T. E. (Theron E.) Sedgwick.

York County, Nebraska and its people : together with a condensed history of the state (Volume 2) online

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NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES



3 3433 08044132 6




A r/ / XC



YORK COUNTY

NEBRASKA

AND ITS PEOPLE

Together with a Condensed History of the State






T. E. SEDGWICK

Supervising Editor



A Record of Settlement, Organization,
Progress and Achievement



VOL. II
ILLUSTRATED



CHICAGO

THE S. .1. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY

1921



THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBEARY



7C72



f



ASTOR, LENOX AND

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS

R 1934 L



CONTENTS







CHAPTER XIII .
EDUCATION IN YORK COUNTY

FIRST SC1I00I-S IN COUNTY — YOIUC SCHOOL DISTRICT — YORK SCHOOL BOARDS — EARLY
TEACHERS LATER SCHOOL BOARDS — TEACHERS IN 1921 — YORK COLLEGE — REV-
EREND SCHELL YORK'S SUPPORT— THE . YORK ACADEMY, 1874 THE METHODIST

EPISCOPAL COLLEGE (1879-1886) — YORK BUSINESS COLLEGE — THE URSULINE CON-
VENT — SCHOOL REPORTS IN 1881 — ORICSUAM SCHOOLS IN 1920 — SCHOOL CONSOLI-
DATION " ' ■'

CHAPTER XIV
RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS OF YORK COUNTY

METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF YORK — PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH — A. C. MONT-

GOMEHY's paper — DOCTOR MC CONAUGHY's PAPER CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH —

CHRISTIAN CHURCH UNITED BRETHREN CHURCH — HOLY TRINITY CHURCH-
BAPTIST CHURCH — ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC UNIVERSALIS! — GERMAN REFORMED

CONGREGATION FIRST LUTHEUAN UNITED EVANGELICAL CHURCII — GERMAN

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN HOSPITALS OTHER CHURCHES ^FEDERATED CHURCH

656

CHAPTER XV

FRATERNAL, * SOCIAL AND WELFARE ORGANIZATIONS IN

YORK COUNTY

EARLY LODOES, 1885, 1895, 1905 — A. F. & A. M. AND MASONIC BODIES NO. 35,

I. 0. 0. F. — ELKS A. O. U. W. — G. A. R., ROliERT ANDERSON POST — CIVIL WAR VET-
ERANS, 1915 SPANISH WAR VETERANS, 1915 WOMAN'S RELIEF CORPS SONS OF

VETERANS — AMERICAN LEGION POST NO. 19 — SOCIAL AFFAIRS OF OTHER DAY'S —

YORK COUNTRY CLUB — AVON Ci,UH — AMATEUR MUSICAL CLUB REVIEW & ART

(Lrii — WOjMFN's CLUH — YOKK V. M. C. a. women's COMMITTEE DEPARTMKNT

6i);5

CHAPTER XVI
BANKING AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

EARLY BANKING IX YORK COUNTY — COilMERCIAL STATE BANK YORK COUNTY BANK



^ FIRST NATIONAL HANK, YOIIK — VOKK NATIONAL BANK CITIZENS STATE BANK —



MEAD STATE BANK FIRST NATIOXAL POST REGIME — EXTENSION OF ACTIVITIES

INTO OTHER TOWNS — MEUCiER WITH FARMERS NATIONAL BANK MC CLOUD

REdLMF, FIRST NATIOXAL — (TI'Y NATIOXAL BANK — GERMAN-AMERICAN BANK

FARMERS STATE BANK — OTIIHI! HANKS IN THE COUNTY' COXDITION OF YORK

COUNTY BANKS, 1917-192(1 7;M



CONTENTS

CHAPTER XVII
THE PRESS OF YORK COUNTY

THE LOCAL NEWSPAPER — THE EARLY NEWSPAPERS — THE REPUBLICAN — THE TRIBUNE

THE DEJIOCRAT THE TIMES THE NEWS-TIilES — THE NEW TELLER — OTHER

PAPERS IN THE COUNTY LAZY MAN's CORNER WHAT's IN A NAME? — OLD-TIME

PRESS RAILLERY' — THE DAILY SQUAWKER 753

CHAPTER XVIII
THE MEDICAL PROFESSION"

CALL THE DOCTOR — THE PIONEER PHYSICIAN — THE MEDICAL ROSTER — DURING THE
'9()S AND SINCE — THE HOSPITALS 'l'??

CHAPTER XIX
THE BENCH AND BAR OF YORK COUNTY

THE LAW — EARLIEST CASE, BY J. B. MEEHAN DISTRICT COURT — INDIAN TRIAL, N. A.

DEAN — GEORGE W. POST — THE DISTRICT COURTS OF YORK COUNTY — THE YORK
COUNTY BAH 787



CHAPTER XX
A CHRONOLOGICAL SURVEY OP YORK COUNTY'S PROGRESS 79.5

CHAPTER XXI
YORK COUNTY IN THE WORLD WAR

YORK county's service "bACK HERE" — THE MILITIA BOYS CALLED — FLAG TO COM-
PANY M — FIRST HOME ACTIVITIES — THE ELKS RESOLUTION RECRUITING BEGINS

— MAKING EACH ACRE COUNT — MEETING OF APRIL 28tII — YORK ilEN CALLED UPON

RED CROSS ORGANIZED COUNTY COUNCIL OF DEFENSE — REGISTRATION DAY,

JUNE 5, 1917 — HOW THE MEN REGISTERED — THOSE WHO REGISTERED RED CROSS

DRIVE — YORK COUNTY's JULY 4, 1917 THE FIRST DRAWING EARLY ENLIST-
MENTS — LATE SUMMER AND EARLY FALL OF 1917 — ^THE CONTINGENT STARTED

LIBERTY BOND DRIVES — LATE FALL AND EARLY WINTER OF 1917 — ENRIGHT,

GRESHAM AND HAY THE QUESTIONNAIRES — LEGAL ADVISORY BOARD WINTER

DRIVES THE HOME GUARDS — THIRD LIBERTY LOAN — FOURTH REGISTRATION,

SEPTEMBER 13, 1918 — A REAL RECORD FOURTH LIBERTY LOAN — SPRING AND

SUilMER OF 1918 — ARMISTICE DAY — AFTER-EFFECTS OF THE WAR 799

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 839



..m.^




■ - -V
n fi



VI




I 'M^u.JL «f rzi'jK'iaKinixxavfi



High School, Toek






Central School, Youk



CHAPTEE XIII
EDUCATION m YOEK COUNTY

FIRST SCHOOLS IN COUNTY — YOKK SCHOOL DISTRICT YORK SCHOOL BOARDS EARLY

TEACHERS LATER SCHOOL BOARDS — TEACHERS IN 1921 — YORK COLLEGE — REV-
EREND scHELL — York's support — the tore academy, 1871 — the methodist
EPISCOPAL college (1879-1886) — york business college — the ursuline con-
vent — school reports in 1881 — gresham schools in 1920 — school consoli-
dation.

Schools

The first public school in the western half of York County was held in a little
dugout over on Lincoln Creek in 1872, with Mrs. A. Linsley as teacher. The dis-
trict was eight by twelve miles in extent and known as District No. 15. As the
country was settled up the district was divided and other little soddies were built.
Then a "frame school" was started in Owens Bros', old store building, which stood
on Mr. Steinberg's farm. In 1881 the first little school house was built in Brad-
shaw. To this additions were made from time to time as needed. But this, the
toil and savings of many years, like the most of Bradshaw was laid in ruins in one
brief hour.

Bradshaw has graduated two uf her principals into the office of county superin-
tendent, Mr. E. S. Franklin, in 1887, and E. C. Bishop in 1899.

The following teachers have served as principals of the Bradshaw schools since
1881: Misses Sylvia Butler and Carrie Moftitt; Messrs. George Greer, A. B. Cod-
ding, E. S. Franklin, Charles Harlan, William Bartz, H. B. McDermed, W. T. Oats,
Fred Archard, W. S. Wright, W. T. Utterbeck, T. A. Gierins, J. H. Frew, E. C.
Bishoi?, B. F. Marquis and J. N. Peck.

other localities

The beginning of school work, which in almost every instance was practically
coincident with the settlement of the locality, is detailed througliout the accounts
of the settlement of the various townships and towns.

YORK SCHOOL DISTRICT

York School District was organized June 14, 1871. It included a territory five
miles square, in which the city occupied aljout the central position. Notice of the
fornuition of this district was served upon the entire voting population residing in
its limits. In the school records the names of the male residents of the district are

Vol. II— 2 619



620 HISTORY OF YORK COUNTY

entered, which will give the reader an idea of how sparsely the county was settled at
this period, and also the names of the early settlers of the now prosperous city. The
total number then claiming a residence in the above territory, which included the
City of York, was only twenty-two and were the following persons : H. M. Detrick,
G. W. Dixon, W. L. Draper, Thomas Myers, Gottleib Hofer. J. II. Bell, F. 0.
Bell, A. B. Tutton, K. S. Tutton, A. E. Hendricks. J. P. Miller. James .1. Holley,
Ichabod Cook, M. B. Noel, A. J. Day, Isaac Crable, C. F. Day, Edward Bates, L. D.
Brakeman, D. A. Ritner, R. Charlton, and August Bonge.

A. B. Tutton was elected director, A. C. Montgomery, moderator, and
Dr. Thomas L. Myers, treasurer. No further steps were made towai'ds perfecting
the organization until January 15, 1873. At a meeting held at this date, the dis-
trict voted to issue bonds to the amount of $2,000 for the purpose of purchasing a
building site and erecting a schoolhouse. This building was completed in season
for a summer school, which was taught by Miss M. A. Hill. During the winter
session of this year J. Cochran was employed as teacher. The first school estab-
lished in York was taught by A. C. Montgomery in the winter of 1870-71. The
old pre-emption house served as a schoolhouse, and twenty-two pujnls were in
attendance, some coming a distance of eight miles. It was maintained by subscrip-
tion and was of two mouths' duration. Mr. Montgomery received his wages in
wood, grain, cash, or whatever the settlers could best give from an individual
standpoint.

At the annual meeting of the board in 1879, it was decided to call a special
election, and submit a proposition to the citizens of York, for issuing the bonds of
the district to the amount of $58,000 for the purpose of erecting a new school
building, the old house having become too small to accommodate the fast growing
school population. This election took place May 16, and was universally favored.
A building was commenced immediately, and it was completed in 1881.

YORE SCHOOL BOAEDS

There are numerous offices in each community which are real labors of love.
One of these is a membership upon the Board of Education. Not for munificent
salary, nor for high honor, does the enterprising citizen of the community serve
at this post year after year, but for the love of doing some service in building np
the public school system. It is the public school system which is the real bulwark
of this wonderful nation of ours. It is the public school where the sons and
daughters of rich and poor, capitalist and laborer, banker, farmer, clerk, merchant,
business man and every class and creed attend upon an equal basis, that has served
the most to leaven our i\.merican melting pot into a real democracy.

Right from the start, in the earlier days when a board of three ruled the school
affairs of the little Village of York, certain faithful spirits began their perennial
careers of service in this field. In 1876, Cliarles Le Count was director, T. D.
Knapfi, miidcTiitdr, and II. ('. Kleiiischinidt. treasurer of School District No. Vi.
tbe York district. Mr. Kleinsclimidt remained as treasurer until 1878, when
Charles Le Count assumed this post and held it until 1883. A. C. Montgomery
scrxed as director in 1879 and in 1880 F. A. Bidwell became director and served
until ISS.".. n. T. ;Moore was iiiodrrator in 1870 and 1880. T. D. Knajip in 1881



HISTORY OF YOEK COUNTY 621

and Henry Seymour in 1882. The board had as fourth and fifth members in 1881
and 1882 H. M. Detrick and John A. Etherly.

In 1883 the board was composed of Henry Seymour, chairman; F. A. Bidwell,
secretary; Charles Le Count, treasurer; H. M. Detrick, and L. J. Gandy. In 1884

5. A. Newell came on. In 1887 Henry Seymour and S. A. Newell were still serv-
ing, N. V. Harlan had come onto the board, destined to perform a long period of
service, and L. L. Sorrick, M. Sovereign, and B. A. Gilbert finished the roster.

EAELT TEACHERS

Among the very earliest contracts for teachers shown on the board's minutes in
the office of the secretary of the Board of Education at York are those with Albert
Logan, made July 8, 1876, for three months' service for $150. And on September

6, 1876, a contract with Mary L. Betcher provided for three months' service for
$120 and Nellie Gunnell was hired in 1879 at $30 per month. Prof. M. Bridges
was principal of York schools in 1880, at a salary of $80 per month. His teaching
staff consisted of Kate Keckley, grammar room, and Emma Hays, intermediate
room; Effie Cutter and Annie Knapp, the other rooms.

In 1884 Mr. Bridges was still principal, with a salary of $100 a month, and his
staff of teachers, receiving $40 per month, were Hattie Woolley, Anna Knapp,
Ada S. Eoe, Mary McCray, Alice Crownover, Vana Crownover, Sylvia Butler and
Flora WyckofE. The staff' in 1887 showed: Central Building, between Grant and
Nebraska avenues on Seventh Street, Prof. C. S. Edwards, principal; Misses Carrie
Matthews, Lucy Gould, Ella Montgomery, Appa Linch, Jennie Eaper, Ella Graves,
and Bella Vance. At the West Ward Building, southeast corner of Sixth and
Division Avenue, Misses Vana Crownover, Effie Detrick and Mary McKenzie were
teaching. In the North Building, on the southwest corner of Pine and Fifth
streets. Misses Hattie Woolley and Flora A. Barton held out.

LATEH SCHOOL BOARDS

In 1890 the board roster shows Mrs. Wing, F. B. Daggy, N. V. Harlan, L. L.
Sorrick, Mrs. Carscadden, and E. A. Gilbert. Prof. Corbett was principal. The
year 1891 found the same members serving, e.xcept that upon the resignation of
L. L. Sorrick, Mrs. W. F. Reynolds was chosen to fill his place. In 1892 Mrs.
Wing, Mrs. Reynolds, Messrs. Daggy and Harlan remained, and Mr. Marcellus
came on the board. In 1893 the board was Reynolds, Myers, Harlan, Daggy, New-
man, and Gilbert. In 1894 Mrs. Ella Harrison and E. S. Franklin and E. A.
Baker came on the board, Harlan, Mrs. Reynolds, and Gilbert holding over.

B. G. Moulton was elected principal in 1894 and Eunice Coy as assistant. In
1895, Mrs. Harrison, Mrs. Reynolds, Messrs. Baker, Franklin, Harlan, and Gilbert
continued to serve together. The year 1896 found Mrs. D. C. Bell serving, the
balance of the board being the older members. In 1897 Reverend Baker was suc-
ceeded by J. E. Evans. In 1898 the board remained intact, Evans, Franklin,
Harlan, Gilbert, Mrs. Bell, and Mrs. Reynolds. In 1899 Mrs. Reynolds gave way
to Mrs. Jerome and the balance of the board remained.

On June 3, 1895, the board had entered into a contract to employ Prof. W. W.
Stoner as principal of the high school and Mrs. W. W. Stoner as eightli grade



C,2-i HISTORY OF YORK COUNTY

teacher, at a joint salary of $1,000 per auiium. At this time Professor Moulton
stepped up to the elevation of superintendent of York Schools. Doris McMaster
was made assistant principal of the high school in 1897.

This brings us down to 1900, when the board of 1899 remained in office, except
that Mrs. Bell was succeeded by Mrs. E. A. Warner. Prof. C. R. Atkinson suc-
ceeded Superintendent Moulton in 1900. This left the board as Mrs. Jerome, Mrs.
Warner, Messrs. Gilbert, Harlan, Evans, and Franklin. The year 1901 brought a
couple of noticeable changes, when Messrs. Franklin and Harlan gave way to
Doctor McConaughy and H. M. Childs, the remaining members being Gilbert,
Evans, Mrs. .Teronic and Mrs. Warner. In 1902, two more new members came on,
George W. Slirerk and G. H. Holdeman succeeding Gilbert and McConaughy. The
board in 1903 were Harris M. Childs, George W. Shreck, G. H. Holdeman, John E.
Evans, Adelaide Jerome and Phila H. Warner. Professor Atkinson had
resigned the superintendency and Prof. Stoner assumed this post. In 1904
Dr. McConaughy succeeded Evans and began a long term of service. Nineteen
hundred and six witnessed some changes, Jessie R. Myers, Julia T. Bell and Etta
Hoyt coming on the board to serve with Childs, Shreck and McConaughy. Nineteen
hundred and seven found the same board serving. In 1908 one change took place,
George M. Spurlock succeeding Mrs. Myers. In 1909 Mrs. Jessie R. Myers
returned, A. M. White succeeded Mrs. Julia Green Bell, and Mrs. Hoyt remained
with Messrs. Childs, Spurlock, and McConaughy: 1910 and 1911 saw no changes
in the hdiii-d ami tliis sextette served harmoniously together for three years. In
1912 five of them remained at the task and Mrs. Mary E. Bradwell displaced
Mrs. Etta Y. Hoyt. In 1913, four of the faithful se.xtette and five of the 1912
board remained, Childs giving way to Henry W. Brott ; 1914 found this board
remaining intact. At a bond election on June -5, 1912, to provide $80,000 bonds
for building three new school houses, the vote was decisively against the proposition,
being 123 for and 586 against. The vote was distriliuted by wards:

For Against

First Ward 44 185

Second W ai'd 38 127

Third Ward 16 91

Fourth Ward 25 183

Til 1915 a IVw ciianges resulted upon the board. Dr. W. L. Bernard and King
taking the phices of Myers and Bradwell. The year 1916 saw Dr. McConaughy
succeeded by A. C. Hubbell. Nineteen seventeen saw two new members, W. W.
Wyckoir ami C. R. Keckley succeed Spurlock and White. On March 20, 1917, an
election was held at which $225,000 bonds were voted for the construction of three
new buildings. This resulted in a vote by wards:

For Against

First Ward 372 75

Second Ward 341 95

Third Waril 178 60

Fourth Ward 265 100

Totals 1.156 330




Lincoln School, York




Edison Schooi,, North Ward, York




-■"■ \






HISTORY OF YORK COUNTY



625



For some time, W. B. Johns had been serving as principal of the high school
and Geo. S. Cook as treasurer for the board. Nineteen seventeen saw not only the
inauguration of the very heavy program for the building of the three new buildings,
but the necessity of another election on August 7, 1917, called for another issue of
$60,000 bonds for the new Central School Building. With the money realized from
sale of property and these two issues, the new Central Building was built at a cost
of some $175,000 and the other two buildings completed, over $.300,000 being put
into this new, but tiioroughly modern school plant. The election of August 7, 1917,
showed a vote upon the $60,000 bond issue, of

For Against

First Ward 100 50

Second Ward 98 71

Third Ward 44 37

Fourth Ward 84 56

Totals 326 214



In 1918 Wyckoff, King, Brott, Keckley and Hubbell remained on the board and
Mrs. Pearle Felton succeeded Doctor Bernard. Sui)erinteudent Stoner resigned and
Prof. James B. Crabbe, of Laramie, Wyoming, was elected on June 5, 1917, to
take his place. M. S. Jones was principal of the high school. Nineteen nineteen
saw two changes on the board, Dean C. E. Ashcraft of York College and EfRe
Detrick displaced HnblK'H and Brott. This leaves the same board as have been
serving in 1920 and early 1921, Miss EfRe Detrick, Mrs. Pearle Felton, Dean C. E.
Ashcraft, Atty. W . W. Wyckoff, who is secretary of the board. Mr. King, and
C. E. Keckley. Superintendent Crabbe resigned in 1918 and was succeeded by
York's present efficient superintendent, F. A. Graham, who came here from Mis-
souri Valley, Iowa. W. E. Nelson is the present principal of the high school.

York now has a thoroughly modern school plant that will compare with any in
the state. Its high school gives a complete college preparatory course, a splendid
normal training course, a vocational agricultural department (Smith-Hughes
courses and home economics), and a splendid commercial course.

The teachers of the York schools in Januai7, 1921, are:



A. W. Graham
W. E. Nelson
Edna Ittner
Ruth Watson
Jennie Muir
A. Tv. Speece
Mildred Holts
Harriett Holley
Luflie Lee
Bess Alexander
Louise McNerney
Hazelle Hedbloom
Charles Cox
Helen Copsey



Mrs. W. C. Noll
Mrs. Lottie Meek
Veva Boren
Jessie Stewart
Ruth Callender
R. E. Townsend
E. V. Deason
Clara King
Matie Hall
Cora Conawa}'
Lillian Shanks
R. L. Clark
Helen Wells
Guy Davis



Zora Wunderlieli
Cassye Baugh
Clara Beck
Hazel C!hapin
Ruth Peterson
Edith Lambert
Esther McDonald
Mrs. Kathryn Morrow
Myrna Hall
Bertha Brooks
Mrs. Hester Brown
Ruth Chapin
Clara James
Cecile Newbold



G2G HISTORY OF YORK COUNTY

Margaret James Ethel Tliompsou Myrtle Fceeborn

Mrs. Sybil Askine Gladys Hitchcock Mrs. Russell Rogers

Mrs. C. E. Anderson Hazel Poster Mrs. Franklin Hunt

HISTOBY OF YOUK L'OLLEGE

The foreruimer of 'fork College was Cihbon Collegiate Institute at Gibbon,
Nebraska. This institution had been bought in 1886 from the Baptist people, and
was conducted as an academy. It was a success for three or four years, but the
size of the town and the lack of full co-operation made it impracticable to continue
its existence.

In the summer of 1890 several cities made propositions to the trustees for the
re-location of the school and for making it full college grade. Kearney and York
were the leading bidders, and the following persons constituted the first board of
trustees: Judge D. T. Moore, Rev. E. A. Leeper, D. D., Lee Love, Judge N. A.
Dean, C. J. Nobes, I). E. Sedgwick, I\t. I)., Judge A. C. ilontgomeiT, Rev. J. C.
Countermine, D. I).. F. 0. Bell, Judge G. W. Post, Rev. G. F. Deal, and Rev.
F. W. Jones.

Its Beautiful Site. A more beautiful site .could not be fmiiid in the State of
Nebraska — a gentle eminence in the eastern i)art of the city, the highest ground in
York County. Here, on a campus of eleven acres, the first building was erected,
and dedicated in June, 1892. It is a splendid edifice of brick and stone, 88x99
feet, basement and three stories, beautiful in architectural design and in approach-
ing the city from any direction can be seen for many miles.

Excellent Equi/nnents. The building is well furnished and well equipped and
unusually well planned for college purposes. The recitation rooms are large and
light. The commercial room covers nearly half of the second floor. The chapel
will seat about six hundred. The literary halls are among the finest in the state.
The library contains about 1,500 volumes, and the reading tables are constantly
supplied with an abundance of the liest periodicals of the day. The museum has
several hundred feet of shelf-room filled with specimens in geology, zoology and
botany. The laboratories are well supplied with apparatus to facilitate the work
in the natural sciences.

Anotlier HuUding. Another liuilding has lieen projected and the work begun.
The foundation was laid and struiture was completed in 190.3. Its dimensions are
80x36 feet, four floors, containing thirty-five rooms, besides halls, closets and bath-
rooms. It is heated by steam, as is the main building, and lioth supplied with city
water and electric light. Tliis Iniiiding is devoted to the conservatory of music and
ladies" dormitory.

It contains an executive board of six inembers, all residents of York, whose duty
it is to carry out the will of the board of trustees.

Such strong managing boards are an assurance to all patrons that their interests
are carefully guarded and wiselj' conserved.

Since the founding of the institution, the following ministers have served as
presidents: Jeremiah George, A. M. ; William S. Reese, D. D. ; William E. Sehell,
D. D.; Melvin 0. McLaughlin, D. D. ; Hervin U. Roop, Ph. D., LL. D.

Reverend George, A. M., D. D., served as president from August, 1890, to
August, 1894. Tlie average yearly enrollment during his term was 176.



HISTORY OF YOEK COUNTY 627

Eev. W. S. Eeese, Ph. M., D. D., succeeded President George and served three
years. During this time the average yearly enrolhiient was 149. Tlie large debt
incurred by the erection of the main building became a heavy burden during this
administration, owing to financial jianic and crop failure.

Eev. William E. Schell, A. M., D. D., was called to take charge on August 3,

1897. That was a dark hour in the history of the institution. Every dollar of a
great debt .was due and suits entered for collection. There was nothing in the
treasury to stay the impending crisis. Some of the trustees advised giving up the
•work. Every member of the faculty had resigned except J. E. Maxwell, M. S.,
professor of Natural Sciences, and Mrs. D. E. Sedgwick, director of tiie music
department. Xo catalogue had been issued.

The details of the five succeeding years cannot here be given. It is enough to
say that the entire situation has been changed. The debt is liquidated. The sum of
$8,000 dollars has been expended for additional equipments and $6,000 in good
pledges is now on hand for another building. The courses of study have been
strengthened, the faculty enlarged, and York College has taken high rank among
the institutions of Nebraska and the West. The average yearly enrollment during
the five years of President SchelTs term has been 281 — over three hundred yearly
for the last three years.

The faculty in 1903 were:

William E. Schell, A. M., D. D., president and professor of philosopliy (Western
College, Toledo, Iowa, June, 1890, A. B. ; June, 1893, A. M. ; Lane University,
Lecompton, Kas,., June, 1902, D. D.).

J. E. Maxwell, M. S., vice president and professor of natural sciences ( Nebraska
Wesleyan University, June, 1894, B. S. ; June, 1895, M. S.).

Sareva Dowell, A. M., professor of Latin and Greek (Amity College, College
Springs, Iowa, June, 1893, A. B. ; June, 1898, A. M. ; post-graduate work in
Europe).

Theodore Jorgenson, A. B., professor of modern languages (Western College,
Toledo, Iowa, June, 1900, A. B. ; post-graduate work in Europe).

Annie P. Jorgensen, A. M., professor of mathematics (Nebraska State Univer-
sity, June, 1899, A. B.; June, 1902, A. M.).

Lena E. Schell, A. B., assistant in English and history (York College, June,
1902, A. B.).

M. D. Adams, M. Acc'ts, principal of the College of Commerce and professor of
commercial branches and shorthand (Gem Ciity Business College, Quincy, 111., June,

1898, M. Acc'ts).

Euth Smith, director of the Conservatory of Music and instructor of piano, pipe
organ, reed organ, harmony, general theory, history of music and voice culture



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