Tiruvalluvar.

The Kural of Tiruvalluvar : with the commentary of Parimelazagar and a simple and clear padavuray; to which is added an English translation of the text by J. Lazarus online

. (page 1 of 36)
Online LibraryTiruvalluvarThe Kural of Tiruvalluvar : with the commentary of Parimelazagar and a simple and clear padavuray; to which is added an English translation of the text by J. Lazarus → online text (page 1 of 36)
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THE

K U R A L



OP



TIEUYALLUYAR

WITH THE COMMENTARY OF

PARIMELAZAGAR



A SIMPLE AND CLEAR PADAVURAY.



TO WHICH IS ADDED

AN ENGLISH TRANSLATION OF THE TEXT

BY

The Rev. J. LAZARUS, b.a.,

Author of a Tamil Orammar, an English Translation of the Nannul, 8fc.




Padt^^:



PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY

W. PUSHPAEATHA CHETTIAR,
K. R. Press:

289, Thumboo Chetty Street.

1885.

(Copy-Right.)



s-if-



oG?H^






uiPGiceotfcSffGa'ULj^

— saoomaoooQon-.-

^ m uS) ^

''Lp(f^Q<3S<3'(ip^66lujinr<suir<sm /r^



eu ^ C? (2? ®



G^eiPCufT[g6trQ?6YT^si!i u^ei|€S>rra|ub

^IfilSGeOlU GlDfTL^GuiUTUL]^ GiSFT^^



188 5.



Gopy-Right.



or trivial it may be, seems to escape the fertility of his pen.
It is a sort of multum in parvo encyclopoedia of ethical
rules and discourses, couched in the most concise, elegant
and pregnant language.

The Work derives its name from the Kural metre in
which it is composed and consists of two lines, the first
being a tetrameter and the second trimeter. This metre is
a species of the well-known Venba — one of the two metres
in which most of the Tamil classics are composed, the other
being the Viruttam. Instead of making the first foot of the
first verse rhyme with that of the second (verse), which is
the usual rule, the poet often makes it rhyme with the last
foot of the first verse — an improvement which adds a new
beauty to the distich.

In conclusion, the Publisher begs to apologise for the
somewhat tarnished colour of the paper in about half the
book. This is owing to the long time the Work has taken
to get through the Press, He, however, hopes to olfer a
far more satisfactory get-up in a second Edition of the
Work.

W. P.




noLxnnnnrDi 1 1 lxxjlxjlhzei:
jrr i LI irijrj ixxjllj jlj u jim,

^ (2^ s>j sirr 25 6u^ Tuj (6W) fT .



LIFE OF TIEUVALLUVAE.



TiEUVALLUVAR deservedly ranks foremost among the
poets and moralists of India, for he has had no superior or
equal in either character. He appears to have lived during
the life time of Oogravazhothi Pandian at Madura in whose
reign the last Madura College (6BS!DL-<9^<5FM<5i*D) existed. All
accounts concur in representing him as the offspring of a
Brahman and a Pariah brought up woman. He is said to
have been brought up by a Vellalan at Mailapur, near
Madras, the Vellalan' s wife having found the babe exposed
in an Ilu]jpei grove in her neighbourhood. We are told
that while yet a youth, he had acquired so great a reputa-
tion for learning and sanctity that Margasagayan, a wealthy
farmer who lived at Kaveripakam, in remuneration for ser-
vices rendered to him, did not disdain to bestow on him the
hand of his only daughter named Vasuki ; and besides, the
highest personages in the place felt a pride in the enjoyment
of his friendship. He, however, appears to have pursued a
quiet and unobtrusive sort of life, working at the loom for
subsistence until he was prevailed upon by his friends to take
up the gauntlet against the professors of the Madura Col-
lege, who had arrogantly defied all other meii of learning
in the country and claimed all literary honors for them-
selves. In order to humble the pride of the professors, he
wrote an ethical poem, under the title of Kural ((^/oerr),
and repairing to the College asked them to review it as
judges of poetical composition. The professors at first
scorned the idea of a strange poet offering himself as their
competitor but afterwards when he drew them into a con-
test and completely vanquished them, they proposed that
should the Sankappalakai, their divine seat on the tank of
Pottamarei (Quir^(rr^u^<si)fr)^ give a place for his Kural, they
would gladly accept the work. This being agreed upon the
book was placed on it. The divine seat is said to have
contracted itself to the size of the book, and threw the pro-
fessors into the water. Upon this they not only approved
his work and gave him the desired seat, but also conferred
on him several honorary titles, such as, Deivappulavar {Q^
uJ6ULJqe\)Qj/f) the divine poet, Mudarpavalar (Qp^pufrenedir^
the first of poets, Perunavalar {Qu(f^fBrr6xi6\)ir) the great
poet, etc. Nothing further is known of Tieuvalluvak



4

which can be relied upon, excepting that some time after
his return to Mailapur, he was visited with a severe do-
mestic calamity by the death of his wife to whom he was
tenderly attached and it so deeply affected his mind that
secluding himself from society, he devoted the remainder
of his life to religious contemplation. It is said that on
the decease of his wife, he ejaculated extempore the fol-
lowing verse :

^u^^pQleSijufrQ&r uudrLjemt—ujiTQefr

iSl6sr^^iEjQ(Lp6aTQsaT^^ih QuSSi^QuuQun ^Qvurr
5 esSjin .



When I have lost a ivoman who excelled in the knowledge of house-
wifery, who is beloved, ivho never transgressed my tvord, loho chafed my
limbs and never slumbering iiniil I slept, arose before I awoke ; Alas ! Alas !
How can my eyes again know sleep.

The time of his death is uncertain ; but when he died
his body was according to his express desire exposed in
the open air outside the town to be devoured by crows.

It is difficult to judge from the tenor of his Kttral to
what sect he belonged, for he has entirely avoided in the
work every thing that savours of sectarianism in order to
harmonize the suffrages of all the sects.

Independent of the Kueal, we have no other composi-
tion of TiEUVALLUVAR. The physiological work, entitled
Gnanavettiyan ((©j/rearOeuLLz^uj/reaT), which is commonly as-
cribed to him, appears to have been written by some per-
son long after his time ; for the author, though he assumes
the title of Tiruvalluvar and speaks in his character in the
body of the work, yet betrays his disguise in one of the in-
troductory stanzas, thus :

SlsLoSl(LaLDU:)i^(SS>t£u QuessresisTQrjio^^Qso
uj6u65ff^[email protected]"6arG)suLli^uj06yr uurr^ih
/Ssi^^(iT)eu6ri(^eiJ6ariU(^Qf)es>ir^^Qeu^
''LDn'fSeoeijQun'LBirsSlanLjurrQLD'



Invoking the spotless one whom the holy Valluva has revealed in his
incomparable Veda as clear as the light of the sun and moon, and by the
grace of the damsel Ambigai {Parvati), who delights the heart, I shall com-
pose the Gnana Vettiyan.



CONTENTS.



Chapter.



I. ^p^^uujev. — On Virtue.

CONTENTS.



Page-





UTuSiii.


Introduction.




1


ai—€iJGfTeiJ(Tihs^ •••


Praise of God


2


2


enrrskw/Dui-i


The Excellence of Rain


6


3


f§^^friTOu(i^es^t£) ...


The Greatness of Ascetics


10


4


^rossreueSl ilj^u^^&o


The Power of Virtue


15




^^evjpasffuj^.


On domestic Virtue.




5


@isbsy/rt£)<seiJ)s


The Domestic State


20


6


The Virtue of Wife


25


7


L^^&)eiie!5)iTuQu^3i&>


Obtaining Children


29


8


cgy scTL/ew L. em LD


Love


33


9


(sS(rF,!BQ^iril)ueO . . •


Hospitality


37


10


^esi?UJ655SL/<Si-/!360 ■ • •


Sweetness of Speech


42


11


Qa^iu/siBioW/Sluu/SI^&y


Gratitude


46


12


fs®(Si]fS8s\}eir.LD


Equity


50


13


^U..SiB(LpQDL-eSilJD ...


Self-control


54


14


e^(i£,sa(tpeinL-es)LD ...


Observance of the Proprieties








of Life


59


15


l3pS^'(S0(SsSiLpUJ!T€S>U^


Against Desiring the Wife of








Another


63


16


Qufres)fioa^es)i—es>LD ...


Patience


&1


17


S>f(tpasT(rr^es)LD


Against Envy ...


71


18


QeUoo^TSSiLD


Against Covetousness


75


19


l-\p!El3h-(ffeS)LD


Against Backbiting


79


20


Lj lu esfl SO Off /r SO SO /r en LD


Against Profitless Conversation


84


21


^(^dsSTina^SFLD


Fear of Sin


88


22


e^uLjireurSl^so


Benevolence


92


23


Ff(SSi£S


Alms-deeds


96


24


4*iP


Praise


101




^rDQjpgis^tU^.


On Ascetic Virtue.




25


<jy(5(er5«!S)L_a5)UD


Kindness


105


26


L/SOn-OTTLO^^^®) ...


Abstaining from Flesh


110


27


^gSUO) ... ...


Austerities


115


28


sh-i—rrQeuiTQ^aaih ...


Inconsistent Conduct


119


29


&<srTSfriTes)LD


Against Fraud


124


30


euatisesiLD ,,


Truthfulness


129



Chapter.



CONTENTS.



II. Quiq^lLuisv. — On Peopeety.



Page.



31


[email protected]>LD


Against Anger...


.. 134


32


^6ur(Ga)Q3=iLiujrr6S>LD,..


Against Inflicting Suffering


.. 138


33


Qi£rT&)sOfres)LD


Against Destroying Life


.. 143




sjTsurii).


Wisdom.




34


lSSsOLU(T6S)LD


Instability


.. 148


35


sip^


Renunciation ...


.. 153


36


QiDsjuu^esunr^eo


True Knowledge


.. 158


37


^wireu^^^&i


The Destruction of Desire


.. 164


38


a^ip


Fate


.. 170



39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46

47
48
49

50
51
52

53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63



64
65
66
67
68
69
70



B\a§\U(B<>.



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Qesn-^EiQsn-ijiTssiLD . . ,

OfflJ a/ /5^ (o)<9= UJ [U n £5) LD
S £327 (c @) '_i_ ii

gp^(2/'i_&i) ...
£6Tra<a(i^S5)i_a5)LD • . .

LDL^uSlssT6S)LD



djiEisaiiueu.






LDmswesiiTff'QeFrre Q^irQ^aec



On the Duties of the King.
Kingly Excellence ... ... 175

Learning ... ... ... 180

The Neglect of Learning ... 185
Hearing (Instruction) .. ... 189

Wisdom 194

The Correction of Faults ...198
Procuring the Aid of Great Men 203
Against Associating with the

mean ... ... ... ... 208

Acting with Forethought ... 213
The Knowledge of Resources... 218
The Discernment of (a suita-

ble) Time 223

The Choice of (a suitable) Place 228
Reflection before Decision ... 233
Deliberation in the Employ-
ment (of Agents) 238

Kindness to Relatives... ... 242

Against Forgetfulness... ... 247

Upright Government ... ... 251

Unjust Government ... ... 256

Against Acting with Cruelty... 260
A Gracious Demeanour ... 265

The Employment of Spies ... 270

Energy 274

Against Idleness ... ... 279

Manly Effort 283

Perseverance in spite of DiflS-

culties 288

On the Constituents of Royalty.

The Minister 292

The Power of Speech 297

Purity of Action 302

Firmness of Action ... ... 306

Method of Action 311

The Ambassador 316

Service under the Sovereign ... 321



Chapter. CONTENTS.


Page.


71


(^/Sluu/S^Qd


Knowing the Sovereign's Mine


325


72


^6S)alJUU/£l^&0


Knowing the Court


330


73


^6I»idi;UJ(55<?/7"65)LD ...


Fearlessness before the Court


335


74


/E/r(3


The Country


339


75


cSyiresV ^ ...


The Fort


344


76


Lj /r0OT G)a=uj eoa/csJffi


The Way to Accumulate Wealtl


I 340


77


uemi—LoinLQ


The Excellence of the Army ..


353


78


uss)L^eFQa'((F^&(^ ...


Excessive Valour of the Army


358


79


's^W


Friendship


362


80


fBilufrjrrrtu^cM


Discerning Friendship


367


81


UlpeS)LD


Long standing Friendship


372


82


^^^4. •••


Evil Friendship


376


83


&n.l^lTlDl—Lj


False Friendship


381


84


Ques)^ss)LD


Ignorance


385


85


l-\£-Oi>i'lBwtT<oSS!eS)LB ...


The Fool's Self-Couceit


390


86


©aeb


Enmity


394


87


u0Da,LDfri—.&


The Greatness of Enmity


399


88


Lj<3S)iB^^fi)mQ^^^m


Ascertaining the Nature of








Enmity


403


89


SL-iLuGS^a, ...


Internal Enmity


408


90


Quiflujnes)rruL9es>Lpujfres)LD ...


Against Disregard for the Great 412


91


QueoweuL^a^Qs^no so...


Listening to the Wife ...


417


92


wsmadlmLDaefiliT ...


Prostitutes


421


93


<s6rr^(SS3r^e!»LD ...


Against Drunkenness ...


426


94


@^ ...


Gambling


431


i. 95


LDQFj/B^


Medicine


435




ejjIiS'ujfeV.


Appendix.




96


(g^-emuD


High Birth


441


97


LD/rearti


Honour ...


445


98


(o)lJ0<S35LO ... ...


Greatness


450


99


<9= /r6S7(27 653rC3) LD


Perfection of Good Qualities ...


454


100


u6mii-j€syi—es}LD


Proper Behaviour to all


459


101


[sm^SioQs's^euLD ...


Unprofitable Wealth


464


102


lb!T^li<3S)L—iSS)LD


True Modesty ...


468


103


(QL^Qa^tjuecsues)^ ...


Method of Raising One's Family


473


104


^iP®/


Agriculture


477


105


is&[email protected](sij ...


Poverty


482


106


^^^ •'■


Begging


486


107


^jreus^a^th


Fear of Begging


491


108


aUJiSS)LD ... ... ... 1


Baseness


495



III. AJLL^^ujGv. — On Love.






/ESDLOL



UL{eS)fT^a(SO



111 Union.

Pain at the sight of beauty ... 501
Ascertaining each other's In-
tentions ... 506

Rejoicing over Sexuality ... 511

Praise of Pleasure ... ... 516

Expression of Excessive Love ... 52 1



Chapter.



CONTENTS.



Page.



114
115

116
117
118

119
120
121

122
123

124
125
126
127
128

129
130
131
132
133



l3ff\tEU!Tp(Tr^(3S>LD






a_ JJ/LJL^/5 SU6OT






Lj&)



Expressing their Loss of Mo-



Talk about Ramour



526
... 530



In Separation.
Inability to Endure Separation 535
Languishing in Sorrow ... 541

The Eyes Suffering from

Eagerness ... ... ... 546

Suffering from Sallowness ... 550
Excess of the Sorrow of Solitude 555
Weeping at the thought of

Her Husband 559

Relating Her Dreams ... ... 564

Weeping at the Approach of

Night 568

The Members Lose their Beauty 573
Speaking to Herself ... ... 578

Loss of Feminine Modesty ... 583
Hankering after each other . . . 588
Making out one another's

Feelings 593

Longing for Intercourse ... 598

Being Displeased with oneself .. 603

Feigned Dislike 607

Dislike Caused by Trifles ... 612
The Delights of Dislike ... 618



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ui—SB ^h-pli^Ufresr (Bij(3smrrs.

(uifGiD6v)iS!a(56!nT.) sreisru^', — ^SirLD/[email protected] (Lp ^osoiq on l-oj gtq^^^s
QciT^eomh- ^^Qufreo, ^^u&ev^QixJ (Lp^^iLj<s^>i—ff;^eO(^, ereirptsufT^.
@l^ s^cDLDup/Slevfd^ <oT(B^^ssrrLL(Beu<3^LD. ^fiir^^p(^^ ^dso
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us6up(3=,s^ sSs\)ss)LD Qs^iupssiS uqensT freurresresT/B ^lup^^s LL^sssriTeufreir
(Lppj^ apes^sriT^Gyrr^Ei Qsfrerrs. ^SQipQ^^^aQsLuesr^ evi—QsuQ^^

QutJuQirmL®u uesTrui^Q^rrca^s <suL^^6k(Lpi^i^. ^(SCiQs^p ^em^uSl/r
ssmQiO e^curp^. srTotruuL-i— eijGOsrp srr(S!!Fruui—rr^ sl-O/lI (gczfbr
QS)iD ^jk-pQeiie!isr(B^<sSloi!r, ^^useuek (ip^pQp otstt (a/soSdrGLoeb (smen^
^k ■3h./BfS)iTi ,^^/SliicS)QrreniiLb s^eoQpf^ Qp^ eorr^uasy Qssreku^i SQFj^^rr
ffiffi Qarrerrs. (^''SrrjTfB Q^pp^^'sis\'s,msr isuii^^. ^uumLu.rr'sk (Lp^p
SL—iBJsrr ^<Fmcs)i-D <rfh-puui—i—^.

1. As all letters have the letter A for their first, so the world has
the eternal God for its first.

e_. 3,pp^^ eofriu uiuQssrcsrQ-mjTso e^neofBeis
esipiTf? Qi^fTLprr^ Qireisvsir.

(uif-sniT.) iST-^, — OTsooO/r .^/reiia^onu^iEi appeufrs &s,s,(k(^ uj/SleL'fr
^'uujjssr lun"^} QiDuuii^omfrsSldsw lues^i—ujsuesT^ /B<soeo ^rr&rsSofT^Q^niniT
jffTuSleisrj er-^.

gTsuQ<?5reBT^Lii (sS^uQuajri' Grc!!TQ6sr6W(2^iJj PFessr L^esrcnLD (^pl^^
fBshrp^, Qafreo Ocosotlj ^as)3=r9Sso. iSlpsSuiSle^a'-i^ LO0/E^rr<56S6Jr wpqr^
Qmmqr^iT, ^sld ^/SlG^pr^u uiuesr ^srewqr^cjsn ^ Q^irn^^^ iSlpeSl lu^^^



2. What prollt have those derived from Icarniug, who worship
not the good feet of Him who is possessed of pure kuowledge?



Qs^P'/bQensSj u5)^/5^a/r60^^« (^/SluQurr(B ®<str^^s^, GSss^/TfB^ Qufrqr^&r
GTGWuQ^fTiT Quiuirup/Slu i3/f)^ ffiL-syi— Qsp^QLiir^fT) (LperriT. Qs^ir^ik-



,-U-SSiir.) LD(oOlTL£Je^S^ - {^^SSJUir^ QrB(^3^LDIT^lu) ^fTLD

eviJLosviflso, CT©@)o3T - Qff-mp &L-Si\en ^^ mwem^i^ - QuQ^anixi
OufTQ^iB^uj urr^iEisSsfTj Q^'irrs^iTir - [^spii^e&i—fr^) S/b^^^guit^
fSe\)L£!ssi3^ - ((STsba)/r 2_sy<£ra<«(sr5<6B(^) Qijb<o\)iTQiU (Lp^^itj^^^^isv^

!§(BlCUlTLpSU,Tir - ^L^<sSl(S0 6\)tTUJ6V 61J fT l^jCU IT IT .

3. They who are united to the glorious feet of Him who occupies
swiftly the flower of the mind, shall flourish in the highest of worlds
(heaven).

^. QsijemQ^soCocuesaT u.frGS)LD u9ic\)fr(oSTL^ Qa^iii^irir^
SliuiTGsmQi iBQinesiu u9io\).

(uif-eoiT.) (oT-^y — epQT) Q u IT (^doir LL^LD ^enip^^ih Qsu^u^^^ld ^s\)

exjiTSfTy er-jru.

LSipeSl^^muisjs €TriT6ij£vrj — ^eurdswuup/B eu(rF^QjeaT<2i^LDj iSlpojuSlir
s2srTLj up^cu(ir)SUGCT<ai^LD^ Q^iuiai.'^c!^^uup/£leij(r^Gu6sr(SijLJD eiesT QyQQjesiSuj fTeir
cu(iT)ii^6VTuiki&&r. ^ up^Q g= IT IB ^ IT if s adjeSirem^ih ^^ircsiLLiSleiTj ^C3)a/
a rr TT GSST LD IT s &j(Tr^Qpeuas)a^ ^asTuihjS(erhLD g)coa//ni9OTr.



4. To those -wlio meditate the feet of Him who is void of desii-e
or aversion, evil shall never come.

g!/ii ^jressr® eSSasrujih s^errevrrafr. ^sap&jesr^ QLDLumasiLDQs'ifiB^ L^sstnip

^CI^iSU (Lppp(BjLD S-OSJL—UJ ^SOT^ffljeCT L/sCtp Q U [T (ITj&T Q J= IT L-j & Q Lp SOT U U lL

i—^. i-jifl^eo - ioTuQurr(Lp^(^ Q,frrGO^^Si),

(^Q^ - u - emir.) — ^empm&sT - «L.(Si/srr^, QuiriT^eaQ'f it-
GLCiuJmsaiLD Qa^irih^, u^ip-Qir^^s^uj^ uftiE^TfrLtiinLQ-eQQFjLbiSls^

sue!^L-rr<s;rsurrLD.

5. The two-fold deeds that spring from darkness shall not adhere
to those who delight in the true praise of God.

Q ihfBiQ(sa(vrj>!r liQls^jirij^ wfrir.

(uif-coiT.) gt-^j-'—Qlduu eumju diem ^sr^s^ Qa^eSl Qiuost^ld Qufv^
a>2snioiJi-^iurrs (SyG5>L_iL/ ^fs ^sumdlSswitjih ^^^^frajT^ QLcajuurresT Qenrrna
ssQiB/BuSleksem euQ^suir^fSevrQ/'iT iSlpuiSlek/B Quuisireo^^Lo e^qhsesr
csJLDiLJjTiruj euiTLQGijfrrr. er-^.

ueoeksar ^iB^fTSGOrrm ^Gu/b^etsrail. Qs^s^Qekp ^eurre^jiD ^/s^rr

^P^mU Q<S=LUlLjL-QLQCS)LDS£B(5mr (SUIE<S^ ' ' S iSf CS^ JT ^ UITlL®" STsku^

Qurrso. ^cineijisrr6k(^ u/nLt—ir^LD ^icmpeiiosjn- fSSsur^^&HLh evfrLp^^^ih
^euQ&sT/Sl Spp^i^Q.fiij^Tir (^(BQu^eijQn-m-u^ sh^puuL-i—^.

(Qs — u - es>ir,\ — Q u fr /iS 6u fT u9 sd - ^iaQ u rr /SI ^dsir euL^di

^(SUOTT^, QuiriU^IT - QLDlLJLOS^LDlJjrrQUj €^(L^£S.SsQfE^ - ^(l£&a,

eiJL^u9e0j /§)d7-(7)^/r - (suiipeurrjsj) iQevrpsjir^ liQ enrripeumr - ^l^
e£l(S\)c^rru:>eo oirripeuirir*

6. Those shall long prosper who abide In the faultless way of Him
wlio has destroyed the five desires of the senses.



LDSST^ds toll Sod imrpp svffl^.

^ rr2s<i 3=Q g^ IT lb ^ rr rr & scoc\)^) LDew^^eisT&esur iS&n^it ^eisruihj&'Ssn 'Ftfrt?;^
^mri^irsir^, er-£ji.

'^s^ppuireo ^ sisr L- rr gSI® ^ eo^^" STssTfvr^pQuiTGO pfcsst l^^tf^cold @)cjr
esiLoQiDeo i§6srp^. ^ireaQs^jTir^rrif iSlpeSlsQes^evrruu &itld Qcu(if)Cifl ldujs
araiadsfT ixtrrppLDiril-L-^iTcs-^LDuSlcur^iSlpfb ^<aiJ/b(yi/'<ok cu^^ih^ekuihjsitsfhca s^cldib
^Qj Qir^u^iTiJoi.

^,Q(^^ld) e^uiQedeoiT^ SL-eijisrrjsjj ^iren - ^i^^SsiT^ QiFWih
flirrr<3S(^ - ^ os) i— <s£l i— w ^ Qih^^i^^n.i(^^ ^«ve\),TG\;-^sua)/rLD0jj
LDSSTLLi 4E(a/S3^3-G)/5(^0(?6\j (o ^ iT&ir ^Q^sirp ^muiEizd^, LDirppso-

7. Auxiety of mind cannot be remoyed, except from those -who,
are united to the feet of Him who is incomparable.

^' .r^P'^'^i^ uj/B^ejOTcsT Qrf> ^ Q <F IT IB ^ rr IT d <3b 6\: (so rr p
i9p6UiriS iiiB^ eoifl^.

(liiP - eoiT.) 6T-^, — s^pssL^coirQiu ^is^sasresr^i ^ircrrirQuj LjSossr
esi'us^Qa^iris^irits&tsooi^ Sj^^p iSipeuirQuLisu.m&'Bsn iih^eo ^ifl^^ ct-^.

^piD Qu!T(i^crr ^muLD STscr s^L-QesrsswessruuLLi— Qpskp^fh Sfpp
cs)S (Lpeurewifu Sifl^^es>LDiurrm, (sr^u Q u it Qf^im^LD ^ehru(LpLD Sip gtsutu
ulLi—.&st. uso Qey^euGSiSuuL-t— ^pi5i£sQen'is060ireypiss)piLjiB ^6ms(^ evLp.
(SUP'S Z-izsyL—Ujeu (S3)ffieSaJr ^psuirL^LUis^essr QasT€ar(rrj rr . ^peurrL^ Qiudsr-u

(LpetTif, ^uLjosm-6S)iu3= Qa^n'T^irfr semrrsfri^^ ^enp^iQerr ^(L£,i^,QjiT

(Q^-U-6TO/r.) ^pio <^^ ^IB^eS^&Sr ~ ^(7BLCi6S^U.6V!TQ.tLI

au-Giisn^^ ^(rerr - ^i^iuirQiu (^Louaseo^s^^), Q 3" i'tib ^ it ir i (s^

8. None can swim the sea of vice, but those who are united to the
feet of that gracious Being who ia a sea of virtue.

3ii. Qsi<^<so Qu!r/i5lu9p (^6smiSa''Qcv Quj6m(^cm^^fT€iT

(irfSea eys^sariEisir^ ^Ssx).
(uif-6!nT.) CT-^^ — SS3LDS Qepp Ljeoeks^s OsirerransuSli^oiT^
OuiT/SlsmQuircou uojcsru®^ jyyemi—ujewffoso, eTeisrQje7i>auuL-u. @63w/a/
&dsiT iucs>L-Ujrresr^ ^irSsrr €ii essr ej s it ^ ^mOsstTj ot-^.

^lup^s iUbiSJ^rifeSswiSi^iS^. app^QpsvvrtfS'S^} ^!ue)uiT<sQi2J u ir 3= liu 3.£m_



^



<5&- a_-i/). -iy^. eiinesTrnpuL-j.

LDtre^eu Qp^GOTS a^sBL-UjeOT OTscrffiyLD^ a:siD£_u5G0/r ^/Slssxaii Qp^&)fr& eycs)i_
lucar eresTG^LO) S-CS^fTuufrQ^Qpsmr. <s/r^ro)^ (Sessr^xp^eSujesrCu/reo evessriEiSfr^

eu!T^SSn'-s IB fT ti 1, (SfhLD jtjSusuiiQp uuje^iso QsL'ssru^^s^tEjOsirerrs:. ^ansu
QpeijT^urrL-i—fr^ih ^eudsn SSosr^^^uoi Guirip^^^f^ QsFuuiufrsL'Lpu u(Biej

Q,3srT6rr(6r^GS)^S^6Vfr^, Qufr^Seir ~ Quit [Ss'SnQ utreo^ gtssst
(^6s:sT;S^frsir-iorsmsiJssi.suuLLL^ (^esJST.ii^Ssfr u^smt^ujeusaT^, ^irSetr-

UiumuQ^ e&6V6orr^e9T(o6uuj!rui.

9, The head that worships not the feet of Him who is possessed
of eight attributes, is as useless as a sense without the power of sensation.

<50. L^psQu Q U (7^ lEJ -X L— <o^ IB^Guir iB/h^lT

(uiF-cm.T.) ST-^j — ^es)pGu esn^Q'um^LD i^ds^GTiuja^ Qs^irib^n'n'
iSpsSiurrSuj Quifiuj <5i_S:Aj i-h.i^surr j ^^osws^ Qs^fffr^rrir .'iii^LDml.u.rT

siTirecsT srrifliu^ Q^rTL—ir3^Q<jjfnu& aes^rruSSsT^ eyQT^^eSiehT i3p<^u
Qu(ff)iEiSL- Q&ieirQT/'ir. Qg^irih^rrQfTmu^ Qg^rreaQ&iJ'a^ih. &.eoQiuGOe!nu
iBSsoTLUir^ ^Gtapcu sari^emiuQuj SSLsruuirrs^u i3p(£laj£)!iSS^LD) ^ta;
eurrpesT/Sl mrr/SlSSszTuuinrs «o'b ^(jT/'csiLDiLjua ^@iu ^irsm(Bi±i ^^<^<^ 'Siu

(^Q^-u-esar.) — ^enpeusk - ^^sueisr^ , ^(^ - ufr^irtfrSiu
{^u^n'is6\3^es)fl^ Q^a^ifiB^suiir)^ i9p<s3u Qu(rF)iEis.L—eo-Sp6Qiu^Qiu
OuiBiu ^L^ds\), i§rB^6uir - &u.Lju!T!r ; Q<firfr^irir - [^^dsjr.3^)

Q 3" if !T ^ •oU IT ^ filB^rriT - ^C—d'SLOirLLL-.iriT,

10. None can swim the great sea of births, but those who are
united to the feet of God.

j)/puiQurr(i^ cfiesruEj^^iJa iBt~^^p Qs^qjitQuj LDGS^L^LSlmr^ &puL^&
eh-^^&i. ^^srr^-QpcmpesiLDiLjLD ^^^Qesr eSerrisi^^Lh.

QTf'snTLElip^ Qu^ssr^bT^irp uirp^,
(uiF-SinT.) loT-^, — LDcs)Lp u9s3)L_uj(27^ i^Spu 2.s05ii SSsoQup^)/



(BuSliTa'ScrT. .jyapeu SdsoQuji)£)j ^^uQr^^eoirev^ LSl^uiSlcmL-uj(rr^cs)LDuSlGiT eT(z§
{ZhfrssT^ih S-i^ihQurr® stressruuLL® is)j(ir)^iso. ^mip^ih S-6sarL-/Tif s^rreuir^

(G!^-u-€S),T.) — a/Tu5T - LbcpnLpiuTssr^, i?lmj^ - (itQQaj ^iki

^<osr'Ss^LL<ss)iu ayOTD/_uj^.

11. By the continuance of rain tlie world is preserved in existence 5
it is therefore worthy to be called ambrosia.



2_. ^uurrfr<sBi^^ ^uurriu ^uuit<sbw^ ^uufrrri(j^^^



Online LibraryTiruvalluvarThe Kural of Tiruvalluvar : with the commentary of Parimelazagar and a simple and clear padavuray; to which is added an English translation of the text by J. Lazarus → online text (page 1 of 36)