preface ^ROBERT E. PARK

". . . This book is, nevertheless, the best manual of social research which
has yet been published in English."

American Journal of Sociology

Social Statistics $2.50 prepaid

By MANUEL C. ELMER, University of Pittsburgh

"Here is a first, compact, adequate discussion of statistical method,
written ... in the everyday language of social life home ownership,
boys clubs, the price of eggs, wayward girls."

Harvey Zorbaugh, in The Survey

History of Social Thought $3.50 prepaid

By EMORY S. BOGARDUS

Heads the list selected by the New York Evening Post, for a dozen books
for a social science bookshelf.



ORDER DIRECT OR

THRU YOUR

DEALER



JESSE RAY MILLER

A Western Publisher of Important Books
3566 University Avenue, Los Angeles



BAKER & TAYLOR CO.

55 FIFTH AVENUE

NEW YORK



(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY. // helps us, it identifies ju.)

130



an Any One Book Please
40,000 People?



Why the Book*o/-tfie*MontK Club

guarantees its subscribers against

dissatisfaction, and how.



rHE purpose of the Book-of-
the-Month Club is a very
simple one, but many people
nisunderstand it. It was organized
rimarily to prevent you from miss-
ng the outstanding new books,
'hink over the last few years. How
nany good books have appeared,
rhich you were anxious to read, but
'htch you never "got around to,"
ecause you were either too busy or
oo neglectful. The Book-of-the-

O

vlonth Club is an absolute insurance
gainst this happening in the future.

Many people think, however, that

they subscribe to the Book-of-the-
vlonth Club service they will be
ibligcd to accept one new book a
nonth, whether they like it or not.

uch an idea repels them. Nobody
vants someone else to choose his
eading. Nobody wants his choice of

ooks limited to a few a year. Now,



Online LibrarySurvey AssociatesThe Survey (Volume 58) → online text (page 30 of 130)