United States. Bureau of the Census.

Rand, McNally & co.'s Handy guide to Philadelphia and environs, including Atlantic City and Cape May online

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'•-^ tIANDY GUIDE TO ir-^:

'HILADELPHIA

AN? CAPE
MAYii




t^AND.M^NAlLY^'



"CQ PI 151.1^11 ER3



iECONf>OOPY,




ia &



f^eading J^ailway

PHILADELPHIA
TO NEW YORK





2




• • I N • •


HOURS







Try the new Whitehall Terminal. 'Most
convenient place to arrive at in New York.
Tickets and information at



NEW GITY TICKET OFFICE

Corner 13th and Chestnut Sts.,

AT CORNER 9TH AND CHESTNUT STS.,

OR AT TICKET OFFICE IN STATION READING

TERMINAL, 12TH AND MARKET STS.



I A, SWEIGARD,

General Superintendent.



EDSON J. WEEKS,



GENERAL Passenger agent






HAS. W. SOULAS'



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AIM! IB)



i5rm
•Eell



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ALL PERSONS VISITING PHILADELPHIA SHOULD VISIT THIS
FAMOUS PLACE AND VIEW ITS WORKS OF ART



All the Leading American and European Newspapers on File

The City Directory of London, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Stuttgardt, and
all the principal cities of United States, kept here for public use.



The following Imported Beer on Draught:

WURZBURGER, PILSNER, COBURGER, MUNCHENER,
ERLANGER. and PSCHORR BRAU.

Cuisine Unexcelled =



(")



When you are ready to return home from
PHILADELPHIA or ATLANTIC CITY

see that your tickets read via the

LEHIGH VALLEY

i

THE ROUTE OF THE

Black Diamond Express

Handsomest Train in the World.

Solid Vestibule Trains Through

BETWEEN



Via Buffalo and Niagara Falls



Best line from Atlantic City to the West
via BUFFALO and NIAGARA FALLS
Through the mountains of Pennsylvania, the t^h^
historic Wyoming- Valley, and the inland '^T^
Lake region of New York State.

Address,

CHAS. S. LEE, General Passenger Agent,
New York,

For information about the line, time tables, rates of fare, etc.

( iii )



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CHESTNUT STREET, LOOKING WEST FROM NINTH STREET,



Rand, McNally & Co.'s



HANDY GUIDE

TO

PHILADELPHIA



AND ENVIRONS,



INCLUDING



Atlantic City and Cape May



FO UR TH EDITION.



WITH MAPS AND ILLUSTRATIONS.



CHICAGO AND NEW YORK:

RAND, McNALLY & CO., PUBLISHERS.
1899.



A A \-^ »!-/>.






30028



Copyright, 1896, by Rand, McNally & Co.
Copyright, 1897, by Rand, McNally & Co.
Copyright, 1898, by Rand, McNally & Co.
Copyright, 1899, by Rand, McNally & Co.



'^^^OP'i^.&HgQ^i



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APR 14



r*-.







TABLE OF CONTENTS.



I. AN INTRODUCTION TO PHILADELPHIA Page 7

Railroads and Depots, 7; Baggage and Checks, 10; Ferries, 10;
Steamship Lines, n; Railroad Cabs and Vehicles, 12; Hotels, 13;
Some of the More Prominent Hotels, 15; Restaurants, 16; Boarding
Houses and Furnished Rooms, 18.

II. GETTING ABOUT PHILADELPHIA.. 20

Street Numbers, 21; Street Car Lines, 23; Suburban Points and How-
to Reach Them, 24

III. THEATERS AND OTHER PLACES OF AMUSEMENT ..... 26

Theaters, 26; Zoological Garden, 28; Lectures and Miscellaneous
Exhibitions, 29; Balls and Masquerades, 29; Suburban Pleasure
Parks, 30.

IV. A TOUR OF THE CITY 33

Public Buildings of Interest, 41; Business Men's Organizations, 47;
A Shopping Trip, 51.

V. THE CITY'S PARKS AND DRIVES 53

Fairmount Park, 54; The Old Park (Lemon Hill), 55; The East Park
(Mount Pleasant, etc.), 56; The West Park (Centennial Grounds,
etc.); Wissahickon Park, 59; Bartram's Gardens, 63; Other Parks
and Public Grounds, 64; Cemeteries, 66.

VL THE RIVERS AND HARBORS . 68

A Trip Up the River, 69; A Short Trip Down the River, 72; A Trip

Up the Schuylkill, 75.

VII. LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS 1 76

The City's Free Libraries, 76; Museums and Galleries, 78.

VIII. CHURCHES— RELIGIOUS AND BENEVOLENT WORK 84

Humane and Benevolent Institutions, 90; Hospitals and Dispens-
aries, 92.

IX. EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 95

Public Schools, 95; Collegiate Institutions, 95.

X. SOCIAL AND LEARNED SOCIETIES, CLUBS, ETC loi



XL THE SUBURBS AND SHORT TRIPS BY RAIL 106

The Surrounding Country, 106; Germantown, 106; West Philadelphia
and Beyond, no; Camden, no.

XII. SEASIDE RESORTS m

Atlantic City, m; How to Get to Atlantic City, 113; Amusements,
116; Cape May, 119.

(3)




HOTEL EMPIRE

BOULEVARD AND 63d STREET, NEW YORK CITY.

Patronized by travelers and tourists of the best class from all parts of the world.
A MODERN FIRE-PROOF HOTELOFTHE FIRST CLASS, CON DUCTED
ON THE AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLANS FOR THE ACCOMMO-
DATION OF THOSE WHO WANT THE BEST AT REASONABLE COST

FAMOUS for the PERFECTION of its CUISINE and SERVICE.

Its Beautiful and Homelike Appointments and Splendid Location.
Within 12 minutes of all the principal theatres and great department stores,

Electric cars running to all parts of the city pass its doors. 6tli and 9th Avenue
Railroad stations one minute's walk from the hotel.

RATES MODERATE.

Music by the Empire Orchestra every Evening.

"Send address for our book, " The Empire, Illustrated."

W JOHNSON QUINN, Proprietor.

(4)



ILLUSTRATIONS. ^



Chestnut Street, looking west from Ninth Street
(frontispiece),

Philadelphia & Reading Terminal,

Broad Street Station, Pennsylvania Railroad,

The Washington Monumen^pB^^^^^^ .

Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co.'s Building

The City Hall,

The United States Mint, ,

United States Custom House,

Independence Hall, .....

Liberty Bell — Independence Hall,

Witherspoon Building, ....

Betz Building, ......

Brown Brothers' Building,

Fairmount Park, looking west from Lemon Hill
Observatory,

Horticultural Hall,

Memorial Hall, ......

Fairmount Water Works, ....

The Schuylkill River and Boat Houses,

On the Wissahickon, . . , . .

The River Drive, Fairmount Park,

Steamboat Landing, Fairmount Park,

Philadelphia Library — Ridgeway Branch,

Academy of Fine Arts,

A Launching in Cramp's Shipyards,

Girard College, Main Building,

The Mary J. Drexel Home,

The Masonic Temple, .

The Odd Fellows' Temple, .

Union League Club,

A Beach Scene at Atlantic City,

The Lighthouse at Atlantic City,

Cape May, .....

On the Beach — Cape M' },

(5)



Opposite page i

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34

36

40

". 42

44
46

48
50

52

54
56
58
6a
62
64
66
76
82
92
96
98

" lOQ

" 102

" 104

IIO

114

118

" 120



S. A. L.



SEABOARD AIR LINE

THE POPULAR LINE

NORTH AND SOUTH

Double Daily Service.



The Famous Atlanta Special
Solid Vestibule Limited




THE CYCLOl

SOLID TRAINS FROM PORTSMOUTH TO ATLANTA,

Make Travel a Pleasure

and Use the Seaboafd Air Line,

SOUTHERN PINES, ATHENS, RALEIGH,
ATLANTA, MACON, MOBILE, NEW
ORLEANS, AND PACIFIC COAST POINTS.

TICKETS ON SALE AT ALL PRINCIPAL TICKET OFFICES IN UNITED STATES AND CANADA,

Ask Ticket Agent for Ticket via

SOT^BOT^RD 75IR LINE.

$3 -SAVE- $3.

Tot Time Tables, Information, Reservation, call on or address

A. B. FARNSWORTH, Gen-l Eastern Pass'R Agent.
371 Broadway. New York.

£. ST. JOHN, H. W. B. GLOVER, T. J. ANDERSON,

Vice-Pres't and Gen'l Mgr.. Traffic Manager, Gen'} Passer Agent.

PORTSMOUTH, VA.

(6)



I.

AN INTRODUCTION TO PHILA-
DELPHIA.



Railroads and Depots.

Four great railroads have direct entrance into Philadelphia — the
Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia & Reading, the Baltimore & Ohio,
and the Lehigh Valley — through the trackage of the Reading. The
three first named have terminals which for magnificence and comfort
are unsurpassed in any other city in the country. All are within the
heart of the city, and two are but three or four minutes' walk from
most of the chief hotels and many of the greatest business houses.

The Pennsylvania Railroad Depot, at Broad and Market streets,
is a splendid example of modern Gothic architecture. Directly
opposite the new City Hall, its eleven stories of granite and brick,
with terra cotta trimmings, add materially to the beauty of Phila-
delphia's chief public building. The main building of the depot has
a frontage of 306 feet on Broad Street, and of 212 on Market.
Beneath it runs Fifteenth Street, and on the north side. Filbert.

Trains enter and depart from this station over an elevated viaduct
of solid brick arches, reaching nearly five squares west to the steel
bridge over the Schuylkill. They run into the largest railroad train-
shed in the world, not excepting anything of like construction in this
country, or the St. Pancras, or other huge terminals, in London, It
covers an area 707 feet long, 307 feet wide, and is 140 feet in
height; the main arches have a clear span of 294 feet at track level,
and a clear height of 141 feet. The entire structure, with its 60,000,-
000 pounds of iron, presents the appearance of a gigantic sun parlor,
for its extensive roof is largely composed of translucent glass in iron
frames. The glass in the roof alone would cover an area of one and
three-quarters acres.

(7)



8 PHILADELPHIA GUIDE.

This shed is on a level with the second or main floor of the build-
ing, which contains all the conveniences looked for in such a place,
and some of the most comfortable and attractive waiting-rooms in
the country. Two costly works of art in high stucco-relief, by Karl
Bitter, enhance its beauty, principally the colossal panel "Transpor-
tation," which decorates the wall facing the grand staircase.

The conception as executed by the sculptor is a portrayal of the
development of Transportation, in harmony with the purpose of the
building. The artist has embodied the spirit or genius of his theme
in the form of a female figure seated on a car, forming a part of a
triumphal procession This figure is in the act of uniting the two
hemispheres, — the East, represented by an Arab, old and infirm,
together with a sprightly Japanese girl; the West, by a youth in
Puritan garb, typifying the North, and, for the South, a woman in
Spanish costume carrying fruit and flowers. The chariot on which
the figure representing Transportation is seated is drawn by horses,
guided by a young girl in the costume of the present time, symbol-
izing America. In front of the horses, leading the procession, is a
group of children, one carrying the model of a locomotive, another
the model of a steamboat, while the youngest child runs ahead with
a model of an airship, indicating future methods of transportation.
These children are under the watchful guidance of a dignified female
figure. Following the North and South is a figure on horseback, in
Spanish costume, who holds up a model of the Santa Maria, the first
transport that came to this country. Following him, and bringing up
the rear of the procession, are the early pioneer and the Indian,
together with the emigrant's wagon drawn by oxen and driven by
early settlers. A handsome clock surmounts this panel.

A second fine relief decorates the wall of the restaurant next the
waiting-room ; and another ornamental decoration of the main hall is
the immense water-color map which covers the entire north wall.

The upper floors of the building are occupied by the general offices
of the Pennsylvania Railroad, and are reached by elevators at the
Market Street entrance.

The ground floor of the building contains the ticket offices, bag-
gage-rooms, telegraph offices, etc. , and a large covered space where
will be found the Company's cabs and messengers.

The Philadelphia & Reading terminal building is at Twelfth and
Market streets, and has won the admiration of all who have seen it.
It fronts on Market Street 266 feet, and extends northward on Twelfth
107 feet. It is eight stories in height, built of New England granite
to the second floor, and above that of pink-tinted brick and white
terra cotta. The waiting-rooms are fitted in sumptuous style, and
its patrons are provided with a fine restaurant, carriages, and every-



AN INTRODUCTION TO PHILADELPHIA. 9

thing for their comfort and convenience. The train shed is 266 feet
wide and 507 feet in length, extending to Arch Street. The great
span covers sixteen tracks, besides wide asphalted platforms. A
handsomely and solidly built elevated railroad extends aorthward to
Callowhill Street, where it divides into two branches, one running
toward Ninth Street, where it reaches the surface at Fairmount
Avenue, and the other toward Broad, where at present it touches the
ground a little to the east of that thoroughfare, not far north of
Callowhill. The city is building a great subway from Broad Street
to Fairmount Park, to connect with this branch of the elevated road,
in order to do away with grade crossings at Broad Street and those
lying to the westward. This branch of the elevated road leads to the
"Reading" main line, and is used also by incoming Baltimore &
Ohio Royal Blue Line trains to New York. The Ninth Street
Branch, besides being used by trains to Manayunk, Norristovsm,
Germantown, Chestnut Hill, and points on the North Pennsylvania,
Bound Brook, Northeast Penns3dvania, Lehigh Valley, and numer-
ous other roads, is made use of by the outgoing trains of the Royal
Blue Line to New York, and from that city to Philadelphia.

The Baltimore & Ohio Depot is at the southwest corner of Twenty-
fourth and Chestnut streets, a short distance west of the Schuylkill
River. A beautiful building in every way, the architects have taken
advantage of an unfavorable situation to enhance, if anything, the
pleasing effect of the structure. A tall clock tower forms a prominent
landmark, and the general architecture harmonizes perfectly with the
handsome Chestnut Street bridge, which spans the Schuylkill close
by. As the tracks of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad are depressed at
this point, the general waiting-room is in the second story of the
depot and on a level with Chestnut Street. The appointments are
on a scale scarcely less magnificent than the depots of the Pennsyl-
vania and the Reading railroads.

Lehigh Valley. — Although, theoretically speaking, the Lehigh
Valley Railroad has no entrance into Philadelphia, in reality its
facilities for taking passengers into the heart of the city are good, as
the Lehigh Valley Company uses the station facilities of the Reading
Terminal.

Other Depot Entrances. — Besides the three magnificent edifices
noted, there are other depots for railroad entrance. Among them
are those of the North Pennsylvania Railroad (Philadelphia & Read-
2



10 PHILADELPHIA GUIDE.

ing System) at Third and Berks streets; Kensington; Market Street
ferry for the many New Jersey branches of the Pennsylvania Rail-
road System, and Chestnut and South Street ferries for the Phila-
delphia & Reading System. For these, see below. Third and Berks
and Kensington depots, however, are but little used, because the major
part of the business has been transferred to Twelfth and Market
and Broad and Market depots respectively. They are, moreover,
remote from the center of the city, and offer few conveniences for
travelers.

Bag'g^age and Checks.

A uniformed and accredited solicitor, belonging to a transfer com-
pany, boards all incoming trains of the Pennsylvania Railroad and
of the Reading and its interchangeable traffic lines, some distance
out of town, and takes orders for the delivery of checked or other
baggage. To him may be delivered the checks in exchange for a
receipt, and the baggage therefor, or article handled, will be taken
quickly to any point within the city limits for a moderate sum,
which can be paid on delivery. Travelers going to hotels may also
properly deliver their checks to the attendants of the various hotel
omnibuses. Package-rooms are provided in every station, where
hand luggage may be checked and left, at the rate of lo cents a day
for each piece for a limited number of days.

Outgoing Baggage. — When a person is ready to depart there
are many baggage and express companies with call stations all over
the city, who will come for the baggage and deliver it to any station
desired for a small charge. If the person has purchased a railroad
ticket, before the call is made, the expressman will furnish checks
for the baggage, thus saving trouble or delay at the depot.

Ferries.

Directly opposite Philadelphia on the Delaware River, is Camden,
N. J., connected with the city by several ferries, as follows:

Camdeji Ferries, from Market Street to Federal, and to Market
Stieet, Camden, and to the Camden station of the West Jersey
(Pennsylvania) Railroad.

Kazgkn's Point Ferries, from Chestnut and from South Street to
Kaighn's Point, Camden, and the station of the Atlantic City (Phila-
delphia & Reading) Railroad.

Vine Street Ferry, from Vine Street to Vine Street, Camden,
and the station of the Camden & Atlantic (Pennsylvania) Railroad
to Atlantic City.



AN INTRODUCTION TO PHILADELHPIA. 11

Shackamaxon Street Fei'-ry, from Shackamaxon Street to Vine
Street, Camden, as above described.

Gloucester Ferry, from Arch Street and from South Street to
Gloucester, N. J., (three miles).

Steamship LJnes.

The owners of shipping in Philadelphia devote themselves chiefly
to the transpoitation of freight, in which they do an enormous busi-
ness with other countries and sister cities along the Atlantic and
Pacific coasts. The list of transatlantic passenger lines follows :

Allan Line. — Pier 46, South Wharves, above Washington Avenue.
Office, 421 Chestnut Street. To Glasgow, touching on western voy-
age at Liverpool, St. Johns, and Halifax.

American Line. — Piers 53 and 54, South Wharves, below Wash-
ington Avenue. Office, 305 Walnut Street. To Southampton from
New York. Passengers from Philadelphia are given tickets to New
York and embark there. The vessels of the American Line plying
between Philadelphia and Liverpool carry second cabin passengers
only, but these have the good fortune to be berthed in the first-cabin
state-rooms, and have the use of accommodations usually accorded to
tourists paying first-class fare ; and embark and are landed at the
company's piers as if they were first-class passengers.

Atlantic Tra7isport. — Pier 17, South Wharves, foot of Washing-
ton Avenue. Office, 303 Walnut Street. To London and Swansea.

Hanibicrg-American. — Piers 35 and 44. Office, 425 Chestnut
Street. To Hamburg, occasionally carrying passengers.

Red Star. — Pier 55, South Wharves, below Washington Avenue.
Office, 305 and 307 Walnut Street. The Red Star Line .§teamers of
the International Navigation Company, which leave this port fort-
nightly for Antwerp, also carry second-class and steerage passengers
only, and, as on the American Line boats, the former are given
nearly all the accommodations of first-class passengers. This line
books first-cabin tourists 'for their vessels which sail every Wednes-
day from Pier 14, North River, New York, furnishing free transpor-
tation from Philadelphia to New York.

COASTWISE STEAMSHIPS.

Boston and Philadelphia. — Pier 20, South Wharves, Pine Street.
Office, 338 S. Delaware Avenue. To Boston and Providence.

Clyde Line. — Pier i, foot of Market Street. Office, 12 South Dela-
ware Avenue. To Charleston and Jacksonville. This is the same
company whose steamers are so well known as passenger boats
between New York and the South, but passengers are not taken on
the Philadelphia boats.

Ericsson Line.— Pier 3, foot of Chestnut Street. Office on .the
Pier. To Baltimore. The steamers of this popular line pass through
Delaware & Chesapeake Canal, and during the summer months a



13 PHILADELHPIA GUIDE.

day-boat is run, leaving Philadelphia at 7:30 a. m. The fare is low,
the boats good, and the trip furnishes an interesting experience.
The regular night-line, daily except Sunday, leaves each terminus at
5 p. m.

Quaker City Frzat Liiie. — Pier 19, North, foot of Callowhill
Street. Office on the Pier. To Jamaica. One of the well-appointed
steamers of this line sails every Wednesday at 8 a. m. in summer,
and 9 a. m. in winter, for Port Antonio, Jamaica, direct. The voy-
age takes five days, and is a popular tourist-trip to the West Indies.

Kailroad Cabs and Vehicles.

The railroads have provided vehicles for those who prefer them
to omnibuses or trolley cars. These hansoms and cabs are leased to the
driver in charge, and are always to be had at the stands in or by the
depots, and may be ordered by telephone to any point desired ; they are
intended for local city travel, and can not be hired for pleasure driv-
ing. A strict schedule of charges is arranged by the hour or by the
mile, and it is highly important that this question be settled by the
patron before starting, since if no agreement is made beforehand,
the driver is privileged to charge either by the trip or by the mile,
as suits him best.

To avoid disputes with the drivers, passengers should compute the
whole distance traveled in squares — allowing ten squares to the mile
— and multiply by the rate per mile for the services rendered, being
careful to consider the number of addresses served. Patrons who
order vehicles to call at their addresses will be required to pay one-
half rates for the calls and full rates for the services — except within
a radius of four squares from the Broad Street Station, in which case
no charge will be made for calls. In ordering by telephone or mes-
senger, patrons should state whether they desire the service by the
hour or trip. If by the trip, and driver is kept waiting fifteen min-
utes at the address called to, he will charge at the hour rates.

The head of the cab service suggests that in case of controversy
between patron and driver, and to save time and trouble, the pas-
senger take the number of the vehicle and hour of the day ; also,
pay the charges as computed by the driver, and forward statement
of the facts to Superintendent of Cab Service, who will give the
complaint proper attention.

The limit of this handy railroad cab-service north is Cambria
Street ; south, Snyder Avenue ; east, the Delaware River ; and west,
Fiftieth Street. In case of an emergency, when a passenger is desirous
of using one of the vehicles of this service to go to a point beyond
the limits (provided said point is not a cemetery, Fairmount Park, or









^ 4«»Ss . .^^ ■■




BROAD STREET STATION, PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD,
Broad, Market, and Filbert Streets.



UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT



Hotel Bornot

Tenth St., below Chestnut

THE FOREMOST CENTRAL LOCATION

NEAR THE DEPOTS AND THE POST OFFICE
HANDSOMELY FURNISHED AND

WITH THE MOST MODERN CONVENIENCES

Rooms with Bath, $i.oo

Rooms with Bath attached, $1.50

special arrangements for those desiring rooms permanently



Restaurant and Cafe

Table d'Hote Lunch at 50c.

Served from 12 to 3

Table d'Hote Dinner at ^1.00

Served from 6 to 8

A LA CARTE ALL DAY

Elegantly Furnished Banquet and Private Dining Rooms on
the Seventh and Eighth Floors for Parties
and After-Theatre Suppers

A new entrance has been made on Tenth
Street to om- elegantly appointed bar

W. BRAUN, Proprietor



AN INTRODUCTION TO PHILADELPHIA. 13

outside of the city limits), he should give notice of such intention
or desire to the Superintendent of Cab Service, at the Broad Street
or Reading Station, who will direct the driver accordingly. The
extra rate to be charged for service to be performed beyond the
regular limits will be upon the basis of double the amount for like
service in the regular limits.

Charges. — The rates charged are as follows:

Hansoms. — By the Trip. — One mile and one-half or less, to one
address, one or two persons, 25 cents; one mile and one-half or less,
to two addresses, one or two persons, 50 cents ; each additional mile
or fraction thereof, 15 cents. By the Hour. — For the first hour or
fraction thereof, one or two persons, 65 cents; for each additional
hour, one or two persons, 65 cents; for each additional quarter hour
or less, one or two persons, 20 cents.

Trunks are not carried on hansoms.

Four- Wheel Cabs. — By the Trip. — One mile and one-half or
less, to one address, one or two persons, 40 cents; one mile and one-
half or less, to two addresses, one or two persons, 70 cents; each
additional passenger, 10 cents; each additional mile or fraction
thereof, one or four persons, 20 cents. By the Hour, — For the first
hour or fraction thereof, one or four persons, 75 cents; for each addi-
tional hour, one or four persons, 75 cents ; for each additional quarter
hour or less, one or four persons, 20 cents.

For each trunk carried on a cab there is a charge of 25 cents. On
every valise carried on top the cab a charge of 10 cents is made.


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Online LibraryUnited States. Bureau of the CensusRand, McNally & co.'s Handy guide to Philadelphia and environs, including Atlantic City and Cape May → online text (page 1 of 13)