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STORIES IN BLACK AND WHITE



STORIES IN
BLACK AND WHITE



BY

THOMAS HARDY J. M. BARRIE

W. E. NORRIS W. CLARK RUSSELL

MRS. OL1PHANT MRS. E. LYNN LINTON

GRANT ALLEN JAMES PAYN



WITH TWENTY-SEVEN ILLUSTRATIONS



NEW YORK

D. APPLETON AND COMPANY
1893



Authorized Edition.



CONTENTS.



PP. E. NOBBIS

THE ROMANCE OF MADAME DE CHANTELOUP 1

W. CLABK BUSSELL

A MEMOKABLE SWIM ... 50

THOMAS HARDY

TO PLEASE HIS WIFE 99

MBS. E. LYNN LINT ON

THE GHOST OF THE PAST 146

JAMES PAYN

KEBECCA'S KEMOKSE 193

/. M. BAEBIE

IS IT A MAN? 236

MBS. OLIPHANT

THE GOLDEN RULE ... 273

GRANT ALLEN

GENERAL PASSAVANT'S WILL , 313



M264306



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGH

W. E. NORRIS ... ... ... ... ... ... 1

"WELL," SAID SHE; "AND OF COURSE YOU TOLD HIM- ALL

THAT THERE WAS TO BE TOLD" ... ... ... 14

" I WAS STROLLING DOWN THE CHAMPS ELYSEES ONE AFTERNOON,
. . . WHEN A PAIR OF EQUESTRIANS CANTERED PAST ME,
IN WHOM I RECOGNIZED THE FAIR COUNTESS AND HER
IMPOSSIBLE ADORER"... ... ... ... ... 20

"ALL THE DOORS WERE OPEN; THE SERVANTS WERE IN HER
BEDROOM, SOBBING AND CHATTERING; I THINK THERE WAS
A POLICEMAN THERE TOO; I SAW HER LYING ON THE BED,
DEAD AND COLD" ... ... ... ... ... 43

W. CLARK RUSSELL ... ... ... ... ... 50

" I CALLED TO HIM TO STOP ROWING, THAT I MIGHT COME UP

TO HIM; BUT HE DID NOT STOP ROWING" ... ... 72

" AND, PUTTING THE BLADE OF HIS LEFT OAR UPON MY

BREAST, THRUST WITH IT WITH THE IDEA OF SUBMERGING

ME" 75

**!N THAT INSTANT I BOUNDED UPON HIM"... ... ... 88

"HE LISTENED ATTENTIVELY, OCCASIONALLY GLANCING AT THE
CONSTABLE, WHO STOOD BY LISTENING WITH HIS MOUTH
SLIGHTLY OPEN" ... ... ... ... ... 94



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE

THOMAS HARDY ... ... ... ... ... ... 99

"HE ADVANCED TO THEIR ELBOW, GENIALLY STOLE A GAZE

AT THEM, AND SAID, 'EMILY, YOU DON'T KNOW ME?'" ... 104
" WHEN ON THE HILL BEHIND THE PORT, WHENCE A VIEW OP
THE CHANNEL COULD BE OBTAINED, SHE FELT SURE THAT A
LITTLE SPECK ON THE HORIZON WAS THE TRUCK OF THE
JOANNA'S MAINMAST" ... ... ... ... 139

MRS. E. LYNN LINTON ... ... ... ... ... 146

*' Atf SHE STOOPED HER HEAD . . . THE SUNLIGHT CAUGHT THE

FRINGE AT THE BACK OF HER NECK" ... ... ... 151

"A BOAT DRIFTED NOISELESSLY ROUND THE HEADLAND, AND

NAOMI AND GEOFFREY SPRANG ON SHORE" ... ... 186

JAMES PAYN ... ... ... ... ... ... 193

"WELL, KEBECCA, NOTHING GONE WRONG, I HOPE?" ... 202

"HAVE YOU NOT ONE WORD, EVEN OF FAREWELL, LUCY?" ... 222
LUCY LESTER'S GRAVE ... ... ... ... ... 234

J. M. BARRIE ... ... ... ... ... ... 236

'* HE SAT UP EXCITEDLY IN HIS SEAT, RUBBED HIS HANDS NER-
VOUSLY ON HIS TROUSERS, AND PEERED, NOT AT THE STAGE,

BUT AT THE WlNGS"... ... ... ... ... 238

" I USED TO BE IN THE PROFESSION MYSELF," HE SAID, SIGHING.

"I AM JOLLY LITTLE JIM!" ... ... ... ... 250

"On, PAPA! THE MOST WONDERFUL NEWS," ESIILY SAID ... 281

"JACK" ... ... ... ... ... ... 3io

GENERAL PASSAVANT ... ... ... ... ... 314

" MAUD SEATED HERSELF WITH GREAT DlGNlTY IN THE EASY
CHAIR, FOLDED HER HANDS IN FRONT OF HER, AND STARED

AT ME FIXEDLY" ... ... ... ... ... 328

"'THESE ARE CLEVER/ I SAID, LOOKING AT HIS SKETCHES"... 338



THE ROMANCE OF MADAME
DE CHANTELOUP.



BY W. E. NORBIS.



I.

WELL, after all, I don't
know that there was any-
thing so very romantic
about the poor woman's
story ; not much more, at
least, than there is in a
score of other stories
which have come to the
knowledge of an old
fellow who has lived, and still to some extent
lives, in the world, who has kept his eyes and




'THE ROMANCE OF



ears open, who is a bachelor, and who, for
some reason or other, has been honoured by
the confidence of numerous fortunate and
unfortunate persons. When I come to think
of it, I am constrained to admit, somewhat
unwillingly, that the ensuing narrative is
redeemed from being absolutely commonplace
chiefly, if not solely, by the circumstance that
Madame de Chanteloup's name so long as it
is remembered at all will be remembered in
connection with that of a reigning monarch.
It was not on that account that I personally
felt interested in her. In the course of a
wandering existence it has been my lot to
be brought into contact with many Eoyalties,
and it is a long time since their presence ceased
to inspire me with that thrill of awe and admi-
ration which they are able to convey to the
great majority of such among their fellow- beings
as do not hate them on principle. In the city
which for upwards of twenty years has been



MADAME DE CHANTELOUP.



my home it is customary to affirm that Les rois
s'en vont. I do not know whether this is true
or not ; but if it be the case that the form of
government which they represent is in a fair
way towards being discarded by civilized nations,
I really do believe that they will owe their
downfall not so much to any sins of their own,
or of those who act under them, as to their
striking lack of individuality.

Now, that is a defect which nobody could
think of imputing to Madame de Chanteloup.
Other shortcomings were, truly or falsely, laid
to her charge; but after the affair of early
youth which brought her into notoriety, and to
which I shall have occasion to refer more par-
ticularly by-and-by, all who enjoyed the privi-
lege of her acquaintance were compelled to
admit that she was not la premiere venue. Her
hastily-arranged marriage with that broken-
down scamp the Comte de Chanteloup did not
prove a happy one considering what the cir-



THE ROMANCE OF



cumstances and what his character and habits
were, it could not possibly have turned out other-
wise than as it did but she managed to make
herself respected, she managed to rise above reach
of the faintest breath of scandal (even Chante-
loup himself, when in a melting mood after
dinner, used to describe her, with tears in his
eyes, as an angel in the disguise of a beautiful
woman), and she accomplished a still more
difficult feat than that, inasmuch as she con-
trived to render her modest abode in the Fau-
bourg Saint-Germain one of the most exclusive
of Parisian houses. When her husband rid
society of a singularly useless and disreputable
member by breaking his neck over a fence at
Yincennes, she preferred residing all by herself
in the land of her adoption to returning to her
friends and relatives in England. Perhaps she
had not a large number of friends or relatives
left; perhaps, if she had, they did not solicit
her company as warmly as they might have



MADAME DE CHANTELOUP.



done. Upon those points I cannot speak with
certainty ; but, having been honoured by ad-
mission into the small circle of her Parisian
intimates, I can say that we should have been
inconsolable had she thought fit to leave us.

After a decent period of mourning, she began
to entertain in a quiet way. Her dinners,
though unpretending, were irreproachably
served ; the guests who gathered round her
table were almost always notable from one
cause or another, and it was seldom that there
was not amongst them at least one who wore
a scarlet, a violet, or a black cassock. She was
excessively and rigidly pious more so, perhaps,
in her actions than in her words ; although it
was very well understood that the free style of
conversation which has become so fashionable
in the last years of this century must not be
indulged in under her roof. To tell the truth,
I think we were all a little bit afraid of her. It
sounds rather absurd, no doubt, for a man of



THE ROMANCE OF



my years to talk about being afraid of a woman
who might very well have been his grand-
daughter ; but many people must have good
reason to be aware that we do not, as a rule,
grow braver as we grow older, and Madame de
Chanteloup, with her tall figure, her clearly-cut
features, her blue eyes, and a certain air of
austerity which she knew very well how to
assume, really was not a person with whom it
would have been safe to take a liberty of any
sort or kind. The mere fact of her youth had
nothing to say to the matter.

Other juveniles, however, are considerably
less formidable, and I certainly felt that my
grey hairs gave me a right to say anything
that I might deem fitting to young Eyre Pome-
roy when he looked me up, one morning, at my
modest quarters in the Hue Tronchet just as I
was finishing my mid-day breakfast.

" Look here, Mr. Wortley," began this young
gentleman, whose well-proportioned frame,



MADAME DE CHANTELOUP.



closely-cut black hair and grey eyes would have
entitled him to be called handsome even if he
had not possessed in other respects the tradi-
tional beauty of his race, " I want you to tell
me something. I want you to tell me what you
know of the Comtesse de Chanteloup's history."

" Oh, is that all ? " said I, handing him a
cigarette. " Well, I know a good many things
about a good many ladies which I don't quite
see my way to imparting to an over-grown
school-boy like you. Why should I gratify your
curiosity with regard to bygone episodes, which
Madame de Chariteloup probably would not wish
me to allude to, in the presence of those who
happen to be ignorant of them ? "

" Only because I am going to marry her, I
hope, and because she referred me to you,"
answered my young friend composedly.

" The deuce you are ! and the deuce she
did ! " I exclaimed ; for I was not a little taken
aback by an announcement, which was scarcely



THE ROMANCE OF



less astonishing to me than it would have been
to hear that Mr, Pomeroy was about to espouse
the Empress Dowager of China. " Mercy upon
us ! What can have persuaded either you or
her to behave in such an unnatural way ? I
thought you were barely acquainted with her."

He explained that he was better acquainted
with her than I imagined, that he had fallen in
love with her at first sight (which, if surprising,
was at all events not inconceivable), that he had
seen her pretty constantly during the few weeks
which he had spent in Paris, that he had ended
by making her an offer of his hand and heart,
and that she had not refused him.

" She did," he added, by way of an after-
thought, " make it a sine qua non that I should
join the Church of Rome feeling so strongly
as she does upon those subjects, one can't wonder
at her having insisted upon that but I told
her I had no objection."

"Oh, indeed !" said I. "That, I suppose,



MADAME DE CHANTELOUP.



was a concession too trifling to be worth dis-
puting about. And you live in Donegal, and
your father is a prominent Orangeman. After-
wards ? "

" Oh, well, if you come to that/' returned
Mr. Pomeroy, " we're a branch of the Catholic
Church at least, I've always understood that
we claimed to be and, as she says, the whole
question narrows itself to one of acknowledging
the supreme authority of the Pope "

" Your father," I interrupted, " " doubtless
joins once a year, with religious fervour, in
the Orange battle-cry of * To Hell with the
Pope!'"

" I don't believe he does anything so dis-
graceful and uncharitable ; and I dare say the
Pope is all right why shouldn't he be ? Well,
then, afterwards ? Afterwards she told me
that there were events connected with her past
life which might make it impossible for her to

marry me, and that I had better go and ask you
2



io THE ROMANCE OF

what they were. She said you were the sort
of old chap who knew all about other people's
business."

Of course I was perfectly well aware that
Madame de Chanteloup was incapable of having
described me in such false and vulgar terms;
still it did seem probable that she had wished
to cast upon me a task which she had found too
painful to undertake on her own account, and
the question was whether I was in any way
bound to oblige her. Was I to rake up the
cinders of a burnt-out scandal for the benefit
of this ridiculous youth, who had brought an
introduction to me from his father a few weeks
before, and who would most undoubtedly be
forbidden by his family to contract any such
alliance as that upon which he had set his
callow affections ? Was I to relate how in
years gone by there had been what shall I
call it? a rather pronounced flirtation between
Madame de Chanteloup, then a mere slip of



MADAME DE CHANTELOUP. II

a girl, and the heir-apparent to a certain
throne ; how there had been a tremendous row
about it ; how that unconscionable old mother
of hers, Mrs. Wilbraham, had threatened to
make revelations which could not possibly be
permitted ; and how, finally, the Comte de
Chanteloup had been induced to marry her
by the payment of his debts and a large sum
of ready money ? All things considered, I
really did not conceive it to be my duty to
do this, and I confined myself to vague refer-
ences to current rumours, which my young
gentleman indignantly scouted.

" What vile lies ! " he cried. " I'm glad you
don't state them as truths ; but if any man ever
dares to say they are true before me well, I'll
promise him a bad quarter of an hour. How
can she have supposed that I should ever waste
a second thought upon the calumnies of reptiles,
who most likely have never seen her in their
lives ? Why, no man with eyes in his head



12 THE ROMANCE OF

could look at her and doubt that she was as
innocent as an infant."

I shrugged my shoulders and held my
tongue. I am old, and even when I was young
T had no taste for unnecessary quarrels. Be-
sides, what is the use of arguing with a man
who is in love ? It was as certain as anything
could be that Pomeroy's father would never
permit him to marry a Papist with a dubious
record ; and, that being so, I naturally paid little
heed to the rhapsodies with which the boy
proceeded to favour me. I had heard that kind
of thing so many, many times before ! What
was really interesting and inexplicable was
Madame de Chanteloup's conduct in the
matter, and I will not deny that I went that
evening to a party at which I thought it likely
that she might be present for the express
purpose of observing her and giving her a
chance to enlighten me.

I can't say whether or not she attended that




'WELL," SAID SHE; "AND OF COURSE YOU TOLD HIM ALL THAT THEHE
\VAS TO BE TOLD."



MADAME DE CHANTELOUP.



party for the express purpose of meeting the
reader's humble servant ; but she behaved very
much as though that had been her motive, for
no sooner had I shaken hands with my hostess
than she sailed straight across the room to-
wards me and beckoned me aside, with a certain
imperious air which was habitual to her. She
was always pale ; but I fancied that she looked
rather whiter than usual that evening ; so I
opened the conversation by saying : " I am
afraid you have one of your neuralgic head-
aches."

" Yes," she answered ; " I am in great pain,
and I have been in great pain all day. That
is one reason why I could not see your friend
Mr. Pomeroy when he called. He was with
you this morning, I presume ? "

I answered that he had been with me, and
looked politely interrogative.

" Well," said she ; " and of course you told
him all that there was to be told."



16 THE ROMANCE OF

" I am not sure that it was in my power to
do that," replied I. " I told him of certain
rumours which, as you are aware, are le secret
de Polichinelle, and I should not have informed
him of them if I had not gathered that you
wished me to do so."

" Of course I wished you to do so. And
what did he say ? "

44 Oh, he simply snapped his fingers at them.
He attached 110 more importance to calumny
than he did to such a trifle as changing his
religion at your hehest."

A faint tinge of colour came into her cheeks
and the slightly severe expression of her face
relaxed for a moment. She resumed it, how-
ever, in order to remark :

" You are a sceptic " (this was quite untrue,
but no matter) ; " you believe a great deal
more in politics than you do in religion, and
I should never be able to persuade you that a
man who adopts the only true faith is not what



MADAME DE CHANTELOUP. 17

you would call a turncoat. Perhaps it may
have been my good fortune to do Mr. Pomeroy
one very real service, although it may be im-
possible forme to grant him all he asks me for."

" Can you really be contemplating such an
unscrupulous trick as that ? " I exclaimed ; " and
can you imagine that it has the remotest chance
of success ? "

She did not deign to answer ; but indeed I
required no answer. Her face told me plainly
enough that she was actually in love with that
impetuous youth, and that she wished, if she
could, to accept him. I fancied also that she
was not less grateful to me than he had been
for merely mentioning as reports what I might
almost have ventured, but for my cautious dis-
position, to affirm as ascertained facts. She
dismissed me presently with a friendly little
motion of her head, and turned to speak to
one of the men who had been hovering near
her during our short colloquy. I don't mind



18 THE ROMANCE OF

acknowledging that T should have been glad
if she had been a little more communicative ;
still I was not altogether sorry that she had
refrained from honouring me by asking my
advice ; for, had she seen fit to do so, I
could not, in common honesty and charity,
have counselled her to do otherwise than
refuse a suitor whom it would have been wiser
to refuse in the first instance. She was one of
the best and one of the most charming women
in the world; but well, the "buts" appeared
to me to be of overwhelming cogency.

Why had she not adopted that easy and
obvious plan? Nobody possessing the most
elementary acquaintance with her sex would
attempt to answer such a question ; but, as
regards this particular case, I have a theory,
which may or may not be correct. I think
Madame de Chanteloup was a curiously con-
scientious woman ; I think she would not,
under any circumstances, have consented to tell







*I WAS STROLLING DOWN THE CHAMPS ELYSEES ONE AFTERNOON, . . . WHEN
A PAIR OF EQPEbTRIANS CANTERED PAST ME, IN WHOM I RFCOGNiZED THE
FAIU COUNTESS AND HER IMPOSSIBLE ADORER."



MADAME DE CHANTELOUP. 21

a lie ; and I suspect that when young Pomeroy
asked her point-blank whether she loved him
or not, she felt unable to reply in the negative.
Being thus situated, she had (or, at least, so I
imagined) imposed a couple of trying tests
upon him, half hoping, half fearing that they
would prove a little too severe for him to face.

Be that as it may, I neither saw nor heard
any more of her or of him for a full week. At
the expiration of that time I was strolling
down the Champs Elysees one afternoon, on
my way back from the Bois de Boulogne,
where I had been breakfasting with a few
friends, when a pair of equestrians cantered
past me, in whom I recognized the fair
Countess and her impossible adorer. I was
sorry to see them together; for, although I
knew that Madame de Chanteloup was in the
habit of riding every day, and that their meet-
ing might have been purely accidental, I could
not but be aware that she would never have



22 THE ROMANCE OF

allowed the young fellow to join her if she
had not contemplated granting him greater
privileges than that ; and really, for her own
sake, it would have been so very much better
to grant him no privileges at all.

That my forebodings were only too well
founded was proved to me long ere I reached
the Place de la Concorde. Young Pomeroy
came galloping back, jumped off his horse, and,
gripping me by the arm, said

" Congratulate me, Mr. Wortley ! I know
you're a true friend of hers, as well as of mine,
and I'm sure you'll be glad to hear that it's all
right."

" Do you mean," I inquired, " that you
have obtained your father's consent to your
marriage ? "

" My father's consent ? good gracious me,
no ! As if I had had any excuse to ask him
for it ! But I have obtained hers, which is a
good deal more to the purpose. She says she's



MADAME DE CHANTELOUP. 23

willing to trust me if I am willing to trust
her; she says that if I will consent to be
received into her Church, and if I will never
allude again to that that infernal blasphemy
(for I really can't call it by any other name)
which you mentioned to me the other
day "

" And which, of course, you are prepared to
treat with the contempt that it deserves," I
interjected.

" My dear sir, am I a born fool ? "

I thought it extremely probable that he was ;
but I was too polite to say so, and he went on

" Is it likely that, knowing her as I do, I
should believe there was even the remotest
possibility of her ever having done anything of
which she ought to be ashamed ? Is it likely
that I should wish to insult her by prying into
bygones which she would rather not talk
about ? Do you suppose I should enjoy re-
lating to her the whole history of my own past



24 THE ROMANCE OF

life ? And what business have I to refuse her
an indulgence which I claim for myself?"

He proceeded to point out, at great length,
and in glowing language, how infinitely higher,
nobler, and purer Madame de Chanteloup must
needs be than himself. I was not concerned to
contradict him ; I do not assert, and never
have asserted, that the world's estimate of what
is pardonable in a man and unpardonable in a
woman is intrinsically just ; only, as we live in
the world, we must take it as we find it ; and
I confess that I was a little disappointed in
Madame de Chanteloup, who, I thought, might
have spared this youthful enthusiast the in-
evitable shock which awaited him.

However, as I said before, nobody who
understands women, however imperfectly, at-
tempts to account for their conduct, and I own
that my heart became softened towards the
woman who is the subject of this sketch when
I met her, the next day, at the entrance of the



MADAME DE CHANTELOUP. 25

church of St. Germain 1'Auxerrois, where, I
suppose, she had been saying her prayers. I
was tolerably well acquainted with her features,
for which, indeed, I had always had a very
sincere and profound admiration ; but at that
moment they wore an expression which was
wholly unfamiliar to me, and which somehow
made her look like what I imagined she must
have looked like as a child. The poor woman
was happy ^ in fact ; Heaven knows that her
life had not hitherto been favoured with any
too large a share of happiness !

I don't remember what I said to her some-
thing congratulatory and commonplace, no
doubt but it did not matter what I said, for
she evidently was not listening to me. Only,
as I was helping her into her brougham, she
grasped my hand with unusual warmth, and
exclaimed, " Ah, Mr. Wortley, the world is not
so bad as we try to make it out. There are
noble and generous hearts even among men."



26 THE ROMANCE OF

I was not aware of having ever maintained
the contrary ; but I was sorely afraid that she
would be driven into doing so before long ; for
Eyre Pomeroy, however noble and generous he
might be, was dependent upon his father, and
it was hardly in the nature of things that his
father's nobility and generosity should display
themselves in the especial form of which she
appeared to be thinking. Still, if my fullest
sympathy and my best wishes could have done
her any good, they would have been as much
at her service as I myself was. Unhappily,
neither I nor my sympathy could obliterate an
episode of which every proof and detail was
easily procurable.

II.

I NEED scarcely say that the news of the
Corntesse de Chanteloup's betrothal to her
young compatriot, and of the latter's impend-



MADAME DE CHANTELOUP. 27

ing admission into the bosom of the Holy
Roman Church, was very soon bruited abroad ;
nor is it necessary for me to add that this
unexpected piece of intelligence set many
tongues in motion. I suppose Porneroy told
everybody ; probably the Countess herself was
too proud to keep silence ; anyhow, all Paris
was placed in possession of the fact, and very
sorry I was that all Paris should thus be
entitled to make observations which, had they
been reported to the persons chiefly concerned,
could hardly have failed to cause them pain.
For my own part, I am not ashamed to ac-
knowledge that I hoped the boy would stand to
his guns, seeing that, if the worst came to the
worst, and his family cast him adrift, his wife's
fortune would suffice to keep him and her out
of want. He was only a boy, after all, arid no
doubt, if I had been his father, I should have
done my utmost to restrain him from rashly
compromising his whole future career ; but I



28 THE ROMANCE OF

was not his father ; I was both powerless and
irresponsible, and I could not for the life of me


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