Survey Associates.

The Survey (Volume 58) online

. (page 67 of 130)
Online LibrarySurvey AssociatesThe Survey (Volume 58) → online text (page 67 of 130)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


the members of his committee from time to time for quesl >ns,
discussions, and to make reports.

Experience has shown that young people eat up work wne
the enterprise is one which has meaning in terms of the
interests. Spoon-feeding, compulsory schedules absence and
tardiness penalties, eligibility rules, and the like are utt
irrelevant when the student has an objective When a young
man sees the relation between history and the developmer
the line in which he is interested, or between economic
processes and price-fixing in his field, or between social contro
in the interest of health and his occupational advancement, it
is not going to be difficult to get him to read history
economics or sociology. And every vocational situation has its
own fringe of concomitant information, an a
which would not only make the student a more tective ar
efficient member of the community, but would at the sam
time constitute for him a liberal education. ,

In conclusion, may I repeat that we hold unalterably to the
determination to make Whittier College a college of
arts. The correlation and project work is in no sense an
attempt to give a substitute for the technical training o
professional or technical schools, but to make the methods of
instruction fit the mind of the man who wishes to be prepared
to meet the situations of life. The intention is *&**"*
ground, a halo of meaning to a mans job, and a ^ pom tot
view regarding both it and the rest of life. /"""SS^TdS
lecture-bound horizon is disastrous to the developmen of the
individual who is trying to get educated. What
and what is being sought in this and other
higher education, is to synthesize the job-lite,
the community life, and the religious life with the
life, so that students shall grow into effiaei

personalities. .

(In answering advertisements please



Fels-Naptha, combining un-
usually good soap and plenty
of dirt-loosening naptha,
makes dirt let go more
quickly. Makes washing
easier on you and your
clothes !



Your dealer has Fels-Naptha

or will get it for you



"MODERN HOME EQUIPMENT'

Our new booklet is a carefully selected list
of the practical equipment needed in an
average-sized home. It is invaluable, alike t
new and to experienced housekeepers alread
in its fourth edition. It considers in turn t
kitchen, pantry, dining room, general cleaning
equipment and the laundry, and gives the pric
of each article mentioned.

Aik for Booklet S it will be tent postpaid.

LEWIS & CONGER

45th Street and Sixth Avenue, New York Citv



Who it Competent to Plan

INSTITUTIONS

know, how to outline the functions.

Henry C. Wright

Consultant on Institutions
289 Fourth Avenue, New York City

- ' notions, developing oln, d



jbeciUlta MJ

i*^-^3^M3B*



_^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^~ ^ .

hflp , ,, if lde nt t fie, you.)




DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL AGENCIES



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR OLD

AGE SECURITY \im: To promote

through legislation adequate provisions for
the dependent aged in the United States.
Bishop Ethelbert Talbot, president. A. Ep-
stein, executive secretary. Box 1001, Harris-
burgh, Pennsylvania.

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PSY-
CHIATRIC SOCIAL WORKERS

To promote association among psychiatric
social workers and to maintain standards in
psychiatric social work. President, Mrs.
Maida H. Solomon, 74 Kenwood Road. Bos-
ton, Massachusetts; Secretary, Kathleen
Ormsby, 370 Seventh Avenue. N. Y. C.

AMERICAN BIRTH CONTROL LEAGUE

President, Margaret Sanger, 104 Fifth
Avenue, New York City. Objects: To edu-
cate American people in the various aspects
of the dangers of uncontrolled procreation;
to establish centers where married persons
may receive contraceptive advice from duly
licensed physicians. Life membership $1.00;
Birth Control Review (monthly magazine)
$2.00 per year.

AMERICAN CHILD HEALTH ASSO-
CIATION 370 Seventh Ave., New York.
Herbert Hoover, President; Philip Van
Ingen, M.D., Secretary, S. J. Crumbine.
M.D., General Executive. Objects: Sound
promotion of child health, especially in co-
operation with the official health and edu-
cation agencies.

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF ORGAN-
IZATIONS FOR THE HARD OF

HEARING promotes the cause of the
hard of bearing; assists in forming organi-
zations. Pres., Dr. Gordon Berry; Field
Secretary, Miss Betty Wright, 1601 35th
St. N.W., Washington. D. C.

AMERICAN HOME ECONOMICS ASSO-
CIATION Alice L. Edwards, executive
secretary, 617 Mills Bldg., Washington,
D. C. Organized for betterment of condi-
tions in home, school, institution and com-
munity. Publishes monthly Journal of Home
Economics: office of editor, 617 Mills Bldg.,
Washington. D. C. ; of business manager,
101 East 20th St., Baltimore, Md.

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR THE CON-
TROL OF CANCER-Dr. George A.
Soper, managing director, 25 West 43rd
Street, New York. To collect, collate and
disseminate information concerning the symp-
toms, diagnosis, treatment and prevention.
Publications free on request. Annual mem-
bership dues, $5.00.

AMERICAN SOCIAL HYGIENE ASSO-
CIATION 370 Seventh Ave., New York.
To provide a better understanding of the
social hygiene movement; to advance sound
sex education, to combat prostitution and sex
delinquency; to aid public authorities in the
campaign against the venereal diseases; to
advise in organization of state and local
social-hygiene programs. Annual membership
dues $2.00 including monthly journal.

AMERICAN WOMEN'S HOSPITALS

(O.S.) COrganized, 1917) 637 Madison

Avenue, New York Chairman; Esther Love-
joy, M. D., Treasurer; Mathilda K. Wajlin,
M. D. Conducts hospitals and food stations
for refugees in Greece, and medical centers
in Macedonia and Western Thrace. Contin-
uing assistance to medical work in France.
Serbia, Russia and Japan.

ASSOCIATED GUIDANCE BUREAU,
INC. 16 East 53rd Street, New York,
Telephone: Plaza 9512. A non-sectarian,
non-philanthropic child guidance bureau, em-
ploying highest social work standards. Sup-
plies, trains, and supervises carefully selected
governesses, tutors, companions, and play
leaders. Conducts psychiatric nurses regis-
try. For information address Jess Perlman,
Director.

THE BOY CONSERVATION BUREAU

90 West Broadway. Suggests all-the-year-
round Home Schools for needy boys. Tel.
Walker 0313. E. W. Watkins. Exec. Sec'y.



CHILD HEALTH DEMONSTRATION

COMMITTEE Courtenay Dinwiddle, di-
rector, 370 Seventh Avenue, New York.
Administers the Commonwealth Fund Child
Health Program demonstrating integrated
child health services in small communities:
Fargo, N. D., Athens, Ga., Rutherford
County, Tenn., Marion County, Ore. Bul-
letins free on request.

CHILD WELFARE COMMITTEE OF
AMERICA, Inc. 730 Fifth Avenue, New
York. To secure home life for normal
dependent children in preference to insti-
tutions; to secure Mothers Allowance laws
in states having none; to urge adequate ap-
propriations for home aid; to promote proper
laws affecting adoption, boarding out and
placing out of dependent children; to aid
in the enforcement of these laws. States
Council ef Committee comprises volunteer
representatives in practically every state.
Sophie Irene Loeb. President; Governor
Alfred E. Smith, Honorary President;
Margaret Woodrow Wilson, First Vice-
President; Edward Fisher Brown. Executive
Secretary.

THE CHILDREN'S VILLAGE, INCOR-
PORATED DobbsFerry-on-Hudson, New
York. A national, non-sectarian training
chool scientifically equipped for the study,
education and development of problem boys
and girls, on commitment ana by private
arrangement ages 7 to 16. Supported large-
ly by voluntary contributions. For further
information address Leon C. Faulkner, Man-
aging Director.

COUNCIL OF WOMEN FOR HOME

MISSIONS 156 Fifth Avenue, New York.
Composed of 22 Protestant national women s
mission boards. Florence E. Quintan, Exec-
utive Secretary.

Work among Farm and Cannery Migrants,
Summer service for college students.
Laura H. Parker, Executive Supervisor.
Bureau of Reference for Migrating People,
follow-up of New Americans, Raymond
E. Cole, Executive.

EYE SIGHT CONSERVATION COUN-
CIL OF AMERICA L. W. Wallace.
President; Guy A. Henry, General-Director.
Times Bldg.. New York. Conducts a na-
tional educational campaign to promote eye
hygiene. Urges correction of eye defects,
protection against hazards, proper lighting.
Comprehensive publications lantern slides-
lecture material. Cooperation of social
agencies invited.



you



Leadership

tail a leg,"



call



said



"TF

1. Lincoln, "how many legs has a
dog?" "Five." "No," replied Lincoln,
"because calling a tail a leg doesn't
make it a leg."

So it is with people and labels as
well as with dogs and tails.

Take leadership, for example. Some
men and women are labeled leaders
who are more concerned with the
label than with the fact.

But leadership, like art, is one-tenth
genius (or desire), and nine-tenths
hard work. A leader cannot afford to
go off half-cocked. He must have a
definite objective and must concen-
trate so vigorously on the attainment
of it that he has little time in which to
ponder oir his label.

Leadership of that kind your
kind is needed in a hundred phases
of social progress. Some of them are
represented on these pages. Inquire
into them.



FEDERAL COUNCIL OF THE
CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN

AMERICA Constituted by 28 Protestant I
communions. Rev. C. S. Macfarland and
Rev. S. M. Cavert. Gen. See's; 105 E. 22nd

HAMPTON INSTITUTE-Train. Negro and!

Indian youth for community service. Ad-
vanced courses: agriculture, builders, busi-
ness, home-economics, normal. Publishes
"Southern Workman" and free material on
Negro problems. J. E. Gregg, principal.
Dept. of Research and Education, Rev. P.

H. Johnson, Sec'y.

Commissions: Church and Social Service
Rev. W. M. Tippy, Sec'y; International
Justice and Goodwill: Rev. S. L. Guiick,
Sec'y; Church and Race Relations: Dr.
G. E. Haynes. Sec'y.

HAMPTON INSTITUTE Trains Negro and
Indian youth for community service. Ad-
vanced courses: agriculture, builders, busi-
ness, home-economics, normal. Publishes
"Southern Workman" and free material on
Negro problems. J. E. Gregg, principal.

HUDSON GUILD 436 West 27th Street.
Dr. John L. Elliott, head worker. Non-
sectarian neighborhood-house: organized to
make effective in the community better ways
of living and working together thru co-
operative effort. Social, educational, recrea-
tional activities for men, women, and chil-
dren. Health work; Athletics; Neighborhood
. Theatre; Mental Hygiene clinic. Supported
by voluntary contributions and memberships.

JOINT COMMITTEE ON METHODS OF
PREVENTING DELINQUENCY

Graham Romeyn Taylor, executive director
50 East 42nd Street, New York. To pro-
mote the adoption of sound methods in this
field, with particular reference to psychiatric
clinics, visiting teacher work, and training
for these and similar services; to conduct
related studies, education and publication;
and to interpret the work of the Common-
wealth Fund Program for the Prevention of
Delinquency.

LEAGUE FOR INDUSTRIAL DEMOC-
RACY Promotes a better understanding
of problems of democracy in industry
through its pamphlet, research and lecture
services and organization of college and
city groups. Executive Directors, Harry W.
Laidler and Norman Thomas, 78 Fifth
Avenue. New York City.

THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS NON-
PARTISAN ASSOCIATION -6 E 39th

Street, New York City. Charles C. Bauer,
director. An Association supplying factual
information about the League of Nations.
World Court and the International Labor
Office, in an effort to give Americans a true
picture of the effectiveness of these organi-
zations. Literature, educational material, a
speakers' bureau, a film, slides, exhibits, and
a reference library, are available to the pul>
lie. Memberships which include subscription
to the Association's monthly publication,
range from $1.00 to $100.

NATIONAL BOARD OF THE YOUNG
WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA-
TIONS Mrs. Robert E. Speer, president;
Miss Mabel Cratty, general secretary, 60fl
Lexington Avenue, New York City. This
organization maintains a staff of executive
and traveling secretaries to cover work in
the United States in 1,034 local Y. W.
C. A.'s on behalf of the industrial, business,
student, foreign born, Indian, Colored and
younger girls. It has 1 59 American secre-
taries at work in 49 centers in the Orient,
Latin America and Europe.

NATIONAL CHILD LABOR COMMIT-

TEE Wiley H. Swift, acting general sec-
retary, 215 Fourth Avenue, New York. Tc
improve child labor legislation; to conduct
investigation in local communities; to adyis*
on administration; to furnish information.
Annual membership, $2, $5, $10. $25 and
$100 includes monthly publication, "The
American Child."

NATIONAL COUNCIL, CHURCH MIS-

SION OF HELP 1133 Broadway, Ne

York. Agency of the Episcopal Churct
dealing with problems of unadjusted youtt
through social case work method. Fifteen
units have been established, maintainini
staffs of tviined case workers in nine states.



(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY.

300



It helps us, it identities you.)



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL AGENCIES



NATIONAL CHILD WELFARE ASSO-
CIATION, INC._(est. 1912, incorp. 1914),
70 Fifth Ave., N. Y. C. (tel. Chelsea 8774)
Promotes as its chief object the building of
character in the children of America through
the harmonious development of their bodies,
minds and spirits. Its method is, in co-
operation with other organizations, to orig-
inate and disseminate educational material in
the form of posters, books, bulletins, charts,
slid, and insignia. Through its "Knight-
hood of Youth" it provides homes, schools
and church schools with a method of char-
acter training through actual practice. Offi-
cers: Dr. John H. Finley. Pres.; Charles
F. Powlison. Gen. Sec'y.

THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR
MENTAL HYGIENE, INC._Dr. William

H Welch, honorary president; Dr. Charles
P Emerson, president; Dr. Frankwood E.
Williams, medical director; Dr. Clarence J.
D'Alton, executive assistant; Clifford W.
Beers, secretary; 370 Seventh Avenue, New
York City. Pamphlets on mental hygiene,
mental and nervous disorders, feebleminded-
ness, epilepsy, inebriety, delinquency, and
other mental problems in human behavior,
education, industry, psychiatric social serv-
ice, etc. "Mental Hygiene," quarterly, $3.00
a year; "Mental Hygiene Bulletin," month-
ly. $.50 a year.
NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL

WORK John A. Lapp, president, Chicago,
111.: Howard R. Knight, secretary, 277 E.
Long St., Columbus, Ohio. The conference
is an organization to discuss the principles
of humanitarian effort and to increase the
efficiency of social service agencies. Each
year it holds an annual meeting, publishes
in permanent form the Proceedings of the
meeting and issues a quarterly Bulletin.
The fifty-fourth annual meeting of the Con-
ference will be held in Des Moines. Iowa,
May 11-18, 1927. Proceedings are sent free
of charge to all members upon payment of
a membership fee of five dollars.

THE NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL
FOR INSTITUTION EXECUTIVES
AND OTHER WORKERS^At the Chil-
dren's Village, Dobbs-Ferry-on-Hudson, New
York. To furnish adequate training to
properly qualified people wishing to engage
in, or already engaged in, institution work.
Provide opportunity for carefully guided
study in all phases of institution manage-
ment and activity. Aims to furnish a
trained personnel for child caring institu-
tions. The first and only school of its kind
in the country. For futher information
address Calvin Derrick. Dean.



NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THE
PREVENTION OF BLINDNESS

Lewis H. Carris, managing director; Mrs.
Winifred Hathaway, associate director; Dr.
B. Franklin Koyer, medical director, and
Miss Eleanor P. Brown, secretary; 370
Seventh Ave., New York. Objects; To fur-
nish information, exhibits, lantern slides,
lectures, personal service for local organiza-
tions and legislation, publish literature ol
movement samples free, quantities at cost.
Includes New York State Committee.

NATIONAL CONGRESS OF PARENTS

AND TEACHERS -Mrs. A. H. Reeve,
President, Mrs. A. C. Watkins, Executive
Secretary, 1201 Sixteenth Street, N. W. t
Washington, D. C. To develop cooperation
between home and school, and an informed
public opinion which will secure highest ad-
vantages tor all chuklren.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF WOMEN

370 Seventh Ave., N. Y. C. Clearing house
for 35 women's organiations. Valeria H.
Parker, M.D.. President.

NATIONAL HEALTH CIRCLE FOR
COLORED PEOPLE, Inc. -370 Seventh
Avenue, New York City. Col. Theodore
Roosevelt, Honorary President; Dr. Jesse E.
Mooreland, Pres. ; Dr. George C. Booth,
Treasurer ; Miss 'Belle Davis, Executive
Secretary.

To organize public opinion and support

for health work among colored people.
To create and stimulate health consciou -
ness and responsibility among the color,
people in their own health problems.
To recruit, help educate and place young
colored women in public health.

NATIONAL WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN
TEMPERANCE UNION-Anna A. Gor-
don, president; Headquarters, 1730 Chicagu
Avenue, Evanston, Illinois. To secure ef-
fective enforcement of the Eighteenth Amend-
ment, to advance the welfare of the Amer-
ican people through the department of Child
Welfare, Women in Industry, Social Moral-
ity, Scientific Temperance Instruction, Amer-
icanization and other allied fields of en-
deavor. Official publications "The Union
Signal" published at Headquarters.

NATIONAL WOMEN'S TRADE UNION

LEAGUE Mrs. Raymond Robins, honor-
ary president; Miss Rose Schneiderman,
president; 247 Lexington Ave., New York;
Miss Elizabeth Christman, secretary. 311
South <Vsh!and Blvd., Chicago, 111. Stands



for self-government in the workshop through
organization and also for the enactment of
industrial legislation. Information given.

NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE- For social

service among Negroes. L. Hollingsworth
Wood, pres.; Eugene Kinckle Jones, exec.
secy; 127 E. 23rd St., New York. Estab-
lishes committees of white and colored people
to work out community problems. Trains
Negro social workers. Publishes "Oppor-
tunity" a "journal of Negro life."

PLAYGROUND AND RECREATION
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA

315 Fourth Avenue, New York City. Joseph
Lee, president; H. S. Braucher, secretary.
Special attention given to organization oi
year-round municipal recreation systems. In-
formation available on playground and com-
munity center activities and administration.

RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION -For the

Improvement of Living Conditions John M.
Glenn, dir.; 130 E. 22nd St., New York.
Departments: Charity Organization. Delin-
quency and Penology, Industrial Studiei,
Library, Recreation, Remedial Loans, Statis-
tics, Surveys and Exhibits. The publication!
of the Russell Sage Foundation offer to
the public in practical and inexpensive form
some of the most important results of it*
work. Catalogue sent upon request.

SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF
CRIME 1819 Broadway, New York. To
aid law-enforcement and the removal of
sources and causes of crime and stimulate
honest official conduct. Howard Clark Bar-
ber, Supt.

ST. ANDREW'S REST, Woodcliff Lake. N.J..

is conducted by the Episcopal Sisters of St.
John Baptist for convalescent or tired girls
and women. Season. May 15 to October 1.
Apply to Sister in Charge. Telephone, Park
Ridge 152. (Country Branch of St. Andrew's
Convalescent Hospital, N. Y. C.)

TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE-An institution for
the training of Negro Youth; an experiment
in race adjustment in the Black Belt of the
South; furnishes information on all phases
of the race problem and of the Tuskegee
idea and methods; Robert R. Moton, prin-
cipal; W. H. Carter, treasurer; A. L. Holsey,
secretary, Tuskegee Institute, Ala.

WORKERS' EDUCATION BUREAU OF

AMERICA a cooperative Educational
Agency for the promotion of Adult Educa-
tion among Industrial Workers. 476 West
24th Street, New York City. Spencer Miller,
Jr.. Secretary.



(Continued from page 274)
that concealment was unthinkable from being sent to the
sorely dreaded hospital. Not until Gov. Altgeld announced
he was about to call a conference of the governors of In-
diana, Wisconsin, Iowa, Missouri and Kentucky, with a
view to instituting an embargo upon all shipments of pro-
ducts of the needle trades from Chicago, did the owners of
the goods believe that the new law must be obeyed. They
then instituted in good earnest a campaign of vaccination
in their factories, their contract shops, and the tenement^ to
which these latter sent out goods. So strong was the feeling
against vaccination in the tenements that one promising
young surgeon working with the vaccination squad was dis-
abled for life for his profession, his elbow being shattered
by a shot from an excited tailor.

The non-transmissibility of smallpox germs in woolen
fabrics seems never to have been definitely proved. With-
out reference to the epidemic the occasional appearance
of isolated cases on lonely farms in the Northwest, through-
out 1924, could not be explained, especially when it coin-
cided as it frequently did, with the previous receipt of wool-
en garments from the Chicago mail-order houses.

The Illinois Association of Manufacturers, established in
1893, seems not to have been in working order until after
the new law took effect in July, or to have been too feeble



to make any timely opposition. No sooner, however, had
we begun to enforce the statute against violators in the
tenement houses, by urging their employers to cut off sup-
plies of work during the period of the epidemic, warning
them that goods found in the presence of infection would
be summarily destroyed, than many workers showed us let-
ters from the Manufacturers' Association promising protec-
tion if they were molested by inspectors who were, the let-
ters said, operating under a new law clearly unconstitutional.

From that day the Illinois labor law has never been with-
out strenuous opposition, sometimes open, sometimes con-
cealed, from that active body. When a labor measure for
women or minors has been strengthened on paper, or a
valuable new one enacted, the quality of the administering
officials has been reduced, if this could be achieved.

This reactionary but undeniably permanent power of the
Illinois Manufacturers' Association was formerly chargeable
to a grievous error of the exceedingly powerful trade unions,
viz- their neglect of, and contempt for, statutory safeguards
compared with negotiations of the organized workers
through their unions. Since 1920, however, this respons,-
bilitv is shared by the rank and file of women voters
fail to line up effectively behind the most important 1
measures. Together voting women and orgai
labor could alwavs win.



ecr in JULY, u. ,. - ;/ ijfllliff , ,..)

(In answering advertisement, please mention THE SURVEY.

301



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS



WORKERS WANTED

WANTED: at the Children's Village,
Dobbs Ferry on Hudson, N. Y., military di-
rector who is also prepared to act as detail
and relief officer. Permanent position with-
in twenty miles of New York City under
most favorable conditions to right party.
Apply to Leon C. Faulkner, Managing
Director.

WANTED: Experienced case worker as
Assistant Secretary of Family Society in
an Eastern City of 100,000. Duties will in-
clude some case work, the supervision of
two workers and some committee and
board work. Excellent opportunity for
case worker to secure executive experience
under supervision. 5846 SURVEY.

WANTED: A young woman experienced
in mental testing for position as psycholo-
gist in institution for children. Write:
Miss M. J. Atwater, Morganza, Pa.

WANTED: Head Worker, Jewish Com-
munity Center. Opportunity for develop- j
ment. Salary $2,400. Apply Mrs. Ernest
Morris, 712 Lafayette Street, Denver,
Colorado.

WANTED: A Case Worker for rural
child and family welfare work. Central
Bureau of Social Service, 51 South St.,
Morristown, N. J.

WANTED: Two Counsellors and As-
sistant Housekeeper for Camp for Jewish
business girls near Detroit. State qualifica-
tions. 5854 SURVEY.

SOCIAL WORKER. A large Jewish
philanthropic educational and social organ-
ization needs a director of girls' work.
Hours afternoon and evening. In applying,
please state specifically and in detail age,
education, experience. 5850 SURVEY.

TWO MEN, non-resident, for evening
club director and basketball coach in large
New York settlement. October i. 5853
SURVEY.

CAPABLE and experienced teacher for
Sewing and Handcraft Classes in a large



Online LibrarySurvey AssociatesThe Survey (Volume 58) → online text (page 67 of 130)