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CHARIOT '65




PUBLISHED BY
DAY AND EVENING
STUDENT COUNCILS



New Haven College
West Haven, Connecticut






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A Growing Campus



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President Peterson addresses hon-
ored guests and Student Body at
Corner Stone Laying of Student
Center.




And the Man Behind It

Under the leadership of President Marvin K.
Peterson, New Haven College acquired its present
campus in 1960, allowing for expansion into the
Arts and Science Program in the Day Division. In
March 1962 twenty-eight acres of undeveloped
land three blocks north of the present campus,
was acquired for further expansion.





New Student Center Takes Form.




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Parking is a Never Ending Problem



Campus Life Reacts to Expansion

To survive, a college must cater to its students' needs and New Haven
College has done that with consistent growth in all phases of school life.
Despite the migratory life of a community college, social activities have
progressed into a calendar of annual events and proud support
of an athletic program garnering the championships in every
major sport.



Gary Liberatore paces Chargers with 34.8 Point Aver-
age.




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student Beats heat at Holiday Hill at Start of Frosh Week.



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Reverend William Coffin, Jr. addresses New Haven College Students at Seminar '65.



Diversified Life Molds Modern



Th.e major factor in the College's planning is its philosophy of service to the

individual student, of whatever age, for the management of business, industry

and other institutions of the New Haven Area.

Knowing this attitude, the student enters New Haven College to master the

scholarly tools needed to conquer the growing complexities of our

diverse technical age.





President's Tea becomes informal meeting of students and faculty.



Man



Intramurals strengthen student body.




. -4 « *'i •'










Programs




Professor Warren Smith instructs Business Finance Class.





Mold Competent Businessmen




New London Extension Class New to the Academic Program of NHC.



Expansion and technology in industry have brought a need for solidly trained
people with a broad background. Equipment for business positions no longer
includes just mastery of the ever-increasing technical requirements. With the
newly recognized social responsibilities of the business world comes a need for
important social and liberal studies.



Engineering Excellence

The strong point of the school's curriculum and the vehicle for
much of its progress has been the Engineering Program, begun
as extension courses of Northeastern University. Many other
courses have come about through the need to supplement
Engineering. The complexity and expanding nature of the course
— which has stressed a constant demand for new facilities —
leaves the engineering student little time for any activity but study.



10



New Haven College's own Laser Beam.



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Mechanical Engineer prepares motor for use.



11






Chemistry Student completes lab work.



Evening Division Holds Presidents Tea

The Evening Division of N.H.C. moved quickly in organizing two of its annual
Fall Semester events. The Presidents Tea is more than an informal gathering
of instructor and student in so much as it allows the student to renew old
acquaintances.



12



Fall Dance allows the family student a night out.




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Receiving line greets students and their families.



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Coach Paul "Topsy"
DelGobbo talks to
his men at halftlme.



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Competition is most fierce near goal.



Booters Open Varsity Competition



The soccer team ended the 1964-65 season
with a 9-21 record, a good showing for
the end of the three-year reign of Co-captains
Paul Moore and Ray Sanzone. Moore was
chosen New Haven College's most valuable
player in the grueling sport.




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16



National Campaign Draws Campus Interest




straw vote taken on campus.




Ex Governor Lodge addresses students.






Chargers Cop S.N. B.C. Title

They did it again. For the second time in their third
organized season, NHC's hoopsters won the Southern New
England College Conference Championship. The deed was
done by able coaching, the craftsmanship of Dick Jackson
and the accuracy of Gary Liberatore.



19



LEFT: Head Coach Don Ormrod briefs players at half-time. Ass't Vieira
helps with strategy. BELOW: Captain Elect record shattering Gary Libera-
tore drives for two more.



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Captain Dick Jackson, N.H.C. second 1,000 point man, helps on defense.




Determination Mark of Champs



Center Phil Andros scrambles for ball.



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Raslavsky scores two
more for Chargers.




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Not the same snow the students try on the instructors, but a
lot more tranquil. The Evening Student Council brought Santa
and a magician to disturb the Christmas quiet. Then the
Evening Students brought their kids — and the kids didn't
mind at all.



23



Students Party Disturbs Quiet Campus




Library academic hub of campus.



Students Utilize Various Study Areas



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Periodical Room often used m research.



25




study and leisure
can be )oined.



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Grand Lake Lodge

The Winter Weekend has become NHC's
No. 1 social event, with a weekend crowded with
dancing, entertainment, gay parties and
activities — all free from the pressures of the
academic life.

This year the memories of an excellent dance
band, lush accomodations, the vibrant talent
of Johnny Nash — formally and informally —
and the relaxed air of comradeship provided
solace for many sessions with textbooks and
term papers.



26



Pie Eating Contest for free ticket to Winter
Weekend proves colorful and filling.




Host of Annual Winter Weekend




RIGHT: Johnny Nash's performance Caps week-
end events.



Viatta Taylor chosen First Winter Weekend Queen.



Queen and Her Court.



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England Sport



LEFT: Coach Fan-
ning watches team
set stage for victo-
ry.



Touches N.H.C.



Hockey at New Haven College went from
a club to a team in its first full season in
athletic competition during the 1964-65
season. The team won four games, and
lost too many, but Coach Jim Fanning
will have another winning team at the
school for the next season now that the
organization difficulties are past.



Overt roughness is rewarded with three minutes pen
alty.



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LEFT: The best laid
plans of Mice and
Men . . .



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The World's A Stage




Informality is the pace at rehearsal.



33



RIGHT: Student Director, Russell D Offen-
bach adds emphasis needed.





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77z^ Charger Nine Really Galloped Home

The 1965 baseball team emerged as a New England power,
when they undertook a 30 game schedule (One of the
longest in the East) and won over 25 of the games, most of
them by lopsided scores. As a result. The Chargers were one of
the first teams to be invited to participate in the N.A.I. A.
regional championships to decide a national champion.



35



LEFT: Head Coach Frank "Porky" Vieira instructs Tony Franco. BELOW: Controversial play loses
District 32 championship for New Haven College.




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Monte Carlo Nile at



The spin of the wheel, the cast of the dice, and the expressions of
loss and gain all played a part in converting N.H.C. into the image of
the famous French resort. The night was caught up in the passion of
trying to beat the odds. Some attempts were sucessful but the law of
exception rather than the rule applied at the tables.



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Dave Jones works hard at something he
loves doing.



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N.H.C.




All bets on the table, please!



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Coach Thomas Saccamone times team.



Track and Golf Enter



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Captain Al Nicholson drives to Green.







with Spring



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Campus Publication Informs Student



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41



ALL MY THANKS TO THOSE OF YOU WHO HELPED TO DRIVE THIS CHARIOT HOME!
('Specially J.T. and CD.) and the brightest of futures to my classmates
of '65.

(We'll meet again at the first reunion)



Raymond D. Sanzone
Editor, '65 Chariot



German Club




42



SAM.



FRONT ROW: Valentine Koory, Treas.; Russell Swanson, WIrth, Lawrence Spellacy, and George Broulllard absent from
Sect't; Edward Seeley, Pres.; Neil Dorso. REAR: Richard picture.
Chirgwin, Brian W. Thompson, Richard Scofield, Richard




Conn. Society of Professional Engineers




Seated left to right are the officers: P. G. O'Brien, Treasurer;
K. H. Burt, Secretary; L. Jozefowicz, Vice-President; M. Cep-



kauskas, President; and Professor Gene Pochette, Faculty Ad
visor. Other members standing in the background.



Photo Club



43




SEATED: Philip Lakernick, Lynn Sabath, Howie Hecht. STANDING: Bill Johnson, Don Rotteck, Tom

McKenna, and Howie Eckels.



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44



Student Council




Newman Club



FRONT ROW: Peter Macary, faculty advisor; Patricia Maloney, Edward Tomasiewitz, President: Valentine Koory: Rictiard Lipp;

Secty,; Reverend Joseph E. Vu|s. Ctiaplain; Letty Fisher: John Richard Scofield: John Giacci, VicePres.

Quinn. REAR: John Raslavsky, Lawrence Spellacy; John Burns;







Handbook Committee




Ed Tomaslewltz, Patricia Maloney, Sue Ackley, Mike Kopchick.



Yearbook Committee



45



Bill Johnson, Raymond Sanzone, Betty Curren, Ed Rogers, Jim Atkinson, and Barry Wallack.





s<s-«5,;::«;:i;jv.-.. *< , j ■ »



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Alpha Phi Omega




46



Chi Kappa Rho



SEATED: Gretchen Treiber, Patricia Maloney, Sharon Kravet.
JoAnn Etter. STANDING: Rosemary DeLlzlo. Jean-Ann Delan-



ey, Margie Gargano. Joanne Valvo. Margie Pontillo, Susan Mc-
Minn, and Lynn Sabath.




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Weight Lifting Club




FRONT ROW: John C. Vorrone, Jr., Sect'y; Ron Ciarcle, Pres.; Roger Bundy. REAR: Fred VIgovlto,
Richard Basllicato, Jaroslaw B. Lucin.



Cheerleaders



47



BOTTOM ROW: Roseanne Becker, Pat Maloney, Pat Liberators. REAR: RoseMary Delizio, Maureen
Yuskus, Susan IVlcMinn.




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Soccer Team




48



Hockey Team



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Baseball Team



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Track Team



49





MARVIN K. PETERSON
PRESIDENT



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ALLEN C. HUTCHINSON
VICE PRESIDENT



51





STEPHEN J. BENNETT
DEAN



GEORGE A. SCHAEFER
DIRECTOR, FVE. DIVISION






JOSEPH J. ARNOLD



IRWIN S. BOAK



RALPH D. BYARD



52




ISRAEL GOPSTEIN



SYDNEY J. GOLUBOFF



JOHN W. GHOREYEB



;» •>» 'f ,1 J .y ■> * i





GEORGE W. COLTON



JAMES T. FANNING




JOSEPH J. ARNOLD

Chairman

Dept. of Industrial Engineering

IRWIN S. BOAK

Chairman
Dept. of Physics

RALPH D. BYARD

Director of Procurement
Building and Grounds

GEORGE W. COLTON

Assistant Professor

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering



OLGA C. GRIFFETH



OSCAR L GROSS



JAMES T. FANNING

Assistant Director of Admissions

ISRAEL GOPSTEIN

Assistant Professor

Dept. of Electrical Engineering





SYDNEY J. GOLUBOFF

Coordinator of Student Publica
tions

JOHN W. GHOREYEB

Director of Student Services

OLGA C. GRIFFETH

Secretary to the College

OSCAR L. GROSS

Chairman

Dept. of Electrical Engineering




**■ -. •*. ■*. ■*. '^. K ■*. », *.






EUGENE D. ROCHETTE



GENE R. SIMONS



WARREN J. SMITH



54






FLORINDO F. VIEIRA THOMAS C. WARNER, JR.



BERNARD WIENER



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HORATIO T. STROTHER



JOHN TELUK




EUGENE D. ROCHETTE

Asst. Professor
Mechanical Engineering



GENE R. SIMONS

Asst. Professor
industrial Engineering



WARREN J. SMITH

Instructor

Business Administration

HORATIO T. STROTHER

Instructor
Social Studies

JOHN TELUK

Asst. Professor
Business Administration

FLORINDO F. VIEIRA

Instructor
Physical Education





THOMAS C. WARNER, JR.

Chairman

Mechanical Engineering

BERNARD WIENER

Asst. Professor
Business Administration

HUGH A. WEISS

Associate Professor
Business Administration

LIEN E. TSAO

Adjunct Instructor
Social Studies



HUGH A. WEISS



LIEN E. TSAO





DONALD A. ORMROD



LAWRENCE C. PARKER



56





WILLARD S. PETERSON KATHARINE B. RAMSHAW



ARTHUR M. REED






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VIRGINIA M. PARKER



ELIZABETH H. PATTON



DONALD A. ORMROD

Director of Athletics

LAWRENCE C. PARKER

Director of Development and
Alumni Relations

VIRGINIA M. PARKER

Director of Division of Special
Studies



RICHARD REIMER



CUSHMAN L. ROBERTSON



ELIZABETH H. PATTON

Librarian

WILLARD S. PETERSON

Assistant Progressor
Business Administration





KATHARINE B. RAMSHAW

Registrar

ARTHUR M. REED

Director of Public Relations

RICHARD REIMER

Asst. Professor
Business Administration

CUSHMAN L ROBERTSON

Director

Admissions & Guidance




i. •'■ ■*. *.







EARL 0. HAMEL



WILLIAM G. HOLMAN



PHILIP S. KAPLAN



58






IVAN LOBAY



PETER A. MACARY



EDWARD J. MAFFEO







SAM Y. LIAO





EARL 0. HAMEL

instructor

Dept. of Mathematics

WILLIAM G. HOLMAN

Chairman

Dept. of Business Administra-
tion

PHILIP S. KAPUN

Chairman

Dept. of English and Humani-
ties

SAM Y. LIAO

Assistant Professor

Dept. of Electrical Engineering

IVAN LOBAY

Assistant Professor

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

PETER A. MACARY

Instructor

Dept. of Industrial Engineering

EDWARD J. MAFFEO

Professor of Arts and Science

RICHARD C. MORRISON

Instructor
Dept. of Physics

WILLIAM H. NYCE

Coordinator
Dept. of Chemistry



RICHARD C. MORRISON



WILLIAM H. NYCE



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FROM THE PRESIDENT TO THE CLASS OF '65

Commencement Day, the twentieth of June, 1965, is an important day in the
lives of you who will receive degrees from New Haven College. Commencement
itself means a beginning, a start toward something else, not an end, as it is
so often considered.

This Day for some of you marks a point in your undergraduate education
which will be recognized by an Associate degree. You may cease your formal
education here, or you may go on. The opportunity is readily available.
For others, this Day recognizes the end of undergraduate education — four
years of achievement formalized by the Bachelor degree. You too may termi-
nate your college education here, but some of you, and the number is ever in-
creasing, will look toward graduate schools.

Whatever your choice now, there is opportunity to begin again, whether it be in
formal education or in your chosen vocation. Thus — Commencement.
We live in a fast moving world, where technological changes are developing rapidly.
They are hard to keep up with, and they will not permit one in the field of
technology to stand still. We hope that you have learned how to learn, have
acquired the desire to learn, and have out where to learn. Your College has
served you well if the answer to these hopes is in the affirmative.
You have now become alumni of New Haven College, Joining some 2,000 gradu-
ates who have preceded you. While your loyalties will change and broaden from this
time on, we trust that you will maintain your feeling for you Alma Mater. You
will acquire other loyalties — to your home, your profession, your community.
This is as it should be. For as you accept your family and community obliga-
tions and fulfill them creditably. New Haven College can feel that it has
achieved another purpose.

As alumni, you will have an opportunity which we hope you will not ignore. In
the broadest sense, everything you do will reflect, favorably or unfavorably,
upon your College. We count on you to discharge your responsibilities in the
best sense of the word, and we hope you will help to guide the College in its
endeavors to serve its community and the people therein.
New Haven College has mapped out its course; it is engaged in a program
planned to fulfill its destiny. You have seen many of the changes necessary to
this fulfillment. You who are leaving now will not have the opportunity to use
the Student Center, the first of the new buildings made necessary by that pro-
gram. Others in the College classes will not be able to further their studies in
the next facility, now on the drawing boards. This is the Engineering-Science
Building, scheduled for construction next year. But students who may never
use its classrooms and laboratories have influenced in many ways the plans
for building.

Physical changes are only a small part of our program. Your College has
sought consistently to improve your education in every way. Change in the
world means changes in curricula, changes in individual courses, and even
new programs. Like the individual, the college which stands still inevitably goes
backward. New Haven College is moving ahead. We invite you to keep in touch
and participate in its progress.

On this Day so full of satisfaction, sentiment and nostalgia, we offer congratu-
lations to you and yours. Our pride, our affection, and our warm and sincere
wishes go with each one of you.




J. THOMAS ACCUOSTI



NEAL ALDERMAN



62




CARMINE A. ANGELONI ROBERT J. ANGELUCCI




GEORGE BALDWIN



ALEX BARONI. JR.






4' w>» *V < ^' 1' .,/' *• #











?6KN0-


.«•«:-♦';»





DAVID BENNETT



KENNETH BERGER




GERALD L BERTHIAUME




J. THOMAS ACCUOSTI

B.S. — Business Administration

NEAL ALDERMAN

B.S, — Business Administration
Amateur Radio Club, Engineering
Society, Soccer 1-3

CARMINE A. ANGELONI

B.S. — Accounting

Student Council 1951- 1953, Pres.
1953, Alumni Association 19541965
Pres. 1960-1964

ROBERT J. ANGELUCCI

B.S, — Accounting

GEORGE BALDWIN

B.S. — Business Administration

ALEX BARBONI, JR.

B.S. — Mechanical Engineering
Engineering Society 4, Publicity
Chairman 4, C.S.P.E. 4, Publicity
Chairman 4

DAVID BENNETT

B.S. — Business Administration
APO Fraternity

KENNETH BERGER

B.S. — Social & Public Administra-
tion
Intramurals

GERARD L. BERTHIAUME

B.S. — Accounting

S.A.M. 2,3,4, Weight Lifting Club 4

JOSEPH J. BIEUNOS

B.S. — Electrical Engineering
Student Council, Weight Lifting Club



JOSEPH J. BIELANOS




PAUL A. BODMER



ALDO BOMBASSEI



64




RICHARD BONTATIBUS ROBERT BOUCHER




WALTER BRADLEY



GEORGE E. BRIXNER,



I % * , » * * * y '.








DAVID BROWN



DOMINIC A. BUONOCORE



PAUL A. BOOMER

B.S. — Electrical Engineering
Amateur Radio Club 1-4, Baseball 1,
Ctiess Club 4, Sportsmen's Club 3,4,
I.E.E.E.

ALDO BOMBASSEI

B.S. — Industrial Engineering

RICHARD BONTATIBUS

B.S. — Industrial Engineering
Phi Zeta Psi Fraternity

ROBERT BOUCHER

B.S. — Industrial Engineering

WALTER BRADLEY

B.S. — Public Administration
T.K.B. Fraternity, Student Council 4,
Student Faculty Relations Committee
4, Magna Cum Laude.

GEORGE E. BRIXNER, III

B.S. — Business Administration




DAVID BROWN

B.S. — Social & Public Administra-
tion
Basketball 3,4

DOMINIC A. BUONOCORE

B.S. — Electrical Engineering

KENNETH H. BURT

B.S. — Electrical Engineering
Phi Zeta Psi Fraternity — Social
Chairman 1963-1964, Intramurals,
Engineering Society, C.S.P.E. Secre-
tary 4, I.E.E.E. 3,4.

THEODORE N. BUSCH

B.S. — Industrial Administration.



KENNETH H. BURT



THEODORE N. BUSCH




66



WILLIAM A. BUXTON ROBERT CALEGARI




WILMA CAPOBIANCO MARTIN CEPKAUSKAS




■Am

PAUL CHARTIER MARSHALL CHEIVRALUCE








RICHARD CHIRGWIN



RONALD CIARCIA




WILLIAM A. BUXTON

B.S. — Business Administration
Evening Student Council — Secretary
1962, Vice-Pres. and Treas, 1963.

ROBERT CALEGARI

B.S. — Electrical Engineering
Radio Club, Engineering Society.

WILMA CAPOBIANCO

B.S. — Business Administration
Drama Club 1, Cheerleading 1, Vari-
ety Show 1, Parents Tea 1-3.

MARTIN CEPKAUSKAS

B.S. — Mechanical Engineering
C.S.P.E. Pres., Engineering Society,
Weight Lifting Club, Phi Zeta Psi Fra-
ternity, I.E.E.E., A.S.M.E.

PAUL CHARTIER

B.S. — Electrical Engineering.

MARSHALL CHEIVRALUCE

B.S. — Business Administration.

RICHARD CHIRGWIN

B.S. — Industrial Administration
S.A.M.

RONALD CIARCIA

B.S. — Mechanical Engineering
Treas. Weight Lifting Club 2-4, Engi-
neering Society, C.S.P.E., Intramu-
rals.

PETER F. CONNELLY

News 1-3, Student Council Pres. 4,
Phi Delta Epsilon 4.

JOHN T. COX

B.S. — Electrical Engineering
I.E.E.E., Engineering Society, Radio
Club 4.



JOHN T. COX



». J. ■* ■*; 'S- i. *. *'. «.




PAUL DeBERNARDO HAROLD DiADAMO, JR.



68




JOHN F. DiBENEDICTIS, JR. JAMES DORNEY




NEIL DORSO



THOMAS DUDA



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FRANK ELIA



FRANK A. S. ELLIOTT



PAUL DeBERNARDO

B.S. — Accounting

HAROLD DiADAMO, JR.

B.S. — Social and Public Administra-
tion.

JOHN F. DiBENEDICTIS, JR.

B.S. — Business Administration
Intramurals 1-4, Apollo Fraternity.

JAMES DORNEY

B.S. — Business Administration
S.A.M.

NEIL DORSO

B.S. — Business Administration
S.A.M.



5






, ,;^;€5j-s


ANTHONY ESPOSITO





THOMAS DUDA

B.S. — Electrical Engineering.

FRANK ELIA

B.S. — Electrical Engineering.

FRANK A. S. ELLIOTT

B.S. — Electrical Engineering
Engineering Society, Magna Cum
Laude.

ANTHONY ESPOSITO

B.S. — Industrial Engineering.

MICHAEL G. FARINO

B.S. — Business Administration
Business Manager 1963 Yearbook,
Phi Delta Epsilon.




MICHAEL G. FARINO



•• J; v_ i^ .*_ 4- ki J J. ^ i




FRANK FASANELLA GERALD E. FELDMAN



70




ROBERT FITZGERALD DAVID M. GARVEY




JOHN J. GEBAUER CHARLES HARDING GESNER



' J .1 .' .* ,* !^ it "f !!"* '•*■ :'■» '^■
;^ J 'f -T 'I' !♦ 1^ '* i^^ . ■ '■ ' ■





JOHN GIACCI



GEORGE E. GILPATRICK, JR.



CHARLES GITLITZ


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FRANK FASANELU

B.S. — Business Administration.

GERALD E. FELDMAN

B.S. — Business Administration,

ROBERT FITZGERALD

B.S. — Business Administration
Basketball Manager 1-4. Baseball
Manager 2-3, Soccer Manager 1-3,
Varsity Club 3,4.

DAVID M. GARVEY

B.S. — Electrical Engineering, Phi
Zeta Psi Fraternity, Bridge Club.

JOHN J. GEBAUER

B.S. — Industrial Administration
Varsity Soccer 1,2, Intramurals 1-4.


1

Online LibraryUnited States. Bureau of the CensusChariot 1965 (Volume [2]) → online text (page 1 of 2)