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Delinquency.

NATIONAL BOARD OF THE YOUNG
WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA. ,

TIONS Mrs. Robert E. Speer, president;
Miss Mabel Crafty, general secretary, 6fl'
Lexington Avenue, New York City. Thii
organization maintains a staff of executive
and traveling secretaries to cover work in
the United States in 1,034 local Y. W.
C A.'s on behalf of the industrial, business,
student, foreign born, Indian Colored ana
younger girls. It has 159 American secre-
taries at work in 49 centers in the Orient,
Latin America and Europe.

NATIONAL CHILD LABOR COMMIT-

TEE Wiley H. Swift, acting general sec-
retary. 215 Fourth Avenue. New Y6rk. To
improve child labor legislation; to conduct
investigation in local communities; to advise
on administration; to furnish information.
Annual membership, $2, $5. $10. $25 and
$100 includes monthly publication. "The
American Child."

NATIONAL CHILD WELFARE ASSO-
CIATION, INC._(eft. 1912. incorp. 1914),
70 Fifth Ave.. N. Y. C. (tel. Chelsea 8774).
Promotes as its chief object the building of
character in the children of America through
the harmonious development of their bodies,
minds, and spirits. Its method is, in co-
operation with other organizations, to orig-
inate and disseminate educational material in
the form of posters, books, buHetins, charts,
slides, and insignia. Through its "Knight-
hood of Youth" it provides homes, schools
and church schools with a method of char-
acter training through actual practice. Offi-
cers: Dr. John H. Finley. Pres.; Charlei
F. Powlison. Gen. Sec'y.

THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR
MENTAL HYGIENE, INC. -Dr. William

H. Welch, honorary president; Dr. Charlet
P. Emerson, president; Dr. Frankwood E.
Williams, medical director; Dr. Clarence J.
D'Alton, executive assistant; Clifford W.
Beers, secretary: 370 Seventh Avenue, New
York City. Pamphlets on mental hygiene,
mental and nervous disorders, feebleminded-
ness, epilepsy, inebriety, delinquency, anc
other mental problems in human behavior,
education, ir.iustry. psychiatric social erv-
ice. etc. "Mental Hygiene." quarterly. $3.0C
a year: "Mental Hy.eiene Bulletin," month-
ly. S.50 a year.

NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THE
PREVENTION Of BLINDNESS

Lewi? H. Carris. ManaeTre Director: Mr*.
Winifred Hathaway. A??oc : ^r Director: B.
Franklin Royer. M.D.. Mriical Director:
Eleanor P. Browr.. Secrtta-y. .-TO Seventk
Avenue. Xen- York. Stv.riies cientific ad-
vances in medical sr.d pedacotric^l knowledge
and disseminate? practical information as to
ways of preventing blindness arrc conserving
ight. Literature, exhibits, lantern slides,
lectures, charts and co-operation :r. sight-
saving projects available on reo.uest.

NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL

WORK John A. Lapp, president, Chicago.
111. ; Howard R. Knight, secretary, 277 E-
Long St., Columbus, Ohio. The conference
is an organization to discuss the principle?
of humanitarian effort and to increase the
efficiency of social service agencies. Each
year it holds an annual meeting, publishes
in permanent form the Proceedings of the
meeting, and issues a quarterly Bulletin.
The fifty-fourth annual meeting of the Con-
ference will be held in Memphis, Tenn., in
the Spring of 192S. Proceedings are sent free
of charge to all members upon payment of
a membership fee of five dollars.



(In answering advertisements please mention THE SURVEY.)
430



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL AGENCIES



LTIONAL CONGRESS OF PARENTS
AND TEACHERS -Mrs. A. H. Reeve,
President. Mrs. A. C Watkins, Executive
Secretary, 1201 Sixteenth Street, N. W.,
Washington, D. C. To develop cooperation
between home and school, and an informed
public opinion which will secure highest ad-
vantages for all children.

kTIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH
WOMEN Mrs. Joseph E. Friend. Presi-
dent; Mrs. Estelle M. Sternberger, Execu-
tive Secretary, 2109 Broadway, New York
City. Program covers twelve departments
in religious, educational, civic and legislative
work, peace and social service. Official
publication: "The Jewish Woman."

Department of Immigrant Aid and Immi-
grant Education, 799 Broadway, New York
City. For the protection and education of
immigrant women and girls. Maintains
Bureau of International Service. Monthly
bulletin. "The Immigrant." Fiorina Lasker,
Chairman; Cecilia Razovsky, Secretary.

Department of Farm and Rural Work,
Mrs. Elmer Eckhousc, Chairman, 5 Colum-
bus Circle, New York City. Program of
Education, recreation, religious instruction
and social service work for rural communi-
ties. Bulletin: "The Rural Voice."

ATIONAL COUNCIL OF WOMEN

370 Seventh Ave., N. Y. C. Clearing house
for 35 women's organiations. Valeria H.
Parker, M.D., President.

ATIONAL FEDERATION OF DAY

NURSERIES (org. 1898), Room 907, 105
East 22nd St., New York (tel. Gramercy
5258). To unite in one central body all day
nurseries; to endeavor to secure the highest
attainable standard; to act as a central
bureau for information in regard to existing
day nurseries, and for the publication and
distribution of literature that may prove help-
ful in the organization of new day nurseries.
Mrs. Hermann M. Biggs, Pres.; Mrs. Wil-
liam A. Baldwin, Treas. ; Mrs. Arthur M.
Dodge, Sec'y; Miss H. M. Sears, Exec.
Sec'y-

ATIONAL HEALTH CIRCLE FOR
COLORED PEOPLE, Inc. -370 Seventh



Avenue, New York City. Col. Theodore
Roosevelt, Honorary President; Dr. Jesse E.
Mooreland, Pres.; Dr. George C Booth,
Treasurer; Miss Belle Davis, Executive
Secretary.

To organize public opinion and support

for health work among colored people.
To create and stimulate health conscious-
ness and responsibility among the colored
people in their own health problems.
To recruit, help educate and place young
colored women in public health work.
Work supported by memberships and
voluntary contributions.

NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE_por 8ocia i

service among Negroes. L. Hollingsworth
Wood, pre*. ; Eugene Kinckle Jones, exec,
sec'y; 127 E. 23rd St., New York. Estab-
lishes committee* of white and colored people
to work out community problems. Trains
Negro social workers. Publishes "Oppor-
tunity" a "journal of Negro life."

THE NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL
FOR INSTITUTION EXECUTIVES
AND OTHER WORKERS-At the Ch,l

dren's Village, Dobbs-Ferry-on-Hudspn, New
York. To furnish adequate training to
properly qualified people wishing to engage
in, or already engaged in, institution work.
Provide opportunity for carefully guided
study in all phases of institution manage-
ment and activity. Aims to furnish a
trained personnel for child caring institu-
tions. The first and only school of its kind
in the country. For further information
address Calvin Derrick, Dean.

NATIONAL TUBERCULOSIS ASSO-
CIATION 370 Seventh Ave., New York.
Dr. Henry Sewall, president; Dr. Linsly
R. Williams, managing director. Pamphlets
on methods and program for the prevention
of tuberculosis. Publications sold and distri-
buted through state associations in every
state. Journal of the Outdoor Life, popular
monthly magazine, $2.00 a year; American
Review of Tuberculosis, medical journal,
$8.00 a year; and Monthly Bulletin, house
organ, free.



NATIONAL WOMEN'S TRADE UNION

LEAGUE Mrs. Raymond Robins, honor-
ary president; Miss Rose Schneiderman,
president; 247 Lexington Ave., New York;
Miss Elizabeth Christman, secretary, 311
South Ashland Blvd., Chicago, 111. Stands
for self-government in the workshop through
organization and also for the enactment of
industrial legislation. Information given.

PLAYGROUND AND RECREATION
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA

315 Fourth Avenue, New York City. Joseph
Lee, president; H. S. Braucher, secretary.
Special attention given to organization of
year-round municipal recreation systems. In-
formation available on playground and com-
munity center activities and administration.

RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION -For tb*

Improvement of Living Conditions John M.
Glenn, dir.; 130 E. 22nd St., New York.
Departments: Charity Organization. Delin-
quency and Penology, Industrial Studies,
Library, Recreation, Remedial Loans, Statis-
tics, Surveys and Exhibits. The publications
of the Russell Sage Foundation offer to
the public in practical and inexpensive form
some of the most important results of its
work. Catalogue sent upon request.

ST. ANDREW'S REST, Woodcliff Lake, N.J..

is conducted by the Episcopal Sisters of St.
John Baptist for convalescent or tired girls
and women. Season, May 15 to October 1.
Apply to Sister in Charge. Telephone, Park
Ridge 152. (Country Branch of St. Andrew's
Convalescent Hospital, N. Y. C.)

TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE An institution for
the training of Negro Youth; an experiment
in race adjustment in the Black Belt of th
South; furnishes information on all phases
of the race problem and of the Tuskegee
idea and methods; Robert R. Moton, prin-
cipal; W. H. Carter, treasurer; A. L. Holsey,
secretary, Tuskegee Institute, Ala.

WORKERS' EDUCATION BUREAU OF
AMERICA a cooperative Educational
Agency for the promotion of Adult Educa-
tion among Industrial Workers. 476 West
24th Street, New York City. Spencer Miller,
Jr.. Secretary.



(Continued from page 425)

lontgomery Flagg, noted artist and
lustrator, for the National Plant, Flower
nd Fruit Guild. The poster is Mr.
lagg's contribution to the Guild work.

C. J. ATKINSON, executive secretary
f the Boys' Club Federation, was the
fficial American delegate to the Conven-
on of the National Association of Boys'
'iubs of Great Britain, held at Buxton,
une 17. He spoke on American Boys
nd American Clubs. Mr. Atkinson will
ttend the Rotary Convention at Ostend,
fter which he will visit boys' clubs in
England, Holland and Germany, returning
) the United States about the middle of

LUgUSt.

SALLY LUCAS JEAN, formerly of the
American Child Health Association, has
een retained as consultant for the School
)epartment of the Cleanliness Institute
see Common Welfare, in this issue).

EDITH SHATTO KING recently joined
be staff of the Welfare Council of New
fork City to organize a coordinated in-
ormation service. She still retains her
onnection with the C. O. S. of New York.

THOMAS S. McALONEY, formerly
uperintendent of the School for the Blind,



in Pittsburgh and now the superintendent
of the Colorado School for Deaf and Blind
at Colorado Springs, has received the
degree of Master of Arts from Gallaudet
College and the degree of Doctor of Laws
from Colorado College.

FLORENCE M. SEDER of Ames and
Norr, publicity counsel, and formerly of
the Indianapolis Community Fund, has
joined the staff of the Cleanliness Institute
to handle magazine and newspaper pub-
licity.

Elections and Appointments

BLANCHE D. BEATTIE, district secretary, Cuya-
hoga Associated Charities, Cleveland, as case
supervisor, Canton Family Service Society,

JOSEPH E. BECK, Cleveland Associated Charities,
as assistant to general secretary, Associated
Charities.

KATHLEEN CLARK, American Red Cross, to do
special field work in Essex County, Mass., for
three months.

HELEN E. ELLIS as field director, A.R.C., at.
U. S. Naval Hospital, Washington, succeeding
Janet Houtz, resigned.

MAY B. GOLDSMITH, formerly with the Social
Welfare League of Seattle, as executive secre-
tary of the Seattle Hebrew Benevolent Society.

LOIS MAE HANDSAKER, Clyde Cash, Catherine
Urban, Bertha E. Schlotter. Isabel Fletcher,
Willie Blumer, as visitors, Provident Associa-
tion, St. Louis.

DOROTHY HUNTER as assistant psychologist, Child
Guidance Clinic, Cleveland.

EMILY LOCVUE, for the past eight years with the
Pittsburgh Chapter, A.R.C., as psychiatric
social worker, Pennsylvania State Department
of Welfare, with headquarters at Mayview.



SUSAN B. PLANT, formerly on the staff of the
New York Children's Aid Society, as agent in
charge of State of Maine Branch, New Eng-
land Home for Little Wanderers, Water-
ville, Me.

EDITH SCHWARZENBERG as psychiatric social
worker, Child Guidance Clinic, Cleveland.

DR. GEORGE DAVID STEWART, professor of surgery
at Bellevue Hospital Medical College and
chairman of the Hospital Information Bureau
of the United Hospital Fund, New York, as
a member of the Distribution Committee of the
New York Community Trust, succeeding the
late Dr. Walter B. James.

GRACE E. STOKES, executive secretary of the
Pittsburgh Chapter, A.R.C., as chief probation
officer, Alleghany County, to succeed Walter
R. Black.



Resignations



CALVIN DERRICK as dean, National Training
School for Institution Executives and Other
Workers, Dobbs Ferry, N. Y., to return to
State Home for Boys, Jamesburg, N. J., as
superintendent.

JOYCE ELY as nursing field representative,
A.R.C., for Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi
and Tennessee.

CELIA FISHER as assistant psychologist, Child
Guidance Clinic, Cleveland.

LOUISE W. FRYE as field representative, A.R.C.,
because of ill health. Succeeded by Raphael
A. Manning.

ELLEN M. MAXWELL as social worker at the Na-
tional Military Home, Dayton, to be married.

KATHARINE T. MORSE as chief occupational
therapy aide, U. S. Naval Hospital, Wash-
ington, to be married. Succeeded by Cornelia
D. Puleston.

MARY V. WAITE as chapter correspondent at Na-
tional Headquarters, A.R.C., due to ill health.
Succeeded temporarily by Mrs. Margaret
Howard.

JOHN N. ZYDEMAN as field director, St. Eliza-
beth's Hospital, Washington. Succeeded by
Margaret Hagan.



431



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Daily discussion with social work lead-
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Rates: Room and Board may be had at
$20 to $30 a week. Registration $5.

Descriptive folder on request.

Address Applications to Arthur A. Guild, Richmond

Community Fund, Grace-American Building,

Richmond, Virginia.

Association of Community Chests and Councils

(formerly American Association for Community Organization)
215 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y.



The Spirit and Practice

of the

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Sixty Cents a single issue. Two Dollars per year.



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Spring Quarter, April 2 June 13

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By PROFESSOR ERICH BRANDENBURG
Translated by A. E. Adams

A book which treats quite dispassionately the
whole development of German Policy from the
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War to the outbreak of hostilities of 1914. Scru-
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of this kind based on documents from the German
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The Problems of Peace

Lectures delivered at the Geneva Institute of
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ON EARTH PEACE .30

A short discussion on ways in which we can help in
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PROGRAM HELP ON INTERNATIONAL
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A dramatization of what the League of Nations is
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THE OPEN HIGHWAY .50

A dramatic presentation of our need for close touch
with other nations and our mutual interdependence
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Online LibrarySurvey AssociatesThe Survey (Volume 58) → online text (page 98 of 130)