Thomas Campion.

Campion's works online

. (page 1 of 34)
Online LibraryThomas CampionCampion's works → online text (page 1 of 34)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


THE WORKS OF



Thomas
Campion








EDITED BY

PERCIVAL VIVIAN




OXFORD
At the Clarendon Press



OXFORD
UNIVERSITY PRESS

LONDON Ely House, 37 Dover Street, W. i

GLASGOW 58 Buchanan Street

NEW YORK 417 Fifth Avenue, N.Y. 16

TORONTO 70 Wynford Drive, Don Mills

MELBOURNE Bowen Crescent

WELLINGTON Empire Building, Willis Street

BOMBAY Apollo Bunder

CALCUTTA

Faraday House, P-I7 Mission Row Ext.

MADRAS Mount Road

KARACHI McLeod Road

DACCA Red Cross Building, 114 Motijheel

LAHORE Bank Square

KUALA LUMPUR Jalan Belanda

HONG KONG

Ming Sang Building, Tung Lo Wan Road

CAPE TOWN Thibault House, Thibault Square

IBADAN Iddo Gate

NAIROBI Church House, Government Road

SALISBURY Baker Street

JOHANNESBURG Joubert Street



Price
(IN U.K. ONLY)

net



NY PUBLIC L BHAHV THE BRANCH I UBRAH.ES





..



THIS BOOK IS FOR REFERENCE,
USE ONLY A. .. :CT BE.

TAKEN FHOI! 'i'i - il S.OOM.



TEE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

MID-MANHATTAN LIBRARY CC1

5th Av<* & 42nd St., N. Y, N. Y. 10018




^-




*



Minutes of the examination of Thomas Campion on the 26th Oct. 1615,

prior to the arrest of Sir Thomas Monson for complicity in

the Overbury murder. [S. P. Dom. James I. Ixxxii.]

See p. xliv. The signatures of the poet and his examiners are in autograph.



Front.



CAMPION'S WORKS



EDITED BY

PERCIVAL VIVIAN



OXFORD
AT THE CLARENDON PRESS



Oxford University Press, Ely House, London IV. i

GLASGOW NEW YORK TORONTO MELBOURNE WELLINGTON

CAPE TOWN SALISBURY 1BADAN NAIROBI LUSAKA ADDIS ABABA

BOMBAY CALCUTTA MADRAS KARACHI LAHORE DACCA

KUALA LUMPUR HONG KONG



FIRST PUBLISHED IQOQ

REPRINTED LITHOGRAPHICALLY IN GREAT BRITAIN
AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS, OXFORD

BY VIVIAN RIDLER

PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY

1966



PREFACE

SOME time ago, when working upon a small edition of Campion';*
English poems for Messrs. Routledge's ' Muses' Library ', I had
the good fortune to come across certain information concerning
the poet's descent and early circumstances which had not, so far
as I am aware, been previously noticed. The original clues,
when fully pursued, provided a mass of material too great for
inclusion in that volume, and I was obliged to content myself
with a promise of dealing with the subject more completely in
a subsequent work. The present edition was undertaken by way
of redemption of that promise, partly with the object of placing
the facts on record, and partly to provide for general access a
complete collection of Campion's works, the fullest edition hitherto
produced (Mr. Bullen's 1889 volume) having been privately
printed and limited by subscription.

The text has everywhere been given in the old spelling (reduced
to consistency in the Latin works) ; and I have striven to repro-
duce the character of the originals in typography, indentation,
and punctuation, though discretion has been used in the last-
named. MS. records have been quoted in their native garb of
spelling and abbreviation ; and here let me anticipate a criticism
which I have heard in respect of other books by stating that I am
fully aware that the current MS. abbreviation for ' th ' is not ' y ',
though I have employed that letter as nearest to the character in
question. Except in a very few passages I have adhered to and
occasionally restored the reading of the original texts.

I think I ought at this point to explain the course of reasoning
which led me to my conclusions as to Thomas Campion's identity,
so as to lay my grounds open to examination. - Egerton MS.
2599 was first pointed out to me by Mr. Flower of the British
Museum, but, beyond the fact that it referred to a Thomas
Campion at Cambridge, I could at first find no sure footing for
identification. Finally, however, a laborious search through ac-
counts and title-deeds, Latin and English, disclosed the allusion
to ' Thomas Campion de Grayes ynne '. This was the keystone
to the whole structure of material. It had been shown by
Mr. Bullen that the poet was a member of Gray's Inn, and the
records of the Inn make it clear that it only boasted one Campion



iv Preface.



at this date. This proved, the MS. afforded clues which ramified
in every direction, frequently providing corroborative evidence of
the truth of my original identification.

My obligations are almost too numerous to be acknowledged
in detail, though shift must be made to mention the greater.
To Professor Raleigh, and that veteran of literature, Dr. Furnivall,
I am indebted for encouragement and advice ; and I have to
thank Mr. Bullen, the pioneer of the study to which I am a mere
apprentice, for his assistance, and for kind permission to quote
several notes from his own editions. I owe much to Dr. Walker,
Librarian of Peterhouse, who at my instance and armed with
clues of my providing, made successful research among the
College records for proof of Campion's membership ; and who
has shown untiring courtesy in affording me subsequent assistance.

Among other literary creditors mention must be made of my
friend Robin Flower of the British Museum, who, as already
explained, was in a sense the only begetter of the present work ;
of Dr. Thomas Lea Southgate, with whose authoritative voice
I speak on technical questions of music ; of my friend Adrian
Collins, for the recollection of many fruitful discussions upon
music and prosody ; of the Rev. F. R. Williams, Rector of
Anstey, for the courtesy of access to the registers of his parish ;
of Messrs. Routledge and Son, for their kind permission to quote
notes from my small edition in their ' Muses' Library ' ; of
Mr. Madan of the Bodleian, and the Librarian of the Cambridge
University Library, for assistance which has saved me time and
labour ; and, finally, of the officials of the Clarendon Press, for
considerate help and useful suggestions, and for a liberality in
the matter of reproductions and illustrations which will have
contributed no little to any success with which this book may
meet.

P. V.



CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION. PAGE

Pedigree of Thomas Campion viii

Chapter I. Biographical . ix

II. The Poetical Works ...... 1

III. The Prose Works lix

A BOOKE OF AYRES .... i
To the Right Vertuous and Worthy Knight, Sir Thomas

Mounson .... . 3

To the Reader .... . . 4

A Table of halfe the Songs contained in this Booke, by

T. C 5

Songs I-XX1 6-18

A Table of the rest of the Songs contained in this Booke,

made by Philip Rosseter . . 19

Songs I-XXI 20-30

OBSERVATIONS IN THE ART OF ENGLISH POESIE . 3i-5 6

THE DISCRETION OF A MASKE, PRESENTED BEFORE THE
KINGES MAIESTIE AT WHITE-HALL, IN HONOVR OF THE
LORD HAYES AND HIS BRIDE . . 57

To the most puisant and Gratious lames, King of Great

Britaine 59

An Epigram 59

Ad Inuictissimum, Serenissimumque Iacobum v Magnae

Britannias Regem 60

To the Right Noble and Vertuous Theophilus Howard,
Lorde of Walden, sonne and Heire to the right Honor-
able the Earle of Suffolke . . 60
To the Right Vertuous, and Honorable, the Lord and

Lady Hayes 6 1

Epigramma .... 61

The Maske .... 62-75

Songs vsed in the Maske . /6

A RELATION OF THE LATE ROYALL ENTERTAINMENT
GIVEN BY THE RIGHT HONORABLE THE LORD KNOWLES,
AT CAWSOME-HOVSE NEERE REDDING: TO OVR MOST

GRACIOUS QVEENE, QVEENE ANNE, IN HER PROGRESSE
TOWARD THE BATHE, VPON THE SEVEN AND EIGHT AND
TWENTIE DAYES OF APRILL 1613 77~S8



vi Contents.

PAGE

THE DESCRIPTION, SPEECHES, AND SONGS, OF THE LORDS
MASKE, PRESENTED IN THE BANQVETTING-HOVSE ON THE
MARIAGE NIGHT OF THE HIGH AND MIGHTIE COVNT
PALATINE, AND THE ROYALLY DESCENDED THE LADIE

ELISABETH 89-100

SONGS OF MOVRNING : BEWAILING THE VNTIMELY DEATH

OF PRINCE HENRY 101-110

Illustrissimo, potentissimoque principi, Fredrico Quinto,

Rheni Comiti Palatino, Duel Bauariae, &c. . . . 103

An Elegie upon the vntimely death of Prince Henry . 104

To the Most Sacred King lames 106

To the Most Sacred Queene Anne. . . . . 106

To the Most High and Mighty Prince Charles . . 107

To the Most Princely and Vertuous the Lady Elizabeth 108

To the Most Illustrious and Mighty Fredericke the fift,

Count Palatine of the Rhein ..... 108

To the most disconsolate Great Brittaine . . . 109

To the World 109

A Table of all the Songs contayned in this Booke . . lio

Two BOOKES OF AYRES. THE FIRST CONTAYNING DIVINE
AND MORALL SONGS : THE SECOND, LIGHT CONCEITS OF

LOVERS 111-142

To the Right Honourable, both in birth and vertue,

Francis, Earle of Cumberland 113

To the Reader 114

A Table of all the Songs contayned in these Bookes . 116

Divine and Moral Songs, I-XXI 117-128

Light Conceits of Lovers 129

To the right noble, and vertuous Henry Lord Clifford,
Son and Heyre to the Right Honourable, Francis,

Earle of Cumberland . 131

To the Reader 131

Songs I-XXI 132-145

THE DESCRIPTION OF A MASKE, PRESENTED IN THE
BANQVETING ROOME AT WHITEHALL, ON SAINT STEPHENS
NIGHT LAST, AT THE MARIAGE OF THE RIGHT HONOVRABLE
THE EARLE OF SOMERSET, AND THE RIGHT NOBLE THE
LADY FRANCES HOWARD 147-156

THE THIRD AND FOVRTH BOOKE OF AYRES . . . 157-187
A Table of all the Songs contayned in the two Bookes

following 159

To my honourable Friend, S r Thomas Mounson, Knight

and Baronet 160



Contents.



Vll



PAGE

The Third Booke of Ayres. Songs I-XXIX . . . 161-174

The Fourth Booke of Ayres 175

To my worthy friend, M r lohn Mounsor., Sonne and

Heyre to Sir Thomas Mounson, Knight and Baronet 175

To the Reader 175

Songs I-XXIIII . 176-187

A NEW WAY OF MAKING FOWRE PARTS IN COVNTEK-

POINT, ETC 189

To the Flowre of Princes, Charles, Prince of Great

Brittaine IQ 1

The Preface 192-194

Of Counterpoint 195-212

A short Hymne, Composed after this forme of Counter-
point, to shew how well it will become any Diuine, or

grave Subiect 212

Of the Tones of Musicke 213-218

Of the taking of all Concords, perfect and imperfect . 219-226

AYRES SVNG AND PLAYED AT BROVGHAM CASTLE IN WEST-

MERLAND IN THE KINGS ENTERTAINMENT . . 227-234

EPIGRAMMATVM, LIBRI II .... 235

Liber primus, Ep. 1-225 .... . 237-269

Liber secundus, Ep. 1-228 ... . 270-305

VMBRA 306-314

ELEGIARVM LIBER . . 3 I 5~3 2 4

APPENDIX TO THE LATIN POEMS . 3 2 5~348

Ad Dianam 3 2 9

Ad Daphnin 3 2 9

Ad Thamesin .... 33~335

Fragmentum Vmbras . 335

Elegiarum Liber ... 336-34

Epigrammatum Liber ... . 34-348

OCCASIONAL VERSES ... 349^354

NOTES 355-379

BIBLIOGRAPHY ... 38~3 8 3

LIST or PRINCIPAL MSS. CONSULTED . 383-384

INDEX OF FIRST LINES . 385-396

INDEX OF PERSONAL NAMES 397-4







t: c p

D D -C


p








JD a. co










O rt t


^ *^








ff!^ .^


> 2

H ~








"o -


r? ^*




'S S'C c c






c c " ^


3 8








rt O ,. . r






-cc/} o E %>






O








4)


4)








~


T!








rt


rt








4)


u








CO


CO






.


u)


T3






p?j


rt


rt


tJa




o **

^ *

rt


o




C

o
u


H




h H *\J

S it


3
hJ




rt
S




o"


ll


^ 4)


QJ








u -S


(U 'u


.






rt


.y ^


bjo-r- 1


*




CO ^

"^ i


< CO

II 9


i rt







r u




4> C


VH 3


s




^


rt 3
% 3


O to


_u




X


_ "^


|| "~~


CO




Ir


H


"o




^






O


rt


O




UH


s


CO


DH




O




er


H






4J


3






w


U

_. O

^ J


Ih


c
o




o

( 1


3

is ra
1


2?
|l


'B,

S

rt
U




Q


u




4)
M




Ir


U ^3


TyT


c




O




M*^


o


C ij










j^ H






p i


'&,


^T
O W



















rt


II








u


1 1










T3 i~>








c

,G
O


b cTjiJJS a^

rt ^^ j3 ^ . -^ rt '


!<s^




11


"e "


d^


jT"? D

"O co 5 ^" C






||!T


C

u E E


rt oj 5 n "*3

C g <C O to

u 2 a P bo






w T5 1 -^

3 ^ v- jo
bjO ^UH )Z

3 - ^ F^H


2^1


-c o 5 3

~ H ^^<
bo c ^






<! .- c

J3 _O


"t.-S|


.S v'lo u- 1? E
* S *






^


O * flj


rt Si c >i








- 4) i-








1


-1"


a rt 'i is 2

<*- >r! 3 ^; rt .2






U


X) <C rt


o ^ b/:^; bo >



INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER I. BIOGRAPHICAL.

FOR some generations prior to his date, it is probable that the
forefathers of Thomas Campion were settled in that district of
Hertfordshire which abuts upon the extreme north-eastern border
of the county ; and, to limit their locality still further, in a group
of scattered villages in this neighbourhood,* mention of which will
occur hereafter. The facts upon which this inference is based
cannot now be stated without undue anticipation, but they will be
sufficiently apparent.

There was, of course, an armigerous family of the name whose
pedigree is recorded in the heraldic visitations of the period.
These people appear to have been resident chiefly in London and
Essex ; but some of them undoubtedly had landed interests in the
neighbouring county of Herts. 1 From such indications it seems
likely that the poet's ancestors had an origin in common with the
Essex Campions ; but while the latter had become prosperous
merchants, the former had not flourished to the same extent.

The earliest of the poet's ancestors in the male line of whom
we have any trace is John Campion, his grandfather, described in
1565 as 'John Campion, late of Dublin, Ireland, deceased'. 2
I can find, however, no certain trace of him in Ireland ; and
I believe that he was not a native of that country, but had either
visited it on some venture, commercial or otherwise, or held
a petty office there ; for he seems to have originally sprung from
Anstey,* one of the small villages above mentioned. From
the Subsidy Rolls for Herts., we find that at Anstey, ' John

1 In illustration of the connexion between the Essex and Herts. Campions see
Feet of Fines, Herts. (1601) Abraham Campion : Robert Curtis and Isabel his
wife. Land in Chesthunt. (1598) Thos. Hitchin : Thomas Campion and
Anastasia his wife. Messuage and land in Stevenage. (1591) Edm. Nodes
senior gent, and Edw. Norwood, gent. : William Campion and Susan his wife.
Land in Stevenage and Graveley. The Campions mentioned in these docu-
ments belonged to the Essex family. The fact is also suggestive that Margaret,
daughter of Thomas Campion of Essex, married Henry Brograve at Buntingford
in 1574, and on his death married Edward Gyll of Anstey, where she was
buried in 1605. A child of the first marriage was Sir John Brograve, who
married Margaret, daughter of Simeon Steward of Ely, and sister of Augustine
Steward, of whom see p. xix. 2 v. infra, p. xiii.

* See map. The Subsidy Rolls and Feet of Fines are transcribed in the
Herts. Genealogist and Antiquary.



Introduction.



Campion, g.' paid iij*. iiij</., and the registers 1 of the parish
disclose the existence of a large family of Campions resident
there. The Christian name of John is very frequent among
these people, and it is accordingly harder to identify the
poet's grandfather. But, as will be seen hereafter, 2 he seems
to have married into a family equally prevailing in the neigh-
bourhood, 3 which bore a name rendered indifferently as Bawcock,
Beaucock, or Bucock ; the middle form, I take it, being that
which reconciles the dissimilarity of the others. The fruit of this
union was John Campion, the younger.

So far, with the exception of one piece of documentary
evidence, we have been mainly on the ground of inference, but
with this next generation we gain more certain footing.

Of John Campion, the poet's father, we learn nothing until
1564, when he espoused a widow who was a small heiress in her
own right and comfortably off besides. From Chester's London
Marriage Licences we gather that 'John Campion, of St. Clement
Danes, gent, and Lucy Trigg, widow, of St. Andrew's, Holborn ',
obtained a licence on June 21, 1564, for marriage at St. Andrew's,
Holborn. The marriage was accordingly solemnized at St.
Andrew's, in the registers of which parish stands the entry
' William Campion, gent, and Lucy Trigg maried the 26 June '
(1564), a curious instance of an undeniable error in what is
usually such a reliable class of records.

It will now be not amiss to give some account of the origin of
Lucy Campion, the poet's mother, whose maiden name was
Searle. Walter Searle, Mawde his wife, and Thomas Searle

1 The registers show 24 baptisms between 1545 and 1594; 6 marriages between
1541 and 1564; and 13 burials between 1541 and 1592, of persons bearing this
name. 2 -j. infra, p. xxii.

3 There were also Campions at Brent Pelham in the same neighbourhood.
In a bill dated 17 April, 12 Elizabeth (1570), Thomas Campion sued John-
Rowley in the Court of Requests (XXXVII, 71) for the recovery of certain
copyhold property in Brent Pelham, formerly the possession of Raafe Campion,
from whom it devolved upon his brother John Campion, the complainant's
father. It is clear from the date, however, that this Thomas Campion was not
the poet, but they must have been of the same family.

Rauf or Ralph Campion was vicar of Brent Pelham shortly before this time ;
his will was proved in the P.C.C. in 1552 (16 Powell\ On the dissolution
of the Abbey of St. Albans in 1539 he was granted by Henry VIII an annuity
of 6 13$. 4</., by a charter dated December 14, 1539, making compensation to
the dispossessed monks. He is also mentioned in the Composition Papers
(P.R.O.) for Herts, as 'Radulphus Campyon, Pelham Arsa, 4 Nov., 33
Henry VIII '.



Introduction. xi

their son, who were living in 22 Edward IV (1483), are the
earliest of her ancestors whom we can trace ; and Nicholas
Searle, 1 described as a ' monyer ', i. e. a money-changer, or banker,
son and heir of the bodies of Walter and Mawde, was a brother
of Thomas, and became the grandfather of Lucy Searle. By his
will made on January 6, 1535, he devised some property in
Hoxton and Hornsey, of which that in the former neighbourhood
afterwards devolved upon Lucy, and became the subject of
considerable litigation. He died on February 2, 27 Henry VIII
( I 53l)> an d his Wl fe Alice, surviving him by a few years, died
in or about 31 Henry VIII (1540).

His son Laurence was a member of a body of officers of whose
functions at this time little seems to be known, the Serjeants-at-
Arms in attendance upon the sovereign. As originally created
the office stood limited to persons of knightly rank : whether this
was so or not in the sixteenth century, the posts were reserved
for gentlemen of good standing, and the appointment was pre-
sumably deemed an honour. Besides attendance on the sovereign
as a kind of guard of honour, their duties comprised the arrest
and possibly custody of noble offenders and those charged with
breaches of parliamentary privilege ; which province of their
function survives to the present day, the Serjeants-at-Arms at the
Houses of Parliament being in theory deputed by the sovereign
to attend the Lord Chancellor and Speaker respectively, to guard
the observance of due privilege, and to execute the warrants and
orders of each House during Session.

Laurence Searle and his wife Lucy had two children, a son,
Leonard, and a daughter, Lucy, afterwards the poet's mother.
Leonard, who had married Johan, daughter of Robert Sonning,
draper, of London, predeceased his father, dying about July 1 7,
1568; and letters of administration of his estate issued to his
relict out of the Commissary Court of London, on July 27, 1568.
Laurence Searle himself died on January 26, 156!, and administra-
tion of his estate issued out of the same Court his wife, who

1 As to Nicholas Searle and his descendants, see Feet of Fines, Middlesex,
24 Henry VIII, Mich. : Nich. Serle, Thos. Armerer, Laur. Serle, and
Thomas Austen : John Williams and Elizabeth his wife. Land in Hoxton and
Fynnesbury. 2 and 3 Ed. VI. Hil. : Sir Clement Smythe, Kt., and Thomas
Curtis : Henry Searle and Alice his wife. The manor of Wyke and premises in
Wyke, Hackeney, Stebenheth, Hoxton, Islington, and Shordych, &c., Co.
Middlesex, and premises in Counties Cambs. and Essex. 10 Eliz. Trin. :
Thomas Estfielde and John Kaye, gen. : Leonard Searle and Joan his wife.
Premises in Hoxton and Hornsey. (Hardy & Page.)



xii Introduction.

died about October 29, 1553, having predeceased him to his
daughter Lucy, then the wife of John Campion, on August 27,
1569. Several years before this, Lucy had married Roger Trigg,
an attorney of the Common Pleas, by whom she had one child,
a daughter named Mary. But he had died, presumably in 1563,
for letters of administration of his estate were granted on
November n, 1563, to Lucy Trigg, out of the Prerogative Court
of Canterbury.

An investigation into the probable means by which the persons
concerned in this history came together is instructive as illustrating
our previous assumption as to the local origin of the Campion
family. The Searles were apparently settled in Hackney, while
their landed interests were in Hoxton, Hornsey, and Shoreditch.
At the same time Laurence Searle is referred to as 'ar(miger) ','
and there was an armigerous family resident at Epping, North
Weald, and Bobbingworth in Essex, to which he may have
belonged. The Triggs were Hertfordshire people, and from the
same neighbourhood as the Campions. There were Triggs at
Barkway,* Furneaux Pelham,* and Wyddial,* all villages within
a few miles of each other and Anstey ; while Roger Trigg himself
was concerned, 2 either professionally or in his own interests, with
property in Brent Pelham* and Stocking Pelham,* as we learn from
the Feet of Fines. But he was also similarly concerned with
London property ; and, of course, as an attorney he must have
spent much time in London, where he probably met and married
Lucy Searle. Roger Trigg was probably, therefore, the means by
which his wife became acquainted with the Campions ; and to
their proximity as neighbours we may assign another intimacy,
that of Augustine Steward (of whom more hereafter) with this
little circle. Steward, Campion, and Trigg were either originally
neighbours in Hertfordshire or sprang from families who had
become acquainted in this way.

In 1564, then, John Campion married the widow of Roger

1 Eg. MS. 2599, f. i.

2 See Feet of Fines, Herts., 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary, Trin. : Roger Tiigg.
gent. & Robert Aprice : William Walgrave, gent. & Katherine, his wife.
Manor of Brent Pelham alias Grays & Chamberlens, & messuages & lands in
Brent Pelham & Stokkyng Pelham. 2 & 3 Eliz. Mich. : Tho. Brand : Roger
Tryg, gent. & Robert Aprice. Lands in Brent Pelham.

Feet of Fines, London, i & 2 Phil. & Mary, Mich. : Roger Trygge, gen. :
Thos. Devyne als. Deane, & E'izabelh, his wife, late the wife of Giles
Harryson deceased. A messuage & brewhouse called le Reed Lyon &
2 gardens in the parish of St. Botolph in Est Smythfelde

* See map.



Introduction.



Xlll



Trigg. They had two children, the elder a girl, Rose, who was
christened at St. Andrew's on June 21, 1565, and a son, Thomas
Campion, the poet, ' borne upon Ash Weddensday being the twelft
day of February, An. Rg. Eliz. nono, 1 and cristened at St.
Andrewes Church, in Houlborne,' as the registers of that church
inform us, on the day following his birth.

Whether John Campion was possessed of any considerable
means prior to his marriage, or whether, as appears rather likely,
he was indebted to a prudent marriage for a start in life, all the
facts at present extant concerning his career date subsequently to
that event. In 1565 he was admitted to the Middle Temple.
The Minutes of a Parliament held at that Inn on July 26, 1565,
record the admission of 'John Campion, son and heir of John
Campion of Dublin, Ireland, deceased ' ; while the Latin entry
runs, 'Johes Campion fils & heres Johm's Campion nup. de
Dublina in Hibnia defunct, admissus est in societate" medij
Templi spec(ialiter) * xxvi to die Julij A Eliz. reginae Septimo
p. (per) mfum (magistrum) Bell Lectorg '. He does not appear
to have been ever called to the Bar, but possibly this was not
his object; for in or after 1566 we find him in enjoyment of the
post and privileges of a Cursitor 3 of the Chancery Court, for which
it was, no doubt, necessary to qualify by a course of legal study.
These Cursitors, Clerks of Course (cleriri de cursu, to follow the
traditional derivation) were a body of 24 or (according to one
account) 19 officers, who drew up the writs of the Court
de cursu, i. e. according to routine. These posts, though not so
valuable as those of the Six Clerks, were yet worth having, for
according to the MS. below cited, 4 the remuneration of the whole
19 was 'not so little as 2ooo u per aim.', and, originally in the



Online LibraryThomas CampionCampion's works → online text (page 1 of 34)