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Negro year book : a review of events affecting negro life, 1952 online

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titles; 16-year old Hosea Richardson, the
first Negro to attain real prominence as a
jockey for many a year; and Art Dor-
rington, on the Washington Lions of the
Eastern Hockey League and first Negro
to play in organized hockey in the U.S.
For the second straight year Howard
Wheeler participated in the National
Open Golf Championships, but failed to
qualify as one of the 50 finalists (his
score, 75-78-153).

Among the most encouraging incidents
was the participation by Negroes for the
first time in a National Bowling Associa-
tion tournament (Baltimore, April).
There is every indication that this "peo-
ple's" sport will soon function as demo-
cratically as the other major American
sports.



The Negro Press



CIRCULATION ARIZONA arc.

Phoenix

. T Sun (wkly) 2,000

Since the beginning of 1947, 27 Negro
newspapers have been established in the

United States. Seven were born in 1947, California Eagle (wkly) 20,000

six in 1948, four in 1949, seven in 1950, ri . te ,fL V" 1 , 6 ^ kly) / Lu<

. . Tf.r'i TU J if. . Neighborhood News (wkly)

three m 1951. 1 hey appeared in 16 states Sentinel (wkly) 25,000

and the District of Columbia, one in each J ribune %W :; 10 ' 000

, .-., . , T. ,. i i Spotlight (Th. & Sun.) 30,000

location except Ohio and Missouri, which Star Review (Th.). 12 500

had three each, and Alabama, Georgia, Oakland

TII. . FT! f, vr j c i_ California Voice (wkly) 10.500

Illinois, lexas, California, and bouth Herald (wkly)

Carolina, which had tWO each. San Bernardino

In 1951, a total of 187 Negro news- San f e o nty Bulletin (wkly)

papers were functioning in 35 states and Comet (wkly) 10,000

tVlP District ni rnlnmhia with a rnmViinprl San Francisco

iCt 01 ^Olumma, Wltn a combined Sun-Reporter (wkly) 24,480

circulation of 2,444,593, and there were Labor Herald (s-mo.) 85,567

43 Negro magazines, with a combined Tota/ 228 047

circulation of 1,299,637. COLORADO

Denver

Colorado Statesman (wkly) 2,700

Circulation of Newspapers 1 _ St *f ( wkl y) 1 500

Pueblo

Western Ideal (wkly) 1,100

ALABAMA Circ.

Birmingham Total 5,300

Baptist Leader (wkly) 3,500 DIST RICT OF COLUMBIA

Review (wkly) 18,893 Washington

World (s-wkly) 10,500 ^tSmerican (s-wkly) (Tue.) 15,120

Mirror (wkly) ......... .. ... 21,106 Afro-American (s-wkly) (Fri.) 19 281

Alabama Weekly Review (wkly) 28,438 c ital Times (Uly) . 13 500

M b, lle ,. , . . . Gaily News (Fri.). 10,000

Advocate (wkly) Nite Life fFri ) 5 000

Gulf Informer (wkly) 12,643

Montgomery T t , 62 o 01

Alabama Tribune (wkly) 1 ,500 J M ^' VU1

Tuscaloosa FLORIDA

Alabama Citizen (wkly) 8,000 J a cf onville

Tuskegee2 Florida Tattler (wkly) 10,508

Herald (wkly) 2,740 Progressive News (wkly) 8,650

_____ Florida Star (wkly) 5,000

Total 107,320 Mj 31 ....

Call, The (wkly)

ARKANSAS Tropical Dispatch (wkly)

Little Rock Florida Times 5,500

Arkansas Survey-Journal (wkly) 12,550 Pensacola

Arkansas World (wkly) 13,560 Colored Citizen (wkly) 1,100

Baptist Vanguard Courier (wkly) 5,342

State Press (wkly) 17,656 Tampa

Arkansas Flashlight (wkly) 1,500 Bulletin (wkly) 780

Pine Bluff Courier (Sat.) 1,500

Negro Spokesman (wkly) 7,000 Florida Sentinel (Tues.) 9,400



Total 52,266



Total 47,780



1 Circulation figures from N. Jf. Ayer & Son's Directory Newspapers and Periodicals (1950) and Editor and
Publisher International Yearbook (1951).

2 Owned by whites and edited by Negroes.

32



CIRCULATION



33



GEORGIA Circ.

Albany

Enterprise (wkly) 2,242

Southwest Georgian (Sat.) 1,500

Atlanta

World (dly) 29,500

Augusta Review 4,000

Columbus

World (Sun.) 2,800

Macon

World 2,500

Rome

Enterprise (ftntly) >.

Savannah

Tribune (wkly) 3,992

Herald . .



Total 46,534

ILLINOIS

Chicago

Defender (wkly) 155,074

World (wkly) 32,000

Globe (wkly) 35,000

East St. Louis

Crusader, The (wkly)

Robbing

Herald (wkly) 3,800

Views and Voices of Chicago and

Suburbs

Springfield

Illinois Chronicle (wkly) 1,200

Illinois Conservator (s-mo.) 3,500

Total 230,574
INDIANA
Evansville

Consolidated News (bi-wkly) 7,000

Gary

American (wkly) 5,500

Lake County Observer (wkly) 8,000

Indianapolis

Recorder (wkly) 11,635

Total 32,135

IOWA

Des Moines

Iowa Bystander (wkly) 1 ,863

Iowa Observer (wkly) ; 1,100

Total 2,863
KANSAS
Hutchinson

Blade (Fri.) 635

Kansas City

Peoples Elevator (wkly)

Plaindealer (wkly) 15,000

Wyandotte Echo (wkly) 1,000

Wichita

Negro Star (wkly) 1,000

Total 17,635

KENTUCKY

Louisville

American Baptist, (wkly) 1,500

Defender (wkly) 1 5,226

Kentucky Reporter (wkly) 1 ,000

Leader (wkly) 15,296

Total 33,022

LOUISIANA

New Orleans

Central Christian Advocate (wkly) 23,000

Informer and Sentinel (wkly) 3,890



LOUISIANA (Cont.) Circ.

New Orleans

Louisiana Weekly (wkly) 12,678

Sun (wkly) 1,000

Shreveport

Sun (wkly) 10,680

Total 51,248
MARYLAND
Baltimore

Afro-American (wkly) 60,742

(Tues. local issue) 31,511

(Sat. local issue) 32,352

Total 124,605

MASSACHUSETTS

Boston

Chronicle (wkly) 5,000

Guardian (wkly) 10,000

Times (wkly) 12,000

Total 27,000

MICHIGAN

Detroit

Michigan Chronical (wkly) 21,619

Telegram (wkly) 1,1*00

Tribune (wkly) 18,500

Inkster

Voice (wkly) 1,600

Total 42,719

MINNESOTA

Minneapolis

Spokesman (wkly) 4,318

Twin City Observer (wkly) 5,127

St. Paul

Recorder (wkly) 3,958

Total 13,403
MISSISSIPPI
Greenville

Delta Leader (Sun.) 3,000

Jackson

Advocate (wkly) 5,500

Mississippi Enterprise (wkly) 10,000

Meridian

Echo (s-mo.) 7,500

Mound Bayou

News-Digest (s-mo.) 4,728

New Albany

Community Citizen (s-mo.) 1,925

Total 32,653

MISSOURI

Kansas City

Call (wkly) 38,892

St. Louis

American (wkly) 18,374

Argus (wkly) 25,650

News (wkly) 3,000

Total 85,916

NEBRASKA

Lincoln

Voice (wkly) 843

Omaha

Guide (wkly) 15,965

Star (wkly) 25,575

Total 42,383
NEW JERSEY
Newark

New Jersey Afro-American (wkly) 14,609



34



THE NEGRO PRESS



NEW JERSEY (Con/.) Circ.

Newark

New Jersey Herald News (wkly) 28,371

New Jersey Record (wkly)

Patterson

North Jersey Independent (wkly) 26,498

Total 69,478

NEW YORK

Buffalo

Criterion, The (wkly) 2,500

Empire Star (wkly) 8,115

New York

Age (wkly) 32,750

Amsterdam News (wkly) 59,849

Westchester County Press (wkly) 6,000

Rochester

Star (wkly) 2,825

Voice (bi-wkly) 3,267

Syracuse

Progressive Herald (wkly) 5,500

Total 120,806
NORTH CAROLINA
Asheville

Southern News (wkly) 2,700

Charlotte

Post (wkly) 5,000

Star of Zion (wkly) 8,000

Eagle 15,000

Durham

Carolina Times (wkly) 10,385

Henderson

Mountain News (wkly) 2,000

Raleigh

Carolinian, The (wkly) 1 5,000

Wilmington

Journal (wkly) 10,000

Total 68,085

OHIO

Cincinnati

Independent (wkly) 7,500

Union (wkly) 12,000

Cleveland

Call and Post (wkly) v . . . . 23,530

Guide (wkly)

Herald (wkly) ; 12,000

Columbus

Ohio State News (wkly) 7,380

Sentinel (wkly) 6,232

Dayton

Ohio Express (dly) .' 7,500

Citizen (wkly) 5,000

Hamilton

Butler County American (wkly) 1,600

Youngstown

Buckeye Review, The (wkly) 2,100

Toledo

Script (wkly) 25,000

Total 109,842

OKLAHOMA

Muskogee

Oklahoma Independent (wkly) 2,000

Oklahoma City

Black Dispatch (wkly) 23,888

Okmulgee

Observer (wkly) 1,800

Tulsa

Appeal (wkly) 3,320

Oklahoma Eagle (wkly) 5,000

Total 36,008



OREGON Circ.

Portland

Northwest Clarion (wkly) . ; 15,000

PENNSYLVANIA

Philadelphia

Afro-American (wkly) 18,496

Christian Review (wkly) 6,000

Independent (wkly) 24,213

Tribune (s-wkly) 20,916

Pittsburgh

Courier (wkly) 268,447

Triangle Advocate (wkly) 2,000

Total 340,072
RHODE ISLAND
Providence

Chronicle (wkly) 1,541

SOUTH CAROLINA

Charleston

New Citizen (wkly) 2,000

Columbia

Lighthouse and Informer (wkly) 6,400

Palmetto Leader (wkly) 4,680

Greenville

American (wkly) 2,000

Sumter

Samaritan Herald and Voice 1,000

of Job (wkly)



Total 16,080



TENNESSEE
Chattanooga

Observer (wkly) ,

Jackson

Christian Index, The (wkly) ,

Knoxville

Flashlight Herald (wkly)

Monitor (wkly)

Memphis

World (s-wkly) (Tues.)

(Fri.)

Nashville

Globe and Independent (wkly)

National Baptist Union Review (wkly) .

Recorder (wkly) .



4,000
6,000

6,500
5,700

16,000
21,000

26,000

53,460

8,000



Total 146,660



TEXAS
Dallas

Express (wkly)

Fort Worth

Defender and Baptist Herald (wkly) ....

Lake Como News (wkly)

Mind (wkly)

Houston

Defender (wkly)

Houston Informer (wkly)

Informer and Texas Freeman, The(wkly)

Negro Labor News (wkly)

Marshall

Traveler (wkly)

San Antonio

Register (wkly)

Waco

Messenger (wkly)

Total 71,111

VIRGINIA
Charlottesville

Tribune (wkly) 3,000

Norfolk

Journal and Guide (wkly) 63,428



8,728

3,860
2,000
2,000

3,361

7,803

26,109

2,000

1,500
9,750
4,000



NATIONAL NEWSPAPER PUBLISHERS



35



VIRGINIA (Cont.)
Richmond

Afro-American (wkly)
Roanoke

Tribune (wkly)



Circ.

11,303

15,000



Circ.



Total



WASHINGTON
Seattle

Northwest Enterprise (wkly)

WEST VIRGINIA
Bluefield

Independent Observer (wkly)

WISCONSIN
Milwaukee

Globe (wkly)

Wisconsin Enterprise-Blade (wkly)



92,731
10,500

2,400



975
55,000



Total 55,975



Circulation of Magazines 1



NEW YORK
New York

Crisis (mo.) 40,000

Interracial Review (mo.) 10,000

Journal of the National Medical Associa-
tion (bi-mo.) 4,032

Our World (mo.) 166,031

Voice of Missions (mo.) 2,300

NORTH CAROLINA
Charlotte

Quarterly Review of Higher Education

Among Negroes (quar.) 2,000

PENNSYLVANIA
Philadelphia

Bronze Woman (mo.) 5,700

Kappa Alpha Psi Journal (mo.) 4,000

TENNESSEE
Memphis

Sphinx Magazine (quar.) 14,000

Whole Truth, The (mo.) 2,000

Nashville

American Negro Mind (mo.) 3,000

Broadcaster, The (quar.) 2,791

Message Magazine (mo.) 5,000

ALABAMA Circ. Modern Farmer, The (mo.) 32,^00

Tuskegee National Baptist Voice (bi-mo.) 5,000

Service (mo.) 5,000 Review, The (quar.) 3,000

CALIFORNIA West'n Christian Recorder (s-mo.) 2,000

Berkeley Union City

Ivy Leaf (quar.) 5,000 Cumberland Flag, The (mo.) 500

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA I EX , A , S .

Washington Port Worth

Journal of Negro Education, (quar.).... 4,500 World's Messenger (mo.) 6,000

Journal of Negro History (quar.) 1 ,450 Ne S ro Aclnevements (mo.) 4,000

Negro History Bulletin (mo.) 9,000 VIRGINIA

Pulse (mo.) 25,000 Manassas

i^urMsr-TA Bulletin of the National Dental Assn.

GEORGIA (quar.)... 1,650

Atlanta D . K j

Colored Morticians Bulletin, The (mo.) 1,500 ^^ke Fraternal Bulletin (mo.) .... 1,400

Foundation, The (quar.) 1,000

Georgia Baptist, The (s-mo.) 2,500 WEST VIRGINIA

Macon Charleston

Sunday School Worker (bi-mo.). ..?... Color (mo.) 100,483

ILLINOIS

Ch E C bo g ny ( mo.) 379,000 NATIONAL NEWSPAPER

Negro Digest (mo.) 100,000 PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION

Negro Traveler 72,000

Tan Confessions 200,000 _, ,. T ,., r ui u A

p eoria The Negro Newspaper Publishers Asso-

Bronze Citizen (mo.) 1,000 ciation, which recently substituted "Na-

KENTUCKY tional" for "Negro" in its name, ended its

LO Kenmcky Negro Education Assn. Journal eleventh year of existence in 1951 with

(bi-mo.) ,1,400 the announcement of a venture designed

MARYLAND to raise the income of individual member

Ba Ced Harvest, The (mo.) 46,000 P a P 6rS and tO & VG the organization a

MICHIGAN greater unity. The venture, to be headed

Detroit by Dowdal H. Davis, general manager of

Postal Alliance, The (mo.) 10,000 the Kansas City Call and former NNPA

MISSISSIPPI president, is a national survey of con-
Bay St. Louis , i ^1 r i -ii-
St. Augustine's Messenger (mo.) 9,400 sumer preferences in the $15-billion an-

Mound Bayou nua l Negro market. Surveys of Negro-

Taborian Star (mo.) 6,000 , , t

Yazoo City consumer brand preferences were con-
Central Voice, The (mo.) 2,500 ducted earlier by individual publications



1 Circulation figures have been derived in the main from N. W. Ayer & Son's Directory Newspapers and
Periodicals (1950).



36



THE NEGRO PRESS



the Pittsburgh Courier, Afro-American,
Louisville Defender, Ebony magazine
and by one newspaper representatives
agency, the Interstate United News-
papers, Inc. Results of the findings have
been printed for distribution mainly to
potential advertisers. The Davis survey
marks the first such inquiry by an organi-
zation of Negro publishers.

At the beginning of 1947, the NNPA
organized within itself three societies de-
voted to editorial, advertising, and circu-
lation interests. Every year these societies
meet concurrently with the parent or-
ganization.

In an effort to strengthen the news
service for Negro newspapers and to meet
objections to the costs of its existing
service, the NNPA, in its eighth annual
session in Detroit in June 1947, voted
transference of its news-service opera-
tions to a group of its members to be
incorporated. P. Bernard Young, Jr.,
editor-in-chief, Journal and Guide, served
as the first chairman of the new agency,
which kept the initials NNPA, signifying
National Negro Press Association. News-
papers subscribing the necessary capital
stock were: The Call, Journal and Guide,
Kansas City Plaindealer, Ohio State
News, Afro-American, Louisville De-
fender, Atlanta Daily World, Cleveland
Call and Post, Houston Informer. Chicago
Defender, and Detroit Tribune.

Thomas W. Young, business manager
for the Journal and Guide r succeeded
Frank L. Stanley, editor-publisher of the
Louisville Defender, as president of the
publishers' organization. Young, a jour-
nalism and law graduate of Ohio State
University, was the first professionally
trained member to serve as the leader of
NNPA. Convention resolutions deplored
the end of National Housing Expediter's
race-relations service, approved the pro-
gram of the American Heritage Founda-
tion, encouraged Negro business, urged
the Senate Sub-Committee on Appropria-
tions to restore cuts in the Farmers Home
Administration Funds for 1948, supported
the Taft-Hartley labor legislation, and
pledged unrelenting vigilance in the



Negro's effort to gain first-class citizen-
ship. Nnamdi Azikiwe, West African
newspaper publisher, who addressed the
convention, was made an honorary mem-
ber.

After the NNPA news service had been
in operation for a period of 25 weeks,
servicing 20 newspapers with a combined
circulation of more than 1,000,000 copies
weekly, the new incorporated set-up was
announced a definite success. There were
prospects that foreign publications would
soon subscribe to the service. Louis
Lautier headed the news staff of six
workers.

At its eleventh annual convention in
1950 in Houston, Texas, the publishers
group, which now consisted of 48 papers,
or approximately 80% of Negro news-
paper circulation, created four new re-
gional directors for the purpose of pro-
moting closer relations among the news-
papers in each division. Dowdal H. Davis,
general manager, Kansas City Call, was
re-elected to his second term as president.

The 1951 NNPA meeting at New York
City witnessed the shift in name from
Negro Newspaper Publishers Association
to National Newspaper Publishers Asso-
ciation. Declared the Louisville Defender
editorially. June 30: "The change in the
name of the NNPA will enable the more
democratic thinking publishers to elimi-
nate some of the glaring inconsistencies
in their papers and will permit them to
go ahead with the fight for full integra-
tion and the full participation of Negroes
in the American way of life."

Retiring president Dowdal Davis said
at the opening luncheon session: "There
will be a Negro market just as long
as the word 'restricted' appears or is
implied in advertising and various con-
tracts [and] just as long as there is an
insensitivity on the part of the majority
in its appraisal of the minorities." He
said that there is a Negro press because
of these things, and because mass media
do not adequately picture the "depriva-
tion of civil rights, discrimination in em-
ployment, exposure to personal indignity,
housing problems or class legislation."



NEGRO PRESS AND NEGRO MARKET



37



David Wasko, of Donahue and Com-
pany, president of the Media Men's Asso-
ciation, offered "constructive criticism"
which might get the publishers more na-
tional advertising. He mentioned some of
the shortcomings of the Negro papers:
insufficient information about the market ;
failure of the advertising to appear in the
paper after the copy and order have been
sent; delay in billing and sending proofs
of publication, and inattention to corre-
spondence. The 1951 convention elected
Louis Martin, Michigan Chronicle pub-
lisher, its new president.

Dateline, the first official publication of
NNPA, made its bow as a quarterly in
January 1949 under the direction of
Ernest E. Johnson, New York City public-
relations representative for NNPA. It
appeared in four pages of S^'xll" stock
with three columns to a page. This pub-
lication was succeeded in February 1951
by the NNPA Bulletin, a 16- to 24-page
pocket-size bi-monthly magazine pre-
pared and printed at Lincoln University
of Missouri under the guidance of its
School of Journalism.

National Negro Newspaper Week,
sponsored by NNPA annually since 1939,
shifted its date in 1951 from the last week
in February to the middle of March, to
fall during the week of the anniversary
of the birth of the first Negro newspaper,
Freedom's Journal, which is March 16.

During the winter meeting of NNPA
in Chicago in January 1950, the delegates
passed a resolution asking for an investi-
gation by the Department of Justice of
the threats to freedom of the press in-
volved in the indictments of two South
Carolina newspapermen for "criminal
libel" in reporting a statement of a Negro
denying an attack on a white girl. John
H. McCray, editor, Lighthouse and In-
former, Columbia, and Darling Booth, AP
writer, were indicted because they re-
ported the denial-of-attack statement of
Willie Colbert, who has since been elec-
trocuted for the alleged crime. In their
complaint the publishers said that prose-
cution of the newsmen, under South Caro-
lina law, was a violation of their civil



rights. A four-man committee was named
to represent the Association before the
Department of Justice: John H. Seng-
stacke, publisher, Chicago Defender; C.
A. Scott, publisher, Atlanta Daily World;
Thomas W. Young, business manager,
Journal and Guide, and D. Arnett
Murphy, vice-president, Afro-American
newspapers. NNPA offered McCray finan-
cial and legal assistance for his court
appearance.

Late in June 1950, at his trial, McCray
pleaded guilty and was fined $5,000 with
a suspended one-year jail term and a
three-year probation by Circuit Judge
Steve C. Griffin. The sentence required
that the editor publish both his plea and
sentence in his paper within a reasonable
length of time.

Early in May 1949, Thomas W. Young,
business manager, Journal and Guide,
NNPA president, and Dowdal H. Davis,
general manager, Kansas City Call,
NNPA vice-president, on invitation, ap-
peared at the annual meeting of the
American Newspaper Publishers Associa-
tion in New York City. In his address
before the assemblage, Young said that
the chief aims of the Negro press are to
maintain a united front "to protest and
expose every condition inconsistent with
the democratic concepts we all treasure"
and to give coverage to that news of the
Negro population which is ignored or
distorted by the white papers. He stated
that the Negro press serves to inspire the
race to greater accomplishment by pub-
lishing news of outstanding achievements
of Negroes in all fields and ranks of life
and strives for greater cooperation and
unity between white and Negro news-
papers and between the ANPA and
NNPA.

NEGRO PRESS MEDIA TO
NEGRO MARKET

"The Negro Market: 15,000,000 strong,
its people have an aggregate income of
$14 billion and the will to buy." These
lines, below a group picture of Chicago
Negroes, appeared on the cover of the



38



THE NEGRO PRESS



July 29, 1951, issue of Tide magazine,
which gave over 13 pages to a discussion
plus media ads of the Negro market.
"Always under-estimated," declared the
headline, "it is rich, ripe and ready
today." The piece opened and closed on
a hot current issue: the "Amos 'n' Andy"
TV show, which has raised the displeas-
ure of the NAACP but which Blatz Beer,
sponsor, defends. Tide told about the
Negro population, the Negro's recent mi-
gratory record, his flare for learning, and
his employment.

The brand-name advertisers have
learned of this lucrative Negro market,
said Tide, and have angled "ad" copy to
Negro newspapers and magazines. These
include Lever Brothers Company, Quaker
Oats Company, Radio Corporation of
America, Best Foods, Inc., Carnation
Company, H. J. Heinz Company, Stand-
ard Brands, Inc., Pillsbury Mills, Armour
and Company, Pet Milk, Rinso, La Palina
cigars, Jelke Margarine, Beech Nut gum,
Hadacol, Unicorn Press, Phillips Soups,
Park & Tilford, Lucky Strike cigarettes,
Lifebuoy, El Producto, Pal Blades, Sin-
clair Oil, Coca-Cola, Remington Rand,
Elgin watches, Zenith radio, Hunt's
Foods, to mention only a few.

This memo from Elinor Zeigler, Tide
editor, accompanied the report:

I think a major point of the story could
well be the striking change that has taken
place in advertisers' and agencies' attitudes
toward Negro media since our last story
(March 15, 1947). People then tended to
talk as though we were researching a pretty
obscure topic about which they knew little,
and they seemed to have only a rather dutiful,
somewhat grudging, interest.

Now that is sharply changed, not in all, but
in an impressive number of cases. Important
executives this time showed great interest,
asked me what we had found out about the
market, went far out of their way to stress
their personal appreciation of the importance
of the subject and in more cases than I can
ever remember they took pains to compli-
ment the media on the progress they had
made. . . . They seem to feel that the buyers
and sellers are learning to deal with each
other without prejudice and that the sooner
everybody on both sides achieves a fair, ob-
jective viewpoint, the sooner an important,
neglected potential in advertising can be
developed.



In an article in a January 1950 issue of
Advertising Age, Marrine Christopher
stated that "expenditures by national ad-
vertisers in Negro media may reach
$2,500,000, a gain of a half-million dol-
lars. . . ." "No matter what their economic
status," he wrote, "Negroes have made
it a part of their behavior pattern always
to buy the best and most expensive items
they can afford."

Working for more than ten years for
the various Negro newspapers in an effort
to promote the Negro market in the eyes
of national advertisers have been two
publishers' representatives groups, both
headquartered in New York City Inter-
state United Newspapers, Inc., William
G. Black, sales manager, and the Associ-
ated Publishers, Inc., Joseph B. LaCour,
general manager. Both organizations have
been active in collecting details about
their special market, publishing and dis-
playing their findings, and making con-
tact with potential space-buyer agencies
for block newspaper accounts. Interstate
services more than 100 papers while API
limits itself to 27 publications, most of
which are members of the Audit Bureau
of Circulations and total more than a
million in combined circulation.

During the two-day meeting of the
American Marketing Association at the
Hotel Waldorf-Astoria in New York City
in December 1949, API set up an exhibit
designed to explain to the country's lead-
ing manufacturers the 11 -figure buying
power of the Negro people. The exhibit
set forth data on the Negro population,
their living places, their earnings, and
their buying preferences.

The API message was prepared by
Harry Evans, API sales manager, and
Major Homer Roberts, director of the
firm's Chicago office. It was built around
a large portrait of an attractive colored
girl on horseback with horse and rider
leaping over a hurdle in perfect coordina-
tion. The picture was an actual news shot
which had been published in colored
newspapers. A caption labeled "Concen-
tration" emphasized that concentration of
the colored press on its compact market



PRESS CLUBS



39



offered advertisers an excellent oppor-
tunity to overcome sales hurdles in their
business operations. An electronic tape



Online LibraryTuskegee Institute. Dept. of Records and ResearchNegro year book : a review of events affecting negro life, 1952 → online text (page 7 of 72)
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