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YOUNG WOMAN, headworker of set-
tlement, also experienced executive in other
branches of social work available for posi-
jtion May or next October. 5748 SURVEY.



BOYS' CLUB or Home Director. Young
man of twelve years experience with boys,
would like to transfer to larger field in
Fall. Excellent references as to character,
and disciplinarian. 5810 SURVEY.

SUPERINTENDENT, varied experience
as executive and organizer, pleasant per-
sonality. For children, convalescents, or
old folks. 5808 SURVEY.

COLLEGE GRADUATE, thoroughly
experienced, desires position as secretary
to Organization Executive, or professional
person. Available immediately. 5817
SURVEY.

WOMAN, State Normal graduate wishes
position: tutt>r, governess, companion dur-
ing vacation. Experience: principal schools,
past three years supervisor grades. 5773
SURVEY.




YOUNG WOMAN experienced in hos-
pital and dispensary management, ac-
counting and statistics, also thorough un-
derstanding of Workmen's Compensafion
Law, wishes institutional position of re-
sponsibility and trust . 5798 SURVEY.

WOMAN of culture and experience in
Settlement and Community Work, compe-
tent executive, desires position as director
For summer camp. Not Jewish. 5761
SURVEY.

EXECUTIVE, male, seven years exper-
ience desires change of position. Jewish
organization preferred. Also research ex-
perience. Excellent references. 5800 SUR-
VEY.

WOMAN, Jewish, Social Worker with
caching experience desires light employ-
nent in institution in return for room and
ward. 5799 SURVEY.

EXECUTIVE: with practical experience
n every phase of institutional work and
management. Wife qualified Kindergar-
en and Grade Teacher, social service and
nstitutional work. 5802 SURVEY.

CAMP DIRECTOR (Male), Jewish
Assistant Principal New York School
Ten Years Experience large institutional
and private camps. Executive and dieti-
cian. 5804 SURVEY.

WANTED: Position as head worker in
Settlement in middle West, preferably
Ohio. College education and several years
experience in Settlements. 5806 SURVEY.



"



SOCIAL
WORKERS

WE PLACE

Case Workers
Girls' Club Workers
Hospital Social Workers
Institutional Managers

-Physical Education Director-,
Psychiatric Workers
Recreation Workers
Settlement Workers
Travelers' Aid Workers
Y. W. C. A. Workers

ELIZABETH ARNOLD

Collegiate Employment Service

1036 Union Trust Building

Cleveland, O.



, .

t 57th St.. N. Y. C




SITUATIONS WANTED

YOUNG WOMAN with four years'
successful Executive Secretarial experience
with International and Civic organiza-
tions, available immediately or in fall.
5822 SURVEY.

PERSONNEL WORKER, astute execu-
tive, welfare worker, vibrant personality,
student vocational guidance, unequivocal
references, stenographer-typist, experience
placing numerous individuals. My in-
tensive knowledge of the needs of com-
mercial, industrial or social institutions a
dependable medium for placing right per-
son in right place. Will consider position
in store, business organization, institution
or hospital. Address Miss LaPidus, 1871
Walton Avenue, New York City.



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WANTED: Position as Superintendent
or managing housekeeper, by woman of
ability, tact, an-d culture, wide institutional
experience and deep interest in youth.
Available at once. Reply 5811 SURVEY.

(In answering advertisement! please mention THE SURVEY. // helps



CASE WORKER, n years experience, 8
in executive positions; 3 years University
teaching in social work courses, several
years in field work supervision; desires
job, preferably in the East, where interest
and experience in training, research into
case work processes, preparation of teach-
ing material and writing will be of value.
Available after June 15. 5815 SURVEY.

WOMAN, University instructor, wishes
change during summer. Companion, sum-
mer camp, clerical or welfare work. 5807
SURVEY.

WANTED: Position, preferably in field
of Social Research. Student for one year
in New York School of Social Work;
three year's experience in Girls' Industrial
School ; special investigator and Acting
Director of Juvenile Protective Associa-
tion for two years, and Supervisor of
Psychiatric Social Service Department
with American Red Cross Chapter for
two years. Address, Box 271, Grand
Central Terminal, New York City.



Fifth Avenue Letter Shop, Inc.

4* East 22nd Street



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Ofewntml ' I Addreaai.1

Ask The Survey about Us!



CURRENT PAMPHLETS

"WHAT EVERT WOMAN SHOULD KNOW
ABOUT CITIZENSHIP". Published in two
editions, English and English-Yiddish.
Booklet answers questions concerning
naturalization of alien and native wo-
men, interpreting Cable Act. isc a copy.
Department of Immigrant Aid National
Council of Jewish Women, 799 Broad-
way, New York City.

DELINQUENT GIRLS ON PAROLE, A Study
of Girls Paroled from Cedar Knolli
School, Hawthorne, N. Y., 1909-1925, by
Alice D. Menken, Vice-President, Jewish
Board of Guardians, za8 East 1910
Street, N. Y. C. "Reprint from Jewish
Social Service Quarterly, Sept. 1926."
us, it identifies you.)



m



Why I Am Going



to the



National Conference
of Social Work



Des Moines



From Boston-



May 11-18



I attend in order to rediscover my place in
the profession. It is here that I revive my
appreciation of the standards and principles
upon which social work is based. Through it
I enrich my personal philosophy of service. In
it I find friendships that are the rewards of life.




Executive Secretary,
Boston Council of Social Agencies.



From Chicag



With a platform as broad as humanity, the
Conference has kept the field of my vision and
action ever extending. The fine fellowships of
its democratic membership have so inspired,
guided and heartened me that neither I nor my
work can afford to lose the momentum to be
gained at every session.



Chicago Commons.



From San Francisc



In general, for inspiration, information, dis-
cussion, guidance, fellowship. For the thrill of
being part of that great group of forward look-
ing men and women who are trying with vision
and courage to work out the problems of human
relationships. In particular, to get ideas and
new information for our own work.



I

Executive Secretary,
California Conference of Social Work.

Can you afford not to attend?

For full information write to

HOWARD R. KNIGHT, General Secretary

National Conference of Social
Work

277 East Long Street, Columbus, Ohio.



(Continued from page 187)

bring fresh prestige to union management cooperation. Already
the quality of Nash suits has been raised to a higher standard;
the last financial statement shows that the business is in a
healthy condition. There is impressive evidence in the factory
nf what can he accomplished where management and workers
agree that their own interests and the interests of the buyers of
their product are best served when the technique of science in
the field of industrial relations is obedient to the Golden Rule.



THOUGH DOCTORS DISAGREE
(Continued from page 156)



is in fact far less expensive than the old method of paying
by the visit, or in the case of mutual societies at so much per
member. Its cheapness, however, does not result from under-
paying the doctor, but from its use of the principle of organi-
zation in saving his time, pooling equipment, and in utili/ing
equipment and personnel efficiently. We have been able through
economies of organization to spend more money than we had
at first thought possible on the improvement of the system
itself, and on opportunities for our physicians to better the
service to their patients and to carry on research.

There has just come to my hand the First Annual R.port
(1925) of the Clinics of the Federation of the Sickness In-
surance Societies of Berlin, a book of nearly two hundred
p ges filled with studies by physicians of the clinic staffs, on
such subjects as: living conditions among tuberculosis cases in
Charlottenburg; diseases of the lungs among children; cancer
and x-ray therapy; medical conditions among certain occu-
pational groups; and other topics of more technical interest.
The introduction points out that these studies are published
as "an evidence that in spite of the strenuous labor which the
rapid growth of the clinics and the throngs of patients have
required of the physician, they have yet found time to turn
their practical experience to scientific account."

This article does not attempt to present an appraisal of the
Berlin clinics nor of the sickness insurance system which under-
lies them. It attempts merely to report a visitor's observations
of a new and challenging experiment which is hardly known
in America. Hence I have let this article report merely my
own brief observation of the clinics, and what the leader of
the experiment had to say about it. Perhaps medical or
economic organizations may thus be stimulated to a more
critical study. One personal comment may be ventured:

I was impressed in Berlin with the probability that the
long-standing sequence of controversies between the organized
physicians and the insurance societies had entered a new phase.
For more than a generation they have pivoted mainly, as we
should say in America, on the dollar. The insurance societies
have usually endeavored to get medical service for as little
money as possible; the doctors have naturally thrown their
weight on the other side of the economic argument. Now in
Berlin the doctors have something more difficult to combat
than financial pr ssure; namely an idea. The clinics have been
set up with the aim of efficiency as well as of economy. Their
leaders believe, or at least declare, that poor medical service
does not pay. If the leaders of sickness insurance societies
have really learned this and if the ultimate German authorities
and the financial conditions permit them to act accordingly, a
new chapter in the dismal history of medical controversy may
have opened.

That insured members have the legal right of choice between
a clinic on the one hand, and a physician on the other to whom
they may go individually and who will be paid by the insurance
society, is a factor in the situation big with significance. The
clinics are faced with the necessity of providing service which
is at least as satisfactory to the members as individual medical
practice. The focus of the clinic policy cannot be described as
"medical service for less money," but as "better medical
service for less money." Is it practicable to achiev; this ideal
through cooperative organization without breaking down
medical morale or deteriorating the ultimate quality of service
for the cure and prevention of disease? That is the issue now
on trial on a large scale in the capital city of the German
republic.



(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY. It helps us, it identifies you.)

192




Communication for a Growing Nation

o

An Advertisement of
the American Telephone and Telegraph Company



THE first telephone call
was made from one room
to another in the same
building. The first advance in
telephony made possible conver-
sations from one point to another
in the same town or community.
The dream of the founders of the
Bell Telephone System, however,
was that through it, all the sepa-
rate communities might some
day be interconnected to form a
nation-wide community.

Such a community for speech
by telephone has now become a
reality and the year-by-year
growth in the number of long
distance telephone calls shows
how rapidly it is developing.
This super-neighborhood, ex-
tending from town to town and




state to state, has grown
as the means of communi-
cation have been provided
to serve its business and social
needs.

This growth is strikingly shown
by the extension of long distance
telephone facilities. In 1925, for
additions to the long distance tele-
phone lines, there was expended
thirty-seven million dollars. In
1926 sixty-one million dollars.
During 1927 and the three follow-
ing years, extensions are planned
on a still greater scale, including
each year about two thousand
miles of long distance cable.
These millions will be expended
on long distance telephone lines to
meet the nation's growth and their
use will help to further growth.



Officers of Administration and Faculty of the \'eu- York School of Socinl Work



PORTER R. LEE

KATE IIOI.I.ADAY CLAGHORN

IIKXKV \V. THURSTO.V

WALTER W. PETTIT

MARGARET LEAL
GEORGIA G. RALPH

JOHN A. FITCH
GEORGE W. KIRCHWEY



ORDWAY TEAD MARY SWAIN ROUTZAI1.V

MARY ANTOINETTE CANNON JANE F. CULliERT

LEROY A. RAMSDELL

MARION E. KENWORTIIY

SHELBY M. HARRISON

SAMUEL BRADBURY

ALBERT M. STEVENS



EVART G. ROUTZAHN



GORDON HAMILTON-
SARAH IVINS
LUCY J. CHAMBERLAIN

LEAH FEDER

ETHEL T. ALLISON

E. C. LINDEMAN



HELEN I'AYSON KI-MPTON

ELEANOR Xia'STAEDTER

JEANKTTE KKGENSBURG

STELLA A. MINER

CHLOE OWINGS

HARRIET P. SCOTT

ANNA YLACHQS



****t&***&Mt**M:&M&&ll4i&^^



DOT only will your training at the School
include instruction in methods which
have applicability to problems confronted
generally in social work. *$ 1? "8? It will be
supplemented by schooling and supervised prac-
tice for service in some chosen field of this new
profession. The New York School of Social
Work, 107 East Twenty-Second Street, New York.



*****&Mi***&4a&i^

(Bourses Presented at The \ew York School of Social W nrk



THE METHOD of SOCIAL CASE

WORK

CONTENT of SOCIAL CASE WORK
SOCIAL WORK and SOCIAL

PHILOSOPHY
SOCIAL EDUCATION
INTERVIEWING
THE FAMILY in MODERN SOCIAL

LIFE

DEPENDENT CHILDREN

DELINOUENT and NEGLECTED

CHILDREN

CHILDREN with SPECIAL HANDICAPS
SPECIAL PROBLEMS .'.i the WORK of

VISITING TEACHERS
CHILD WELFARE in NEW YORK

STATE
STATE and NATIONAL SYSTEMS of

CHILD WELFARE
HEALTH and NUTRITION-



PROBLEMS of DISEASE

HYGIENE and HAZARDS of the ADULT

PUBLIC HEALTH and PERSONAL

HYGIENE
THE NATURE and VARIETIES of

HUMAN BEHAVIOR
PSYCIIOPATHOLOGY
MENTAL HYGIENE PROBLEMS of

CHILDHOOD
CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY
SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS of MENTAL

TESTING

CRIME and PUNISHMENT
DESCRIPTIVE PENOLOGY
THE SOCIAL WORKER and the LAW
POLICE SYSTEMS
WOMEN POLICE
PROTECTIVE WORK for GIRLS



LABOR PROBLEMS
PSYCHOLOGICAL PROBLEMS of

ADMINISTRATION

STRUCTURE of MODERN INDUSTRY
PROBLEMS of INDUSTRY
LABOR LEGISLATION
METHODS of SOCIAL RESEARCH
THE IMMIGRANT
SOCIAL SURVEYS and COMMUNITY

STUDIES
COMMUNITY PROBLEMS and

ORGANIZATION
RURAL SOCIAL WORK
LEISURE TIME PROBLEMS
PUBLICITY METHODS m SOCIAL

WORK
\DMIXISTRATION of SOCIAL

AGENCIES
PHILOSOPHY of COMMUNITY







MIDMONTHLY

MAY 15, 1927




Settlement vs. Saloon

How They Have Competed in the Des Moines Bottoms

By Flora Dunlap

Who Commits Suicide?

By Ruth Shonle

The New Puritanism

Board Members Resurgent

Putting the Public into Public Health

New York's Study of Crime and Its Causes

Chests, Funds and Trusts

Workers and Waste

The Big Flood



25 Cents a Copy



$5.00 a Yemr







Analytic Index to This Number

May 15, 1927



Child Welfare:

Children and drunken fathers, p. 197
Boys gangs and crime, p. 206
Boys' Club of Worcester, Mass., p. 209
Working children in Missouri, p. 212
Good vs. obedient children, p. 214

Family Welfare :

Saloon's effect on family, p. 197
Casework and unemployment, p. 208
What social workers do, p. 208

The Law and Law Breakers :

New York's Crime Study, p. 206
Conditions in Pennsylvania penitentiary, p. 209
Missouri child labor law, p. 212
Kidnapping students, p. 215

The Promotion of Health:

What Worcester does for boys, p. 209
New Haven's health board is alive, p. 218
Putting the public into public health, p. 219

Mental Hygiene:

What causes suicide, p. 200
Psychological influences to crime, p. 207

Town Planning :

British Columbia's university subdivision, p. 224

Immigration and Race Relations:

University of Wisconsin experiment, p. 212

How to handle difficult group discussions, p. 216

East and West friendly in Hawaii, p. 225

School and Community:

A newcomer to a college community, p. 211
Can Johnny go to college? p. 213
Undergraduates want free speech, p. 215
How Vancouver's University pays its way, p. 224

Education Outside the School:

A primer lesson in economics, p. 213
Teaching the child to be "reasonable," p. 214
Cooperative reading, p. 217
Scholarships for farmers, p. 217
Educating a community to health, p. 219

Industrial Relations:

Labor votes to cancel waste, p. 210

Peace and International Relations:

How to guide tense discussion, p. 216
Pan-Pacific Union's magazine, p. 225

Motives and Ideals:

Newer ideals in industry, p. 210

The aim of business, p. 213

Efficiency in the ideal social work executive, p. 230



Announcing
OUR ANNUAL EDUCATION NUMBER

SURVEY GRAPHIC for June

The Squirrel Cage, by Agnes M. Conklin :

The brilliant young psychologist of a large public high
school shows what happens when boys and girls in their
'teens are held to the treadmill of academic schooling.

A Teacher Forges Ne-w Tools, by Herbert W. Smith :

Felix Adler's vision as it is being embodied in the new
pre-professional high school of New York Ethical Culture.

A Public School That Dares, by Bruno Lasker:

An evaluation of the Lichtwarkschule in Hamburg,
which has dispensed with a curriculum in favor of vital
experience.

Make the Method Fit the Mind, by Joseph Herschel Coffin:
On a California campus, the old apprenticeship plan
and the project method of the "new" elementary schools
are being adapted to the uses of college education.

Snap Shots at Antioch, by Robert W. Bruere:

Arthur Morgan's experiment in integrating work and
study, interpreted on the basis of what the students told a
sympathetic visitor.

Wisconsin's Experiment, by Alexander Meikeljohn:

Dr. Meikeljohn's first full-length statement of his plans
for the new liberal college on the Wisconsin campus, and
the educational philosophy underlying it.



SURVEY ASSOCIATES, INC.

112 East 19 Street, New York

ROBERT W. DEFOREST, President
JULIAN W.MACK, V.EVERIT MACT, ROBERT HALLOWELL

Vice-Presidents

RITA WALLACH MORCENTHAU, Secretary

ANNE RYLANCE SMITH, Field Secretary

ARTHUR KELLOCC, Treasurer

PUBLISHERS

THE SURVEY Twice-a-month $5.00 a year
SURVEY GRAPHIC Monthly $3.00 a year

PAUL U. KELLOGG, Editor
ARTHUR KELLOCC, Managing Editor

Associate Editors

JOSEPH K. HART HAVEN EMERSON, M.D.

GEDDES SMITH ROBERT W. BRUERB

MART Ross BEULAH AMIDON

LEON WHIPPLE GRACE HATHEWAT

Contributing Editors

EDWARD T. DEVINE GRAHAM TAYLOR

JANE ADDAMS FLORENCE KELLET



JOHN D. KENDERDINE, Business Manager

MART R. ANDERSON, Advertising Manager

MOLLIE CONDON, Extension Manager

THIS SURVEY, published semi-monthly and copyright 1927 by
SURVEY ASSOCIATES, INC., 112 East 19 Street, Neva York, N. Y.
Price: this issue (May IS, 1927, Vol. L.VIII, No. 4) 25
cents a copy; $5 a year; Canadian postage, 60 cents; foreign.
postage $1 extra. Changes of address should be mailed us two
weeks m advance. When payment is by check a receipt will be
sent only upon request.

Entered as second-class matter, March 25, 1909, at the post
office. New York, N. Y.. under the Act of March 3, 1879. Accept-
ance for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in
Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorised on June 26, 1918.








Midmonthly Number

Vol. LVIII, No. 4

CONTENT^

Settlement vs. Saloon - - . - Flora Dunlap

who Commits Suicide? - ... R^/, ghonle

THE COMMON WELFARE -

SOCIAL PRACTICE

New York Studies Causes of Crirae^ if eh
^^on-Stabilizing Dependency? Maurice
B. HexterWhzt Social Workers Do
Pennsylvania's Prisons

INDUSTRY

The Workers Recapture Their Tools, ' Robert
tT. BruereFrom Factory to Campus A Co-
operative Primer

EDUCATION

A Note on the New Puritanism, Gertrude
UtamantTbe Freedom of the Campus, Doug-
lass Orr First Aid for Group Leaders Grace
Loyle Cooperative Reading, Edna "-"
HEALTH - - -___,

An Institute of Trusteeship, Anne R. Winslota

-Puttmg the Public Into Public Health,

Geddes Smith
COMMUNITIES - -

Without Benefit of Controversy, Homer W.

Borst Could Community Trusts Work?

Pierce Williams Streets That Go To College

BOOKS IN OUR ALCOVE

THE SOCIAL WORK SHOP



197
200

202

206



- 210



214



- 218



226

230




The Gist of It

RORA DUNLAP'S story of the long contest
Between Roadside Settlement and Wayside
Jaloon may come as a shock to some of the
younger generation who have grown up since
the saloon and know of whiskey only as something
that comes out of a hip-flask. Her scene is timely,
for the National Conference of Social Work is now
in session at Des Moines and Conference members
no doubt will visit Roadside House, of which she
was headworker for twenty years ending in 1924,
and of whose board she is still a member. They
may also visit Camp Dunlap, named for her, "a
refuge for tired working-girls who must always be
spoken of as 'business girls'." Miss Dunlap had been
in residence at Kingsley House, Pittsburgh, Good-
rich House, Cleveland, and Hull-House before going
to Des Moines. Her services have extended far
beyond social work, including membership on the
Des Moines School Board the first woman to hold
the post, the presidency for four years of the State
Equal Suffrage Association in the crucial suffrage
years of 1912-16, and first president of the Iowa
League of Women Voters. For ten years she was
chairman of the Legislative Department of the Iowa
Federation of Women's Clubs and had a hand in
the passage of much of the state's forward-looking
social legislation. Her article has been used in some
part in the National Federation of Settlements' re-
cent study, Does Prohibition Work? (Harper).
Page 197.



R? . raWS " " "icide

AVirom a doctor's thesis on the subject which she
recently p repared under the , ^ y*j

I! h H 7?^ f ChiCag ' eventuall y t be pub-
.shed m book form. At present she is assistant to

!cia g tio Se " etary f the Religi US Educati "
sociation.



XTELS ANDERSON discusses the reports of the
bub-commission on Causes of the New York
e Crime Commission from the vantage point of
hi. many sociological studies of cities. At present
he ., the director of Whittier House, Jersey City,
N. J- Page 206.

X^AURICE B. HEXTER is executive director
AVJ. of the Federated Jewish Charities of Boston
Mass., and the author of Social Consequences of
Business Cycles (Houghton Mifflin, 1924). Page 208.

/-GERTRUDE DIAMANT, who tried out her
VJ educational theories in an experimental kinder-
garten, is now a high school teacher by vocation and
a writer of magazine articles and short stories on
the side. Page 214.

P\OUGLASS ORR is an undergraduate at
1-S Swarthmore College and active in the National
Student Federation. Page 215.



COYLE is on the staff of The Inquiry.
Page 216.



EDNA PHILLIPS is library adviser in work
with the foreign-born in the Massachusetts De-
partment of Education. Page 217.

ANNE R. WINSLOW (Mrs. C.-E. A. Win-
slow) is the secretary of the committee which
planned and carried through the unique New Haven
Institute for Board Members of Public Health
Nursing Organizations. Page 218.

GEDDES SMITH, an associate editor of The
Survey, is director of publications of the Child
Health Demonstration Committee. Page 219.

HOMER BORST is the executive secretary of
the Indianapolis Community Fund. Page 222.

T)IERCE WILLIAMS is a member of the staff
i. of the American Association for Community
Organization. Page 223.

ARTHUR KELLOGG, managing editor of The
Survey, joined the party headed by Secretary



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