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many of these patients prothrombin levels of
from 20 to SO per cent of normal have been
found. Proper administration of Vitamin K
brings this within normal bounds and surgery
can be performed without the added risk of
postoperative hemorrhage. In our series of in-
vestigations, conditions other than obstructive
jaundice have been scrutinized and \'itamin K-
deficiency has been found to be the possible
basis of other hemorrhagic disorders.
Discussion opened by —
Dr. W. L. Pressi.ey, Due West, S. C.
Dr. F. B. Johnson, Charleston



6:30 — Ulain Dining Room John Marshall Hotel
Banquet tendered by the Association to Guests
Speakers, Ex-Presidents, Officers and their Ladies



SOUTHERN MEDICINE & SURGERY



February 1940



8 p. m.

ADDRESS OF THE PRESIDEXT—
Dr. a. E. Baker, Charleston

ADDRESS OF THE PRESIDENT- ELECT-
OR. C. J. Andrews, Norfolk

^£)£)i?£SS— REFRIGERATIOxN IN CANCER,
Dr. Temple Fay, Philadelphia

The work of Dr. Fay and his associates in the
application of subcritical general body tempera-
tures through local and general refrigeration
would seem to offer a valuable adjunct in the
treatment of cancer.

— The Secretary

ADDRESS—TKE DIAGNOSIS AND
DIETARY MANAGEMENT OF

HYPERINSULINISM. (Lantern Slides.)
Dr. Seale Harris, Birmingham

In recognition of his '"first recognizing and de-
scribing a new disease hyperinsulinism," the
Medical Association of the state of Alabama
awarded Dr. Seale Harris a Citation on July
7th, 1939.

— The Secretary



Tuesday, February 27th
9:00 a. m.



REPORT OF MEET IX G OF COUNCILLORS

REPORT OF SECRETARY

(Few minutes only)

THE SELECTION OF PATIENTS WITH
GALLBLADDER DISEASE FOR
SURGERY—

Dr. W. S. Cornell, Charlotte

From attention to follow-up results and a
more searching study of operative findings there
seems to be a growing need for a revision of
the selection of patients for surgery in gallblad-
der disease. Particularly is this true in those
patients who have been classed as having
chronic cholecystitis. The more advanced the
the disease the more definite the indications
for surgical interference. The early institution
of surgical measures has been further enhanc-
ed by the failure of medical treatment to ma-
terially relieve the patient with either early or
late gallbladder affections. The employment of
surgery for early gallbladder disease is justified
by the dual belief that its early use will both
relieve the patient of symptoms and prevent



the development of a more serious type of dis-
ease. The use of surgery in the early stages of
cholecystitis has been advocated because of the
high percentages of cures reported and the at-
tendant low mortality rate.

However, the problem still faces us that many
of the patients are in as bad or worse condition
following cholecystectomy for chronic cholecy-
stitis. Hence a method of selecting the cases
of chronic cholecystitis which might be ex-
pected to have a favorable result is presented.
Also a routine is presented to attempt to im-
prove the methods of differential diagnosis in
advanced disease.
Discussion opened by —
Dr. Frank S. Johns, Richmond
Dr. George R. Wilkinson, Greenville

THE INSULINS AND THEIR USES—
Dr. Maurice Protas, Washington

The purpose of this presentation is to review
the insulin products, giving the indications for
each, their actions and reactions, dosage, con-
versation of one type for another, time of ad-
ministration and the advantages and disadvan-
tages of each.

The non-diabetic use of insulin is also dis-
cussed. And the brief includes morphinism,
alcoholism, delirium tremens, dementia precox,
malnutrition, pulmonary tuberculosis, inani-
tion, unexplained malnutrition, and spontaneous
hypoglycemia.
Discussion opened by —

Dr. W. R. Jordan, Richmond

EXPERIENCES WITH SULFAPYRIDINE IN
THE TREAT:SIENT OF PNEU:\IOCOCCIC

PNEU.MONIA—
Dr. Harry Walker, Richmond

During the past year we have had under ob-
servation approximately seventy-five cases of
pneumococcic pneumonia that have been treat-
ed with sulfapyridine, and in this paper I shall
deal with the diagnostic criteria of this disease
together with the results and effects of this
drug on the gastrointestinal tract, the hema-
poietic system and the genito-urinary system.
Discussion opened by —
Dr. James H. Smith, Richmond
Dr. Wyndham Blanton, Richmond

HYDRONEPHROSIS: ETIOLOGY,
SYMPTOMS AND CLINICAL

MANAGEMENT—
Dr. Lin wood D. Keyser, Roanoke

Definition — Etiology — Developmental, ob-
structive, neurogenic and hormonal theories.



February 1940



SOUTHERN MEDICINE & SURGERY



Occurrence. ^lorphologic types. Pathologic
findings. Svmptomatologv. Differentiation
from other types of intraabdominal pathology.

Urologic diagnosis — Relation to ptosis, renal
ectopia, horseshoe and embrvogenetic anoma-
lies.

Clinical management — Postural therapy and
appliances. Catheter drainage. Ureteral dila-
tation. Drug therapy.

Surgical therapy — Diyision of anomalous ves-
sels. Renal fi.xation. suspension, obliteration of
ureteral kinks. Sympathectomy operations. Al-
cohol injections of sympathetic ganglia. Plastic
operations on renal pelyis and ureter. Endo-
crine therapy.

Psychologic aspects of the problem. Case re-
ports. Lantern slides.

Discussion opened by —

Dr. W. M. Coppridge, Durham

Dr. Hamilton A\'. ^IcKay, Charlotte

STERILIZIXG THE AIR IX THE
OPERATING ROOM WITH BACTERICIDAL

RADIATION—
Dr. Deryl Hart, Durham

The air of the operating room is contami-
nated with pathogenic bacteria giyen off from
the noses and throats of the occupants. These
bacteria we believe to be the greatest source
of danger in the operating room today. The
greater number of these can be killed by ex-
posure to an ultraviolet radiation during the
operative procedure. The results obtained jus-
tify our opinion that the greatest .source of
danger in the operating room today is the bac-
teria floating in the air.
Discussion opened by —

Dr. Harry Warthen, Jr., Richmond

Dr. Carrington Williams, Richmond

DOING STUDENT HEALTH WORK—
Dr. Chas. N. Wyatt, Greenville

Dealing with the duties of the physician do-
ing student health work, or college work, and
tying in the college work with athletics, and the
demands that are becoming more and more
acute of holding athletic interests in the local
communities.
Discussion opened by —

Dr. W. L. Press ley, Director of Student
Health Work, Erskine College, Due West, S. C.

TRE.\TMENT (JF \-ENERE.\L ULCERS
IN GENER.AL PRACTICE—
Dr. Jack Mickley, Tabor City, N. C.

Treatment of chancre, mucous patch, gumma,
gonorrheal ulcer, chancroid, mi.xed sore, lym-
phogranuloma venereum and granuloma in-



guinale is discussed. Recent comprehensive re-
views of lymphogranuloma venereum and gran-
uloma inguinal are sifted for practical applica-
tion in general practice. A few pertinent case
histories are appended.
Discussion opened by —

Dr. Thurston FormyDuval,
Whiteville, N. C.

Dr. W. R. Wallace, Chester, S. C.

Dr. J. L. Hamner, Mannboro, Va.



1:00 p. 7n. — Recess



2:00 p. in. — Reconvene



FOUR PROBLEMS CONCERNING
ADENOMATOUS GOITER

(Moving Pictures.) —
Dr. R. S. Anderson, Rocky Mount

This paper deals with four common problems
in adenomatous goiter, which make it more
serious than any other type of goiter, as fol-
lows:

1. Adenomatous goiter is the only type of goi-
ter that ever becomes malignant.

2. It is the only type of goiter we ever have
to deal with substernally, producing pres-
sure on the deep vessels and other compli-
cations such as dyspnea, the removal of
which is frequently followed by collapse of
the trachea.

3. It is the only type of goiter in which there
is much danger of injuring the recurrent
laryngeal nerve while removing the goiter.

4. The majority of adenomatous goiters give
very little trouble until about middle age,
after they have grown to a very good size,
and the general condition of the patient
makes the operative risk more serious.

The paper is very short, and deals only with
a discussion of each of the four problems out-
lined above. It is illustrated by colored moving
films of the operation.
Discussion opened by —
Dr. Addison G. Brenizer, Charlotte
Dr. J. Morrison Hutcheson, Richmond

TREATING NEUROSYPHILIS
AT HOME WITH FEVER—
Dr. James Asa Shield, Richmond

The use of malarial fever in the treatment
of cases of tabes dorsalis and early paresis, al-
lowing the patient to remain at home during
treatment, is discussed. The selection of the
patients for treatment, the home routine and
the pertinent observations to be made by the



SOUTHERN MEDICINE & SURGERY



Februarv 1940



family physician are pointed out. The factors
that influence the course of fever and the sub-
sequent treatment are outlined.
Discussion opened by —
Dr. R. S. Crispell, Durham
Dr. R. Finley G.ayle, Richmond
Dr. Roy Kellum, Richmond
IS THE :\IORTALITY OF ACUTE
APPENDICITIS INCREASING?—

Dr. J. R. Young, Anderson

For some fifteen years we have made clinical
studies of our experiences at the Anderson
County Hospital. The subject is presented
from an institutional standpoint rather than
personal experience. The conclusion that we
have reached is that the mortality in acute ap-
pendicitis is not increasing and I am doubtful
of this being true anywhere, though you see
this statement in so many medical journals that
it appears to be accepted as fact. Indeed many
attempt to account for it, offering various theo-
ries.

Discussion opened by —
Dr. John P. Kennedy, Charlotte
Dr. W. Lowndes Peple, Richmond

ADDRESS—TtiE TREATMENT OF
PRIMARY DYSMENORRHEA—

Dr. Emil Novak, Baltimore

Dr. Novak's contributions to the advance-
ment of useful knowledge in this field are so
many and varied as to make it appropriate to
speak his name along with that of Marion Sims.
— The Secretary

ADDRESS— ^lORmV) FEAR AND ANXIETY
AS A CAUSE OF PHYSICO-PATHOLOGI-

CAL CHANGES IN STRUCTURE—
Dr. Lawrence F. Wodli.ey, Towson, Md.

As Clinical Director of The Sheppard and
Enoch Pratt Hospital, Dr. Woolley has had a
foremost place in the development of improved
methods of dealing with mental abnormalities,
notably the shock treatments of dementia prae-
cox.

— The Secretary



MEMORIAL SERVICE

(Details in Final Program)



ELECTION OF OFFICERS



NEWS



SOUTHERN SURGICAL CONGRESS

irmingham, March 11th-



Eleventh Annual Assemhl
13lh, Tutwiler Hotel.



ADJOURNMENT



For information, write

DR. B. T. BEASLEY, Secretary-Treasurer, 701 Hurt
Bldg., Atlanta.

PROGRAM

Gynecology

Dr. Quitman U. Newell, St. Louis,
Common Lesions of the Vulva, and Their Treatment.

Dr. C. J. .Andrews, Norfolk,
Pelvic Supports — Their Injury and Repair.

Dr. Robert .\. Ross, Durham,
Sex Endocrinology and Pelvic Surgery.

Laryngology
Dr. Edward \. Looper. Baltimore,
The Diagnosis and Surgical Treatment of Carcinoma of
the Larynx.

Otology
Dr. S. S. Hall, Clarksburg, West Va.,
Chonic Exudative Sclerosing Mastoiditis.

Ophthalmology
Dr. R. O. Rychener, Memphis,
A Simple Technique for Glass Ball Implantation Follow-
ing Enucleation of the Eye Ball.

Medicine

Dr. James K. McGregor, Hamilton, Canada,
Dysfunct on of the Thyroid Gland as a Cause for Prema-
ture Old .Age.

Dr. T. Z. Carson, Jacksonville,
Subject to be announced later.

Dr. Francis M. Massie, Lexington.
•Ameb'-C Colitis as a Cause of .Abdominal Pain.

Dr. K. K. Sherwood, Seattle,
Classification and Treatment of Chronic Arthritis.

Proctology
Dr. Martin S. Kleckner, .Allentown, Pa.,

Dr. Louis h. Buie, Rochester,
Management of .Anal Fistulas in Office and Hospital.

Anesthesia
Dr. C. N. Carrawa)'. Birmingham,
Pentothal Sodium Oxygen Anesthesia.

Surgery

Dr. Herbert .Acuff. Knoxville,
The Surgical Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis with
a Survey of End Results.

Dr. Russell B. Bailey, Wheeling,
Surgical Treatment of Obstruction at the Cardiac Orifice.

Dr. Randolph L. Clark, Jackson, Miss.,
Recent .Advances in the Management of Intestinal Ob-
struction.

Dr. George Curtis, Columbus, Ohio,
The Rationale of Splenectomy in the Treatment of Certain
Anemias.



February 1940



SOUTHERN MEDICINE & SURGERY



91



Dr. T. C. Dawson, Atlanta,
Breast Tumors. Moving Picture in Color.

Dr. Michael de Bakey, New Orleans,
Significant Factors in the Prognosis and Mortality of Per-
forated Ulcer.

Dr. James W. Gibbon, Charlotte,
Castro- Jejunal Ulcer with Case Reports.

Dr. Stuart W. Harrington, Rochester,
Surgical Treatment for Calcified Constricting Pericardium.

Dr. Frank S. Johns, Richmond,
The Progress in the Development of Extrapleural Thoro-
plasty in the Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

Dr. J. B. Lukins, Louisville,
Postoperative Pulmonary Complications.

Dr. J. M. Mason, Birmingham,
C. Jeff Miller Memorial Lectureship.

Dr. Roy D. McCIure, Detroit,
The Modern Treatment of Burns.

Dr. George Pack, New York City,
The Diagnosis and Treatment of Malignant Tumors of the
Skin.

Dr. Edwin G. Ramsdell. New York City,
The Prevention of Wound Disruption.

Dr. J. D. Rives, New Orleans,
The Splenic Anemias: Present Conception of the Etiology,
Diagnosis and Treatment, With Some Suggestions on Surgi-
cal Technique.

Dr. R. L. Sanders, Memphis,
Presidential Address

Genito-Urinary Surgery

Dr. Edgar G. Ballenger, Atlanta,
The Importance of Early Diagnosis of Genito-Urinary Dis-
eases.

Dr. Robert Herbst, Chicago,

Dr. Roy B. Henline, New York City,
Prostatic Disease — the \'arious Causes and Types and Their
Treatment.

Dr. Nelse F. Ockerblad, Kansas City,

Dr. Lawrence P. Thackston, Orangeburg,
Suprapubic Prostatectomy With the Use of an Original
Combination Hemostatic Drainage Bag.

Orthopedic Surgery
Dr. .Austin T. Moore, Columbia,
The Treatment of Fractures of the Neck of the Femur by
Internal Fixation With Four Adjustable Nails— An End
Result Study.

Dt, Leslie V. Rush, Meridian,
Some Commonly Seen Fracture Cases in which Bad Re-
sults Frequently Occur.

Pediatric Surgery
Dr. Stanley J. Seegar, Milwaukee,
Pediatric Surgical Problems.

Neurosurgery
Dr. Cobb Pilchcr, Nashville,
Surgical Aspects of Epilepsy.
Dr. Exum Walker, Atlanta,



in Richmond from 2:00 to 5:30 p. m., in the historic
Egyptian Building of the Medical College of Virginia,
by the Richmond members of the College, under the di-
rection of the state chairman. Doctor William B. Porter.
Papers:

1. Management of Pneumococcic Meningitis, by Doctor
Harry Walker.

2. Management and Prognosis of Diabetic Coma, by
Doctor WilHam Jordan.

J. .\ Critical Survey of the Anemias .'Associated with Sul-
fanilamide Therapy, by Doctor George Craddock.

4. Heart Block and Its Therapy, by Doctor J. Morrison
Hutcheson.

5. Presentation of Several Cases of Weil's Disease, by
Doctor W. B. Porter.

Following the scientific session there a dinner was served
to 37 at the Commonwealth Club at 6:30.



ANNUAL MEETING REGION II AMERICAN
ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS

Edgewater Gulf Hotel, Edgewater Park, Mississsippi,
March 15th and 16th.

Edgewater Park is in the very center of the Riviera of
America, on the main line of the Louisville and Nashville
Railroad and on the famous Old Spanish Trail (U. S.
Route 90), which connects Florida with California. Edge-
water Park is a semi-tropical, winter pleasure community
overlooking the Gulf of Mexico, with more than 300 acres
of its own premises devoted to outdoor recreation.

An extraordinarily interesting program has been pre-
pared for the scientific session and in addition to clinical
papers, a wide variety of round-table and panel discu.s-
sions have been planned. Opportunity will likewise be
afforded for a delightful recreation on the Gulf Coast dur-
ing its most attractive season.

For the high quality of service for which the Edgewater
Gulf Hotel is famed, the following moderate rates are
quoted for this meeting: ?6.50 and $7.00 single, $6.00 and
$6.50 each person in double rooms, daily, American plan.

Region II of the Academy of Pediatrics comprises the
Southern States from Virginia to Texas and a cordial in-
vitation is extended to any physician to attend this meet-
ing.

It is suggested that reservations be made immediately
by writing the hotel directly.



THE \IRGINIA SECTION OF THE AMERICAN

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS
On the 1 7th of January a clinical session of the Virginia
Section of the American College of Physicians was held



MEETING NORTH CAROLINA MENTAL
HYGIENE SOCIETY FEBRUARY 16th

The Washington Duke Hotel, Durham, was the place.
Dr. C. C. Burlingame, of Hartford, Conn., the chief
speaker. Dr. Burlingame, is Psychiatrist-in-chicf to the
Neuro-Psychiatric institute of the Hartford Retreat, and
is Consultant and staff member of a number of the
country's largest medical and educational institutions.

The afternoon session will open at 2:30 o'clock with
Dr. W. R. Stanford of Durham, state president, presiding.
The general topic for discussion for the afternoon meeting
will be "The Mental Hygiene of the Child." Dr. W. D.
Perry, director of the University testing service and ad-
viser for the general college of the University of North
Carolina, will talk on "The Child in the School." Dr.
Richard F. Richie, assistant director of the division of
mental hygiene of the State Board of Charities and Pub-
He Welfare, will talk on the "Child in the Community."
Dr. Frank Howard Richardson, Black Mountain, specialist
in the field of the child-guidance, will talk on the "Child
in the Home."



92



SOUTHERN MEDICINE & SURGERY



February 1940



MeCKLENBITRC CotlNTY MEDICAL SoCIETV

Buerger's Disease Arrested and Clinically Cured follow-
ing Lumbar Sympathectomy, by Dr. R. B. McKnight.

The Handling of Hemorrhoids, by Dr. W. W. Craven;
Discussion by Dr. T. C. Bost.

Hypertension, by Dr. R. Z. Query, Jr.; Discussion by
Dr. William Allan'.

Hypertensive Factor in Wilms' Tumor, by Dr. Walter
E. Daniel; Discussion by Dr. T. W. Baker.

ANDREW D. TAYLOR, Secretary



Dr. H. Stokes Munroe, Sr., announces to the profession
the association of Dr. H. Stokes Munroe, Jr., 301-30.';
Professional Building, Charlotte, North Carolina, Practice
limited to surgery.



Dr. Oscar Zeigler Culler, announces the opening of
offices at 57 South Broughton Street, Orangeburg, South
Carolina. Practice limited to internal medicine.



Dr. Roscoe McMillan, of Red Springs, spoke to the
January meeting of the Robeson County Medical Society
on The History of Medicine in Robeson.



Dr. James W. Gibbon, of Charlotte, N. C, and Dk.
Lawrence P. Thackston, of Orangeburg, S. C, are two
of the speakers for the Post-Graduate Surgical Assembly
of the Southeastern Surgical Congress to be held at Bir-
mingham, March llth-13th.



Dr. R. S. Beam, of Lumberton, has been chosen presi-
dent of Robeson Enterprises, Inc.



Ramon D. G.arcin, M. D., announces the association of
his son, Ramon D. Garcin, Jr., M. D.. who has been ac-
tively practicing Internal Medxine in Brooklyn, New York,
for the past ten years. Offices 2618 East Broad Street.
Richmond, \ irginia.



MARRIED



The marriage of Miss Florence Roome, daughter of
Mrs. Howard Le ChevaUer Roome of Old Westbury, to
Dr. John Staige Davis, Jr., of New York, son of Mrs.
John Staige Davis of Charlottesville and the late Dr. Davis,
took place in the afternoon of December 9th, in the Com-
munity Church of East Williston, Long Island.



Dr. Gibson Lewis Sikes, of Salemburg, and Miss Mar-
.garct Lee MacLeod, of Cameron, were married on Decem-
ber 22nd.



Dr. Irving E. Shafer, of Salisbury, and Miss Maggie
Jane Honeycutt, of FrankUnton, were married in New
York City on January 16th.



Dr. Robley C. .Allison, of Petersburg, \irginia. and Miss
Grace Elizabeth Johnson, of Lenoir, North Carolina, were
married on January 20th. Dr. .AlHson is a member of the
medical staff of the Central State Hospital at Petersburg.



DEATHS



Dr. Walker Washington, 79, a descendant of the family
of which George Washington was a member, died Dec.
10th at his Staten Island home. He was born at Fredericks-
burg, Va., and was graduated from the Medical College of
Virginia in 1883. Later, he studied at Bellevue, where he
received his doctor's degree in 1885. Dr. Washington prac-
ticed his profession on Staten Island for 52 years.



Dr. Martin L. Stevens, of Asheville, died January 20th.
.A tribute to him, a part of the Tri-State Medical .Associa-
tion program, will be carried in our next issue.



Dr. R. .Angus Nichols, Jr., 39, Richmond, died December
10th, after suffering a heart attack at his residence, Stuart
Court Apartments, a few hours before.



Dr. Francis Owington Rogers died of a heart attack
in a hospital in Memphis on November Sth. His home
had been for several years in Little Rock, .Arkansas, where
he had been engaged in the lumber business. His wife
and two daughters survive him. In 1894-99 Dr. Rogers
was a student in the University of North Carolina. He
starred in athletics — both in football and in baseball. He
was captain of the football team in 1898. He was a native
cf Salisbury and a resident of Concord while a student.
He was a graduate in medicine of the University of Mary-
land in 1901.



Dr. O. C. McCarn, Warrior, .Alabama, died January
15th, atfer a long illness. His wife was Miss Swann, of
Iredell County, North Carolina. Two of his sons are phy-



OUR MEDICAL SCHOOLS



University of \'irc.inia



Dr. Edwin P. Lehman and Floyd Boys gave a report
of their investigations on the Control of Intraperitoneal
.Adhesions with Heparin before the Lynchburg Academy of
Medicine on January 8th.

Sir James Purves Stewart, a distinguished neurologist
of London, England, and Dr. Beverley R. Tucker, of
Richmond, visited the Medical School on January 12th.

Mr. PhiUpp B. Philipp of New York City and Albe-
marle County, Virginia has contributed a gift of $3000.00
to the Department of Radiology for the purchase of ad-
ditional x-ray equipment.

On February 7th, Dr. Samuel .A. Vest spoke before the
Fourth District Medical Society in Petersburg on The
Clinical Use of the Male Sex Hormones.

Dr. Eugene M. Landis spoke before the Virginia Penin-
sula Academy of Medicine, meeting in Newport News,
on December 18th, on the subject of Diagnosis and Treat-
ment of Peripheral \ascular Diseases. On January 22nd,
he addressed the St. Elizabeth's Hospital Staff in Rich-
mond, on the subject. Recent Work on the Pathogenesis
of Hypertension. On February 7th, he spoke before the
.Augusta County Medical .Association in Staunton on Diag-
nosis and Treatment of Peripheral \'ascular Diseases; A
General Survey.

.At the meeting of the .American Microscopical Society
in Columbus, Ohio in December, Dr. H. E. Jordan was
elected President.

At the January meeting of the Albemarle County Medi-
cal Society the following officers were elected: Dr. H. B.
Mulholland, President; Dr. R. G. Magruder, Vice-Presi-
dent ; and Dr. William H. Wood, Secretary and Treasurer.

On February 8th. Dr. H. E. Jordan spoke before the
Virginia Chapter of Sigma Xi on the subject of the Origin
and Significance of the Giant Cells of the Lungs.



Medical College of Virginia



The attendance at Founders' Day, January 16th, when
the restored Egyptian Building was rededicated, exceeded
expectations. The various programs were pronounced ex-
ceptionally good.



Februarv 1940



SOUTHERN MEDICINE & SURGERY



Dr. James Asa Shield has been elected president of the
Richmond chapter of the General Alumni Association.
Other officers are: Dr. J. .\. C. Jennings, vice-president.
Mrs. Annie Franks Mahoney, secretary, and Dr. J. A.
Reese, treasurer.

Sir James Purves-Stewart. internationally famous British
neurologist, spoke to the senior class in medicine, and
others, on January 13th.

Dr. Fred J. Wampler. Professor of Preventive Medicine,
attended the meeting of the Council on Industrial Health
of the American Medical Association in Chicago recently.
Doctor Wampler is chairman of the Industrial Hygiene
Committee of the Medical Society of Virginia. He con-
ducted the discussion on the organization of industrial
health committees in State medical societies at a round-
table meeting of the Council.

The Departments of Bacteriology and Pathology have
been moved to new quarters in the restored Egyptian
Building.

Dr. H. L. Osterud, Professor of .\natomy, has been
elected to a three-year term on the Council of the Ameri-
can .Association of University Professors.

Dr. Lewis E. Jarrett. Director of the Hospital Division,
attended the meeting of the Council on Hospital Service



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