United States. Bureau of the Census.

Standard nomenclature of diseases and pathological conditions, injuries, and poisonings for the United States online

. (page 1 of 21)
Online LibraryUnited States. Bureau of the CensusStandard nomenclature of diseases and pathological conditions, injuries, and poisonings for the United States → online text (page 1 of 21)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS

SAM. L. ROGERS, Director



STANDARD NOMENCLATURE



OF



Diseases and Pathological Conditions,
Injuries, and Poisonings

for the

United States



FIRST EDITION




WASHINGTON

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
1920






VVB

IS"



CONTENTS.



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 4

PREFACE 5

EXPLANATORY 10

LlST OF DISEASES AND PATHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS 11

LlST OF INJURIES, WOUNDS, ETC., BY EXTERNAL CAUSES 260

LlST OF POISONINGS AND INTOXICATIONS... 310



a



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE,

BUREAU OF THE CEXSUS,
Washington, D. G., June 24, 1919.
SIR:

The Council of National Defense began the Standard Nomen-
clature of Diseases, Pathological Conditions, Injuries, and Poisonings
for the United States, but was unable to complete the work because
of other pressing problems. The Council therefore recommended
that the nomenclature be completed by the Bureau of the Census.
This recommendation was indorsed by the Surgeon Generals of the
Army, Navy, and Public Health Service, and the President of the
United States allotted the necessary funds.

Emphasis should be given to the fact that this Standard Nomen-
clature is a first edition and it is hoped that criticisms will be so freely
made that a better second edition will result. This publication has
been prepared in the Bureau of the Censua under the direct super-
vision of William II. Davis, M. D., chief statistician for vital statistics,
and Richard C. Lappin, expert special agent, after consultation with
the Advisory Committee on Medical Nomenclature.
Respectfully,

SAM. L. ROGERS,

Director.
To Hon. WILLIAM C. REDFIELD,

Secretary of Commerce.



PREFACE.



The need of a standard nomenclature of diseases and disabilities has
long been felt, and repeated but unsuccessful efforts to popularize
such a nomenclature cover a period of more than 50 years.

Botanists would have the greatest difficulty in discussing flowers if
they did not use one name for each flower, and likewise zoologists in
their discussions of animals. So also in American medical literature
there should be uniformity of expression.

As cumulative experience is valuable only in direct proportion to
its volume and correlative possibilities, uniformity of expression con-
cerning morbid conditions, similar in character, is highly essential to a
cumulative grouping of data relating to the incidence of disease and
death.

To make possible medical discussion and to facilitate the interchange
of ideas, therefore, it is necessary that we all speak the same medical
language, that we all call the same diseases by the same names that
we all call, for example, the febrile condition resulting from infection
with the bacillus typhosus, either typhoid fever, or else enteric fever.
It makes no difference which we call it so long as we all call it by the
same term and understand what the term means.

Notable efforts in the use of uniform names for diseases and conditions
have resulted in the nomenclatures of diseases issued by the Royal Col-
lege of Physicians of London and Bellevue and Allied Hospitals of New
York. Other hospitals have also had their nomenclatures, and likewise
the medical departments of the Army, the Navy, and the Public Health
Service. Authors of many of the systems of medicine have used their
own judgment in the use of terms so that each has, in a sense, used a
nomenclature of his own. This confusion of language is not unlike that
alleged to have existed during the construction of the Tower of Babel.

In 1918, at a meeting of representatives of the Army, the Navy, the
Public Health Service, the War Risk Insurance, and the Council of
National Defense, the possibility and desirability of creating and adopt-
ing a standard medical nomenclature were discussed. It became clear



PREFACE.

at once that the original plan for the Government services to adopt and
put into immediate use a common nomenclature, meeting all needs
of the Army, the Navy, and the Public Health Service, was impossible
of accomplishment. The Army had just printed a new nomenclature,
and it was apparent that even the preparation of a short combined list of
diagnostic terms, meeting all needs, would require several months for
completion. It became apparent, however, that the adoption of a
common nomenclature of diseases and injuries would be very desirable
and would be welcomed by all three Federal services.

The suggestion was made that it would be advantageous if a complete
nomenclature could be prepared for general acceptance, each term
bearing a serial number. Thereby each sendee could prepare its own
abridged list to meet its own needs, and each list would be standard,
as every term taken from the master list would bear its serial num-
ber of that list, yet these special lists employed by the different
services could always be amplified without difficulty.

Other meetings were held in the offices of the Council of National
Defense, and the problems were fully discussed. The following list of
representatives present at the meeting held July 19, 1918, will give
an idea of the breadth of the movement to prepare a standard medical
nomenclature:

Lieut. Col. ROBERT L. DICKINSON, Medical Section, Council of National Defense.

Lieut. Col. ALBEKT G. LOVE, Sick and Wounded Records, Army.

Lieut. Comdr. J. R. PHELPS, Navy.

Surgeon CHARLES E. BANKS, War Risk Insurance.

Dr. WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Vital Statistics, Bureau of the Census.

Dr. JOHN W. TRASK, United States Employees' Compensation Commission.

Mr. CHARLES H. VERRILL, Committee on Statistics and Compensation Insurance
Costs of the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commis-
sions.

Assistant Surgeon General W. G. STIMPSON, Public Health Service.

Dr. WILMER R. BATT, Committee on Statistics, Council of National Defense.

Dr. WILLIAM J. MEANS, Association of Medical Colleges of America, President.

Dr. FREDERICK L. HOFFMAN, Prudential Life Insurance Co. of America.

Mr. GEORGE H. VAN BUREN, Statistical Bureau, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.

Major JOHN S. FULTON, Conference of State and Provincial Health Officers.

Dr. CHARLES F. BOLDUAN, Municipal Health Boards.

Mr. RICHARD C. LAPPIN, American Public Health Association.

Dr. JOSEPH HENRY BYRNE, Catholic Hospital Association.

Mr. ELM ORE DAVIES, Foreign Nomenclature and Abbreviations.

Surgeon CARROLL Fox, Division of Sanitation, Navy.

Major CHARLES B. DAVENPORT, Department of Anthropology, Surgeon General's
Office.

Mr. CHARLES H. WINSLOW, Federal Board for Vocational Education.



PREFACE.

The following representatives were unavoidably absent:
Dr. JOHN G. BOVTMAN, American College of Surgeons.
Dr. WAKREN COLEMAN, Bellevue Nomenclature.
Dr. ARTHUR HUNTER, New York Life Insurance Co.
Dr. H. S. PLUMMER, Mayo Clinic.

Mr. JOHN H. WILLIAMS, Civil Engineers and Scientific Management.
Dr. ROYAL MEEKER, United States Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Miss CLARA D. NOYES, American Nurses Association.
Colonel W. T. LONGCOPE, Internal Medicine.

Assistant Surgeon General B. S. WARREN, Division of Sanitary Reports and Statis-
tics, Public Health Service.
Colonel CHAMPE C. MCCULLOCH, History of the War, Army Medical Museum.

The associations invited but designating no representatives were
the American Medical Association and the American Hospital
Association.

The Council of National Defense, confronted -with the pressing
problem of forming the United States Volunteer Medical Service Corps,
found that it could not also continue the preparation of a medical nomen-
clature, and a recommendation was made that the Bureau of the Census
undertake the work. This recommendation was indorsed by the
Surgeon Generals of the Army, the Xavy, and the Public Health
Service. The President of the United States allotted funds to the
Bureau of the Census for the preparation of the nomenclature as a war
measure.

The Council of National Defense, therefore, turned over all its mate-
rial to the Bureau of the Census and the preliminary work was then con-
tinued by a special corps of expert clerks in the Division of Vital Statis-
tics under the direct supervision of William H. Davis, M. D.. chiaf
statistician, and Richard C. Lappin, expert special agent.

The preliminary work and plans for the completion of the nomen-
clature were discussed with great care in a two-day session of the
Advisory Committee on Medical Nomenclature held in the Bureau
of the Census May 1 and 2, 1919.

The members of the Advisory Committee on Medical Nomenclature
are:

Dr. WILLIAM H. DAVIS, Chairman.

Dr. WILMER R. BATT.

Dr. FREDERICK L. HOFFMAX.

Lieut. Comdr. J. R. PHELPS, U. S. Navy.

Lieut. Col. ALBERT G. LOVE, U. S. Army.

Surgeon JOHN W. TRASK, U. S. Public Health Service.

Dr. WARREX COLEMAN.

Lieut. Col. ROBERT L. DICKIXSOX.



PREFACE.

Three members of the Committee were unable to be present
Dr. Coleman being ill with influenza; Lieut. Col. Dickinson, absent
in China; and Lieut. Col. Love, who was represented by Lieut. Col.
John S. Fulton, U. S. Army.

Particular emphasis should be given to the fact that the medical
nomenclature here presented is a first edition and consequently far
from perfect. Free criticism is earnestly solicited from all, that
each succeeding edition may be an improvement on the preceding
one.

The following headnote appears in the section relating to Injuries,
Wounds, etc., by External Causes:

In all statements of injuries the cause or manner of the injury should be given and
information as to whether the injury was accidental, suicidal, homicidal, or a casualty
in action.

Oftentimes physicians are not in a position to say, absolutely,
whether an injury was accidental, suicidal, or homicidal. In such
cases it is recommended that the physician qualify his statement
with the word "probably," as probably accidental, probably sui-
cidal, probably homicidal.

Occasionally a term under Injuries, Wounds, etc., by External
Causes, is not actually an injury or wound by external causes, but
does imply the existence or previous existence of such an injury or
wound, as, for example, compression by cicatrix, amputation stump,
etc.

The nomenclature here submitted is an attempted consolidation
of eight nomenclatures, namely: The Bellevue Hospital Nomenclature
of Diseases and Conditions; Nomenclature of Diseases and Condi-
tions, United States Public Health Service; Coding Book for Dis-
eases and Traumatisms, Medical Department, United States Army;
Nomenclature of Diseases and Injuries, Medical Department, United
States Navy; Nomenclature of Diseases and Affections, American
Expeditionary Forces; Classification of Diseases, Massachusetts General
Hospital; List of Diseases and Pathological Conditions, Stanford
University Medical Department, including Lane Hospital; and the
Nomenclature of Diseases, Royal College of Physicians of London.

To the terms taken from these nomenclatures have been added
terms from standard works on medicine and surgery, the Johns
Hopkins Hospital Reports Monographs, New Series No. IV, and
such medical dictionaries as Gould, Stedman, and Dorland. When



PREFACE.

authorities differ as to proper spelling of terms and as to preferred
terms, Gould has been followed for the most part.

Many terms are given which physicians may regard as symptoms
of a known disease. In all such cases the primary disease should
be given the preference. The printing of such terms in boldfaced
iype merely suggests the propriety of using such terms if no better
ones can be determined.

"Splenic anemia" is printed in boldfaced type, but if the physi-
cian considers such an anemia simply a manifestation of syphilis,
then syphilis would be the preferred term.

Again anemia, agraphia, and many other symptoms dependent upon
lesions of the nervous system are printed in boldfaced type. But
whenever the physician is able to ascertain the underlying cause of
these symptoms the cause should be given preference. In the present
state of medical knowledge it would be a decided loss to delete all
of these symptoms from a medical nomenclature, for oftentimes these
symptoms give the only picture of the disease that is obtainable.

Who can say that cancer, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, and all the other
diseases of unknown origin will be regarded as separate entities a gen-
eration hence? At present, however, there can be no doubt about
placing each of these diseases in the acceptable class in a medical no-
menclature.

A clear line between symptoms and diseases oftentimes can not be
drawn. Many a term which to-day is properly used to describe a
pathological condition may to-morrow be considered a symptom of a
disease if the etiology of the disease is discovered.

Attention is again called to the fact that this medical nomen-
clature is a first edition, intended to draw from physicians and
all others interested free criticisms which will help to make a
later edition of greater value.



EXPLANATORY.



Preferred terms are printed in boldfaced type and are preceded by
numbers. The first preferred term in the list of DISEASES AND PATHO-
LOGICAL CONDITIONS, page 11, has the number 1001, the first pre-
ferred term under the second letter of the alphabet 2001, and so on.

Terms in the list of INJURIES, WOUNDS, ETC., BY EXTERNAL CAUSES,
beginning on page 260, are similarly numbered, the letter "A" pre-
ceding each number.

Terms in the list of POISONINGS AND INTOXICATIONS, beginning
on page 310, are similarly numbered, the letter "B " preceding each
number.

Synonyms are inclosed in parentheses.

Terms have been carefully cross-referenced so that no index is
necessary, as every preferred term will be found either in the list of
"Diseases and Pathological Conditions," in the list of "Injuries,
Wounds, etc., by External Causes," or in the list of "Poisonings and
Intoxications."



10



DISEASES AND PATHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS.



Abdominal Pregnancy. See 16351 Pregnancy, Abdominal.

Sinus. See 19128 Sinus, Abdominal.

Tuberculosis. See 20122 Tuberculosis, Abdominal.

Tumor, Benign. See 20249 Tumor, Abdominal, Benign.
Malignant. See 20250 Tumor, Abdominal, Ma-
lignant.

Wall, Abscess. See 1008 Abscess, Abdominal Wall.

Carcinoma. See 3029 Carcinoma, Abdominal Wall.

Epithelioma. See 5164 Epithelioma, Abdominal

Wall.

Malformation, Congenital. See 13013 Malforma-
tion, Congenital, Abdominal Wall.

Tumor, Benign. See 20251 Tumor, Abdominal

Wall, Benign.

Malignant. See 20252 Tumor, Abdominal Wall,

Malignant.

Abductor, Paralysis, Larynx. See 16058 Paralysis, Larynx,
Abductor.

Abnormal Parturition. See 16099 Parturition, Abnormal.

Abnormally Formed Uterus, Pregnancy in. See 16353 Preg-
nancy in Abnormally Formed Uterus.

High Pressure, Artery. See 8260 Hypertension, Artery.

Low Pressure, Artery. See 8309 Hypotension, Artery.

1001 Abortion (Miscarriage), Accidental.

1002 Incomplete Retention, Placenta.

1003 Induced, Criminal.
1004 Therapeutic.

1005 Missed. (Retention, Dead Ovum.)

1006 Threatened.

1007 Abscess. State location and cause.



1008 Abdominal Wall. State cause.

1009 Alveolar. (Gum-boil.) State cause.

1010 Anus. State cause.

1011 Subtegmentary. State cause.

1012 Axilla. State cause.

11



Supplement the di-
agnosis by stating
the infecting mi-
croorganism.



Abs



STANDARD NOMENCLATURE.



1013 Abscess, Bartholln's Gland. Not to in-

clude 7104 Gonococcus In-
fection, Bartholin's Gland.

State cause.

1014 Bladder Wall. State cause.

1015 Bone. State bone and cause.

Tuberculous. See 20227 Tubercu-
lous Abscess of Bone.

1016 Brain. State location and cause.
1017 Rhinologic. State cause.

1018 Breast, Nonpuerperal. State cause.

1019 Puerperal.

1020 Broad Ligament. State cause.

1021 Bursa. State bursa and cause.

1022 Cartilage. State cartilage and cause.
Tuberculous. See 20228 Tubercu-
lous Abscess of Cartilage.

1023 Cornea. State cause.

1024 Cowper's Gland. Not to include 7107

Gonococcus Infection,
Cowper's Gland.

1025 Dental Periosteum. State cause.

1026 - Pulp. State cause.

1027 Entamebic. State location.

1028 Epididymis. Not to include 7110 Gon-1

ococcus Infection, Epididy-
mis.

1029 External Ear. State location and cause.

1030 Extradural. State cause.

1031 Eye. State cause.

1032 Eye-lid. State cause.

Gum. See 1009 Abscess, Alveolar.

1033 Ischlorectal. State cause.

1034 Kidney. Not to include 7115 Gono-

coccus Infection, Kidney.
State cause.

1035 Lacrymal Gland. State cause.

1036 Sac. State cause.

1037 Larynx. State cause.

1038 Liver. State cause.

1039 - Entamebic.

12



Supplement the
diagnosis by
stating the in-
fecting micro-
organism.



Supplement the
diagnosis by
stating the in-
fecting micro-
organism.



DISEASES AND PATHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS.



Abs



1040 Abscess, Lumbar. Statel Supplement the diagnosis by

cause. [ stating the infecting micro-

1041 Lung. State cause. j organism.
104? - Entamebic.

1043 Lymph -node. State location and cause.

1044 Mammary Gland. State cause.

1045 - Puerperal.

1046 Mastoid Process. State cause.

1047 Mediastinum. State cause.

1048 Muscle. State muscle and cause.

1049 Nabothian Gland. State cause.

1050 Nasal Septum. State cause.

1051 Omentunt. State cause.

105? Orbit. State location and cause.

1053 Ovary. State cause.

1054 Palate. State cause.

1055 Palmar. State cause.

1056 Pancreas. State cause.

1057 Parametric. State cause.

1058 Pelvic, Nonpuerperal. Not to include

313? Cellulitis, Pelvic; 1057
Abscess, Parametric, nor 7103
Gonococcus Infection. State
cause.

1059 - Puerperal.

1060 Penis. State cause.

1061 Perunetric. State cause.

106? Perinephritic. Xot to include 7115
Gonococcus Infection, Kid-
ney. State cause.

1063 Perineum. State cause.

1064 Periosteum. State location and cause.

1065 Periproctic. State cause.

1066 Perirectal. State cause.

1067 Peritonsillar. State cause.
1063 Periurethral. State cause.

1069 Pharynx. State cause.

Tuberculous. See ?0??9 Tubercu-
lous Abscess of Pharynx.

1070 Prostate. Not to include 71?? Gono-

coccus Infection, Prostate.
State cause.

13



diagnosis by

stating the in-
fecting micro-
organism.



Abs



STANDARD NOMENCLATURE.



1071 Abscess, Psoas. State cause.

1072 Rectum. State cause.

1073 Betropharyngeal. State cause.

1074 Salivary Duct. State location and

cause.

1075 - Gland. State location and cause.

1076 Scrotum. State cause.

1077 Seminal Vesicle. Not to include 7134

Gonococcus Infection, Sem-
inal Vesicle. State cause.

1078 Skenc's Gland. State cause.

1079 Skin. State location and cause.

1080 Spermatic Cotd. State cause.

1081 Spine. State cause.
1083 Spleen. State cause.

1083 Stitch. State cause.

1084 Submammary. State cause.

1085 - Puerperal.

1086 Subphrenic. State cauce.

1087 Tendon Sheath. State tendon and

cause.

1088 Testicte. Not to include 7128 Gono-

coccus Infection, Testicle.
State cause.

1089 Tongue. State cause.

1090 Tonsil. State cause.

Tuberculous. See 20236 Tuberculous

Abscess.

1091 Tubo-ovarlan. State cause.
1093 Urethra. State cause.

1093 Uterus. State cause.

1094 Vagina. State cause.

Vertebra, Tuberculous. See 30330 Tu-

berculous Abscess of Ver-
tebra.

1095 Vulva. Not to include 7133 Gonococ-

cus Infection, Vulva. State
cause.

Vulvo- vaginal Gland. See 1013 Ab-

scess, Bartholin's Gland.
14



Supplement the
diagnosis by
stating the in-
fecting micro-
organism.



DISEASES AND PATHOLOGICAL COXDITIONS.

1096 Absence, Acquired. State organ or part and cause.

1097 Congenital. State organ or part and cause.

1098 Acanthocephaliasis. State location, genus, and species.

1099 Acanthosis Nigricans.
Acariasis. See 13127 Mange.
Acarodermatitis. See 9118 Itch, Grain.

1100 Accessory. State organ or part.

Sinus, Nose, Aspergillosis. See 1313 Aspergillosis, Ac-

cessory Sinus, Nose.

Cyst. See 3317 Cyst, Accessory Sinus, Nose.

Tumor, Benign. See 20253 Tumor, Accessory Sinus,

Benign.
Malignant. See 20254 Tumor, Accessory Sinus,

Malignant.
Accidental Abortion. See 1001 Abortion, Accidental.

Hemorrhage from Detachment of Placenta. See 8074

Hemorrhage from Detachment of Placenta,
Accidental.

Parturition. State variety, as: 8066 Hemorrhage,

Ante Partum, and 80S3 Hemorrhage, Post-
partum.

Pregnancy. See 8094 Hemorrhage, Pregnancy, Acci-
dental.

Puerperium. See 8096 Hemorrhage, Puerperium,

Accidental.

Accommodation, Spasm. See 3289 Cramp, Ciliary Muscle.

Accommodative Asthenopia. See 1318 Asthenopia, Ac-
commodative.

Accumulation, Cerumen. See 3141 Cerumen, Accumula-
tion.

1101 Acetonemia. State cause.

1102 Acetonuria. State cause
Achillobursitis. See 2026 Bursitis.

1103 Achillodynia. State cause.

1104 Achlorhydria. State cause.

1105 Achondroplasia. State location.
Achromatopsia. See 3229 Color-blindness.

1106 Achylia Gastrica. State cause.

1107 Acidosis. State cause.

1108 Acne. State location and variety.

Frontalis. See 1112 Acne Varioliformis.
15



STANDARD NOMENCLATURE.

1100 Acne, Kelold. State location.

1110 Keratosa. State location.

1111 Rosacea. State location.

1112 Varioliformis. State location.

1113 Vulgaris. State location.

Acoustic Nerve, Tumor, Benign. See 90255 Tumor, Acous-
tic Nerve, Benign.

Malignant. See 20256 Tumor, Acoustic Nerve,

Malignant.
Acquired Absence. See 1096 Absence, Acquired.

Atresia, Uterus. See 1334 Atresia, Uterus, Acquired.

- Vagina. See 1335 Atresia, Vagina, Acquired.

Color-blindness. See 3230 Color-blindness, Acquired.

Deformity, Bladder. See 4011 Deformity, Bladder,

Acquired.

-External Ear. See 4012 Deformity, External Ear,
Acquired.

- Liver. See 4013 Deformity, Liver, Acquired.

Nose. See 4015 Deformity, Nose, Acquired.

Palate. See 4016 Deformity, Palate, Acquired.

Penis. See 4017 Deformity, Penis, Acquired.

Stomach. See 4018 Deformity, Stomach, Acquired.

Tongue. See 4019 Deformity, Tongue, Acquired.

Urethra. See 4020 Deformity, Urethra, Acquired.

Diverticulum, Intestine. See 4174 Diverticulum, Intes-

tine, Acquired.

Hemolytic Jaundice. See 10001 Jaundice, Hemolytic,

Acquired.

Ilydrocephalus. See 8207 Hydrocephalus, Acquired.

Leukodenna. See 22039 Vitiligo.

Malformation. See 13011 Malformation, Acquired.

Myotonia. See 13246 Myotonia, Acquired.

Nystagmus. See 14123 Nystagmus, Acquired.

Phimosis. See 16243 Phlmosls, Acquired.

1114 Acrocyanosis. State part.

1115 Acromegalia.

1116 Acroparesthesia. State location and cause.

1117 Actlnomycosis. State location.

1118 Adrenal.

1119 Bone.

1120 Conjunctiva.

16



DISEASES AND PATHOLOGICAL CONDITIONS. Adh

1121 Actinomycosis, Intestine.

1123 Jaw.
1133 Kidney.

1124 Liver.

1125 Lung.

1126 Mammary Gland.

1127 Mouth.

1128 Periosteum and Alveolus.

1129 Peritoneum.

1130 Skin.

1131 Spine.

1132 Spleen.

1133 Stomach.

1134 Tongue.

1135 Actlnoncurltis. State location and cause.

1136 Adamantinoma. State location.
Adams-Stokes' Disease. See 8008 Heart-block.

1137 Addlson's Disease.

1138 Adenitis. Not to include 7103 Gonococcus Infection.

State location and cause. Supplement the
diagnosis by stating the infecting microorganism.

1139 Adeno-carcinoma. State location.

1140 Rectum.

1141 Adeno-fibroma. State location.

1142 Adenoids.

1143 Adenoma. State location.

1144 Sebaceum.

1145 Sudorlparum.

Adenomatous, Caruncle, Urethra. See 3110 Caruncle,
Urethra, Adenomatous.

1146 Adeno-myoma, Uterus.

1147 Adeno-myxoma. State location.

1148 Adeno-sarcoma. State location.

1149 Adherent Pericardium.

1150 Adhesion. State location.

1151 Clitoris.

1152 Epiglottis.

1153 Fallopian Tube.

1154 Gall-bladder.

1155 - Hernial Sac.

1156 Intestine.

123433 20 2 17



STANDARD NOMENCLATURE.

1157 Adhesion, Peritoneum.

1158 Pleuritic.

1159 Preputial.

1160 Stomach.

Adhesive Pericarditis. See 16147 Pericarditis, Adhesive.

Perinephritis. See 16180 Perinephritis, Adhesive.

Peritonitis. See 16209 Peritonitis, Adhesive.

Phlebitis, Chronic. See 16347 Phlebitis, Adhesive,

Chronic.

Pleurisy, Chronic. See 16278 Pleurisy, Adhesive

Chronic.

Pylephlebitis. See 16462 Pylephlebitis, Adhesive.

1161 Adiposis Cerebralis.

1162 Dolorosa.

Adrenal, Actinomycosis. See 1118 Actinomycosis, Adrenal.

Cyst. See 3318 Cyst, Adrenal.

Degeneration and Infiltration. See 4021 Degeneration

and Infiltration, Adrenal.

Embolism. See 5054 Embolism, Adrenal.

Hemorrhage. See 8065 Hemorrhage, Adrenal.

Hyperplasia. See 8256 Hyperplasia, Adrenal.

Hypoplasia. See 8304 Hypoplasia, Adrenal.


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

Online LibraryUnited States. Bureau of the CensusStandard nomenclature of diseases and pathological conditions, injuries, and poisonings for the United States → online text (page 1 of 21)