United States. Bureau of the Census.

Sixty-ninth annual program 1954 (Volume 1954) online

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Piasa (%zufruiaua



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PROGRAM






FDR




N EW P I ASA
CHAUTAUQUA



JUNE 19 - SEPTEMBER 5

19 5 4




THE PIASA BIRD



SIXTY-NINTH ANNUAL SEASDN
CHAUTAUQUA, ILLINDIS



KequiremeniA for sQdmiidion

The Chautauqua Grounds are owned and operated by the
New Piasa Chautauqua Association and every person entering
or remaining on the grounds must have an Admission Ticket
purchased from the Association. The Association reserves the
right at all times to revoke the privileges granted to ticket
holders and to limit the sale of tickets.

Prices of tickets are as follows:

Adult Season Ticket $10.00

Child's Season Ticket (5-12 years) .. 4.50

Helper's Season Ticket 4.50

Daily Admission Ticket .50

Guest Coupon Book

(40 admissions) 10.00

(Note: Purchase of Guest Coupon Books is
limited to holders of Adult Season Tickets and
coupons are for use only of their house guests.
Coupons are good only for the season in
which issued.)

A Special Rate will be made for Party Guests ( four
or more) between the hours of 10 A. M. and
6 P.M., by registering the names of the guests
at the office with our Office Manager, who
will make and collect the admission charges.

All automobiles must be brought to a full stop at the Gate
House at entrance to grounds. Gatekeeper is required to de-
termine that each person entering grounds holds ticket of ad-
mission. For your convenience carry Season Tickets with you.
Also register Season Tickets at Administration Office within
one week of purchase.

If you expect guests notify Gatekeeper in advance and
make arrangement for admission charges either by paying for
guests' admission or authorizing Gatekeeper to collect admis-
sion charges from your guests. Failure to make advance ar-
rangements can cause embarrassment as Gatekeeper is not re-
quired to admit strangers to grounds simply because they an-
nounce they have come to visit a Chautauqua resident.

Persons arriving at Chautauqua Grounds by river must
contact Manager of Grounds at Administration Building to ar-
range for tickets. No person is permitted to remain on grounds
without a ticket.



Uhe j\ resident's ///<



eSdctae



9>




GREETINGS



The Piasa Chautauqua Sixty-Ninth Season opens
Saturday, June 19. A cordial greeting is
extended Chautauquans , friends and guests.
All are bid to enjoy the rich traditions of
this outstanding Summer Resort.

As usual, a Religious (non-sectarian)
Social, Educational and Recreational program
has been prepared for you. All of which has
been made possible by the untiring efforts of
the committees and the usual fine Chautauqua
spirit .

Arthur G. Maier
President



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA



rJLlfe at L^haufr



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9

Since its inception as the Piasa
Bluffs Assembly, a Methodist camp
meeting ground, 69 years ago, Chau-
tauqua has maintained its religious
atmosphere. Here families bring up
their children in a God-centered pro-
gram of religious training and rec-
reation. While enjoying the beauties
of the Chautauqua Valley, the lure
of the Piasa Bluffs and the thrills
of Alton Lake, young and old parti-




roarcim



WILLIAM E. KNACK,
Resident Minister



9

cipate in a program of Christian
training that gives purpose to the
eleven-week summer season and sets
Chautauqua apart from the usual re-
sort.

Heading the Religious Training
program for the 1954 season will be
William E. Knack, a third year stu-
dent at Eden Seminary, who will
serve as Resident Minister through-
out the Chautauqua season. As Resi-
dent Minister he will be responsible
for the Thursday night Devotions at
the Chapel, will preside at the Sun-
day morning Worship Service, and
take an active part in the Church
School teaching program. In addi-
tion, he will serve as Youth Leader
in coordinating the recreational pro-
grams of the children and young
men and young ladies on the ground.

Mr. Knack was born and reared
in Milwaukee. He is a graduate of
Elmhurst College, Elmhurst, Illinois.
Last year he served as student pas-
tor o f a church in Wisconsin. He has
had a wide and varied experience as
Youth Counselor and will devote
much of his time to Youth Activities
under the supervision of the Youth
Activities Committee headed by Joe
Rain.



CHAUTAUQUA. ILLINOIS



Seven



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Services



Each Sunday morning at 11 a.m.
a non-denominational Service of Wor-
ship is held in the auditorium. Promi-
nent guest ministers from various Pro-
testant faiths preach throughout the
season. A Worship Service in the
open-air auditorium is a thrilling ex-
perience. A choir, made up of Chau-
tauqua youth, provides special music.
Miss Jean Wessel again will pro-
vide the instrumental music for all
services and direct the choirs.




MISS JEAN WESSEL



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a u la u qua



(church behoof . . .



Each Sunday morning at 9:45 a.m.
Church School is held in the audi-
torium under supervision of Mr.
Joseph L. Rain, Mr. C. J. Jacoby
and Mrs. Milton Grimm. A staff of
capable teachers provides excellent



training for all age groups. Accred-
ited attendance cards are given those
who attend. Special recognition is
given those with a perfect attendance
record throughout the season.



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evotiona



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er vices



Every Thursday night at the Me- become a traditional part of the pro-



morial Chapel Devotional Services
will be held under the leadership of
William E. Knack, resident minister.
Services begin at 7:30. These mid-
week services through the years have



gram and are generously supported
by the residents on the grounds as
well as guests. Special music and
special Bible studies will highlight
the Devotional Services this year.



Eight



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA



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Life can be lazy - - and very
leisurely - - at Chautauqua. But
most Chautauquans have too much
fun playing to doze in the sun very
long!

And p'ay at Chautauqua is de-
signed for all ages. There's organ-

«_/of the i/eru Ljouna . .

For the little tots and children up
to age 12 there's Play School every
morning Monday through Friday
from 9 to 11:30 a.m. and organized
play at playgrounds from 1:30 to
2:30 p.m. This season Mrs. Lorin W.
Twigger (the former Sylvia Kurt) has
been engaged to handle the Play
School. Her popularity with the



ized play for children that have just
learned to toddle, but there's also
hot competition at Roque, Horseshoes,
or Bowling on the Green, for many
past sixty. You're never too old or
too young to play at Chautauqua.



children when she served as Life-
guard at the pool in the 1952 sea-
son assures the children of an able
and likeable teacher and the parents
of well supervised play for the chil-
dren. There's a special playground
reserved just for the little ones, with
slides, swings and wading pool.



3,



^Jen through ^Jeen-^Arqe



There will be supervised play for Field. Also, throughout the season



both boys and girls throughout the
summer, the Athletic Committee re-
ports. Each Wednesday morning at
10 a.m. there will be a baseball
game for the boys at the Athletic



the Chautauqua Boys baseball team
will play clubs in surrounding towns.
Boys and girls are eligible to enter
tournaments in various sports.



3or -All -^



SWIMMING This year the spring-fed, newly

Boasting one of the finest pools painted pool will be under the direc-

in the area, the Chautauqua swim- tion of Frank Woodrow, manager.

ming pool is the center of recrea- Miss Barbara Jacoby will serve as

tional activities for all ages. chief lifeguard.



CHAUTAUQUA. ILLINOIS



Swim tickets are 35 cents each.
Books of swim tickets may be pur-
chased as follows: 10-swim books,
J2.00; 30-swim books. $6.00. Persons
desiring to enter grounds for after-
noon swim can pay 25 cents at
cate and 25 cents at pool by inform-
ing gatekeeper of purpose of visit
and asking for special combination
rate.

Season tickets: S5.00 for children
under 14 years of age. For those 14
years of age and over, $6.00

Pool hours: 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
daily and Sunday. Pool closed on
Monday.

Private swim lessons will be given
from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Wed-
nesday, Thursday and Friday each
week. $1.00 per hour.

Pool available for private swim
parties from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at
charne of $7.00. Advance arrange-
ments must be made with pool man-
ager.

Through the years the Chautauqua
rwimming pool has been a delight
to bathers of all ages largely be-
cause Charles M. Horner, perennial
chairman of the Pool Committee, has
insisted on strict enforcement of the
fbJ.'cwing rules of good manners and
safety: No running or games of tag
permitted at pool at any time. Eat-
ing, drinking or smoking in pool area
is prohibited. Strict adherence to
these rules means all ages can en-
joy the pocl without the thought-
lessness of one person spoiling the
pleasure of another.




MISS BARBARA JACOBY



ROQUE

Through the years Roque has been
one of the most popular sports at
Chautauqua. A form of croquet, it
originated in England many years
ago and has been played at Chau-
tauqua for some forty years. A game
that is popular with all ages, the
older men often beat out their youn-
ger opponents in the hotly contested
annual tournament. Lighted courts
make possible night as well as day-
time games. If you're a stranger to
Roque introduce yourself to any of
the men, women or children at the
courts and they'll be glad to explain
the fine points of the game! A spe-
cial court is maintained for women
and children.



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA



BOWLING ON THE GREEN

Another English game, Bowling on
the Green, or Lawn Bowling, was
introduced to Chautauqua last year
by Chautauquans who had become
fascinated by the game in Florida.
It was an immediate hit - - both
with men and women.

The game has been played in Eng-
land for over 700 years. It came
to America with the English settlers
and has been popular in sections of
the East ever since. In recent years
it has achieved great popularity in
Florida. Originally played on a
closely cut grass lawn, in some
places rinks of clay have proved
more satisfactory. Rinks at Chau-
tauqua are clay.

The game is played with "bowls"
that are not truly round, one side
being turned down slightly more than
the other side. Thus when the speed
leaves the bowl, it drops over on
the slightly flattened side, causing
the bowl to curve. Thus the bowl,
when bowled toward the "jack,"
does not run in a straight line but
describes an arc of a circle. Each
bowl has two ivory disks on it, one
larger than the other, the small disk
marking the slightly flattened side of
the bowl. When bowling, the small
disk is held to the inside of the arc
of the circle that reaches toward
the jack.

The jack is a small china ball that
it thrown down the rink, as a marker
for the bowls to approach. The bowls
nearest the jack at the end of the



inning count one point each. The
game consists of a number of "ends,"
or innings, determined upon before
the game is begun. All the bowls are
bowled to the opposite end, trying
to get as close to the jack as possible,
and then after being "counted," are
bowled back to the starting position
again.

It sounds complicated, perhaps, but
it is not. It is easily learned and the
novice becomes quite efficient after
just a few tries. The game is for
all Chautauquans, and all are invited
to take part in it, either as a spec-
tator or as a participant. Instruc-
tions will be given to those interested
by competent instructors.

TENNIS

The all-weather tennis courts at
Chautauqua have produced some
noteworthy tennis players in years
gone by. It is the hope of the Athletic
Committee that every child who
spends a summer at Chautauqua and
is big enough to swing a racquet
will master at least the fundamentals
of tennis. As in many other sports
on the grounds you can always find
an "expert" who will give you some
fine points on the game. Some of
the best Chautauqua tennis players
are in the 40-and-up age group. They
need more competition from the
younger players.

BADMINTON

Opposite the tennis courts and
bowling green is a vacant lot owned
by a Chautauquan who wants it



CHAUTAUQUA. ILLINOIS



used for a badminton court. Don't
be backward about using it; he ex-
pects you to! And whether you're
a beginner at the game or a skilled
player you'll find your match on
the Chautauqua grounds.

HORSESHOES

Watching some of the old-timers
throw ringers might lead one to be-
lieve that in another generation
horseshoe pitching will be a lost art,
but not so at Chautauqua. The age-
range on horseshoe pitching is from
eight to nearly eighty. Here is a
sport in which youth nearly always
learns from age - - but not fast
enough. Chautauqua needs better
young horseshoe pitchers to com-
pete with our venerable dead-eye
pitchers. The court near the Ad-
ministration Building is yours to use.

SHUFFLEBOARD

Men, women and children heed the
call to the shuffleboard courts. Any-
body can play it but don't let that
fool you; it takes practice to de-
velop real skill such as is demon-
strated in tournament play at Chau-
tauqua. Take a little time to try your
luck with shuffleboard at courts near
the Administration Building.

TABLE TENNIS

There's more than relaxation to the
game of table tennis or ping-pong.
For those who like to get their ex-
ercise quickly there are ping-pong
tables waiting for you at the River-



front Pavilion. Secure paddles and
balls at Station Stand.

The only charge for participation
in any of the sports at Chautauqua
is for the use of the swimming pool.
You are invited to participate in all
of the other sports free of charge.
Your admission ticket buys you the
privilege of the playing courts.

BOATING

Not all of the recreation at Chau-
tauqua is found on the grounds. The
Mighty Mississippi River passes by
our door, its current slowed by the
dam at Alton tc form Alton Lake.
The Alton Lake area is one of the
fastest growing boating areas in the
United States, and Chautauqua,
nestled in a valley between the
beautiful stone bluffs which stretch
from Alton upstream to Grafton, Ill-
inois, is the harbor for many of the
area's pleasure boats. The docks at
Chautauqua are maintained by the
Chautauqua Yacht Club and rental
of berths at the dock is through the
Yacht Club. If motor boating, sail-
ing, water sports or fishing appeal
to you then you'll agree with many
Chautauquans that the most fascin-
ating side of Chautauqua life is its
Life on the Mississippi. But you
needn't own a boat to experience
some of the thrill of the river. You
can sit on Riverview Lookout, main-
tained by the L.C.I.A., and watch
the mighty barges churn by, laden
with whole "trainloads" of valuable
cargo, or idle away the hours watch-
ing sailboats slip in and out amid



Twelve



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA



the motor-driven pleasure crafts that
dot the majestic stream. And at the
end of day you can turn your eyes
upstream and see the sun set in
a riot of color over the confluence
of the Illinois River and the Missis-
sippi.

It is not surprising that the com-
mittee of ministers and laymen seek-
ing the site for the Chautauqua As-



sembly as they came by boat up
the river from Alton immediately
settled their eyes and minds on the
beauty of the Valley as they saw it
nestling between the stone bluffs
that form the Illinois shore of the
Mississippi. Every Chautauquan
who sees Chautauqua from the River
is eternally grateful that the Com-
mittee chose Piasa Valley for their
Assembly site!



All Playing Courts Are Closed
On Sunday Until After Church Services



CHAUTAUQUA, ILLINOIS



Thirteen



Zntertainnren



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Life at Chautauqua can be just
as busy as you want to make it.
Each week finds a series of regu-
larly scheduled events for your en-
tertainment. Usually Sunday nights
are left open, but several times dur-
ing the season there are "home
movies" at the Auditorium showing
vacation scenes. All are invited tc
see the travel pictures made by
fellow-Chautauquans on their travels.
Sometimes you get, along with the
travel pictures, shots of events at
Chautauqua. On other Sunday nights
during this season there will be a re-
ception for the Chautauqua staff, a
dedication of the Billy Clarkson Mem-
orial and other events which will be
announced by bulletin board and
through the schedule of daily -events.

Community song fests and movies
are the steady entertainment diet for
Monday, Wednesday, Friday and
Saturday evenings throughout the
season. On eight of the Saturday
nights a dance at the Riverfront
Pavilion will be held immediately fol-
lowing the movie at the Auditorium.



Music for the dances will be pro-
vided by such popular and well
known dance bands as Ronnie Klaus,
Hank Penning, Barney Hale and Otis
Berry. See the daily schedule for
dance night dates.

Tuesday nights are reserved for
the weekly card parties sponsored by
the Ladies Civic Improvement Asso-
ciation. The parties are held at the
Springs Hotel, beginning at 8 p.m.
All ladies on the grounds are in-
vited to attend. Beautiful prizes are
awarded for bridge, canasta, and
pinochle. On Tuesday, August 10,
a special invitation is extended to
the men to attend the card party.

Following the Devotional Service
on Thursday nights there are usually
special activities for children. Watch
for announcements on bulletin board
or at auditorium. Likewise efforts
are being made to organize a Square
Dancing group for either Wednesday
or Thursday nights. If interested,
contact Mr. or Mrs. Claude Huss
or Mr. or Mrs. Harold Roberts.



a



9



In addition to the salaried staff
and the Board of Directors of New
Piasa Chautauqua Association who
devote their time to making Chautau-
qua a place of beauty and enjoy-
ment there are a number of organi-



racinizcitionS



tli



zations that function throughout the
year or the season adding an im-
portant ingredient to the Season's
success. Listed on the following pages
are the organizations:



Fourteen



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA



rsLadied L^lt/ic ^x,



mprovemen



.A



idocia



tion



Occupying a unique position among
organizations is the Ladies Civic Im-
provement Association, or L.C.I.A.
as it is known on the grounds.
Membership in L.C.I.A. is open to
all ladies at Chautauqua. Organized
more than 40 years ago to bring
added improvements to the grounds
the L.C.I.A. now is responsible for
the management and furnishings in
the Springs Hotel and the Station
Stand. Managers of these enter-
prises are hired by the L.C.I.A. and
report directly to that organization.



In addition, the L.C.I.A. maintains
Riverview Lookout and Memorial
Chapel, sponsors the annual Chil-
dren's Day, which this year is a
two day affair (Friday, August 13
and Saturday, August 14), under-
writes two of the dances during the
season, sponsors the weekly card
parties, chaperones the dances, pro-
vides activities for children on Thurs-
day night, sponsors the Girls' Club
and in many other unofficial ways
contributes immeasurably to the suc-
cess of each season.



OFFICERS

MRS. W. H. GRUNDMANN
President



MRS ARTHUR A. BREWER
First Vice President

MRS. FRED DuHADWAY

Recording Secretary

MRS. WILLIAM GREEN
Corresponding Secy.



MRS. ROBERT MITCHELL
Second Vice President

MRS. JOSEPH J. VOSS
Treasurer

MRS. NATHALIA E. GREGG

Auditor



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN



Children's Day - - -


Hotel - - -


Mrs. Melbourne Scherman


Mrs. Milton Grimm


Dances - - -


Mrs. William Green


Mrs. Kenneth Schulenburg


Girls' Club - - -


Station Stand and Lookout - - -


Mrs. Joseph J. Voss


Mrs. J. R. Adams


Card Parties - - -


Membership - - -


Mrs. Favre Gould


Mrs. Arthur A. Brewer


Dii r»1 <*-•«#"* t -



Auditorium and Chapel -

Mrs. Robert Mitchell



Mrs. Fred DuHadway
Mrs. Milton Grimm



CHAUTAUQUA, ILLINOIS



Fifteen



L^hautauqua rf/en 5 L^luo



Often initiating ideas for the bet-
terment of Chautauqua or carrying
out a project inaugurated by the
Board of Directors of the Associa-
tion, the Chautauqua Men's Club
has a notable record of worthwhile
achievements through the years. Ev-
ery man on the grounds should be-
long to the Men's Club and every
man is invited to become a member
by contacting an officer or director.
Among recent achievements of the
Club were the raising of funds for
purchase of more adequate fire
fighting equipment for the grounds
and the launching of an educational
program of safety and fire fighting



techniques under the leadership of
Charles Feldwisch. Fourth of July
festivities are under the supervision
of the Men's Club with Vice Presi-
dent Rippley in charge. This year
the observance will be held on Mon-
day, July 5, starting with balloon as-
cension contest at 10 a.m., and con-
tinuing with games and contests
throughout the afternoon, barbecue
supper at 5:30 p.m. and fireworks dis-
play at Riverfront immediately fol-
lowing the movie. Annual dinner and
election of officers will be held at
Kentucky Home at 6:30 p.m. Sun-
day, August 29.



JOSEPH L. RAIN
President



OFFICERS

ROBERT RIPPLEY

Vice President

DIRECTORS



FAVRE GOULD

Secretary-Treasurer



HARRY ROGERS HAROLD R. COLBERT CLIFFORD C. RAIN



y^nautauaua (JSouA L^lub



Membership in the Boys' Club is
open to all boys from junior high
school age through college age.
Through the years the Boys' Club
activities have been numerous and
varied - - from learning how to
fight fires to providing trash con-



tainers on the grounds. When a
helping hand is needed for a worth-
while project, Chautauqua has come
to depend on the Boys' Club. Regu-
lar meetings of the club are held
throughout the season, and there is
time for play as well as work.



RONALD RAIN

President

MILTON GRIMM
Treasurer



OFFICERS

JACK WEYFORTH

Vice President



JOSEPH MEISEL III
S2cretary

JOSEPH L. RAIN
Sponsor



Sixteen



NEW PIASA CHAUTAUQUA



y^-hautauaua Ljlrls L^lub



Aii girls and young women at
Chautauqua arc invited to become
members of the Chautauqua Girls'
Club. Founded in 1933 under the
sponsorship of Mrs. Charles M.
Hcrner, and now under the spon-



20 years the club has carried on
many worthwhile projects and has
served to bring all young ladies to-
gether for social activities. One of
the major activities this year is the
Girls' Club dance on Saturday,



sorship of L.C.I. A., for more than August 28.



OFFICERS



MISS NANCY HEMPHILL

President
MISS JUDY RAWLINS

Vice President
MISS SUSAN WESSEL

Secretary



MISS PAT MEISEL

Treasurer
MISS BETTY KAY MILLER

Chaplain & Sgt.-At-Arms
MRS. JOSEPH VOSS

Sponsor



L^hautauciua Ujackt i^lub



For more than 15 years the Yacht
Club has taken an active part in
Chautauqua life. Membership is open
to all who wish to encourage the
sport cf sailing, yachting and boat-
ing and the science of seamanship
and aquatics. The club provides and
maintains piers and anchorage for
its members.



Highlights of its activities are the
crowning of a Yacht Club Queen at
a dance sponsored by the Yacht Club,
followed by a day of boat races in
which boats owned by Chautauquans
participate. The Yacht Club dance
this year will be held on August 21,
with Sunday, August 22, designated
as Yacht Club Day.



DR. G. A. RAWLINS

Commodore

FRANK WEYFORTH

Vice Commodore



OFFICERS



FRED KIRSCH

Rear Commodore

W. R. GILBERT
Secretary-Treasurer



DIRECTORS

ROSS MILFORD 1RL RAIN

DR. WILLIAM GRUNDMANN J. P. BECKWITH



CHAUTAUQUA. ILLINOIS



Seventeen



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^rSSociation \Jl licerS, ^Directors and
J^tanaina Committee / e



erionnei



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

ARTHUR G. MAIER ._. President

C. J. JACOBY 1st Vice President

FRED H. BERNET 2nd Vice President

W. F. GRIESEDIECK Secretary

OTTO E. CICHLAR Treasurer

Budget Committee — General Maintenance —

OTTO E. CICHLAR C. J. JACOBY

W. F. GRIESEDIECK WM. HILMER

Religious Committee - J OSEPH I ^OSS

E J BYRON Pool 6 Utilities -

C- J- r ,A( ?^j CHARLES HORNER

JOE L. RAIN j OS A MEISEL j R

Counsel —

FRED A. DuHADWAY Program & Publicity —

HAROLD COLBERT
Co-ordinating — WM MERGARTH

JOS. A. MEISEL, JR.

JOE L. RAIN Youth Activities —
HAROLD COLBERT JOE RAIN

ROLAND L. WESSEL FRED BERNET

Cottage Improvements — HAROLD COLBERT


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Online LibraryUnited States. Bureau of the CensusSixty-ninth annual program 1954 (Volume 1954) → online text (page 1 of 3)