Survey Associates.

The Survey (Volume 58) online

. (page 54 of 130)
Online LibrarySurvey AssociatesThe Survey (Volume 58) → online text (page 54 of 130)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


City, Mich.

ETHEL WARD, formerly secretary Assoc:
Charities, Newburgh, N. Y., as district *
tary in Queens, Long Island.
MRS. GRACE WATERMAN, formerly a mei
Social Service Department, Berkeley (Cs
Health Center, as chief of social Ber
Alamada County (Calif.) hospitals.
BESSIE WILLIAMS, as public health nurse, 1
Co. Public Health Association. Miss Will
is a graduate of the Good Samaritan Hos
in Portland. She has had two years unive:
training for public health nursing at the
versity of Washington.

MRS. MARGARET WELLS WOOD, formerly ex
live secretary, Hospital Social Service /
ciation, New York City, as special lect
in the parent-teacher field on the staff of
American Social Hygiene Association.
MARTHA WOOD as chapter correspondent,
tional Headquarters, A.R.C., Washing
D. C.

Resignations

MABLE EISAMAN, R.N., attached to the full I
county health unit in Coos County, haa
for her home in Penntylvania.

ELLEN L. HINE, as recreation worker, U.
Veterans Hospital, Aspinwall, Pa.

LAURA PORTER, as field representative, Natfc
Headquarters, A.R.C., to accept a post
with the U. S. Public Health Service, Sti
Island, N. Y.

HARRY M. SHULMAN, as assistant psycholof
Jewish Board of Guardians, following a
months leave of absence as research wor]
N. Y. State Crime Commission, where he '
engaged in community studies.



LITERATURE



CHILD HEALTH IN SMALL COMMU
ITIES Bulletins describing the Coma
wealth Fund child health demonstration
two in small cities, two in rural count
No. 1, Program and Policies. No. 2. Mar
County, Ore. No. 3, Athens. Ga. No.
Progress Report. Mailed free on applicat:
to Director of Publications, Room 1648, ;
Seventh Avenue, New York.

THE SCHOOL PARENT -Keeps in to,
with events in th New York Public Scho
and Parents Associations weekly in 1
School Parent. Send subscription price
$1.00 to the United Parent* Association
Greater New York. 152 W. 42nd Str
New York City.

FOURTEEN IS TOO EARLY: SO1S
PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS (
SCHOOL-LEAVING AND CHI1

LABOR by Raymond G. Fuller, publish
by the National Child Labor Committee, 2
Fourth Avenue, New York City, price
cents.

UP-TO-DATE CHILD LABOR PUBl
CATIONS Child Labor Facts, 19i
Selected Bibliography on Child Labor (191
1927); Children Working in Missouri, 19;
Price 10 cents each. National Child Lat
Committee, 215 Fourth Avenue. New Yc
City.

EAST BY WEST A special number of Si
vey Graphic devoted entirely to an int
pretation of the Japanese and Chinese
America and at home. An excellent bat
ground for the newspaper despatches of
day. Original price 50 cents now 25 cec
a copy. Survey Graphic, 112 E. 19th S
New York.

A BIBLIOGRAPHY ON PSYCHOLOG

by Helen G. Estey, Gardner, Mass,
pages, $1.00 a copy. Obtained of author

Gardner, Mass.



ntinued from page 233)' satisfactory. Where several
jle each do a small amount of dictation the use of the
ating machine can be scheduled and the machine can be
idled from one to the other so that each can do his
ation; while one stenographer or secretary can handle
dictation for all of the dictators.

Wholesale Buying

nquiry has developed the fact that many institutions have

yet discovered that they can buy supplies direct from

wholesaler instead of through the corner grocer or the

lil store. Wholesale groceries are almost invariably glad

deliver goods to social agencies and the same is true of

olesalers and even of jobbers in other fields. Savings of

to twenty-five percentage over retail prices can often be

de in this way.



WHO COMMITS SUICIDE?

(Continued from page 201 )



revious system of moral values, a previous galaxy of hopes,
linst which to measure present troubles. It is this com-
ison. this failure of the present to fulfill the hopes and
ires of the past, which leads to despair and the wish to end
unendurable struggle.

While one factor in suicide is personal disorganization or
ladjustment the inability to find in the social environment
fillment for fundamental needs and interests another im-
rtant influence is the attitude which people develop toward
cide as a favorable solution of their troubles. Suicide is a
of adjusting to difficulties. People develop typical reac-
ns to difficulties: some sink into day-dreams as a substitute
, a real adjustment; some move to another community to
ake a new start; some drown their sorrows in drink; some
d solace in religion; some develop psychoses; some stick to
e difficulty and work out the solution in new types of rela-
Hiships and new goals. Once established, a type of adjust-
ent may become a habit with a person and be utilized with
ch succeeding difficulty. There is ample evidence from life
stories and diaries of people who have committed or at-
mpted suicide that wishes for death and attempts at suicide
ay arise upon the occasion of every difficulty, until some
.rticularly severe crisis leads to a successful attempt at suicide
id death is the result.

The point has already been made that child-suicide is not a
enace in this country. In childhood, however, an attitude
ay be developed which later leads to suicide. University
udents and public school teachers were asked to fill out
uestionnaires regarding wishes for death. Four-fifths of those
:plying had wished at some time that they were dead, always
: a crisis or when life did not satisfy their cravings. A
umber of persons listed instance after instance in which
ley had felt the desire for death. Others had developed a
:neralized attitude from these experiences and said that i
as justifiable for the aged, sick or troubled to commit suicide.

That suicide is in part the result of a previous attitude
oward death as a favorable solution of difficulties is evident
Iso from the records of suicides. In Chicago in 1923, 391
uicides occurred. Of these, 79, or 204 per cent, had pre
iously expressed a suicidal tendency or had attempted suicide
nsuccessfully. How many more had thought of sutcide with-

expressing their wishes to family or friends i
wssible to say.

It appears then that suicide is a corollary of two factors:
ersonal disorganization and a favorable attitude toward
uicide. It is found most frequently where disorgamzal
(Continued on page 237)




THEOLOGICAL

, , SEMINARY

TWO TEN DAY SUMMER CONFERENCES

CONFERENCE ON CITY CHURCH WORK.
June 7 to 17, 1927

For Pastors and Staff Workers.




Church. Among the Lecturers and Leaders are, Charles Stelzle,
Rev. C. C. Webber, Prof. Adelaide T. Case, Prof. H. N. Shenton,
Henry Busch.

MID-SUMMER CONFERENCE FOR MINISTERS
July 12 to 22, 1927

Six Courses of Five Lectures each on General Theological Sub-
jects, Preaching, and Youth and the Church, by such leaders as
Dr. Harry Emerson Fosdick, Prof. A. B. Macaulay of Glasgow.
Rev. Percy R. Hayward of Chicago, Prof. Eugene W. Lyman,
Prof. Ernest F. Scott.

Interdenomination Fellowship. Dormitory Residence. Observation
trips to Centers of Religious and Social Work.
For full particulars, write

PROF. GAYLORD S. WHITE, Director
3041 Broadway New York City



HOUSES SUPPLYING INSTITUTIONAL TRADE"

Dry Goods

FREDERICK LOESER & CO.
484 Fulton Street Brooklyn. N. Y.

Groceries

SEEMAN BROS.
Hudson and North Moore Streets New York

Electric Clock System
LOCKWOOD & ALMQU1ST. Inc.
Fifth Avenue New York City



501



$1-50



for both



For Social Workers

And All Who Are Interested in Community
Health Programs

An attractive combination offer is now postible
THE SURVEY twice-a-month (in-
cluding Survey Graphic).
The ideal magazine for social workers.
The indispensable medium for informa-
tion on social welfare and progress.
Regularly $5-OO a year.
THE PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE
monthly.

The magazine for public health nurses
and for workers in allied groups. rhe
official publication of the National I
ganization for Public Health Nursing.
Regularly $3-00 a year.

Whether or not you are a lay or nurse
the N O P H.N. this bargain offer is for you, provided
you are 'a new subscriber to either magazine.

This coupon entitles you to the big saving.

it today P^ later if y U Wish> bU \ ' T
check if possible djimjtjm*** 1

30 day. after



receipt of bill).

Name

Address




mtinued on page w > _ ; hlps ,, j t identifies you.)

(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURV

235



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL AGENCIES



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR OLD

AGE SECURITY \im: To promote

through legislation adequate provisions for
the dependent aged in the United States.
Bishop Ethelbert Talbot, president. A. Ep-
stein, executive secretary. Box 1001, Harris-
burgh, Pennsylvania.

AMERICAN BIRTH CONTROL LEAGUE

President, Margaret Sanger, 104 Fifth
Avenue, New York City. Objects: To edu-
cate American people in the various aipects
of the dangers of uncontrolled procreation;
to establish centers where married persons
may receive contraceptive advice from duly
licensed physicians. Life membership $1.00;
Birth Control Review (monthly magazine)
$2.00 per year.

AMERICAN HOME ECONOMICS ASSO-
CIATION Alice L. Edwards, executive
secretary, 617 Mills Bldg., Washington,
D. C. Organized for betterment of condi-
tions in home, school, institution and com-
munity. Publishes monthly Journal of Home
Economics: office of editor, 617 Mills Bldg.,
Washington, D. C. ; of business manager,
1211 Cathedral St., Baltimore, Md.



AMERICAN SOCIAL HYGIENE ASSO-
CIATION 370 Seventh Ave., New York.
To provide a better understanding of the
social hygiene movement; to advance sound
sex education; to combat prostitution and sex
delinquency; to aid public authorities in the
campaign against the venereal diseases; to
advise in organization of state and local
social-hygiene programs. Annual membership
dues $2.00 including monthly journal.

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR THE CON-
TROL OF CANCER Dr. George A.
Soper, managing director, 25 West 43rd
Street. New York. To collect, collate and
disseminate information concerning the symp-
toms, diagnosis, treatment and prevention.
Publications free on request. Annual mem-
bership dues, $5.00.

AMERICAN WOMEN'S HOSPITALS

(O.S.) (Organized, 1917) 637 Madison

Avenue, New York Chairman; Esther Love-
joy, M. D., Treasurer; Mathilda K. Wallin,
M. D. Conducts hospitals and food stations
for refugees in Greece, and medical centers
in Macedonia and Western Thrace. Contin-
uing assistance to medical work in France,
Serbia, Russia and Japan.

ASSOCIATED GUIDANCE BUREAU,

INC 16 East 53rd Street, New York,
Telephone: Plaza 9512. A non-sectarian,
non-philanthropic child guidance bureau, em-
ploying highest social work standards. Sup-
plies, trains, and supervises carefully selected
governesses, tutors, companions, play leaders,
and psychiatric nurses. For information
address Jess Perlman, Director.

THE BOY CONSERVATION BUREAU

90 West Broadway. Suggests all-the-year-
round Home Schools for needy boys. Tel.
Walker 0313. E. W. Watkins, Exec. Sec'y.

CHILD WELFARE COMMITTEE OF
AMERICA, Inc 730 Fifth Avenue, New
York. To secure home life for normal
dependent children in preference to insti-
tutions; to secure Mothers Allowance laws
in states having none; to urge adequate ap-
propriations for home aid; to promote proper
laws affecting adoption, boarding out and
placing out of dependent children; to aid
in the enforcement of these laws. States
Council of Committee comprises volunteer
representatives in practically every state.
Sophie Irene Loeb, President; Governor
Alfred E. Smith, Honorary President;
Margareet Woodrow Wilson, First Vice-
President : Edward Fisher Brown, Executive
Secretary.

CHILD WELFARE LEAGUE OF

AMERICA C. C. Carstens, director. 130
E. 22nd Street, New York City. A league
of children's agencies and institutions to se-
cure improved standards and methods in
their various fields of work. It also cooper-
ates with other children's agencies, cities,
states, churches, fraternal orders and other
civic groups to work out worth-while results
in phases of child welfare in which they are
interested.



THE CHILDREN'S VILLAGE, INCOR-
PORATED Dobbs-Ferry-on-Hudson, New
York. A national, non-sectarian training
school scientifically equipped for the study,
education and development of problem boys
and girls, on commitment and by private
arrangement ages 7 to 16. Supported large-
ly by voluntary contributions. For further
information address Leon C. Faulkner, Man-
aging Director.

COUNCIL OF WOMEN FOR HOME

MISSIONS 105 East 22d St., New York.

Florence E. Quinlan, Executive Secretary .

Composed of 23 Protestant national women's
mission boards of the United States and
Canada. Purpose: To unify effort by consul-
tation and cooperaton in action.

Work among Farm and Cannery Migrants,

Summer service for college students,

Laura H. Parker, Executive Supervisor.

Religious Work Directors in Government

Indian Schools.

Bureau of Reference for Migrating People,
follow-up of New Americans.

EYE SIGHT CONSERVATION COUN-
CIL OF AMERICA L. W. Wallace,
President; Guy A. Henry, General-Director,
Times Bldg., New York. Conducts a na-
tional educational campaign to promote eye
hygiene. Urges correction of eye defects,
protection against hazards, proper lighting.
Comprehensive publications lantern slides
lecture material. Cooperation of social
agencies invited.

FEDERAL COUNCIL OF THE
CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN

AMERICA Constituted by 28 Protestant
communions. Rev. C. S. Macfarland and
Rev. S. M. Cavert, Gen. Sc's; 105 E. 22nd
St., N. Y. C.

Dept. of Research and Education, Rev. F.

E. Johnson, Sec'y.

Commissions: Church and Social Service.
Rev. W. M. Tippy, Sec'y; International
Justice and Goodwill: Rev. S. L. Gulick,
Sec'y; Church and Race Rtlations: Dr.
G. E. Haynes, Sec'y.



^Neighbors



made us neighbors," said
Senator William E. Borah in
speaking of Mexico, "let justice make
us friends."

God has made you a neighbor, too
a neighbor to people who think and
act, often, in ways that are incompre-
hensible. Men and women whose reli-
gion differs from yours, who are politi-
cal heretics, whose social standards
reek of 1890.

Yet social justice can make such
neighbors into friends you'll be proud
of and who will be proud of you.

Four thousand men and women who
meet together this month at the Na-
tional Conference of Social Work in
Des Moines, have consecrated their
lives to the doctrine of social justice
and to its application in the neighbor-
hoods of the land.

Compared with the size of the task,
they are but a nucleus. They need
you, too. Not your passive approval,
but your active support, as well. If
you cannot come to Des Moines, at
least send in your membership to the
National Conference of Social Work
(listed above).



GIRLS FRIENDLY SOCIETY I
AMERICA 15 East 40th Street, New Yori
Girls and women working together to upho)
Christian standards of daily living in tl
home, in the business world, and in I]
community. Numbers nearly 60,000, wil
branches in 44 states.



HAMPTON INSTITUTE Prepares Nep
youth for community usefulness. Collegia'
courses; Agriculture, Normal, Busines
Builders, Library, and Home Economic
Publishers of the SOUTHERN WORI
MAN. Free material on race problems an
education. James E. Gregg, Principal.



JOINT COMMITTEE ON METHODS O!
PREVENTING DELINQUENCY-

Graham Romeyn Taylor, executive di recto
50 East 42nd Street, New York. To pr
mote the adoption of sound methods in th
field, with particular reference to psychiatr
clinics, visiting teacher work, and trainir
for these and similar services; to condu-
related studies, education and puhlicatior
and to interpret the work of the Cotnmot
wealth Fund Program for the Prevention *
Delinquency.

NATIONAL BOARD OF THE YOUN<
WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA

TIONS Mrs. Robert E. Speer, president
Miss Mabel Cratty, general secretary, 60
Lexington Avenue, New York City. Tk
organization maintains a staff of executit
and traveling secretaries to cover work i
the United States in 1,034 local Y. fl
C. A.'s on behalf of the industrial, luisines;
student, foreign born, Indian. Colored an
younger girls. It has 159 American seen
taries at work in 49 centres in the Orien
Latin America and Europe.

NATIONAL CHILD LABOR COMMIT

TEE Wiley H. Swift, acting general seen
tary, 215 Fourth Avenue, New York. T
improve child labor legislation; to conduc
investigation in local communities; to advii
on administration; to furnish information. As
nual membership, $2. $5, $10, $25 and tlO
includes monthy publication, "The America:
Child."

NATIONAL CHILD WELFARE ASSO

CIATION, INC. (est. 1912, incorp. 1914)
70 Fifth Ave., N. Y. C. (tel. Chelsea 8774)
Promotes as its chief object the building
character in the children of America throng
the harmonious development of their bodiel
minds, and spirits. Its method is, in
operation with other organizations, to ^ onj
inate and disseminate educational material i
the form of posters, books, bulletins, chart)
slides, and insignia. Through its "Knighl
hood of Youth it provides homes, school
and church schools with a method_ of chw
acter training through actual practice. Off
cers: Dr. John H. Finley. Pres.; Charle
F. Powlison, Gen. Sec'y-

THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOI
MENTAL HYGIENE, INC.-Dr. Williat
H. Welch, honorary president; Dr. Charle
P. Emerson, president; Dr. Frankwood B
Williams, medical director; Dr. Clarence J
D'Alton, executive assistant; Clifford W
Beers, secretary; 370 Seventh Avenue, Nei
York City. Pamphlets on mental hygieni
mental and nervous disorders, feebleminded
ness, epilepsy, inebriety, delinquency, UK
other mental problems in human behaviol
education, industry, psychiatric social sen
ice, etc. "Mental Hygiene," quarterly, $3.0
a year; "Mental Hygiene Bulletin," montfc
ly. $.50 a year.



NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THI
PREVENTION OF BLINDNESS

Lewis H. Carris, managing director; Mri
Winifred Hathaway, associate director; Di
B. Franklin Royer, medical director, an<
Miss Eleanor P. Brown, secretary; 37 1
Seventh Ave., New York. Objects: To fui
nish information, exhibits, lantern slides
lectures, personal service for local organia
tions and legislation, publish literature o
movement samples free, quantities at cos)
Includes New York State Committee.



(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY. // helps us, it identifies you.}

236



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL AGENCIES




NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR




!

a year; "Mental Hygiene Bulletin," mo
ly, $.50 a year.

TIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THE
PREVENTION OF BLINDNESS

Lewis H. Carris, managing director; Mrs.

Winifred Hathaway, associate director. Lit.

Franklin Royer, medical director, and

Miss Eleanor P. Brown, . secretary^ .




tions aiiu icso"**" i - - - - ... f, n e+

movement-samples free, quantities at cost.
Includes New York State Committee.

ATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL
WORK John A. Lapp, president, Chicago,
TTI Howard R. Knight, secretary, 277 E.
Long St Columbus, Ohio. The conference
U an organization to discuss the principles
of humanitarian effort and to increase the
efficiency of social service agencies. Each
y*""t y holds an annual meeting, publishes
in permanent form the Proceedings of the
meeting, and issues a quarterly Bulletin.
The fifty-fourth annual n g in f [( $ u >e j^
MaTTl.^', 1927. C Proceedings are sent free
of charge to all members upon payment of
a membership fee of five dollars.

ATIONAL CONGRESS OF PARENTS
AND TEACHERS-Mrs. A. H. Reeve,

President, Mrs. A. C. Watkins Executjre
Secretary, 1201 Sixteenth Street, N. W.,
Washington, D. C. To develop cooperation
between home and school, and an informed
public opinion which will secure highest ad-
vantages for all children.



for 35 women's organizat
Parker. M.D., President.



Valeria



NATIONAL COUNCIL, CHURCH MIS-
SION OF HELP H33 Broadway, New
York, Agency of the Episcopal Church
dealing with problems of unadjusted youth
through social case work method. Fifteen
units have been established, maintaining
staffs of trained case workers in nine states.

NATIONAL HEALTH CIRCLE FOR
COLORED PEOPLE, Inc. -3/0 Seventh

Avenue, New York City. Col. Theodore
Roosevelt, Honorary President; Dr. Jesse E.
Mooreland, Pres.; Dr. George C. Booth,
Treasurer; Miss Belle Davis, Executive
Secretary.

To organize public opinion and support

for health work among colored people.
To create and stimulate health conscious-
ness and responsibility among the colored
people in their own health problems.
To recruit, help educate and place young
colored women in public health work.
Work supported by memberships and
voluntary contributions.

THE NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL
FOR INSTITUTION EXECUTIVES
AND OTHER WORKERS-At the Chil-
dren's Village. Dobbs-Ferry-on-Hudson, New
York. To furnish adequate training to
properly qualified people wishing to engage
in, or already engaged in, institution work.
Provide opportunity for carefully guidec
study in all phases of institution manage-
ment and activity. Aims to furnish a
trained personnel for child caring Institu-
tions The first and only school of its kinc
in the country. For further information
address Calvin Derrick, Dean.

NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE-For social
service among Negroes L. HoUingsworth
Wood, pres.; Eugene Kinckle Jones, exec,
sec'y 127 E. 23rd St., New York. Estab-
ashes' committees of white and colored people
to work out community problems. Irai
Negro social workers Publishes J'Oppor-
tunity" a "journal of Negro life.

NATIONAL WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN
TEMPERANCE UNION-Anna A. Gor-
don, president; Headquarters, 1730 Chicago
Avenue Evanston, Illinois. To secure et-
felrive 'enforcement' of the Eighteenth Amend-
ment, to advance the welfare of the Amer-
an people through the departmer .of Child
Welfare, Women in Industry, Social Mor
Hy! Scientific Temperance Instruction. Amer-
icanization and other allied fields of en_
deavor. Official publications "The Union
Signal" published at Headquarters.



NATIONAL WOMEN'S TRADE UNION

LEAGUE Mrs. Raymond Robins, hon-
orary president: Miss Rose Schneiderman,
president; 247 Lexington Ave., New York:
Miss Elizabeth Chriitman. secretary. 311
South Ashland Blvd.. Chicago. 111. Standl
for self-government in the work shop
through organization and also for the enact-
ment of industrial legislation. Information
given.

PLAYGROUND AND RECREATION
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA

315 Fourth Avenue, New York City. Joseph
Lee, president; H. S. Braucher, secretary.
Special attention given to organization of
year-round municipal recreation systems. In-
formation available on playground and com-
munity center activities and administration.

THE RELIGIOUS MOTION PICTURE
FOUNDATION, Inc. William E. Har-
mon, Pres.; W. Burke Harmon, Vice-Pres. ;
Mary Beattie Brady. Treas.: Estelle Merrill,
Sec.; 140 Nassau Street, New York. Pro-
ducers and distributors of simple, short
motion pictures designed strictly for church
use as oart of a regular service. One of
the activities of the Harmon Foundation.

RUSSELL SAGE FpUNDATION-For the

Improvement of Living Conditions John M.
Glenn, dir.; 130 E. 22nd St., New York.
Departments: Charity Organization, Delin-
quency and Penology, Industrial Studies,
Library, Recreation. Remedial Loans. Statis-
tics. Surveys and Exhibits. The publications
of the Russell Sage Foundation offer to
the public in practical and inexpensive form
some of the most important results of iti
work. Catalogue sent upon request.

ST. ANDREW'S REST, Woodcliff Lake. N.J..
is conducted by the Episcopal Sisters of S
John Baptist for convalescent or tired girls
and women. Season. May 15 to October 1.
Apply to Sister in Charge. Telephone, Park
Ridge 152. (Country Branch of St. Andrews
Convalescent Hospital, N. Y. C.)

TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE -An institution for
the training of Negro Youth; an experiment
in race adjustment in the Black Belt of the
South' furnishes information on all phases
of the race problem and of the Tuskegee
idea and methods; Robert R. Moton, prin-
cipal" W. H. Carter, treasurer; A. L. Holiey.
secretary, Tuskegee Institute, Ala.

WORKERS' EDUCATION BUREAU OF

AMERICA - a cooperative Educational
Jr., Secretary.



(Continued from page 235)
most rife; it is not found to any marked degree in highly or-
ganized social groups where the individual is carefully m
corporated into the group, his needs denned for n and
fulfillment provided. It is found also where there is . ^general y
accepted attitude that suicide is justifiable, commen
within the right of the individual.

The control of suicide seems to lie either m gmn,E he in
dividual some firm and systematic outline of the , rests .c rf a
full life and a means of satisfying them, or m making *