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medical treatment, for suggestions with reference to health
I examination procedure, for guidance as to clinic service, and
for protection against fraud and deceit in quack medical
methods. To some extent local health centers, clinics, dis-
pensaries, hospitals, and pay clinics are attempting to meet
this situation. A few county medical societies have made



We assist in preparing special articles, papers, speeches
debates. Expert scholarly service. AUTHOX'I RUIABCB
BURIAU. 500 Fifth Avenue, New York.

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394



a beginning in this field, such as those in Brooklyn, Toledo,
and possibly other centers, but judging from the volume and
type of correspondence analyzed above, the facilities are by
no means adequate nor are they widely known and accepted.
Now, in addition to the lack of local responsible medical
provision, the other big factor which interferes with the
effective operation of such an information service at the present
time, is that the doctors are not yet prepared to meet the
demand along these lines. Take simply the field of health
examinations. Here it is fairly evident that the popular pro-
paganda has gotten considerably ahead of medical interest or
provision for this type of service. It is also evident that there
is a growing public interest in some method of post-graduate
medical instruction and standardization and continuous tech-
nical control. Health and medical authorities are of course
ay no means unaware of this situation, and to a degree, meas-
ures are being taken to meet it. Organized efforts by county
and state medical societies for the promotion of the health
examination work in medical channels, for the extension of
post-graduate instruction through medical societies, may be
effective ultimately in meeting the professional need and in
allaying the lay unrest, but the magnitude and the seriousness
of the problem should be recognized, and the organized efforts
lin this direction should certainly be accelerated. Much can
!be and is being done by Health Departments and by local and
state medical organizations in this field. Much more can be
done in supplementing these efforts by aggressive procedures
on the part of organized medical machinery on a national
scale. Aggressive American Medical Association leadership is
needed.

IF the public in general had been educated to expect health
advice from the physician and if the individual physician
had been trained to a greater degree than is the case at
present, to give hygienic instruction and to answer intelligent
inquiries from his patients with reference to the hygiene of
living and to specific treatment procedures, a large part of
the total volume of correspondence that now comes in to
national agencies of one kind or another would have been
^eliminated.

More concrete efforts are needed to encourage competency
on the part of the medical profession, and public confidence
tin its proficiency. The incorporation of more preventive medi-
cine in medical school curricula, post-graduate educational
measures, medical extension courses, definite controlling legis-
lative procedures all such steps need wider application. It is
particularly important to encourage the doctor to meet the
growing demand for personal hygienic advice, for health exam-
ination service, and for his full participation in the private
practice of preventive medicine. This medical educational work
is an obligation which rests primarily upon medical schools,
medical societies, and similar professional organizations.

The public is willing to accept and indeed actively desires:

1. Protection from quackery and fraud.

2. Direction to safe and helpful medical and health services
and facilities.

The problem in its simplest terms is a three-fold one:

1. To get the doctors ready to teach personal hygiene and
practice private preventive medicine.

2. To get the public more fully aware of its needs in this field
and of the competency and willingness of orthodox medicine to
meet these needs about which it is already conscious.

3. To establish the local machinery which will purposefully
and usefully associate service and need.

In brief, it is necessary to find the short cut to medical guid-
ance, to establish the local circuit, and to connect up physician
and patient in a competent and justifiably trustful relationship.

It is true as stated previously, that Health Departments,
some voluntary health agencies, and certain medical societies
have made attempts to develop a local information service.
But something more than general sanitary or hygienic informa-
tion is needed. If there were in all of our larger centers of
population at least, Medical Guidance Bureaus under com-
petent and reliable auspices, then certainly, most national
agencies would be glad to take advantage of such local centers
in referring inquiries to them. After all, such a service is
fundamental in disseminating facts with reference to disease
prevention and treatment, and in preserving an attitude of
confidence in competent medical guidance. Much of our medi-

(In answering advertisements please mention THE

395




GRADUATE training in New York for
professional service in the field of
social work is enhanced in value by asso-
ciation with students from other states
and foreign countries in an environment
in which the staffs of over a thousand
philanthropic enterprises live and
work. $ TB The Fall
Quarter begins on
October third.



The New York School of Social Work

107 East Tu/entjr'Second Street
New York



Smith College School

for

Social Work



Fellowships paying all expenses, internships
providing maintenance, and numerous
scholarships are available to properly
qualified students who desire to enter
the field of social work, child guid-
ance, juvenile courts, visiting
teaching, and psychiatric so-
cial work. Graduates of
accredited colleges eligi-
ble for the degree

MASTER OF SOCIAL SCIENCE



Summer session for experienced social
workers

For information address

THE DIRECTOR

College Hall 8, Northampton, Massachusetts



SURVEY. It helps us, it identifies you.)



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL AGENCIES



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF HOS-
PITAL SOCIAL WORKERS - 20 E.

Division St., Chicago, 111. To serve as an
organ of inter-communication among hospital
social workers, to maintain and improve
standards of social work in hospitals, dis-
pensaries, special clinics or other distinctly
medical or psychiatric institutions and to
stimulate its intensive and extensive develop-
ment. Mrs. Charles W. Webb, President,
Miss Helen Beckley, Executive Secretary,
Miss Kate McMahon, Educational Secretary.

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR OLD

AGE SECURITY \im: To promote

through legislation adequate provisions for
the dependent aged in the United States.
Bishop Ethelbert Talbot, president. A. Ep-
stein, executive secretary. Box 1001, Harris-
burgh, Pennsylvania.

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PSY-
CHIATRIC SOCIAL WORKERS

To promote association among psychiatric
social workers and to maintain standards in
psychiatric social work. President, Mrs.
Maida H. Solomon. 74 Kenwood Road. Bos-
ton, Massachusetts; Secretary, Kathleen
Ormsby. 370 Seventh Avenue. N. Y. C.

AMERICAN BIRTH CONTROL LEAGUE,
INC. Margaret Sanger, President. 104
Fifth Avenue, New York City. Purpose:
To teach the need for birth control to pre-
vent destitution, disease and social deteri-
oration; to amend laws adverse to birth
control; to render safe, reliable contracep-
tive information accessible to all married
persons. Annual membership, $200 to $500.
Birth Control Review (monthly) $2.00 per
year.

AMERICAN CHILD HEALTH ASSO-
CIATION 370 Seventh Ave., New York.
Herbert Hoover, President; Philip yan
Ingen, M.D., Secretary, S. J. Crumbine,
M.D., General Executive. Objects: Sound
promotion of child health, especially in co-
operation with the official health and edu-
cation agencies.

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF ORGAN-
IZATIONS FOR THE HARD OF
HEARING promotes the cause of the
hard of hearing; assists in forming organi-
zations. Pres., Dr. Gordon Berry; Field
Secretary, Miss Betty Wright, 1601 35th
St. N.W., Washington. D. C.

AMERICAN HOME ECONOMICS ASSO-
CIATION Alice I,. Edwards, executive
secretary, 617 Mills Bldg., Washington,
D. C. Organized for betterment of condi-
tions in home, school, institution and com-
munity. Publishes monthly Journal of Home
Economics: office of editor. 617 Mills Bldg.,
Washington, D. C. ; of business manager,
101 East 20th St., Baltimore, Md.



THE BOY CONSERVATION BUREAU

90 West Broadway. Suggests all-the-year-
round Home Schools for needy boys. Tel.
Walker OJ13. E. W. Watkins. Exec. Sec'y.

CHILD HEALTH DEMONSTRATION
COMMITTEECourtenay Dinwiddle. di-
rector, 370 Seventh Avenue. New York.
Administers the Commonwealth Fund Child
Health Program demonstrating integrated
child health services in small communities'
Fargo, N. D., Athens, Ga., Rutherford
County, Tenn., Marion County, Ore. Bul-
letins free on request.

CHILD WELFARE COMMITTEE OF
AMERICA, Inc 730 Fifth Avenue, New
York. To secure home life tor normal
dependent children in preference to insti-
tutions; to secure Mothers' Allowance laws
in states having none; to urge adequate ap-
propriations for home aid; to promote propel
laws affecting adoption, boarding out and
placing out of dependent children; to aid
in the enforcement of these laws. States
Council of Committee comprises volunteer
representatives in practically every state.
Sophie Irene Loeb, President; Governor
Alfred E. Smith, Honorary President;
Margareet Woodrow Wilson, First Vice-
President; Edward Fisher Brown, Executive
Secretary.

THE CHILDREN'S VILLAGE, INCOR-
PORATED Dobbs-Ferry-on-Hudson, New
York. A national, non-sectarian training
school scientifically equipped for the study,
education and development of problem boys
and girls, on commitment and by private
arrangement ages 7 to 16. Supported larg-
ly by voluntary contributions. For further
information address Leon C. Faulkner, Man
aging Director.

COUNCIL OF WOMEN FOR HOME

MISSIONS 105 East 22d St., New York.

Florence E. Quinlan, Executive Secretary.
Composed of 23 Protestant national women's
mission boards of the United States and
Canada. Purpose: To unify effort by consul-
tation and cooperaton in action.
Work among Farm and Cannery Migrants,
Summer service for college students,
Laura H. Parker, Executive Supervisor.
Religious Work Directors in Government

Indian Schools.

Bureau of Reference for Migrating People,
follow-up of New Americans.



I



AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR THE CON-
TROL OF CANCER -Dr. George A.
Soper, managing director, 25 West 43rd
Street. New York. To collect, collate and
disseminate information concerning the symp-
toms, diagnosis, treatment and prevention.
Publications free on request. Annual mem-
bership dues, $5.00.

AMERICAN SOCIAL HYGIENE ASSO-

CIATION 370 Seventh Ave., New York.
To provide a better understanding of the
social hygiene movement ; to advance sound
sex education, to combat prostitution and sex
delinquency; to aid public authorities in the
campaign against the venereal diseases ; to
advise in organization of state and local
focial-hygiene programs. Annual membership
ncludin



dues $2.00



AMERICAN WOMEN'S HOSPITALS

(O.S.) - COrganized, 1917) 637 Madison
Avenue, New York Chairman; Esther Love-
joy, M. D., Treasurer; Mathilda K. Wallin,
M. D. Conducts hospitals and food stations
for refugees in Greece, and medical centers
in Macedonia and Western Thrace. Contin-
uing assistance to medical work in France,
Serbia, Russia and Japan.



brakes

T was the brakeman's first trip.
Painfully, with groaning wheels,
the train finally reached the top of the
long grade.

"Pretty hard pull, wasn't it?", re-
marked the engineer.

"Yes," replied the brakeman. "And
if I hadn't had the brakes on we
might have slipped back!"

So it is in social progress. Some-
body is forever applying the brakes on
the up-grade.

Brakes aren't made for that. They
are to keep us from going too fast and
smashing the works. When the engine
is climbing it needs all the help a train
crew can give it.

There is a long grade ahead in social
work. But the engine is in good con-
dition and the crew is well trained.
There is plenty of fuel, if we have
brains enough to use it. Here it is,
on these pages tested fuel for social
progress. Each of the organizations
listed here is helping in the long climb.
(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY. // helps

396



ng monthly journal.



EYE SIGHT CONSERVATION COUN-
CIL OF AMERICA L. W. Wallace
President; Guy A. Henry, General-Director
Times Bldg.. New York. Conducts a na
tional educational campaign to promote ey>
hygiene. Urges correction of eye defects
protection against hazards, proper lighting
Comprehensive publications lantern slides-
lecture material. Cooperation of socia
agencies invited.

FEDERAL COUNCIL OF THE
CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN
AMERICA Constituted by 28 Protestan
communions. Rev. C. S. Macfarland anc
Rev. S. M. Cavert. Gen. See's; IDS E. 22nc
St., N. Y. C.

Dept. of Research and Education, Rev. F

E. Johnson, Sec'y.

Commissions: Church and Social Service
Rev. W. M. Tippy, Sec'y; Internationa
Justice and Goodwill: Rev. S. L. Gulick
Sec'y; Church and Race Relations: Dr
G. E. Haynes, Sec'y.

HAMPTON INSTITUTE-Trains Negro anc
Indian youth for community service. Ad
vanced courses: agriculture, builders, bus!
ness, home-economics, normal. Publishei
"Southern Workman" and free material 01
Negro problems. J. E. Gregg, principal.

HUDSON GUILD 436 West 27th Street
Dr. John L. Elliott, head worker. Non
sectarian neighborhood-house: organized ti
make effective in the community better wayi
of living and working together thru co
operative effort. Social, educational, recrea
tional activities for men, women, and chil
dren. Health work; Athletics; Neighborhoot
Theatre; Mental Hygiene clinic. Supportet
by voluntary contributions and memberships

JOINT COMMITTEE ON METHODS OF
PREVENTING DELINQUENCY

Graham Romeyn Taylor, executive director
50 East 42nd Street, New York. To pro
mote the adoption of sound methods in thi
field, with particular reference to psychiatri*
clinics, visiting teacher work, and training
for these and similar services ; to conduc
related studies, education and publication
and to interpret the work of the Common
wealth Fund Program for the Prevention o
Delinquency.

LEAGUE FOR INDUSTRIAL DEMOC

RACY Promotes a better understandini
of problems of democracy in industry
through its pamphlet, research and Iccturi
services and organization of college an<
city groups. Executive Directors, Harry W
Laidler and Norman Thomas, 70 Fiftl
Avenue. New York City.

THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS NON
PARTISAN ASSOCIATION -6 E. 39ti
Street, New York City. Charles C. Bauer
director. An Association supplying factua
information about the League of Nations
World Court and the International Labo:
Office, in an effort to give Americans a tru<
picture of the effectiveness of these organi
zations. Literature, educational material, ;
speakers' bureau, a film, slides, exhibits, am
a reference library, are available to the pub
He. Memberships which include subscriptioi
to the Association's monthly publication
range from $1.00 to $100.

NATIONAL BOARD OF THE YOUNC
WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA
TIONS Mrs. Robert E. Speer, president
Miss Mabel Cratty, general secretary, 601
Lexington Avenue, New York City. Thi
organization maintains a staff of executivi
and traveling secretaries to cover work it
the United States in 1,034 local Y. W
C A.'s on behalf of the industrial, business
student, foreign born, Indian, Colored an<
younger girls. It has 1 59 American secre
taries at work in 49 centers in the Orient
Latin America and Europe.

NATIONAL CHILD LABOR COMMIT-

TEE Wiley H. Swift, acting general sec
retary, 215 Fourth Avenue, New York. Ti
improve child labor legislation ; to conduc
investigation in local communities; to adyis>
on administration; to furnish info mint ion
Annual membership, $2, $5. $10, $25 anc
$ 1 00 includes monthly publication. "Tht
American Child."

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NATIONAL CHILD WELFARE ASSO-
CIATION, lNC._(est. 1912, incorp. 1914)
70 Fifth Ave., N. Y. C. (tel. Chelsea 8774).
Promotes as its chief object the building of
character in the children of America through
the harmonious development of their bodies,
minds, and spirits. Its method is, in co-
operation with other organizations, to orig-
inate and disseminate educational material in
the form of posters, books, buHetins, charts,
slides, and insignia. Through its "Knight-
hood of Youth" it provides homes, schools
and church schools with a method of char-
acter training through actual practice. Offi-
cers : Dr. John H. Finley. Pres. ; Charles
F. Powli^on. Gen. Sec'y-

THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR
MENTAL HYGIENE, INC.-Dr. William
H. Welch, honorary president; Dr. Chan*.
P. Emerson, president; Dr. Frank wood E
Williams, medical director; Dr. Clarence J
D'Alton, executive assistant; Clifford V\
Beers, secretary; 370 Seventh Avenue, New
York City. Pamphlets on mental hygiene
mental and nervous disorders, feebleminded
ness, epilepsy, inebriety, delinquency, anc
other mental problems in human behavior
education, industry, psychiatric social serv
ice, etc. "Mental Hygiene," quarterly, $3.00
a year; "Mental Hygiene Bulletin," month
ly. S.50 a year.

NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THE
PREVENTION OF BLINDNESS

Lewis H. Carris, Managing Director ; Mrs.
Winifred Hathaway, Associate Director; B.
Franklin Royer, M.D., Medical Director;
Eleanor P. Brown. Secretary, 370 Seventh
Avenue, New York. Studies scientific ad-
vances in medical and pedagogical knowledge
and disseminates practical information as to
ways of preventing blindness and conserving
sight. Literature, exhibits, lantern slides,
lectures, charts and co-operation in sight-
saving projects available on request.

NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL
WORK John A. Lapp, president, Chicago,
111.; Howard R. Knight, secretary, 277 E.
Long St., Columbus, Ohio. The conference
is an organization to discuss the principles
of humanitarian effort and to increase the
efficiency of social service agencies. Each
year it holds an annual meeting, publishes
in permanent form the Proceedings of the
meeting and issues a quarterly Bulletin.
The fifty-fourth annual meeting of the Con-
ference will be held in the Spring of 1928.
Proceedings are sent free of charge to all
members upon payment of a membership
fee of five dollars.

NATIONAL CONGRESS OF PARENTS
AND TEACHERS -Mrs. A. H. Reeve,
President. Mrs. A. C. Watkins, Executive
Secretary, 1201 Sixteenth Street, N. W.,
Washington, D. C. To develop cooperation
between home and school, and an informed
public opinion which will secure highest ad-
vantages for all children.



NATIONAL COUNCIL OF WOMEN

370 Seventh Ave., N. Y. C. Clearing house
for 35 women's organiations. Valeria H
Parker, M.D., President.

NATIONAL COUNCIL, CHURCH MIS.

SION OF HELP 1133 Broadway, f\

York. Agency of the Episcopal Church
dealing with problems of unadjusted youth
through social case work method. Fifteen
units have been established, maintainine
Stan's of trained case workers in nine states.

NATIONAL FEDERATION OF DAY

NURSERIES Corg. 1898), Room 907, 105
East 22nd St., New York (tel. Gramercy
5258). To unite in one central body all day
nurseries; to endeavor to secure the highest
attainable standard; to act as a central
bureau for information in regard to existing
day nurseries, and for the publication and
distribution of literature that may prove help-
ful in the organization of new day nurseries.
Mrs. Hermann M. Biggs, Pres.; Mrs. Wil-
liam A. Baldwin, Treas.; Mrs. Arthur M.
Dodge, Sec'y; Miss H. M. Sears, Exec.
Sec'y.

NATIONAL HEALTH CIRCLE FOR
COLORED PEOPLE, Inc. -370 Seventh
Avenue, New York City. Col. Theodore
Roosevelt, Honorary President; Dr. Jesse E.
Mooreland, Pres.; Dr. George C. Booth,
Treasurer; Miss Belle Davis, Executive
Secretary.

To organize public opinion and support

for health work among colored people.
To create and stimulate health consciou 8 -
ness and responsibility among the colored
people in their own health problems.
To recruit, help educate and place young
colored women in public health.

THE NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL
FOR INSTITUTION EXECUTIVES
AND OTHER WORKERS-At the Chil

dren's Village, Dobbs-Ferry-on-Hudson, New
York. To furnish adequate training to
properly qualified people wishing to engage
in, or already engaged in, institution work.
Provide opportunity for carefully guided
study in all phases of institution manage-
ment and activity. Aims to furnish a
trained personnel for child caring institu-
tions. The first and only school of its kind
in the country. For further information
address Calvin Derrick, Dean.

NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE- For social

service among Negroes. L. Hollingsworth
Wood, pres. ; Eugene Kinckle Jones, exec,
sec'y; 127 E. 23rd St., New York. Estab-
lishes committees of white and colored people
to work out community problems. Trains
Negro social workers. Publishes "Oppor-
tunity" a "journal of Negro life."

NATIONAL WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN

TEMPERANCE UNION -Anna A. Gor-
don, president; Headquarters, 1730 Chicago



Avenue, Evanston, Illinois. To secure ef-
ective enforcement of the Eighteenth Amend-
ment, to advance the welfare of the Amer-
ican people through the department of Child
Welfare, Women in Industry, Social Moral-
ity, Scientific Temperance Instruction Amer-
icanization and other allied fields 'of en-
deavor Official publications "The Union
signal, published at Headquarters.

NATIONAL WOMEN'S TRADE UNION

LEAGUE Mrs. Raymond Robins, honor-
ary president; Miss Rose Schneiderman.
president; 247 Lexington Ave., New York;
Miss Elizabeth Christman, secretary. 311
South Ashland Blvd., Chicago, 111. Stands
for self-government in the workshop through
organization and also for the enactment of
industrial legislation. Information given.

PLAYGROUND AND RECREATION
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA

315 Fourth Avenue, New York City. Joseph
Lee, president; H. S. Braucher, secretary
Special attention given to organization o>
year-round municipal recreation systems. In-
formation available on playground and com
munity center activities and administration

RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION- For the

Improvement of Living Conditions John M
Glenn, dir.; 130 E. 22nd St., New York.
Departments: Charity Organization. Delin-
quency and Penology, Industrial Studies
Library, Recreation, Remedial Loans, Statis-
tics, Surveys and Exhibits. The publications
of the Russell Sage Foundation offer to
the public in practical and inexpensive form
some of the most important results of its
work. Catalogue sent upon request.

SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF
CRIME 1819 Broadway, New York. To
aid law-enforcement and the removal of
sources and causes of crime and stimulate
honest official conduct. Howard Clark Bar-
ber, Supt.

ST. ANDREW'S REST, Woodcliff Lake, N.I.,
is conducted by the Episcopal Sisters of St.
John Baptist for convalescent or tired girls
and women. Season, May 15 to October 1.
Apply to Sister in Charge. Telephone, Park
Ridge 152. (Country Branch of St. Andrew's
Convalescent Hospital, N. Y. C.)

TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE-An institution for
the training of Negro Youth; an experiment
in race adjustment in the Black Belt of the
South; furnishes information on all phases
of the race problem and of the Tuskegee
idea and methods; Robert R. Moton, prin-
cipal; W. H. Carter, treasurer; A. L. Holsey,
secretary, Tuskegee Institute, Ala.

WORKERS' EDUCATION BUREAU OF
AMERICA a cooperative Educational
Agency for the promotion of Adult Educa-
tion among Industrial Workers. 476 West
24th Street, New York City. Spencer Miller,
Jr., Secretary.



"SEE YOUR DOCTOR"
(Continued from page 395)



cal service may be poor, but it is the best we have at present.
Private medical practice is deep-rooted in our social scheme.
Certainly, by increasing the demand for competent medical ser-
vice, and by simplifying and clarifying the public's method of
access to this service, we are bringing into play influences that
would ultimately force an improvement in the service rendered.

We have for dissemination certain facts about disease preven-
tion, and we have for the treatment of disease certain technical



Online LibrarySurvey AssociatesThe Survey (Volume 58) → online text (page 89 of 130)