Theodore Roosevelt.

The naval war of 1812; or, The history of the United States navy during the last war with Great Britain, to which is appended an account of the battle of New Orleans; online

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lowed — as I did myself in calling the tonnage of
the Macedonian 1325. Since finding the plan
of 181 7, however, I think it possible that the
other refers to the second vessel of the name,
which was built in 1832. If this is true, then
the Macedonian (as well as the Guerriere and
Java) should be put down as about 120 tons
less than the measurements given by Emmons
and adopted by me; but even if this is so, she
must be considered as tonning over 1200, using
the method I have applied to the Chesapeake.
Therefore, adopting the same system that I ap-
plied to the American 3 8 -gun frigates, the British



294 Naval War of 1812

38-gun frigates were of over 1200 not under iioo
tons.

As for the Cyane, James makes her but 118 ft.
and 2 in. long, while the American Peacock he
puts at 119 ft. 5 in. But Lieutenant Hoffman's
official report makes the former 123 ft. 3 in., and
the plans in the State Department at Washing-
ton make the latter 117 ft. 11 in. in length. I
care nothing for the different methods of meas-
uring different vessels; what I wish to get at is
the comparative measurement, and this stands as
above. The comparative tonnage is thus the very
reverse of that indicated by James's figures.

Finally, as to the brigs, James makes them
some ten feet shorter than the American ship-
sloops. In the Washington archives I can find
no plan on record of the measurements of the
captured Epervier; but in the Navy Department,
volume X of the Letters of Masters-Command-
ant, 18 14, under date of May 12th, is the state-
ment of the Surveyor of the Port of Charleston
that she measured 467 tons (in another place it
is given as 477). James makes her 388; but as
he makes the American Wasp 434, whereas she
stands on our list as of 450, the application of the
same rule as with the frigates gives us, even taking
his own figures, 400 as her tonnage, when meas-
ured as our ships were. But the measurements of
the Surveyor of the Port who examined the Eper-



Naval War of 1 812 295

vier are corroborated by the statements of Capt.
Biddle, who captured her sister brig, the Pen-
guin. Biddle reported that the latter was two
feet shorter and a httle broader than his own
ship, the Hornet, which was of 480 tons. This
would correspond almost exactly with the Sur-
veyor's estimate.

It still seems impossible to reconcile all these
conflicting statements ; but I am inclined to think
that, on the whole, in the sea (not the lake) vessels
I have put the British tonnage too high. On the
scale I have adopted for the American 44-gun
and 38-gun frigates, and i8-gun sloops like the
Hornet and Wasp, the British 38-gun frigates
ought to be put down as of a little over 1200,
and the British i8-gun sloops as of between
400 and 450 tons. In other words, of the twelve
single-ship actions of the war, five — those of the
Chesapeake and Shannon, Enterprise and Boxer,
Wasp and Frolic, Hornet and Peacock, Hornet
and Penguin — were between vessels of nearly
equal size ; in six, the American was the superior
about in the proportion of five to four (rather
more in the case of the frigates, rather less in the
case of the brigs) ; and in one, that of the Argus
and Pelican, the British sloop was the bigger,
in a somewhat similar ratio.

This correction would be in favor of the British.
But in a more important particular, I think I have



296 Naval War of 181 2

done injustice to the Americans. I should have
allowed for the short weight of American metal
on the lakes, taking off seven per cent, from the
nominal broadsides of Perry and Macdonough ; for
the American ordnance was of exactly the same
quality as that on the ocean vessels, while the
British was brought over from England, and
must have shown the same superiority that ob-
tained on the sea-going ships.

Moreover, I am now inclined to believe that
both the Guerriere and the Java, which were
originally French ships, still carried French i8's
on their main-deck, and that, therefore, about 20
pounds should be added to the broadside weight
of metal of each. The American accounts stated
this to be the case in both instances ; but I paid
no heed to them until my attention was called to
the fact that the English had captured enormous
quantities of French cannon and shot and cer-
tainly used the captured ordnance on some of
their ships.

In writing my history, I have had to deal with
a mass of confused and contradictory testimony,
which it has sometimes been quite impossible to
reconcile, the difficulty being greatly enhanced
by the calculated mendacity of James and some
others of the earlier writers, both American and
British. Often I have had to simply balance
probabilities, and choose between two sets of fig-



Naval War of 1 812 297

ures, aware that, whichever I chose, much could
be said against the choice. It has, therefore, been
quite impossible to avoid errors ; but I am con-
fident they have been as much in favor of the
British as the Americans; and in all important
points my statements are substantially accurate.
I do not believe that my final conclusions on the
different fights can be disputed. James asserts
that the American ships were officered by cun-
ning cowards, and manned, to the extent of half
their force in point of effectiveness, by renegade
British. I show that the percentage of non-
American seamen aboard the American ships was
probably but little greater than the percentage of
non-British seamen aboard the British ships ; and
as for the charges of cowardice, there were but two
instances in which it could be fairly urged against
a beaten crew — that of the British Epervier and
that of the American Argus (for the cases of Sir
George Collier, Commodore Rodgers, Chauncy,
Yeo, the commander of the Bonne CUoyenne,
etc., cannot be considered as coming under this
head). James states that there was usually a
great superiority of force on the side of the Amer-
icans this is true; but I show that it was not
nearly as great as he makes it, and that in deal-
ing with the lake flotillas his figures are absolutely
false, to the extent of even reversing the relative
strength of the combatants on Lake Champlain,



298 Naval War of 181 2

where the Americans won, although with an in-
ferior force. In the one noteworthy British vic-
tory, that of the Shannon, all British authors fail
to make any allowance for the vital fact that the
Shannon's crew had been drilled for seven years,
whereas the Chesapeake had an absolutely new
crew, and had been out of port just eight hours;
yet such a difference in length of drill is more im-
portant than disparity in weight of metal.

As a whole, it must be said that both sides
showed equal courage and resolution; that the
Americans usually possessed the advantage in
material force; and that they also showed a de-
cided superiority in fighting skill, notably in
markmanship.



INDEX



Abeille, i., 258

Aboukir, i., 29, 67

Acasta, i., 54, 69, 90, loi, ii.,

173-177^ . , , ,
Accurate nnng of the Amen-

cans, i., 206

d'Ach6, ii., loi

Achille, i., 51

Adams, i., 66, 78, 88, 89; ii.,
23. 35. 63, 198; cruise, ii..
63; chased by Tigress, ii.,
64, 65; curious sailing
quaUties resulting from be-
ing built by contract, ii.,
65; grounds on Isle of
Haute, ii., 66; attacked by
British in Penobscot, ii.,
66; burned by Captain
Morris, ii., 67

Adams, Chaplain, ii., 34

Adams, Lieutenant, i., 278

Adirondack region, i., 170

Adonis, ii., 60

^olus, i., 90, 103, 107, 108

Mtna, i., 121, 123

Africa, i., 54, 90, loi, 103,
107, 108

Alacrity, {., 258

Albion, ii., 42

Alert, i., 99, 100, 168; cap-
tured by Essex, i., 100

Alexandria, 1., 214, 215

Alexandria surrenders to
British, ii., 44, 45

Alfred, ii., 162

Alison, Sir A., ii., 121

Allen, ii., 115



Allen, Lieut. U. H., i., 251

Allen, Lieut. W. H., on
United States,!., li^o; com-
mander of Argus, i., 250,
253.255; ii-.203; mortally
wounded, i., 250

Alligator, i., 267; ii., 8, 9, 75;
futile attempt to cut her
out, ii. , 9 ; sunk in a squall,
ii., 9

Almy, Sailing-master T. C,

i., 318
Alwyn, Master J. C, i., 113,

114, 152

Atnbuscade, i., 237

Amelia Island, ii., 40

Americans accused of treach-
ery, i., 228

American gunboats employed
in protecting coasting
trade, i., 241, 242; futile
attack on British vessels,
i., 243; lesson taught by
their failure, i., 266

American loss in all, ii., 197-
199

American navy, confidence in
itself, i., 35; esprit de corps
of its officers, i., 35; life-
long training of sailors, i.,
36 ; great effectiveness and
reasons for it, i., 37; no im-
pressment, i., 44; vessels
not "largely manned by
British sailors," i., 46-55;
proportion of officers fur-
nished by different States



299



300



Index



American navy — Continued
and sections, i., 55; ton-
nage, i., 56; navy yards,
i., 57; statistics of ofificers
and seamen, i., 57; list of
vessels, tonnage, and de-
scription, i., 59-63; com-
pared with British navy,
i., 64; charges of under-
rating, i., 65-70; unques-
tionable superiority in
force, i., 74; effectiveness
due to small size, i., 75;
crew of a '44, i., 84; of an
i8-gun ship, i., 84; tabu-
lated comparison of three
British and three American
vessels, i., 86; superior dis-
cipline of Americans, i.,
164; officers better paid
and of a better class, i.,
164; American navy gave
more damage than it re-
ceived, ii., 196

American naval officers, rea-
sons for their superiority,
ii., 204-205; ignorance of
army officers and men, ii.,
212—213

American privateers cut out
by British squadron, i.,
210—212

American Revolution, fleet
actions of British with
Europeans mostly inde-
cisive during war of, ii., 105

American sailors, compared
with British, i., 43; of
better material for man-of-
war's crew than British, ii.,
204; on Guerriere, i., 119

American sharpshooters, i.,
164

American State Papers, i.,

25. 59. 312; ii-. 38, 80,
116
American vessels built and



captured or destroyed in
1812, i., 168; prizes made,
i., 169; in 1813, i., 256-
267; in 1814, ii., 143; in
1815, ii., 193-195, sum-
mary, ii., 192-196; make-
shifts in use of merchant
schooners, i., 176

American whalers, i., 43

American writings miscalled
histories, i., 301

Amherst Bay, i., 295

Amherstburg, i., 309, 310

Anglo-French naval war, ii.,
207; comparative force
and loss, ii., 208-210

Angus, Lieut. S., i., 248, ii.,
108; leads disastrous ex-
pedition against Red
House barracks, i., 193-
194

Anjier, ii., 188

Appling, Major, ii., 96-97

Arab, i., 21 1-2 12

Arbuthnot, Admiral, victory
over B arras off Chesa-
peake, ii., 105

Arbuthnot, Capt. J., ii., 56

Argo, i., 132

Argus, i., 5, 48, 79, 86, 90,
119, 131, 195, 203, 249-
258, 265-267; ii., 39, 40
45,82,199,200; makes six
prizes, i., 131 ; engagement
with Pelican, i., 250; is
captured by her, i., 252;
comparative force and loss,
i., 252-254; not an action
creditable to Americans,
i., 254; diagram of ac-
tion, i., 254; charges
against her crew, i., 255;
powder alleged to be bad,
i., 255; comparison with
previous combats, i., 256;
inferiority of beaten crew
unaccountable, i., 257



Index



3or



Ariel, i., 309, 311, 315, 318-

321. 325. 327. 328; 11., 109
Armada, ii., 55
Armide, ii., 74
Armstrong, Lieutenant, ii.,

Arundel, Sailing-master, i.,
188; wounded and
drowned, i., 189

Asp, {., 187, 247, 267, 271,
278, 281, 289, 296-299,
302, 311; ii., 197; cut out
by boats from Mohawk and
Contest, {., 247

Aspinwall, Lieutenant, i., 283

Astrea, i., 144

Atalanta, ii., 60

Atlas, ii., 164

Austrians, i., 74

Autobiography of a Seaman,

i-. 4, 157
■\von, 1., 82, 254, 256, 257;

ii., 56-59,62, 83, 172, 201;

chased by Wasp, ii., 56;

captured after short and

furious engagement, ii., 58;

sinks, ii., 59
Aylwin, ii., 115
Ayscough, Sir G., i., 66
Azores, i., 213



Badajos, ii., 235; instance of
cruelty of British troops at,

ii-. 243
Bainbridge, Commodore, 1.,
45, 62, 146, 148, 150, 152,
154. 155. 157. 159. 162,
165, 221, 223, 239; u., 108,

151.203
Bainbridge, Master J., ii., 34
Baker, Captain, ii., 45
Ballahou, ii., 41, 82
Ballard, ii., 115
Ballard, Lieutenant, ii., 169,

„ 174, 177

Baltic, battle of, i., 28, 336



Baltimore, i., 210; ii., 41, 73,
161, 162; unsuccessfully
attacked by British, i., 11;
ii., 46

Barbadoes, i., 265; ii., 35, 41

Barclay, Capt. R. H., i., 79,
85. 273. 306, 317, 331, 332,
336, 339; "•- .1.14; com-
mander of British forces
on Lake Erie, i., 309-311;
description of his squadron
and crews, i., 311— 315;
engagement with Perry,
i-' 3i7~32o; severely
wounded, i., 321

Bamegat, i., 102

Barney, Commodore J., i.,
50; ii., 42, 44; errone-
ously called an Irishman,
ii., 41 ; attacks Albion and
Dragon with flotilla, ii., 42,

43
Barnwell, Sailing-master, ii.,

20
Barossa, i., 244; ii., 163
Barras, Admiral, ii. , 105
Barrie, Sir R., relieved by

Rear- Admiral Cochrane,

ii-, 3
Barry, Captain, ii., 67
Bartholomew, Captain, ii.,

191, 192; wanton attack

on American gtinboat, ii.,

192
Bartlett, Purser, ii., 189, 190
Bassett, Sailing-master, ii., 8;

promoted to lieutenancy,

ii., 9
Bastard, Capt. J., i., loi
Batailles Navales de la

France, see Graviere, i., 121
Bathurst, Earl, ii., 238
Baynes, Adj. -Gen. E.,i., 284,

3^3, 314
Bayonnaise, i., 237
Beale, G., Jr., ii., 116
Bell, Lieutenant, ii., 134



302



Index



Belvidera, i., 8i, 90-95, loi,
103,106—108,210; engage-
ment with President, i., 91-

95 ^ ..

Bentham, Capt. G., 11., 68

Beresjord, i., 272, 285, 306;

ii., 88

Beresford, Capt. J. P., i., 130

Bermuda Royal Gazette, ii.,

Bermudas, i., 132, 199; ii.,

.165 . .

Biddle, Captain, 1., 126, 130,

216; ii., 108, 14s, 178, 179,

182, 184, 187, 203
Bignall, Lieut. G., i., 318,

325
Big Salmon River, ii., 95
Big Sandy Creek, ii., 95, 96
Bingham, Captain, i., 8
Black Rock, i., 192
Black Snake, ii., 97, 143
Bladensburg, i., 11, 212;

ii-, 43
Blaeny, Lieutenant, ii., 93
Blake's victory over Dutch,

i-. ii(>, 340
Blakely, Capt. J., i., 50, 82;

ii., 34, 47- 49-51, 53-60,
85- 203

Bland, Quartermaster F., ii.,
20

Blockade of American coast,
strictness of, ii., i

Blucher, ii., 152

Blyth, Capt. S., i., 260; ii.,
203; killed, i., 261; great
personal courage and hu-
manity, i., 263

Boarding nettings boiled in
pitch, i., 198

Boasting on both sides, ii., 4

Bombay, i., 210

Bonne Citoyenne, i., 145, 159,
202, 221 ; ii., 184,

Borgne, Lake, ii., 74, 158

Boston, i., 59; ii., 197



Boston, i., 109, 159, 165, 199;
ii., 8, 145, 161, 165

Boston Gazette, i., 156

Boston Harbor, ii., 209

Boston Lighthouse, i., 222

Bowyer, Fort, ii., 68

Boyer, Fort, ii., 253

Boxer, i., 260, 262-264,
267; ii., 81, 115, 140, 156,
200, 296; engagement with
Enterprise, i., 260-262; is
captured, i., 262

Brailesford, Midshipman, i.,
194

Braimer, Captain, ii., 58

Brant, ii., 160

Breckenbridge, Lieutenant,

i-. 245
Brenton's Naval History, i.,

16, 17, 46, 47, 50, 51, 77,

91, 113, 142, 145, 157, 300;

ii. , 1 2 8 ; its inaccuracy, i. , 1 7
Brest, i., 265
Brine, Captain, ii., 54
Bristol, ii., 161
British accused of brutality,

i., 228; ii., 242-243
British Admiralty report, i.,

53
British Infantry, ii., 245, 258

British loss, summary, ii.,
197, 207—210, 250, 251;
balance of loss against the
British, ii., 199

British navy, its great pres-
tige at opening of war, i.,
122; numbered a thousand
vessels, ii., 199

British officers hampered by
red tape, ii., 204

British vessels captured or
destroyed in 1812, i., 168;
in 1813, i., 267; in 1814,
ii., 82, 83; in iSi5,ii., 195;
total loss, ii., 197, 198;
vessels on great lakes, in-
experience of crews, i., 172



Index



303



British whalers in Pacific, i.,
200

Broke, Capt. P. V., afterward
Admiral, i., 43, 76, 102,
109, 116, 219-228, 233-
236; ii., 3, 84, 203-204;
memoir of, i., 76; his
chivalric challenge of Law-
rence, i., 221; gallant con-
duct in engagement against
Chesapeake, i., 221-230

Brooks, Lieutenant, mortally
wounded, i., 322, 325

Broom, Lieut. J., killed, i.,
226

Brown, Capt. T., ii., 4

Brown, Gen. J., i., 283; ii.,
92, 99, loi, 102

Brown, Lieutenant, i., 188,
278; ii., 96

Brutality of British troops, i.,
197

Buchan, Lieut. E., i., 318:
dangerously wounded, i.,

321, 325
Budd, Lieut. C, ii., 192
Budd, Lieut. G., i., 221, 226,

227
Bulger, Lieutenant, ii., no,

III
Bunker Hill, i., 41
Bureau of Navigation, i., 52
Burleton, Admiral Sir G., ii.,

186
Burlington Heights, ii., 99
"Burlington Races," i., 306
Burrows, ii., 115
Burrows, Lieut. W., Com. of

the Enterprise, i., 260; ii.,

203; mortally wounded, i.,

262; his gallant conduct

and great popularity, i.,

262, 263
Bush, Lieutenant, i., 113
Byng, Capt. H. D., i., 247
Byron, Capt. R., i., 91-95,

loi, 109, 210; ii., 203



Calder, Sir R., i., 294

Caledonia, i., 173, 190, 192,
193, 282, 308, 311, 315,
317-325. 327. 328; li., 109,
III, 198; and four schoon-
ers brought into Lake Erie,
i., 282

Caledonia, British privateer,
captured by Norwich, i.,
212

Call, William, ii., 17

Callao, i., 200

Campaign on the lakes, a fair
account difficult, i., 175

Campbell, Commodore H. G.,
i., 240; ii., 68, 71, 191

Campbell, Master's Mate J.,

i-. 317
Camperdown, victory of Lord

Duncan, i., 28, 337

"Canada must be con-
quered," i., 9

Canadian colonies feebly de-
fended, i., 9

Canadians, alleged cowardice
of, i., 181

Canary Islands, i., 198; ii.,63

Captains' Letters, i., 102,
218, 223, 240; ii., 159, 160,
183, 191

Carden, Capt. J. S., i., 134-

136, 139-143; ii-. 23; a

poor commander, i., 139

Carnation, i., 258; ii., 68, 69

Caroband Bank, i., 202

Carolina, i., 53, 168; ii., 74,

79, 157, 219, 224, 225, 228,

232

Carolinas, i., 196; ii., 144

Carroll, Major-General, ii.,
221, 240, 249.

Carron, ii., 68

Cassin, Lieutenant - Com-
mander, i., 245; ii., 115,

134, 142.
Castilian, ii., 59
Castlereagh, Lord, i., 53



304



Index



Castine, ii., 66

Cathcart, Captain, i., 214

Centipede, i., 246; ii., 115,

140
Chads, Lieut. H. C, i., 147,

149. 151. .154-156, 158

Chameleon, i., 157

Champlain, Lake, i., 171,
174, 176, 180, 186; Battle
of, i., 180, 333, 334, 338,
341; 11., 113, 121, 197

Champlin, Sailing-master, i.,
318, 324; ii., no. III

Chandeleur Islands, ii., 74,
216

Charlestown, i., 223, 264

Charwell, ii., 88, 90, 91, 112

Chasseur, ii., 162-164, 195;
American privateer, chased
by Barossa, ii., 163; inis-
takes St. Lawrence for
merchantman and engages
her, ii., 163

Chauncy, Commodore L, i.,
82, 177, 1S6, 191, 235,
279, 282, 285, 287-289,
291-293; ii., 86-91, 198;
commander of forces
on Ontario, i., 186; at
Sackett's Harbor, i., 188;
attacks Royal George, i.,
188; takes York, i., 279,
and Fort George, i., 280;
in action with Yeo does not
compare favorably, i., 291,
292; advantage from long
guns, i., 296; his account
of action near Genesee
River, i., 296; engagement
in York Bay, i., 297-303;
partial victory ofif Burling-
ton, i., 299; criticised as a
commander, i., 307, 308;
blockades Kingston, ii., 98;
refuses to co-operate with
Gen. Brown, ii., 100, 104;
does not make best use of



his materials, ii., 104; not
deserving of praise given
him, ii., 107

Chauncy, Lieut. W., i., 278,
286

Chauncy's squadron on On-
tario compared with Yeo's
i., 271-273

Cherub, ii., 10-16, 18, 21, 27,
29-31

Chesapeake, i., 4, 51, 52, 83,
85, 89, 130, 139, 182, 198,
216, 220—226, 228—231,
233-237. 254. 266, 267; ii.,
172, 199, 200; refitted out
at Boston, inexperienced
crew and new officers, i.,
216; armament, i., 220;
engagement with Shannon,
i., 221-230; captured by
her, i., 228; diagram of
action, i., 229

Chesapeake Bay, i., 196, 210;
ii., 41

Chesapeake River, i., 102; ii.,

3. 105. 145. 194
Chevretie, i., 158
Childers, ii., 68
Chili, ii., 105
Chippeway, i., 173, 180, 314,

316, 317, 319, 321, 324,

327, 328, 343; n., 81
Chlorinde, i., 122
Chubb, i., 182, 343; ii., 118,

119, 131, 132, 136, 141, 143
Ciudad Rodrigo, ii., 235, 243
Claxton, Lieutenant, i., 128
Claxton, Midshipman, i., 325
Clement, Sailing-master G.,

,"■- 55 .
Cleopatra, 1., 144

Clyde, i., 73

Cockburn, Admiral, i., 196;
ii., 191; attack on Wash-
ington, ii., 43

Cochrane, Admiral, i., 4; ii.,
3. 45> 74. 215, 237



Index



305



Codrington, Admiral, Ale-
moirs, i., 75, 174, 206; ii.,
35, 39, 206, 233; comments
on uselessness of mere
martinets, i., 206
Coffee, Gen., ii., 221, 238
Coggeshall, G., History of
American Privateers, i.,
247; ii.,72,163: gross mis-
statetnents and sneers, i.,

247

Cole, Memoirs of British Gen-
erals, ii., 237, 256

Collier, Captain, Sir G. R.,i.,
146, 214; ii., 47, 173, 176,
178, 193; his blunders, ii.,

Columbia, ii., 45, 82

Comus, {., 144

Confiance, i., 80, 180, 181,

304. 335; ii-. "4. 118, 119.
125, 128, 131, 132, 135-

141. 143

Congress, i., 70, 90, 91, 94,
131. .1.32, 169, 212, 215,
267 ; ii., 1 18, 176, 202

Congress, measure proposed
against France and Eng-
land, i., 7

Congressional forethought,
lack of, ii., 199

Conklin, Lieut, A., i., 318

Conkling, Lieut., ii., 112,

Conner, Lieut. D., i., 204,
205, 209, 259

Conquest, i., 185, 188, 271,
278, 280, 2S9, 296

Constellation, i., 33, 39, 70,
89, 144, 197, 211, 245, 246;
ii., 118, 202, 204; unsuc-
cessful attempt to capture
her, i., 197, 198

Constitution, i., 5, 41, 45, 47,
51-54, 67-72, 80-83, 86-
89, 102— 114, 116— 122, 130,
140, 142, 144-152, 156-



163, 169, 217, 334; ii., 5-
8, 63, 85, 142, 145, 153,
165-177, 188, 193, 202,
205, 206; skirmish with
and escape from British
squadron, i., 102—109; cap-
tures and burns two brigs,
i., 109; recaptures Ameri-
can brig, i., 109; engage-
ment with and capture of
Guerridre, i., 110-114;
comparative force and loss,
i., 114; diagram of action,
i., 115; her gunnery excel-
lent, faultlessly handled,
i., 117; crew new men, i.,
iiS ; engagement with
Java, i., 147-151; cap-
tures Java, i., 152; slight
damage received, list of
killed and wounded, i.,
152; coinparative force
and loss, i., 155; diagram
of action, i., 153; cruising,
ii., 5; captures Pictou, ii.,
5 ; misstatements in regard
to crew, ii., 6, 7 ; chased by
two British frigates, ii.,
7 ; engagement with Cyane
and Levant, ii., 167-172;
captures both, ii., 168, 169;
comparative force and loss,
ii., 169, 170; brilliant
manojuvring of C, dia-
gram of action and com-
ments on it, ii., 171;
chased by British squad-
ron, ii., 174—176; sviccess-
ful escape, ii., 177, 178

Contest, i., 247

Cooper, J. F., Naval History
of the United States, i., 52,
82, 92, 102, 105, 112, 118,
124, 134, 178, 180, 181,
183, 198, 200, 203, 230,
231, 255, 269, 292, 310,
318, 330, 3S3; ii-, 50- 53.



3o6



Index



Cooper — Continued

60, 80, 87, 107, 116, 118,
147, 148, 160, 173; disposi-
tion to praise everything
Ainerican, i., 22; his in-
judicious praise, i., 330

Cooper's Miles Wallingford,
Home as Found, Pilot,
Tii'o Admirals, i., 26

Cooper, Midshipman, i., 205

Copenhagen, i., 29

Coshnahan, Midshipman, i.,
226

Cornick, Lieut. H. D., i., 157

Cornwall, i., 249

Cornwallis, i., 69, 157, ii.,
184, 185, 193

Courage alone does not make
a great commander, i., 329

Courier National, i., 144

Cowell, Lieut. J. G., heroism
when wounded, ii., 17

Cox, Lieut. W. S., ii., 96; his
cowardice, i., 225

Crab Island, ii., 122, 133, 141

Crane, Lieutenant, i., loi

Craney Island, i., 197, 245

Crawford, U. S. Minister to
France, i., 249

Creeks, power of, broken at
battle of Horseshoe Bend,
ii., 214

Creerie, Lieut. J., i., 239, 240

Creighton, Captain, i., 46

Creole Militia, ii., 220, 239—
241

Croghan, Colonel, ii., 109

Crowninshield, Sec. B. W., i.,

Crow's Shoal, i., 248
Cumberland Head, ii., 129-

Cumberland Island, ii., 191
Cummings, Midshipman J.

^ C, i., 192, 325
Curlew, i., 212
Curry, Lieut. R. C, i., 247



Cutting-out expedition
against privateers, ii., 160;
daring and successful one
by British, ii., no, in

Cyane, i., 65, 76, 80, 81, 214,
334; ii-. 2, 7,2,, 165-169,
171, 172, 174-176, 193, 195;
engagement with Constitu-
tion, ii., 167-172; surren-
ders, ii., 168

Cyprus, ii., 157



Dabney, Consul J. B., ii., 68
Dacres, Capt. J. R., i., loi,
109, no, 116, 117, 119,
139, 141, 142; wounded in
engagement with Constitu-
tion, {., 113
Daily, Sailing-master, ii., 157
Danes defeated in battle of

Baltic, i., 336
Danish gunboat, i., 242
Dart captured by Newport

flotilla, i., 264



Online LibraryTheodore RooseveltThe naval war of 1812; or, The history of the United States navy during the last war with Great Britain, to which is appended an account of the battle of New Orleans; → online text (page 39 of 42)