United States. Bureau of the Census.

Program of the seventeeth annual session of the Piasa Chautauqua Assembly (Volume 1900) online

. (page 1 of 3)
Online LibraryUnited States. Bureau of the CensusProgram of the seventeeth annual session of the Piasa Chautauqua Assembly (Volume 1900) → online text (page 1 of 3)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


wP m (t a ^ ua



aw ^Asscn^bl/




oo



Educational
Sunday School

TLEASURf



A MODERN HOME

Is not furnished until it contains

A MODERN PIANO




We carry a large variety of the most desirable makes— sell on easy terms —
at much lower prices than can be secured from dealers in large cities, because our
.expenses are much less.

We take old instruments in exchange at fair value.



A FULL LINE OF



Sheet Music Books »«* Musical Merchandise



CALL OR WRITS FOR PRICES ON ANYTHING IN THE LINE OF MUSIC.



The Frank R. Davis Piano
Company

J 00- J 02 East Second Street, - - ALTON, ILL.



PROGRAM



Seventeenth Annual Session




SCENERY AT PIASA CHAUTAUQUA.



PI ASA CHAUTAUQUA ASSEMBLY,



JULY 19 TO AUGUST 16, 1900



Pi ASA CHAUTAUQUA ASSEMBLY.

OFFICERS, 1900.



President A. W. CROSS Jerseyville, 111.

First Vice-President J. B. ULRICH St. Louis, Mo.

Second Vice-Pres't HON. C. P. STAFFORD Grafton, 111.

Secretary P. M. HAMILTON Jerseyville, 111.

Treasurer GEORGE. H. DOUGHERTY Otterville, 111.

Superintendent of Instruction .. S. B. WARNER, D.D.

Assembly Chaplain F. M. VAN TREESE, D. D., Lebanon, 111.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS.



*S. B. Warner, D. D St. Louis.

T. H. Perrin Alton.

*Col. A. F. Rogers Upper Alton.

*Judge O. B. Hamilton Jerseyville.

Gforge H. Dougherty Otterville.

*J. B. Ulrich : St. Louis.

*L. Hallock St. Louis.

N. Luccock, D. D St. Louis.

*A. W. Cross Jerseyville.

Joel McDavid Hillsboro.

*Hon. C. P. Stafford Grafton.

Col. W. H. Fulkerson Jerseyville.

Those marked * constitute the Executive Committee.

COMMITTEES FOR 1900.



The first name on each committee being chairman.

Program.— S. B. Warner, D. D., T. H. Perrin and O. B. Hamilton.

Advertising and Printing. — T. H. Perrin, O. B. Hamilton and W. H. Fulkerson.

Privileges. — A. F. Rogers.

Gates.— J. B. Ulrich, T. H. Perrin and O. B. Hamilton.

Tents. — Col. W. H. Fulkerson.

Transportation. — O. B. Hamilton, A. W. Cross, T. H. Perrin and A. F. Rogers.

Hotel, Lunch Counter and Store. — C. P. Stafford, G. H. Dougherty and

A. W. Cross.
Lots (including surveying and recording plat, and price and sale of lots). — L.

Hallock, G. H. Dougherty, C. P. Stafford, J. B. Ulrich and W. H. Fulkerson.
Notes and Accounts. — A. W. Cross and O. B. Hamilton.
Picnics.— A. F. Rogers.



PI AS A CHAUTAUQUA ASSEMBLY, 1900.




N presenting the program
for our seventeenth an-
nual session, we feel con-
fident that our previous
record has made a place
for us of no mean rank
among the popular as-
semblies of the country.
The long list of illustrious talent which has
appeared on our platform through the
years includes nearly every name that has
served as an attraction at any of the lead-
ing assemblies and many of these have had




REV. WILLIAM POTTS GEORGE, D.D., L.L.D.

a place on our program repeatedly. To
maintain variety and attractiveness, and at
the same time provide wholesome instruc-
tion and inspiration is our unfailing pur-
pose. We have an ambition to sustain
a creditable and recognized relation to the
great Chautauqua educational movement,
based on the merit of actual work done.
Hence, we do not limit our sessions to ten
days or two weeks, neither do we confine
our work to lectures and entertainments.
Prominence is given to the specifically edu-
cational function of the true Assembly. The
forenoons of all days except Sundays are
devoted to schools and institutes, together



with the Round Table hour in the late af-
ternoons. Some of the best instructors
available have been secured to conduct these
departments of instruction.

Not far from seventy-five new faces will
appear on our platform this season, and
these, taken together with those who return
to us of other years' acquaintance, consti-
tute one of the strongest arrays of talent
that will be found upon any Assembly pro-
gram. From our list of talent we wish to
call attention to the following:

REV. WM. P. GEORGE, D. D., L. L. D.,
Is one of the most popular preachers and
lecturers of the West. He is the pastor of
Westminster Presbyterian Church, Kansas
City, Mo. In him are combined traits which
make him a typical Englishman and an
ideal American. Abundant and discriminat-
ing press notices from the East and West
testify to his successes on the platform. His
reading of Dickens' Christmas Carol is in-
imitable.

DR. P. S. HENSON,

The Weil-Known Baptist Divine,
Pastor of First Church, Chicago, will deliv-
er two lectures. He is in great demand
on Assembly programs, where he never fails
to delight and instruct. H. W. Grady said




DR. P. S. HENSON.



of him in the Atlanta Constitution, "As a
lecturer, he ranks second to no man on the
American platform."



PI AS A CHAUTAUQUA ASSEMBLY.



REV. DR. A. A. WILLITS,

The "Apostle of Sunshine," delivers two lec-
tures and a sermon. For nearly forty
years he has been prominently before the
public as preacher and lecturer. He has
now retired from pastoral work of the Pres-



since then a minister in various parts of the
South, he is fully qualified to treat the theme
of his lecture, "Home Life in Dixie During




RE V. FATHER J. M. CLEARY.

byterian ministry, and devotes himself to
the lecture platform. His years seem not
to have diminished his popularity in this
field, for he captivates and helps every aud-
ience to which he speaks.

REV. S. A. STEEL, D. D.,
Of Richmond, Va., who lectures and preach-
es for us, belongs to a givup of Southern




MR. DANA. C. JOHNSON

speakers popular in the North as well as the
South. A native of Mississippi, reared amid
the turbulent scenes of the Civil War, and




MISS OLOF KRARER.



the War." From all directions praise is
heard. Col. Bain, himself a Southerner,
says of that lecture, "It is equal to anything




REV. DR. JESSE BOWMAN YOUNG.

on the American platform as an entertain-
ment."

REV. FATHER J. M. CLEARY,
Of Minneapolis, will deliver his eloquent lec-
ture on "American Citizenship." A leading



PI ASA CHAUTAUQUA ASSEMBLY.



daily says: "Father Cleary is pre-eminently
a lecturer. His voice is melodious and well-
moulded, bis words flow freely and are well
chosen, his gestures are few, and his man-
ner earnest, but his clear, convincing argu-




MRS. A. E. SHIPLEY.

ment is the great charm of his address." He
is admired by all the people who hear him
without reference to their church connec-
tion.

REV. DR. JESSE BOWMAN YOUNG,

Of St. Louis, is to give on Grand Army
Day "The Story of a Great Battle, - ' this lec-
ture being the description of the battle of
Gettysburg. The Philadelphia Enquirer
says: "As only a participant could have
painted in words that memorable three
days' battle, Dr. Young painted it, and the
audience listened with breathless attention."



MR. DANA C. JOHNSON,
Of Ohio is to give us a much praised lecture
on "Thomas Jefferson." To students of
American history and biography tnis effort
will be full of interest. Testimony from
several assemblies say of it: "It was the peer
of any address given during the season."
"Everybody who heard him was delighted."
"Has the polish of the schools and reaches
the people." "No more promising lecturer
before the public." "An . able production,
couched in the choicest of English."

MISS OLOF KRARER,
A native Esquimaux lady, will address us
twice on life in the frozen North. She is
but 40 inches in height, weighs 100 pounds
and is 37 years old. She will describe her
people in Greenland, tell the story of her
life, sing in her native language, and appear
in native costume. Her popularity is indi-
cated by the fact that she has lectured near-
ly a hundred times in Philadelphia.

REV. S. W. GAMBLE,
Of Kansas is a specialist on the Sabbath
question, and has been secured to deliver a
series of lectures on that theme. Bishop






MR. AND MRS. FRANCIS LABADIE.

He was a staff officer in that battle, while
yet in his teens, and has since lived as pas-
tor in that town. He is the author of a pop-
ular volume, "What a Boy Saw in the
Army."



MISS JENME SHOLMAKER.

Vincent says that his addresses are "A fresh
and unanswerable argument of immense
value." Bishop Fowler calls his theory "the
greatest theological discovery of the centu-
ry-"

We have been exceeding fortunate in se-
curing the services of

MRS. A. E. SHIPLEY,
To take charge of our C. L. S. C. department.
Headers of the Chautauquan will remember
the appreciative editorial reference to her
work in the April number. She is the sec-



j ■ lf- v retary of this work for Iowa, and will con-



PI ASA CM A U TA UQ UA A SSEMBL J \



duct a C. L. S. C. headquarters, tlie daily
Round Table, a woman's council and a
girls' club, remaining with us for two weeks.

MISS JENNIE D. SHOEMAKER,
A reciter, and entertainer, is thoroughly ar-
tistic, unique and versatile. She has suc-
cessfully toured in all parts of the country,
and will entertain us for two evenings. Her
Delsartean exhibition is pronounced inaster-



they are particularly effective. The presi-
dent of the Bay View Assembly wrote them:
"You gave me one of the pleasantest even-
ings I have enjoyed for a long time."
The services of the

DOUBT FAMILY ORCHESTRA
Have been secured for three weeks, from
July 19 to August 10. They will make daily
appearances, besides furnishing the entire




THE DOUBT FAM

ful. The wide range of her programs is
very exceptional and satisfactory.

MR. AND MRS. FRANCIS LABADIE,
Will appear in their two great entertain-
ments as delineators of human characters.
They appear in a series of dialogues by the
most eminent authors, and in readings from
both classic and modern literary fields. In
interpretations of Shakespearean characters



ILY ORCHESTRA.

entertainment for three evenings. The de-
mand for these musicians is so great that
their services for so long a period were only
secured through an early engagement.

THE SCHWARTZ LADIES' ORCHESTRA
Will be at our assembly for the entire last
week, furnishing music at special hours, and
introducing the various numbers on the
program as may be desired.



PI AS A CHAUTAUQUA ASSEMBLY



MR. FRANK ROBERSON,
Now (June) in South Africa, will afford us
two entertainments with his stereopticon




most important churches of St. Louis, and
his lecture is the outcome of ten years' ex-
perience.

MR. AND MRS. JAMES P. WHYTE,
Who last year rendered such efficient ser-
vice and formed so many strong attach-
ments to Piasa, and our people, will be with




MR. FRANK R. ROBERSON.

and lectures. This, his last tour, and a
former one to the Philippines, will be illus-
trated by 300 life-colored views me high-
est results of art and the latest information
will characterize these entertainments.

MR. WILLIAM D. ARMSTRONG,
Director of Shurtleff College School of Mu-
sic, will deliver a lecture on that interesting




MR. AND MRS. JAMES P. WHYTE.

us for several days. He is now the Master
of English in the Academy of Lake Forest
University.

REV. DR. A. P. GEORGE,

State Superintendent of the Missouri Sun-
day-school Association, has been secured to
conduct the Normal Department, and will
have charge of an early morning class for
two weeks. His experience in convention




MR. WILLIAM D. ARMSTRONG.

and perplexing theme, "Church Music." He
has had charge of the music in some of the



REV. DR. A. P. GEORGE.

and assembly work places him easily as a
leader in this line in the West.



PI ASA CHAUTAUQUA ASSEMBLY




WHERE THE PTASAUQUANS LIVE.



PI ASA CHAUTAUQUA ASSEMBLY.



THE SOUTH AFRICAN BOY CHOIR,
Under the direction of Mr. J. H. Balmer and
assisted by Miss Elsie Clark of Kaffirland
will constitute an attraction for two even-
ings of absolutely unique character. These
boys have been secured from Zulu, Basuto,
Kaffir and Bushman tribes of South Africa,
and trained by Mr. Balmer for this work.
The success has been marvelous. The As-
sembly Herald, Chautauqua, N. Y., in speak-
ing of their second entertainment at that As-
sembly last year, said: "The vast amphithea-
ter was crowded in every available corner.
The audience was more than delighted. At
one point in the program in response to a
signal by Bishop Vincent, they gave Mr.



training and several years' experience be-
fore the public assure us of a fitting con-
clusion of our delightful series of entertain-
ments.

In addition to this list of new talent, there
will be a number ^of familiar workers who
return to add to their good record.

REV. ALFRED A. WRIGHT, D.D.,
Dean of the Boston Correspondence School,
will have charge of our Ministers' Institute
and Church Congress. He will present two
courses of lectures upon those profoundly
important themes, that lie hidden from the
English reader in the unexpressed remain-
ders of the Greek text of our New Testa-
ments.






SOUTH AFRICAN BOY CHOIR.



Balmer and his band the Chautauqua salute.
It was as surprising as it was enjoyable."

MISS ADDA B. YOUNG,
Of St. Louis, a graduate of the Perry School
of Oratory, will be at the Assembly for one
week and entertain our audiences from time
to time with a rich variety of selections. Her
readings display keen analysis of character,
true appreciation of situation and strong
mastery of the humorous and pathetic. From
her first appearance she will be a favorite.

MR. C. W. YERKES,
Principal of the Brighton Public School, will
give the concluding evening's entertainment,
consisting of dramatic and humorous recita-
tions, impersonations, etc. His professional



Especial attention is asked to the fact that
these lectures present in familiar language
the most up-to-date conclusions of scientific
research. Those who heard Dean Wright
on his former visit to Piasa need no incen-
tive, save remembrance, to insure their
presence this season. He will preach on
Sunday, July 22.

PROF. J. R. BUCKINGHAM

Will conduct a School of Art, and give in-
struction in drawing and painting. He will
be the Chalk-Talk Artist for the Assembly
and Sunday-school. Instruction to private
scholars, outdoor sketching and painting a
specialty. He will also tell stories to the
boys three times a week.



JO



PI ASA CHAUTAUQUA ASSEMBLY.



REV. DR. GEORGE HINDLEY
Will deliver the Recognition Day Address
and lecture and preach to the delight of old
and new friends.

THE ALTON CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC
Will provide the evening's program for July
31. This successful institution at our door




REV. UK. GEORGE HINDLEY.



tive features. A pleasing program will be
provided each day for the little ones. Terms,
65 cents per week, $1.50 for term of three
weeks. If children are unable to remain on
the grounds longer than one or two days, ar-
rangements have been made, so that they
can attend. A complete and interesting
program for each day will be provided. The
Kindergarten will open Monday morning,
July 23. Hours, 8 to 10:30 a. m.

REV. SAM P. JONES
Will be greeted by his usual throng of inter-
ested hearers, and will probably have the
largest audience of the Assembly. His sub-
ject this year will be "Shams and the Genuine "

REV. F. M. VAN TREESE, D. D.,
Will continue to be our Assembly Chaplain.
He has new plans for making the morning
devotional hour interesting and profitable.

SLAYTON'S JUBILEE SINGERS
Will give three evenings of song. These
nine colored singers have together given ov-
er 2,500 concerts, and are the leading jubilee
concert company of America. Aside from
their own regular programs, they will sing
in connection with other parts of our pro-
gram.

HON. S. V. WHITE.

Hon S. V. White, (familiarly called "Deacon
White") one of the most prominent and suc-
cessful characters in Wall Street, New York



kindly joins hands with us in our education-
al work. We opine that for once prophets
will not be without honor in their own coun-
try.

THE LYRIC LADIES, OF CHICAGO,
Will sing for two evenings. This quartette
has sung its way into the hearts of the peo-
ple over a large portion of our country. All
are cultivated soloists of the highest order,
and will afford a decided feature of musical
work. They are accompanied by Miss Or-
ra Mae Noonan, an accomplished reader.

CARTER, THE AMERICAN MAGICIAN,

Has been secured for an evening's entertain-
ment with mystifying illusions. He will
give refined and comic displays of the art of
sleight-of-hand. The Chicago Tribune says:
"Neither Herrman nor Kellar can outdo
Carter, their clever young competitor."

MISS ADDIE G. TANDY,

Of St. Louis will again have charge of the
Kindergarten. Songs, games, stories, talks,
occupations and nature work will be attrac-




HON. S. V. WHITE.

City, will attend the Assembly this year. He
will take part in the great Jersey County Re-
union, giving his recollections of Jersey Coun-
ty from 1835 to 1850.



Piasa Assembly Program, 1900.



^£^^-^-^?-^£-



OPENING DAY,

Thursday, July 19.

JERSEY COUNTY REUNION.

TWO DAYS.

9:30 a. m. Devotional Hour, Rev. F. M. Van
Treese, D. D., Assembly Chap-
lain.

10:30 a. m. Address of Welcome, Hon. Geo. W.
Ware, Jerseyville.

11:15 a. m. Response, Judge A. A. Goodrich,
Chicago.
1:45 p. m. Poem, "Sixty Years Ago on a
Jersey County Farm," Hon. Ed.
Miner, Carrollton.
2:00 p.m. Recollections of Jersey County
from 1835 to 1850, Hon. S. V.
. White, Wall Street, New York.
8:00 p. m. A Spelling School of Ye Olden
Tyme. Teacher 1st contest,
Hon. Jacob Terry, Edwardsville;
leaders, Hon. Benj. Wedding
and Prentiss D. Cheney; teacher
2d contest, Mrs. Virginia Cor-
bett Harbert, Jerseyville; lead-
er, Mrs. Eliza Chandler White,
Brooklyn, N. Y., Mrs. Harriett
Douglass Noble. Webster's
Elementary Speller will be
used.

The Doubt Family Orchestra, consisting of
Children of David Doubt, for-
merly of Otter Creek Township,
will be in attendance. See
page (i.

The Elegant Excursion Steamer, Golden Gate,
capacity, 800, will give excur-
sions to mouth of Illinois river,
stopping at Grafton and giving
time for inspection of the im-
mense ship yards and quarries,
in the afternoon.

Friday, July 20.
8:00 a. m. Devotional Hour.
9:00 a. m. Chorus Class, Prof. M. E. John-
son.
9:00 a. m. Normal Class, Dr. A. P. George.
See page 7.
10:00 a. m. Woman's Council, Mrs. A. E. Ship-
ley; Topic, "How the Doors
Have Opened to Women During
the Century." See page 5.
10:00 a. m. Ministers' Institute, Dean A. A.
Wright, of Boston See page 9.
Lecture, "Divine Men and the
Deity of Jesus."
11:00 a. m. Address, "Farmers and Farming
in Jersey County 50 Years Ago,"
Hon. Minor S. Gowins, of
Kansas.



2:00 p. m. Address, "Bench and Bar of Jer-
sey County," Judge Geo. W.
Herdman, followed by ad-
dresses in part as follows:
"Brush College and Social Life
in Jersey County 50 Years Ago,"
Judge L. Stilwell, Kansas.
County officers: Hon. Prentis D.
Cheney, Jerseyville; Jersey-
ville Seminary, Mrs. Virginia
Corbett Harbert; Hamilton Prim-
ary School, Lineus Humiston;
Jerseyville High School, Prof.
Edward Shafer; Medical Pro-
fession 50 Years Ago, Dr. A. K.
Van Home.
An opportunity will be given for remarks

after each address.
Excursion on Steamer Golden Gate in after-
noon.

4:00 p. m. Church Congress, Dean A. A.
Wright. Lecture, "Paul, the
Incomparable Servant. ' '

5:00 p. m. Round Table, Mrs. A. E. Shipley.
Topic, "Chautauqua — Past, Pres-
ent and Future."

7:30 p. m. Entertainment by the Famous
South African Boy Choir, con-
ducted by Mr. J. H. Balmer,
and assisted by Miss Elsie
Clark of Kaffirland.

Saturday, July 21.

8:00 a. m. Devotional Hour.
9:00 a. m. Chorus Class, Prof. Johnson.
9:00 a. m. Normal Class, Dr. George.
10:00 a. m. Woman's Council, Mrs. Shipley;

Topic, "The Household Prob-
lem."
10:00 a. m. Ministers' Institute, Dean Wright;

Topic, "The Incarnation and

Some of its Implications."
11:00 a. m. Address on Sociology, Rev. Dr. W.

P. George.
2:00 p. m. Lecture, "The Value of a Man,"

Rev. Wm. Potts George, D. D.,

LL. D., of Kansas City, Mo.

See page 3.
4:00 p. m. Church Congress, Dean Wright;

Topic, "John and the Heart of

Jesus."
5:00 p. m. Round Table, Mrs. Shiplev; Topic,

"What Shall Our Children

Read ?"
7:30 p. m. Entertainment, South African Boy

Choir.

Sunday, July 22.

9:00 a. m. Sunday School, T. H. Perrin, of
Alton, Superintendent.
11:00 a. m. Sermon, Rev. William Potts
George, D. D., LL. D.
7:00 p. m. Vesper Service.



The Ivers & Pond Grand Piano is loaned by the Frank R. Davis Piano Co., Alton, III.



PROGRAM.



8:00 p.m. Sermon, Rev.. Alfred A. Wright, 4:00 p.m.
D. I).
Monday, July 23.

Devotional Hour.
Kindergarten, (organized)



8:00
8:00



5:00 p.



9:00 a. m
9:00 a. m
10:00 a. m

10:00 a. m



11:00 a. m.

11:00 a. m.

2:00 p. m.
4:00 p. m.



Miss
A.ddie G. Tandy, of St. Louis.

Chorus Class, Prof. Johnson.

Normal Class, Dr. George.

Woman's Council, Mrs. Shipley;
Topic, "Our Children."

Ministers' Institute, Dean Wright.
Topic, "Jesus and the Baptism
of Death."

Address, "The South African
Question." Rev. Dr. George.

Girls' Outlook Club. Mrs. Ship-
ley. Topic, "The Home Girl."

Lecture.

Church Congress. Dean Wright.
Topic, "The Evolution of the
Rock in Simon."

Round Table. Mrs Shipley. Topic,
"Our Country; Dangers that
Threaten."

Entertainment. Reading of Dick-
ens' Christmas Carol by Rev.
Dr. W. P. George.

Tuesday, July 24.

SAM JONES DAY.

Devotional Hour.

Kindergarten. Miss Tandy.

Chorus Class. Prof. Johnson.

Normal Class, Dr. George.

Woman's Council, Mrs. Shipley.
Topic, "The Children of the
Slums."

Ministers' Institute. Topic, "Bib-
lical Doctrine of the Holy
Spirit."

Girls' Outlook Club, Mrs. Shipley.
Topic, "An Octagon of Needs."

Lecture, Rev. Sam P. Jones,
"Shams and the Genuine."

Church Congress. Topic, "What
is the Church and What is It
Not?"

Round Table, Mrs. Shipley. Top-
ic, "The Influence of Margaret
Fuller."

Concert. The Doubt Family Or-
chestra.

Grand Steamboat Excursion on the Mississippi
River in the Afternoon.
Wednesday, July 25.
8:00 a. m. Devotional Hour.

Kindergarten, Miss Tandy.

Chorus Class, Prof. Johnson.

Normal Class, Dr. George.
10:00 a. m. Woman's Council, Mrs. Shipley.
Topic, "Man in the Home."

Ministers' Institute. Topic, "Bib-
lical Doctrine of the Holy
Spirit"— Cont'd.

Girls' Outlook Club, Mrs. Shipley.
Topic, "A Young Girl's Read-
ing."

Lecture, Rev. P. S. Henson, D.D.,
of Chicago, "Backbone." See
page 3.



5:00 p.



7:30 p. m.



8:00 a.
8:00 a.
9:00 a.
9:00 a.
10:00 a.



10:00



11:00 a. m.



2:00 p. m.
4:00 p. m.



5.00 p. m.



7:30 p. m.



8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
9:00 a. rn.



10:00 a. m.



11:00 a. m.



2:00 p. m.



f:30 p. m.



8:00 a. m.
8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
10:00 a. m.



10:00 a. m.

11:00 a. m.

2:00 p. m.
4:00 p. m.

5:00 p. m.

7:30 p. m.



8:00 a. m.
8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
10:00 a. m.



10:00 a. m.

11:00 a. m.
2:00 p. m.
4:00 p. m.
5:00 p. m.
7:30 p. m.



8:00
8:00
9:00
9:00
10:00



Church Congress. Topic, "For
What is the Church and for
What is It Not?"

Round Table, Mrs. Shipley. Top-
ic, "Chautauqua Work for the
Coming Year."

Concert, "The Lyric Ladies of
Chicago." See page 10.

Thursday, July 26.

Devotional Hour.

Kindergarten, Miss Tandy.

Chorus Class, Prof. Johnson.

Normal Class, Dr. George.

Woman's Council, Mrs. Shipley.
Topic, "What Constitutes Good
Society?"

Ministers' Institute. Topic, "Bib-
lical Doctrine of the Holy
Spirit"— Cont'd.

Girls' Outlook Club, Mrs. Shipley.
Topic, "Darning, Mending —
Tags and Things."

Lecture, Rev. Dr. Henson,
"Fools."

Church Congress. Topic, "What
Helps the Church and What
Helps It Not?"

Round Table, Mrs. Shipley. Top-
ic, "An Hour with Our Short
Story Writers."

Concert, The Lad}- Lyrics of Chi-
cago.

Friday, July 27.

Devotional Hour.
Kindergarten, Miss Tandy.
Chorus Class, Prof. Johnson.
Normal Class, Dr. George.
Woman's Council, Mrs. Shipley.

Topic. "Frances Willard and

Her Mission."
Ministers' Institute, Mr. J. P.

Whyte. Topic, "Public Speak-
ing on Platform and Pulpit."

See page 7.
Girls' Outlook Club. Mrs. Shipley.

Topic, "The Charm of Good

Manners."
Lecture, Rev. A. A. Willits, D.D.,

of New Jersey, " Sunshine." —

See page 4.
Church Congress. Topic, "Wherein

is the Church Failing and

Wherein Succeeding ?"
Round Table. Mrs. Shipley.

Topic, "Manners and Customs

of Old Colonial Days."
Lecture-Recital, Mr. and Mrs.

James Primrose Whyte, of Lake

Forest University, "National

Life in Song."

Saturday, July 28.

Devotional Hour.


1 3

Online LibraryUnited States. Bureau of the CensusProgram of the seventeeth annual session of the Piasa Chautauqua Assembly (Volume 1900) → online text (page 1 of 3)