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midlander



The Annual Publication of Middle Tennessee State University
Volume 48 Jim Trammel, Editor-in-Chief 1972-1973



COXTFATS




The St Lifl In The Front


1


The Whole Year Catalog


19


Student Living


45


Administration


88


Sports


106


Beauties


138


(ireeks


154


Organizations


194


Classes


246


Advertisements


299


The StulTIn The Back


331


Dimlander Magazine


. .lacing page 209



RELEVANT QUOTATION'S
"Where is Dennis Deathridge?" — Jim Trammel.
Pxiitor-in-Chief



MIDLANDER or that serious consideration be given
to its abandonment as a viable journalistic vehicle."
— Dr. Edward Kimbrell. Chairman. Department of
Mass Communications.

"The present-day managing editor refuses to die!"
— Cindv Robert.son. Managing Editor




"Jim: (luess What III "A campus organization'was at
6:00. not at 6:30. So— they didn't get their picture
taken ... I got there at exactly 6:33. She said she
wasn't going to pay $80 and I told her we just wouldn't
run anything . . . She said she would talk to you (you
lucky guy) — tell her I said to (message deleted)!"
—Fred Carr. Photographer



'W'here is Dennis Deathridge'



-Dr. Kimbrell



The MIDLANDER is printed on 80-pound Contemporary
Matte paper, with the exception of the opening 16 pages on
Coated Embossed Enamel and the magazine insert on
Gloss Enamel, by DELMAR PRINTING COMPANY of
Charlotte, N.C. Their representatives are Bill Stoess and
•lerrv Smith.

MIDLANDER (898-2748, Box 94) is a completely student-
edited publication. Its adviser is Dr. Edward Kimbrell.
MIDLANDER is a member of the Associated Collegiate
Press; this book is not copyrighted.

Materials published in MIDLANDER do not necessarily
reflect the opinion or position of Middle Tennessee State
University, its students, its faculty, or its administration.
All material appearing in this publication is the sole re-
sponsibility of the MIDLANDER editorial board.



'Where is Dennis Deathridge'



In the beginning —
i.e., before the beginning-
there was nothing.
And matter
came out of nothing.
And matter was
chaos.



'^^- U-KiS




Strangely,

and for no reason whatsoever,

chaos started to change.

Simplicity begat complexity.

randomness begat order, and most peculiar of all.



»'• ».-» ,.-,












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inanimate matter
begat organic matter.



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V



DIAL ATOM






A



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V -^w




For many years this state of affairs existed,
but man became restless. Was it so? Was man
a creation of love? Why should he simply be-
lieve a rumor? Had anyone used reason — a
very special activity of mind that had proven
to be successful in understanding matter — to
find out if the rumor was true?



i




-I -



N /





Soon man decided he was not some mysterious higher
being who was significant. He was, on the contrary, of
no importance at all — simply a complex product of cause
and effect. Man saw himself as a meaningless piece of
matter on a larger but equally meaningless piece of mat-
ter called Earth.



A few perceptive people noticed
changes in the way men and women
behaved. Once they had loved each
other, and their love was thought
to be a reflection of the love who
was God.





%



But now there was just sex —
liaisons of the moment. And man
called these liaisons love, though he
knew the word didn't mean any-
thing.




*1 *l^



!ij ..[









All sorts of startling consequences followed.
Some men said, "If man is only a machine
caught up in the vast mechanism of nature,
why not treat him accordingly?" So the ma-
nipulators set to work and used men just like
other objects of nature. And behold, there
came a very efficient system — called Utopia.




Reason was abandoned — be-
cause, you see, it couldn't give
answers to the really big ques-
tions after all. In its place came
unreason (they called it "irration-
ality"). And so nonsense was wor-
shipped instead of sense (they call-
ed it "the absurd.")




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Jimitvys MAP



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I




And now there was no longer tragedy-
only misery.



jy Pef3SJ,j:'vDSd




The old rumors still persist — found
in outlying regions and small cliques
of non-conformists in Utopia — that
love is. Some still say man is. But
these are the same ones who claim no
man has ever really died, that even
the ancients are alive (some well,
some not) and living in other worlds.
Such rumors are being suppressed
wherever they are found.



J" ^ f'



UW'



3-^'^





The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language



Whole

Year

Catalog




Yeah.
We can make it hiippen.
We can make it hap



Registration switches from computer;
Students sign up for spring in 3 days




Sometimes I wonder if I'm
Ever gonna make it home again,
It 's so far and out of sight . . .

— Carole King



Each registration presents its own
unusual problems added to all the
ones inherent in the whole miserable
system. Registration for fall 1972 was
switched from the computer to the
old manual card-pulling routine. In
the spring the process remained the
same but the site was different — the
Murphy center handled the 9,000
registrants. One should also remem-
ber that the worst snowstorm of the
winter of 1972-73 came on spring
registration day, but next to some of
the catastrophes encountered in the
lines, the snow seemed a positively
minor annoyance.




Start



HASSLE



THEMTSU

RUNAROUND

GAME



+ 2



A



Five
drop-adds

$15




Library

Fines

$10




Ground Situations



2 You're a rich and beautiful, but
dumb, girl. Begin with $800 and
115 hours; pay double academic
and social penalties.

3 You're a black athlete. Begin
with $450 and 119 hours; pay
double academic and social pen-
alties.

4 You're a poor farmer's only child.
Begin with $500 and 113 hours; pay
double academic penalties.

5 You're an average white male. Begin
with $450 and 121 hours.

6 You're an intelligent black girl. Be-
gin with $550 and 120 hours; pay
double social penalties.



7 You have a part-time job. Begin with
$500 and 1 15 hours.

8 You're on academic scholarships.
Begin with $450 and 120 hours; pay
triple academic penalties.

9 You're on necessity scholarships.
Begin with $400 and 125 hours; pay
double academic penalties.

10 You are a G. I. Bill veteran. Begin
with $500 and 1 18 hours.

11 You are being sent to college by
wealthy and indigenous parents.
Pay double academic penalties.

12 You are an intelligent Thai transfer
student. Begin with $700 and 112
hours. Pay double social penalties.



Playing the Game

Roll two dice to get your Ground Situation. As in life, we won't
all start equally. Continue, rolling one die, proceeding through
the Fall (left-hand page) and Spring (right-hand page) Semesters
of your senior year at Middle Tennessee State.

You must hit the graduation circle by exact count. Before that
you must hit one of the six "G" circles and roll two dice to learn
what your graduation requirements are.

The starred circle is Fall Semester Finals. Here you must stop
and pay $400 to cover Spring living expenses and tuition. If you
don't have it, you may stay on the star for as long as you want,
collecting $5 per turn.

Social problems (white), with the name of the "other party"
in the circle, are expressed in money to show relative impact.
Academic problems (light brown), involve gain or loss of hours;
financial problems (dark brown) involve money. Your Ground
Situation may make some penalties more intense than others.




To Graduate:



Roll two dice.



3, 9. B.S. degree. 142 hours, $300.

5, 12. Double major. 158 hours, $250.
2, 8. Changed major. 147 hours, $350.

6, 10. B.S. degree. 148 hours, $225.

4, 11. B.S. degree. 145 hours, $350.

7, B.A. degree. 145 hours, $250.



MTSU greets freshmen

I've been asked to make a few remarks to welcome you in-
coming freshmen to Middle Tennessee State University.
I'm supposed to tell you not to go home on weekends,
though what recreational or social advantages Murfressboro
offers you I can't see. I'm supposed to tell you to study two
hours for every one hour of classwork you have, knowing
that some of you will do well to study two hours over the
entire semester. I'm supposed to tell you that it's socially
important to be yourself, but I realize that the one thing
most of you cannot be if you want to succeed is yourselves.
I'm supposed to tell you that the educational system, which
has been your enemy for twelve years or more, will hereafter
be your friend. Welcome to the university.





A Cry of Players






W:/,



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Rare Earth





Bob
Hope




Chase





Students eulogize Vietnam



With the signing of the ceasefire
in early February of 1973, Ameri-
ca's involvement in Vietnam came
to a halt. If any progress was made
during the seemingly endless in-
volvement, one had to search more
than casually to find it. Neverthe-
less, the dominant mood on Febru-
ary .5 was relief — relief at the end-
ing of a war of varying popularity
but unchanging tragedy.

The Associated Student Body
announced plans for a eulogy to be
held on the I'niversity Center steps
on February 7, possibly featuring
an appearance by former Senator
Albert (iore, to put the Vietnam
mess to rest in the student con-
sciousness.

The eulogy was cancelled and re-
scheduled for February 1 J, and
then cancelled again. A change in
plans was announced; all dormi-
tory students would be asked to
burn candles in their windows for
an hour (candles and holders sup-
plied by the ASB) to commemorate
the war dead. The hour was moved
from 7 p.m. to sometime near mid-
night, and the day was changed
to February l.i; some few candles
finally did burn while a huge loud-
speaker played "Taps."

Taps indeed. Taps for the Viet-
nam dead, and also Taps for ef-
fective utilization of student power.
From afar, drawing nigh, falls the
night.













Well.
I guess it beats
cursing the darkness






Students help soak Murfreesboro



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The issue was simple; you were
for sin or agin' it. (Wets read "pro-
gress" for "sin.") Once that truth
was examined, the rest was tradition-
al and tiresome. Still, the liquor ref-
erendum, which passed in the No-
vember balloting, meant far more
than just a drink.

The referendum was the strongest
flash of student voting power to spark
in 1972. Surely students played a
large part in passing by over 1,000
votes a measure which had failed
two years earlier.

Space and taste limitations pre-
vent a chronicle of the funniest mo-
ments of the campaign. If you really
care to hear them, however, we'll
come over some night and talk about
it over drinks.






o o^ So o
o k: :2 o

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A'<DRY
COUNTY"
HAS
PROBLEMS
LIKE THIS



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ImzHO





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o oS

O &Z

D.



Nixon, Democrats both win in balloting



George
McGovern
Speaks On
The Issues





(



The Democrats, bankrupt and be-
draggled, hopefully nominated George
McGovern for the Presidency amid the
rending sounds of a splitting party.
The Republicans merely watched, so
confident that they were almost scared.
So, for the voters of America (many
newly enfranchised and casting their
first Presidential ballots) the choice
stood between conservative and secre-
tive Tricky Dicky with his quasi-
corrupt administration, and the bumb-
ling, confused zealot McGovern.

In response to this non-choice, many
young voters turned their energies to
local and state races. Bob Clement
(opposite page), son of the late
governor, won election to the Public
Service Commission in the clearest
victory for the new youth populists.
Senior senator Howard Baker Jr.
won re-election over his opponent Ray
Blanton (right).

The Democrats, by virtue of much
changeover voting, kept control of the
legislatures of Tennessee and the
nation; but, as for the Presidency,
Democrats are still waiting up for
America to come home.




Let's Re-elect
Senator Howard H.



President Nixon:

The Choice of

America's

Women.



There's a lot more



re-elect




l«i'^



to be done.





ROBin BEdRD

Candidate

For U.S. Congress

Sixth District of Tennessee

For Real Representation





ASB plans ahead at Hy-Lake retreat





The Hy-Lake retreat is a semi-established
tradition with the MTSU student government.
Just before the beginning of classes each year,
students, faculty and administrators seclude
themselves in the hills and plan student govern-
ment activities for the coming year. But plan-
ning is only a small part of Hy-Lake — partici-
pants usually cast aside all pretense and have
an enjoyable time before returning to the begin- '
ning of the academic grind.






M^^M










♦ k.^^ : •« ^' 'li•■'
*-^t■t-•xv ; . ■.■'11 ri



David Frye





High-Rise East renamed for "Mr. Jim"




Flanked by the women of his new dormi-
tory all around him, former state senator
"Mr. Jim" Cummings triumphantly re-
ceives a symbolic portrait of the former
High-Rise East.

The seven-story women's residence hall
was named for Cummings in appreciation
of his work on behalf of state institutions
of higher learning during times when the
existence of several state schools were
threatened by rough finances.

The name "Cummings Hall" was official-
ly conferred at a special session of the
state legislature held at the Dramatic
Arts Auditorium in early January.




Raiders stun Tech in pre-game rally




The MTSU student government proposed a "Beat
Tech" spirit week to heighten tempers for the annual
football clash between MTSU and that school in
Cookeville. The ofHcial ceremonies included a parade
and pep rally, a week-long signpainting competition,
and the choosing of a Spirit Queen to reign at the
game. However, the unofficial ceremonies proved
more exciting. Five Kappa Delta sorority pledges
abducted the student body president of Tennessee
Tech Trade School (left of our own John Jackson in
the adjoining picture) and left him wandering in the
wilderness. Two intrepid bandits from Sigma Alpha
Epsilon fraternity made off with Harvey (or "Shinny
Ninny," as they call him at Tennessee Tech Research
Hospital) from within their very bookstore the week
before the game. The rally pictured here was called
to officially return the prize to the temporary (we
hoped) possession of Tennessee Tech Remedial, and
the participants bcecame fired up to see the Blue
roll the Yellow Chickens on game day.

We don't remember who won that game.





OPPOSITE PAGE: TOP: Cheerleaders
cavort before 300-plus crowd on the
Administration Building steps at Har-
vey's Return rally. BOTTOM: While
Harvey is prepared for loading into his
case for the trip back to Cookeville, ASB
president John Jackson vainly attempts
to quiet jeering crowd so that Tech stu-
dent body president Bob Bibee can speak.
(He didn't say anything intelligible when
he took the mike; he just gurgled some-
thing and slunk away.)



THIS PAGE: TOP: Cheerleaders prac-
tice their welcoming salute prior to the
arrival of the unruly mob from Tech.
BOTTOM LEFT: SAE's prepare to
flaunt Harvey one last time before re-
turning him to the Tech hordes. BOT-
TOM RIGHT: The craven cowards
from Tech arrive. Note the moronic
facial expressions, sunburnt necks and
hick headgear. After a short interval in
which they demonstrated their unfitness
for unsupervised activity, they were
summarily escorted off campus by our
gallant constabilitorians.




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says!

Josh McDowell has
spoken on more than 400
campuses in 42 countries.
He has spent two years
among students and
revolutionaries m Latin
kmerica and is going
back again soon. Last
year alone, he spoke
to over 500,000
students and faculty



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Online LibraryTheodore F BrownMidlander (Volume 48) → online text (page 1 of 9)