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the other hand does it interpret Comstock psychologically. It
remains a very entertaining and instructive picture of the out-
side of the man and some of the ludicrous or pathetic dramas
he staged.

LEON WHIPPLK

ANTHONY COMSTOCK. by Heyu-ood Broun and Margaret Leech. A. &
C. Boni. 285 pp. Price $3.00 postpaid of The Survey.

Geography Explains History!

IF all scientists could write like Huntington, we should need
no journalists to interpret their work. In the present
volume, the well known Yale geographer summarizes a num-
ber of previous studies and adds new material, made up, in
the main, of the results of two investigations. These are very
unequal in value. The chapters which give the geographical
and climatological background of the history of the Jewish
people lights up obscure phases of that history to an extent
which entirely justifies the author's claim that selective migra-
tion, under the compulsion of climatic changes, is the cause
of broad historical movements in which social, religious, po-
litical and commercial institutions represent merely the tools
of progress.

Not only in these chapters but throughout the book, the
author reveals or re-states with astonishing precision of
proof factors in the development of racial character, in the
experiences of peoples and in individual achievement, to which
a majority of our historians are as yet blind.

It is all the more regrettable that the author, already often
under attack for his imaginative historical reconstructions on
the basis of climatological discoveries, saw fit to include in this
book observations to which he has not given the usual scientific
tests. This is true more especially of his statistical analysis
of leadership as revealed in the collection of brief biographies in
Who's Who. The superficiality of some of his deductions
comes mainly from the fact that he uses that reference work
as though its selection represented purely objective standards
of "competency." Some pages of the social evaluations in this
section merely reflect the author's preferences or the unstated



(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY. It helps as, it identifies yeu.)

182



Western Reserve University

SCHOOL OF APPLIED SOCIAL SCIENCES
CLEVELAND



A graduate professional school offering
preparation in social administration.

Family Case Work
Child Welfare
Group Service Work
Medical Social Work
Public Health Nursing

Supervised remunerative field work is avail-
able under certain conditions.

Application for admission must be made
in advance.

JAMES ELBERT CUTLER, Ph.D., Dean

2117 Adelbert Road
Cleveland, Ohio



The National School of

The Young Women's Christian Associations for
Professional Study

Graduate courses of interest to those wishing to pre-
pare for work with women and girls in social or religious
organizations, or for those desiring to enter Association
work as a profession. Single courses may be taken in
connection with graduate work at Columbia.



SUMMER SESSIONS
Nev> York, N. Y.July ll-August 19
Berkeley, California June 21-August 6



For information address
135 East 52nd Street New York, N. Y.



MEDICAL AND PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL
SERVICE TRAINING

Lectures by members of the staff of

JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICAL SCHOOL,

SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND

PHILOSOPHICAL FACULTIES

Supervised practice work FAMILY WELFARE

ASSOCIATION, JOHNS HOPKINS' SOCIAL

SERVICE DEPARTMENT, MEDICAL AND

PSYCHIATRIC CLINICS.

Two year course leading to M.A. Degree
For Social Economics circulars apply to Registrar

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

BALTIMORE, MD.



WHAT DOES JEWISH SOCIAL WORK OFFER AS

2L!^?Ll (2 .i V fa?* '<"* wi ^ a .j fr e .

i*t.V oetter tnan tne other socialised professions svch as teach-
tng, public health work, etc. . . ." (See Pamphlet, 9. 7).



The Training
School




for Jewish
Social Work



Offers a fifteen months' course of study in Jewish
Family Case Work, Child Care, Community Centers,
Federations and Health Centers.

Several scholarships and fellowships ranging from
$250 to $1500 are available for especially qualified
students.

The regular course begins July 5, 1927

For information, address The Director

THE TRAINING SCHOOL
FOR JEWISH SOCIAL WORK



210 WEST 91ST STREET



NEW YORK CITY



Smith College Scho

for



(In answering advertisements please mention THE

183



Fellowships paying all expenses, internships
providing maintenance, and numerous
scholarships are available to properly
qualified students who desire to enter
the field of social work, child guid-
ance, juvenile courts, visiting
teaching, and psychiatric so-
cial work. Graduates of
accredited colleges eligi-
ble for the degree

MASTER OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

Summer session for experienced social
workers

For information address

THE DIRECTOR

College Hall 8, Northampton, Massachusetts
SURVIY. // helps *>, it identifie, you.)



UNION



THEOLOGICAL
SEMINARY
TWO TEN DAY SUMMER CONFERENCES



CONFERENCE ON CITY CHURCH WORK
June ; to 17, 1927

For Pastors and Staff Workers. Ten days of Group Study of
Perplexing Problems of the City Church, such as: The Church and
its Constituency; The Church and the Industrial and Foreign
Language Groups; The City Mind and its Significance for the
Church. Among the Lecturers and Leaders are, Charles Stelzle,
Rev. C. C. Webber, Prof. Adelaide T. Case, Prof. H. N. Shenton,
Henry Busch.



MID-SUMMER CONFERENCE FOR MINISTERS
July 12 to 22, 1927

Six Courses of Five Lectures each on General Theological Sub-
jects, Preaching, and Youth and the Church, by such leaders as
Dr. Harry Emerson Eosdick, Prof. A. B. Macaulay of Glasgow,
Rev. Percy R. Hayward of Chicago, Prof. Eugene W. Lyman,
Prof. Ernest F. Scott.



Observation



Interdenomination Fellowship. Dormitory Residence,
trips to Centers of Religious and Social Work.

Par full particulars, write

PROF. GAYLORD S. WHITE, Director
3041 Broadway New York City




Theological Seminary
School of Religious Education
Kennedy School of Missions

W. DOUGLAS MACKENZIE, President

THE Foundation is an interdenominational university
of religion. Three separate schools on one campus:
the Theological Seminary training for the ministry ;
the School of Missions for the foreign field, the School
of Religious Education for the lay worker and teacher
and for social service.

Courses in all schools are open to all students, giv-
ing ample opportunity for well-rounded training in
the whole field of Christian work.

Hartford Seminary Foundation, Hartford, Conn.



School of Social Work

SIMMONS COLLEGE

In planning your summer, we call attention to the
following opportunities:

SUMMER INSTITUTES IN:
Medical Social Work
Psychiatric Social Work
Psychiatric Method to be used in Children's Work

and Family Work

Special course for Teachers in Mental Hygiene as it
relates to Education

Dates: July 5 August 12
Individual attention given to each student

Address

THE DIRECTOR
18 Somerset Street, Boston, Massachusetts



bias of the material he uses. One of the astonishing incon-
sistencies which incidentally suggests the danger of including
in a single volume articles written at different times is that
between his tears over the large amount of talent which urban
America draws from rural America and his denial of the pos-
session of talent in Russia because it has lost its pre-war urban
intellectuals.

In spite of its faults, however, this book is to be recomi-l
mended. Its two or three main theses are presented with in-
controvertible evidence, and its style is of a simplicity and
charm that make easy reading for the Hyman.

BRUNO LASKER

THE PULSE OF PROGRESS, fry Ellsworth Huntmgton. Scribnert.
341 pp. and charts. Price $5.00 postpaid of The Survey.



THE GOLDEN RULE THROUGH UNION EYES

(Continued from page 150)



workers and as a union. We, ourselves, have been dealt a blow
where it hurts. It has been hurting us like blazes in our pocket-
books. . . . Our reputation as craftsmen in the industry has been
hurt far more. We certainly cannot afford to let this continue.
We must now spike and eliminate the cause of this for all time.

Could there be a more illuminating example of the com-
bined effect of Arthur Nash's insistence upon the Golden Rule
attitude and the union's insistence upon scientific plant organ-
ization and skilled craftsmanship?

Just as the union has recognized the morale-building value
of Nash's attitude, so Mr. Nash himself has recognized the
value of the extraordinary attitude of the union toward tech-
nical competence. It has led him to adopt many of the tech-
niques which formerly he disparaged as deadening mechan-
isms. Quite candidly, he told me that since the union had been
in the factory he for the first time knew in advance of pro-
duction what the precise cost of each suit would be. A num-
ber of his district sales agencies involved him in serious loss
for want of an adequate accounting system. He is rapidly
introducing modern accounting into all branches of his busi-
ness. For want of an adequate current inventory, he piled
up stocks of unsalable woolens. It is his custom to issue
sample books to his agents every six weeks. Inevitably, they
pushed lines that were easiest to sell played favorites among
their samples and so the less popular goods piled up in the
storeroom. To dispose of these stocks when they threatened
his credit, Mr. Nash had to keep (Continued on page 187)



FOLK DANCE SCHOOL

of the

ENGLISH FOLK DANCE SOCIETY

American Branches

at

Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst
Ma ssa ch us e tts

August 22 to September 3, 1927

under the direction of
Miss MAUD KARPELES and MR. DOUGLAS KEN NEDY, of L,ondon,

Directors of the English Folk Dance Society

Graded classes in Country, Morris and Sword Dances, Folk
Songs and Singing Games.

The classes will be carefully graded so as to meet the needs of
those who have done no previous dancing as well as the needs of
more advanced students. Beginners will be welcome. Students
may register for either or both weeks.

For information address

SUSAN H. GILMAN

159 East 33 Street New York City



THE RECREATION COUNCIL OF SAN FRANCISCO

In Co-operation With
THE RECREATION TRAINING SCHOOL OF CHICAGO

offer

Intensive courses in games, folk dancing, story telling, dramatics,
acting and coaching, theoretical and technical courses. June 27
July 30.

For Catalog address: Miss Lois WILLIAMS, Executive Secretary.

COMMUNITY SERVICE RECREATION LEAGUE

942 Phelan Building, San Francisco, California



(In ansii-eriitf advertisements please mention THE SURVEY. It kelps uj, it identifies you.)

184



When Parent



4




HIS is a clumsy world
for children. They are
constantly running in'
to the barbed wires of
our grown-up principles and con'
ventions. Every year thousands
of them get into trouble which
brings them before the Juvenile
3ourts for punishment or wisely
tempered mercy. Rarely are these
unfortunate youngsters really bad.
Nearly always the hidden cause
behind their waywardness is lack
of training or proper guidance at
home. Oftentimes, physical con'
ditions cause their abnormality.
When health is restored the vi'
cious tendencies often disappear.

Warm-hearted men and women in all
parts of the country are doing splendid
work in helping to salvage these bits of
human driftwood. Organizations have
been formed which send volunteer
representatives to the Juvenile Courts to
take boys and girls on probation and so
save them from slipping into lives of
crime. The kindly folk who do this
work are "friends at court" to these
youngsters.

Delinquent children are by no means
found to come only from homes of
poverty. From well-to-do and even rich
homes have come children with tenden-
cies toward crime which have amazed
their parents. Too late these fathers
and mothers learned that in reality they
never had known their sons and
daughters.

May Day Children's Day

May First has been set aside by the
nation as a day on which mothers and




fathers, philanthropists and public-
spirited men and women, interested in
America's future, join in one great pur-
pose the big, important work of check-
ing up the health of the children of this
country.

It is a great forward step to set aside
a definite day to have eyes, ears,
noses, throats, and teeth examined for
possible physical defects. But why stop
half-way? Examine minds just as thor-
oughly for possible mental troubles.

In May, then, after you good fathers and
mothers have found out whether or not
your children are sound and healthy,
physically, you will want to have an
old-fashioned, heart-to-heart talk with



<f\

/



the youngsters and learn what they
are thinking about, who their com-
panions are, and where they spend
their time.

More especially will you want to do this
if you have ever spent
a few hours in a Juvenile
Court where you will have
learned that the young
offender, in nearly every
instance, lands in court
because of bad companions
or want of proper home
training.

Lacking a friend at home,
a child may need a friend
at court.



Each year more than 20O.OOO children are brought before the

Juvenile Courts charged with more or less serious offenses.

Seventy-five per cent of all adult offenders begin their criminal

careers before reaching the age of 21. The steps are fast from

petty thieving to murder.

In the three year period, 1923, 1924 and 1925, the homicide

mortality rate in the United States mounted to the higne

point ever recorded.

In 1926 there were approximately 1O.OOO homicides. In

recent years our homicide rate has been 6OO% grea.er than th.

of Canada and 1400% greater than that of England and Wales.



emotionally."

The Metropolitan ha. prepared a booHe,

Child". It may help .you o "^^ , h



Published by

METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE

Blggut in the WorldMore Assets. More Policyholdcrs. More

(In anwenng advertise*, please motion THE SumT.

185




HALEY FISKE.



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL AGENCIES



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PSY-
CHIATRIC SOCIAL WORKERS

To promote association among psychiatric
social workers and to maintain standards in
psychiatric social work. President, Mrs.
Makla H. Solomon. 74 Fenwood Road. Bos-
ton, Massachusetts; Secretary. Kathleen
Ormsby, 370 Seventh Avenue, N. Y. C.

AMERICAN BIRTH CONTROL LEAGUE

President, Margaret Sanger, 104 Fifth
Avenue, New York City. Objects: To edu-
oate American people in the various aspects
of the dangers of uncontrolled procreation;
to establish centers where married persons
may receive contraceptive advice from duly
licensed physicians. Life membership $1.00;
Birth Control Review (monthly magazine)
$2.00 per year.

AMERICAN CHILD HEALTH ASSO-
CIATION 370 Seventh Ave., New York.
Herbert Hoover, President; Philip Van
Ingen, M.D., Secretary, S. J. Crumbinc,
M.D., General Executive. Objects: Sound
promotion of child health, especially in co-
operation with the official health and edu-
cation agencies.

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF ORGAN-
IZATIONS FOR THE HARD OF

HEARING promotes the cause of the
hard of hearing; assists in forming organi-
zations. Pres., Dr. Gordon Berry ; Field
Secretary, Miss Betty Wright, 1601 35th
St. N.W., Washington. D. C.

AMERICAN HOME ECONOMICS ASSO-
CIATION Alice L. Edwards, executive
secretary, 617 Mills Bldg., Washington,
L). C. Organized for betterment of condi-
tions in home, school, institution and com-
munity. Publishes monthly Journal of Home
Economics: office of editor. 617 Mills Bldg.,
W ashington, D, C. ; of business manager,
1211 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md.

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR THE CON-

TROL OF CANCER-Dr. George A.
Soper, managing director, 25 West 43rd
Street, New York. To collect, collate and
disseminate information concerning the symp-
toms, diagnosis, treatment and prevention.
Publications free on request. Annual mem-
bership dues, $5.00,

AMERICAN SOCIAL HYGIENE ASSO-
CIATION 370 Seventh Ave., New York.

To provide a better understanding of the
social hygiene movement; to advance sound
sex education, to combat prostitution and sex
delinquency; to aid public authorities in the
campaign against the venereal diseases; to
advise in organization of state and local
social-hygiene programs. Annual membership
dues $2.00 including monthly journal.

AMERICAN WOMEN'S HOSPITALS

(O.S.) (Organized, 1917) 637 Madison

Avenue, New York. Chairman; Esther Love-
joy, M. L>., Treasurer; Mathilda K. Wallin,
M. D. Conducts hospitals and food stations
for refugees in Greece, and medical centers
in Macedonia and Western Thrace. Contin-
uing assistance to medical work in France,
Serbia, Russia and Japan.

ASSOCIATED GUIDANCE BUREAU,

INC. 16 East 53rd Street, New York,
Telephone: Plaza 9512. A non-sectarian,
non-philanthropic child guidance bureau, em-
ploying highest social work standards. Sup-
plies, trains, and supervises carefully selected
governesses, tutors, companions, and play
leaders. Conducts psychiatric nurses regis-
try. For information address Jess Perlman,
Director.

CHILD HEALTH DEMONSTRATION
COMMITTEE Courtenay Dinwiddle. di-
rector, 370 Seventh Avenue, New York.
Administers the Commonwealth Fund Child
Health Program - demonstrating integrated
child health services in small communities:
Fargo, N. D., Athens, Ga., Rutherford
County, Tenn., Marion County, Ore. Bul-
letins free on request.

CHILD WELFARE COMMITTEE OF
AMERICA, Inc 730 Fifth Avenue, New
Yerk. To secure home life for normal
dependent children in preference to insti-



tutions; to secure Mothers Allowance laws
in states having none; to urge adequate ap-
propriations for home aid; to promote proper
laws affecting adoption, boarding out and
placing out of dependent children; to aid
in the enforcement of these laws. States
Council of Committee comprises volunteer
representatives in practically every state.
Sophie Irene Loeb, President; Governor
Alfred E. Smith, Honorary President;
Margaret Woodrow Wilson. First Vice-
President; Edward Fisher Brown, Executive
Secretary.

THE CHILDREN'S VILLAGE, INCOR-
PORATED Dobbs-Ferry-on-Hudson, New
York. A national, non-sectarian training
school scientifically equipped for the study,
education and development of . problem boys
and girls, on commitment and by private
arrangement ages 7 to 16. Supported large-
ly by voluntary contributions. For further
information address Leon C. Faulkner, Man-
aging Director.

COUNCIL OF WOMEN FOR HOME
MISSIONS 156 Fifth Avenue, New York.
Composed of 22 Protestant national women's
mission boards. Florence E. Quinlan, Exec-
utive Secretary.

Work among Farm and Cannery Migrants,
Summer service for college students,
Laura H. Parker, Executive Supervisor.
Bureau of Reference for Migrating People,
follow-up of New Americans, Raymond
E. Cole, Executive.

EYE SIGHT CONSERVATION COUN-
CIL OF AMERICA L. W. Wallace.
President; Guy A. Henry, General-Director,
Times Bldg., New York. Conducts a na-
tional educational campaign to promote eye
hygiene. Urges correction of eye defects,
protection against hazards, proper lighting.
Comprehensive publications lantern slides-
lecture material. Cooperation of social
agencies invited.

FEDERAL COUNCIL OF THE
CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN

AMERICA Constituted by 28 Protestant
communions. Rev. C. S. Macfarland and
Rev. S. M. Cavert. Gen. See's; 105 E. 22nd
St., N. Y. C.



made us neighbors," said
Senator William E. Borah in
speaking of Mexico, "let justice make
us friends."

God has made you a neighbor, too
a neighbor to people who think and
act, often, in ways that are incompre-
hensible. Men and women whose reli-
gion differs from yours, who are politi-
cal heretics, whose social standards
reek of 1890.

Yet social justice can make such
neighbors into friends you'll be proud
of and who will be proud of you.

Four thousand men and women who
meet together this month at the Na-
tional Conference of Social Work in
Des Moines, have consecrated their
lives to the doctrine of social justice
and to its application in the neighbor-
hoods of the land.

Compared with the size of the task,
they are but a nucleus. They need
you, too. Not your passive approval,
but your active support, as well. If
you cannot come to Des Moines, at
least send in your membership to the
National Conference of Social Work
(listed above).

(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY. It helps

186



Dept. of Research and Education, Rev. P.
E. Johnson, Sec'y.

Commissions: Church and Social Service.!
Rev. W. M. Tippy, Sec'y; International
Justice and Goodwill: Rev. S. L. Gulick,
Sec'y; Church and Race Relations: Dr.
G. E. Haynes, Sec'y.

HAMPTON INSTITUTE-Trains Negro and
Indian youth for community service. Ad-
vanced courses: agriculture, builders, busi-
ness, home-economics, normal. Puhlishes
"Southern Workman" and free material on
Negro problems. J. E. Gregg, princip.il.

HUDSON GUILD 436 West 27th Street.

Dr. John L. Elliott, head worker. Non-
sectarian neighborhood-house: organized to
make effective in the community better ways
of living and working together thru co-
operative effort. Social, educational, recrea-
tional activities for men, women, and chil-
dren. Health work; Athletics; Neighborhood
Theatre; Mental Hygiene clinic. Supported
by voluntary contributions and memberships.

JOINT COMMITTEE ON METHODS OF
PREVENTING DELINQUENCY

Graham Komeyn Taylor, executive director,
SO East 42nd Street, New York. To pro-
mote the adoption of sound methods in this
field, with particular reference to psychiatric
clinics, visiting teacher work, and training
for these and similar services ; to conduct
related studies, education and publication;
and to interpret the work of the Common-
wealth Fund Program for the Prevention of
Delinquency.

LEAGUE FOR INDUSTRIAL DEMOC-

RACY Promotes a better understanding
of problems of democracy in industry
through its pamphlet, research and lecture
services and organization of college and
city groups. Executive Directors, Harry W.
Laidler and Norman Thomas, 70 Fi f th
Avenue. New York City.

THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS NON-
PARTISAN ASSOCIATION -6 E. 39th
Street, New York City. Charles C Bauer,
director. An Association supplying factual
information about the League of Nations,
World Court and the International Labor
Office, in an effort to give Americans a true
picture of the effectiveness of these organi-
zations. Literature, educational material, a
speakers' bureau, a film, slides, exhibits, and
a reference library, are available to the pub-
lic. Memberships which include subscription
to the Association's monthly publication,
range from $1.00 to $100.

NATIONAL BOARD OF THE YOUNG
WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA-
TIONS Mrs. Robert E. Speer, president ;
Miss Mabel Cratty, general secretary, 600
Lexington Avenue, New York City. This
organization maintains a staff of executive
and traveling secretaries to cover work in
the United States in 1,034 local Y. W.
C. A.'s on behalf of the industrial, business,
student, foreign born, Indian, Colored and
younger girls. It has 159 American secre-
taries at work in 49 centers in the Orient,
Latin America and Europe.

NATIONAL CHILD LABOR COMMIT-

TEE Wiley H. Swift, acting general sec-
retary, 215 Fourth Avenue, New York. To
improve child labor legislation; to conduct
investigation in local communities; to advise
on administration; to furnish information.
Annual membership, $2, $5, $10. $25 and
$100 includes monthly publication, "The
American Child."

NATIONAL CHILD WELFARE ASSO-
CIATION, INC (ett. 1912. incorp. 1914),
70 Fifth Ave., N. Y. C. (tel. Chelsea 8774).
Promotes as its chief object the building of
character in the children of America through
the harmonious development of their bodiet,
minds, and spirits. Its method is, in co-
operation with other organizations, to orig-
inate and disseminate educational material in
the form of posters, books, buHetins, charts,
slides, and insignia. Through its "Knight-
hood of Youth it provides homes, schools
and church schools with a method of char-
acter training through actual practice. Offi-
cers: Dr. John H. Finley. rres. ; Charlei
F. Powlison. Gen. Sec'y.

at, it identifiu you.)



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL AGENCIES



THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR
MENTAL HYGIENE, INC Dr. WiUUm
H. Welch, honorary president; Dr. Charles
P. Emerson, president; Dr. Frankwood E.
Williams, medical director; Dr. Clarence J.
D'Alton, executive assistant; Clifford W.
Beers, secretary; 370 Seventh Avenue, New
York City. Pamphlets on mental hygiene,
mental and nervous disorders, feebleminded-



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