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SECOND EDITION



The Farmington Magazine will be issued the first day
of each month. It will contain matters of interest to all who
feel an interest in the village of Farmington, its people, its
activities, and its surroundings,— its objects of artistic and
historic value.

Editor :

Eleanor H. Johnson.

Associate Editor:

Lillian Baynes Griffin.

Terms : 15 cents a single copy.
$1.50 a year.

Subscriptions may be sent to the Secretary of
The Farmington Magazine, Farmington, Conn.






IISTDEX



yi'ji.i



THE FARMINGTON MAGAZINE



Vols. I. and II.



Atjout Clubs, (A. A. Redfield)

About Clubs, (M. D. Brandegee)

About the Bobolink, (R. B. Brandegee)

About the Junipers, (R. B. Brandegee) . .

Aina Anuenue. Land of the Rainbow, (Lucj- Adams)

American Heraldry, (Julius Gay)

American Schools of Painting Represented in Farmington, (R. B. Brandegee

"Amyntas" of Tasso, The (E. H. Johnson)

Ancients Club, The

Andante. Poem. (W. Brian Hooker) .... ...

Apropos of St. Valentine's Day. Poem. (Burges Johnson)

Art Notes, (Walter GrifEn) . . . ,



Vol.
L
I,



Arts and Cratts in Farmington, (E. H. Johnson) ....

Autumn, (R. B. Brandegee)

Autumn Berries, (Fannie F. Neale)

"A Voice in the Stirring of Each Tree." Poem. (L. L. Moore)

" Back-Log Studies," by Chas. Dudley Warner, (E. H. Johnson)

Bed-Time. Poem. (Burges Johnson)

Birds that Stay with us Through the Winter, (R. B. Brandegee)
Book Notes, (Charles Foster)



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INDEX.



Book Notes, (E. H.Johnson)



Vol.
I,
I,
I,



Ko. Page,



Building of a Lodge in the Adirondacks. Poem. (Surges Johnson)
Bull, Deacon Thomas, (Julius Gay)



Cassandra. Poem. (W. Brian Hooker)

Center School, The (H. P. Swett)

Chapel, The Old (Henry Hall Mason)

Chapel Building, The (M. D. Brandegee)

Chauncey Rowe, (A. R. Wadsworth)

Chaunccy Rowe, (E. G. Porter)

Chinese Pussy, The. Translation from Pierre Loti. (Edith V, Cowles)

Christmas in Dresden, (H. Trowbridge Allen)

Christmas, (E. H. Johnson)

Church Window Decorations by Farmington Artists; An Interview.

(E. H.Johnson)

Cinquez— The Black Prince, (Charles Ledyard Norton)

Commerce and Art, (R. B. Brandegee) ' .

Comparison, A (Walter GrifEn) .

Conflict of Law, A. D. 1807, (JuHus Gay)

Connecticut League of Art Students, (J. F. Wright) ....

Country Club House, The (Julius Gay)

Cowles, Alfred (Cornelia Cowles French)

Creamery, and Guernsey Stock in Farmington, The (.\nna Y. Barbour)

Dame's School of Sixty Years Ago, (_|ulius Gay)

Day at Newgate Prison, A (Josephine M. Wilkinson) ....

Day in Retreat, A (Mary R. Johnson)

"Dear, Life Hath Wings." Poem. (L.L.Moore) ....

Death of Dr. Backus, (Jas. Gibson Johnson)

Dedication of St. Patrick's Church, (H. T. Walsh) ....

Diary of David Gleason, (Julius Gay)

"Dr. North and His Friends," (Charles Foster)

Dutch and Flemish Masters, (Charles N. Flagg)



1,



Editor's Sketch Book, (E. H. Johnson)



Expansion of Connecticut, The (.\. A. Redfield)



Farmington and the Underground Railway, (E. H. Johnson)

Farmington Ferns, The (R. B. Brandegee)

Farmington Hawks, The (R. B. Brandegee)

Farmington Magazine, The; A Review (E. H.Johnson) .



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INDEX.



Vol. No. P»ge.



Farmington Myth, (K. B. BraiidcKce)
Farniington Street iu 1802, (Julius Gay)
First Violin, The. Poem, (.\nnie Eliot Truinljull)
Flycatchers, The (R. B. Brandegee) ....
Foreign Visitors in Farmington, (David \V. Bartlett)



Ghost, The (Julius Gay)

Girls' Club, The (R. B. Brandegee) ....
Glance at the Farmington Landscape, (Charles Foster)
"God bless thee. Little Infant Year." Poem. (K. B. Brand

Golf Girl, The (R. B. Brandegee)

Governor's Choice, The (Herbert Knox Smith) . .

Greek Invasion, The (R. B. Brandegee) .

Guest Book, The (William Potts) ....



Ilans Holbein, the Younger (R. B. Brandegee)
Hardy House, The Old (JuHus Gay) ....
Hartford Orchestra, (S. L. Brandegee)

Historic Notes, (Julius Gay)

History of Farmington Waterworks, (.\. R. Wadsworth)
Hooker, Rev. Samuel (^[ulius Gay) ....
How the Town of Fairfield Exiled its Tory .Minister

(Harriet E. G. Whitniore) ....
Howkins, Anthony (Julius Gay) ....



Illustration, (Walter Griffin)

Imagination. Poem. (Laetitia Webster)
Independence Day in Farmington in Ye Olden Time, (C
In Memoriam. Poem, (copied) ....
In Memoriam. S. P. Poem. (Mary R. Johnson) .
In Memory of John Hooker, (C. Rowe) .
In the Farmington Gardens, (R. B. B., E. H. J.) .

Japanese Students in Farmington, (S. L. Gruraan)
Josephine. Poem. (K. B. Brandegee)
Jules Bastien Lepage, (R. B. Brandegee) .
Junco, The. Poem. (Ernest Harold Baynes)

Last Years of Air. Rowe's Life, (Jas. Gibson Johnson)

Letter, A (Sarah Porter)

Letter from Southern Spain, A (W. Bradford Allen)

Limitations, (Walter Griffin)

Lyceum, The (Editor's Sketch Book)



re)



Marplot, Part I. (.\nnie Eliot Trumbull)

" II. " " . .
McKinley Oak, The (R. B. Brandegee)
Memorial Building in Farmington, A (Charles O. Whil
Mendi Indians Again, The (J. M. Brown)
Migration of Birds, The (R. B. Brandegee)
Minister Fishing, The (R. B. Brandegee) .
Morehead Ledge & Diamond Glen, (C. Rovi'e)
Mural Decoration in Farmington (M. D. & R. B. Brandegee)
Musician's Reminiscences, A; An Interview. (E.H.Johnson)
Myth of the Bend, (R. B. Brandegee)



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4 INDEX.

Vol. No. PafTC.

Nature Books, (Mary R. Johnson) I, 6: 13

Nature's Hints for Color in Dress, (L. W. Livingston) I, 6: 8

New Borough, The (A. A. Redfield) 1,12:1

Notes of Miss Porter's School, II, 1 : 29



Odd and End Shop. Poem. (J. R. A.) .

Old Cemetery, The (Julius Gay) ....

Old Church, The (E. H. Johnson)

Old Homestead, The (E. H. Johnson)

Old House, The. Poem. Qulia R. Andrews) .

Old Houses and Doorways, (E. H. Johnson) .

Oldtime Worthies of Farmington, (Julius Gay)



One Morning. Poem. (L. W. Livingston)

One of Farmington's Foes, (W. Bradford Allen) ....
Origin of the Meadow Orchid. (Translated by Isabel F Hapgood)

O'Rourkery, The (M. D. Brandegee)

Owls, The (R. B. Brandegee)



Pan American, The [Art Notes] (Lillian Baynes Griffin) ....

Peach Culture in Farmington, (L. E. Root)

Pere Ingres, The (R. B. Brandegee)

Picture of Hawk Stealing Fish from Pelican's Beak. Poem. (G. F. Dun-
ning)

Pilgrim Path, The (Mary R. Johnson)

Pitkin, Rev. Timothy

Porter, Dr. Daniel (Julius Gay)

President Roosevelt in Farmington, (Jas. Gibson Johnson)

Public Libraries and Local Industrial Development, (Edward Porritt) .

Quebec, (Walter Griffin)



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Record of the Red Man, (Lillian Baynes Griffin)
Reflections. Poem. (L. L. Moore).
Retired Minister, The (R. B. Brandegee ) .
Rose-breasted Grosbeak, (R. B. Brandegee)

Roses, (R. B. Brandegee)

Rub3 - Throated Hummingbird, (R. B. Brandegee)
Ruffled Grouse or Partridge, The (R. B. Brandegee)



Saint's Rest, (R. B. Brandegee)

Sandpipers, The (R. B. Brandegee)

Seaweed. Poem. (L. J. Webster)

Short Reminiscence of Books not New, (Charles Foster)

Sixty Years Ago, (^[ulius Gay)

Soliloquy of the Judge, (R. B. Brandegee)

Some Worthies of the Last Generation, ....



Song at the "Lean-to," (Charles Foster)
Spring-Time-Fantasie, (R. B. Brandegee)

Steele, John (Julius Gay)

Summer Visitor's Rememberings, A (Tudor Jenks)
Sweet Peas. Poem. (R. B. Brandegee) .



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INDEX.

The First ; The Last ; aud the Sequel, (Edward Hooker)
Thrush Family, The (R. B. Brandegee) ....
To a Coru-Flower. Poem. (M. Upton) . . ■ •
To Lesbia. Poem. (H. K. Monteith) . . . •
To the Farminston River. Poem. (R. B. Brandegee)
Trees Alongside the Asphalt Walks, (R. B. Brandegee)

Trolley, The

Tunxis Sepus, Julius Gay)

'"Twas Only One." Poem. (H.Nichols)



Untried Wings. Poem. (Laetitia Webster) . ' ^ ' ,
Unveiling of Memorial Tablet at the Lodge, (Editor's Sketch Book)
Usefulness of Recent Fiction, (E. H.Johnson)



Value of Sketch Books, (Walter Griffin
Village Girls' Club, (Mary L Potter) .
Village Green, The (A. A. Redfield)
Village Impro



Village Library, The (M. D, Brandegee)
Village Notes, (M. D. Brandegee)



Village Street, The. Poem.



Vitality of Error, The (Julius Gay)



Vol.

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venient Societies, (M. D. Brandegee) !•



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(Burges Johnson) I'



Water Lilies. Poem. (R. B. Brandegee)

Weather Prophet, The. Poem. (R. B. Brandegee) II

WhippoorwiU Family, The (R. B. Brandegee)

W^inter, (R. B. Brandegee)

Winter Landscape, A (Ernest Harold Baynes)

Woodpeckers, The (R. B. Brandegee)

Working Girls' Clubs, (Grace H. Dodge)

Worthies of the Last Generation, Some



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ILLUSTRATIONS.
Arts and Crafts in Farmington, (Photographed by A. Carlson)
Borough Seal,

Chess Players, The (From Painting by R. B. Brandegee) . .
Choir BoYS for Memorial Window, (Sketches by Miss G. Cowles)
Coming o'f Winter, The (From Painting by R. B. Brandegee) .
Congregational Church, Farmington, (Drawn by Walter Griffin)

Ell of O'Rourkery, Showinj
Carlson)



Odd and End Shop, (Photographed by A



II, 4: 22
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INDEX.



Farmington from Station Road, (Photographed by A. Carlson)
Farraington Garden, A (From Painting by E. T. Roberts) .
Farmington Landmark, A (Photographed by A. Carlson) .
Farmington Pasture, A (From Painting by Charles Foster)

Head of Charles Noel Flagg, (Wood Cut by J. Britton)

Josephine, (From Painting by R. B. Brandegee)
Little Red Shop, (Photograph lent by Dr. Carrington)
T .-.-i.i-g Forward
Brandegee)



LookingForward and Looking Backward, (Photographed by R



Memorial Window with Iris Motive, (Sketches by the Misses Cowles)
Mural Decorations, (H. Gernhardt)
Mural Decorations, (R. B. Brandegee)



Co^



Notes from an Artist's Sketchbook, (Pencil Sketches by G. A

Old Chapel, The (Sketch by Walter Griffin)

Old Fireplace, (Sketch from Painting by R. B. Brande-ee)

Old Fireplace in Ancient's Club, (Drawn by J. R ) °

Old Stage, The (Sketch by Walter Griffin) '

On the Farmington River, (Photographs by A. Carlson)

Plan, Sarah Porter Memorial, (Drawn bv C. 0. Whitmore)
Portrait by Gilbert Stuart, (Photographed bv Allderige)
Portrait Sketch of Chauncey Ro we, (R. B. Brandegee)
Portrait Sketch of One Student by Another, (Woodcut by J. Britto
Portraits ot Worthies of the Last Generation



les)



Pitkin, Hon. Timothy,

Pitkin, Rev. Timothy

Sarah Porter Memorial, The (Drawing by
Sketches, (Walter GrifBn) . . .° "



Sketches, Quebec, (Walter Griffin



phed by



Allderige)



Some Farmington Doorways, (Photog
Sweet Peas, (R. B. Brandegee)

Tombstone, (Walter Griffin)

Unknown Portrait, An (From Painting by Hans Memling)



C. O. Whitmore)




Views in Farmington, (From Paintin



on)
rige and A. Carlson



gs by Brevoort and J. W. Hill)



Waterlilies, (R. B. Brandegee)
let, The (From
Whitman House, The Old (Drawn by Charles FortTrr'



w j:'r/^°Z'^^*'J'^^i^^V P-'^^-g by R. B. B;andegee;



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The Farmington Magazine



Vol. I. NOVEMBER, 1900 No. i



Zo tbc 3faiminoton TRivcr

When the River visits the Town

She is dressed in her long white gown,

And the edges are fluffy with thin light beams,

That are only made in the deepest streams.

In the dark of the night she leaves her bed, —

The brio-ht stars shining overhead, —

And lightly, and gently, as soft as down.

The River is visiting the Town.

The clock strikes three, she must soon return,
Lest the sun the edsre of her mantle burn ;
The clock strikes four, she is by the stream.
And the Town is awakening from its dream.
She has gone, with her wonderful misty gown,-
The River that visited the Town.

R. B. B.



2 The Farmington Magazine

Tibc TRecorC* of tbe IRcD man

In the Farmington burying-ground on the bank of the river, stands a red sand-
stone monument which bears the following inscription :

In Memory of the Indian Race ; Especially of the Tunxis Tribe, the
Ancient Tenants of these Grounds.

The many human skeletons here discovered confirm the tradition that this spot
was formerly an Indian burying-place. Traditions further declare it to be the ground
on which a sanguinary battle was fought between the Tunxis and Stockbridge
tribes. Some of their scattered remains have been re-interred beneath this stoner

And on the reverse side of the monument is Mrs. Sigourney's verse :

"Chieftains of a vanished race.
In your ancient burial-place,
By your fathers' ashes blest,
Now in peace securely rest.
Since on life you looked your last
Changes o 'er your land have passed ;
Strangers came with iron sway,
And your tribes have passed away.
But your fate shall cherished be.
In the strangers' memory :
Virtue long her watch shall keep,
Where the red men 's ashes sleep."

These, and an occasional paragraph in some local history or sketch of Farm
mgton, a few handfuls of arrow-heads, an old canoe, and the Indian signatures
scattered through the town records, are all we have left to remind us of the red men
to whom Farmmgton once belonged. The arrow-heads went to Hartford the canoe
to Bristol, but the records, yellow and brittle with age, are here in the office of the
lown Clerk.

For the rest we have only the traditions handed down through three and four
generations.

The town records give detailed accounts of the transferring of the land between
the English and the Tunxis Indians; but as the names they used for boundary lines
have changed several times since those days, they are difficult to follow, save in the
cases where the land is still in the possession and name of the descendants of the
original purchaser. The Indian signatures are extremely interesting, each man
having striven to express himself by a crude illustration rather than by writing
The signatures as a whole are suggestive of a child's first kindergarten work One
Indian tried to draw a man pointing. The body is made of four straight lines form
ing an imperfect oblong, to which he has attached four bent lines for limbs and a
arge round dot for a head. Another tried to make a flower, which might be taken
for a rose, but in all cases the signatures show the pathetic effort of the untrained
hand to express what was in the mind.



The Farmington Magazine 3

The Tunxis Indians were not a warlike tribe and seldom fought excepting
when attacked. Referring to them. Dr. Noah Porter, writes :

" Much of the descending slope from the mountain, along which now runs the
village street, was more or less densely wooded ; in some places it was moist and
even marshy. At its foot lay the open meadow. Beyond was the western forest, its
border darkening the western hills quite down to their base, the terror of the Indian
and the white man ; for along its unknown tract, for hundreds of miles, roamed the
dreaded Mohawks, to whom all the tribes in this region were tributary. The Mo-
hawks were fierce and warlike, the terror of all the New England tribes. From the
banks of the river which bears their name, they have roved hither and thither upon
their errands of conquest ; now surprising a native settlement upon the Sound, or
breaking in on a defenceless tribe on the branches of the Connecticut. The terror
of the Mohawk rendered the presence of the English desirable, and disposed the
Indians in all this region to a peaceable demeanor."

No tradesman ran routes in Farmington in those days, and the heads of each
family were compelled to fish along the banks of the river for salmon and shad.
The more friendly of the Indians taught the English the art of fishing, showed
them where the deer were most plentiful, and where to expect the wolves and
panthers.

But there were times when the white man had to fear even the Tunxis Indian.
One night soon after the settlers were established, a house was destroyed by fire,
and the family occupying it were burned to death. A little later in the year a cruel
murder was committed on the outskirts of the village, and, though there was no
actual proof, both outrages were attributed to the Indians, and the whites made
them pay a tribute for seven years, in the words of the town records, of " eighty
faddoms of wampum, well strung and merchantable."

The village grave-digger tells the gruesome story of finding the remains of an
Indian in a grave which he was preparing for a white man. It is a common occur-
rence for him to turn over their bones, arrow-heads, and old kettles.

One of the Indians' traditions handed down through generations is of Will War-
ren, or Moor Warren, so called on account of his dark skin. Will Warren lived in a
cave on the top of the mountain. He hated the whites, but was on the best of
terms with the Indians, and he was often seen on Sunday mornings making his way
to the river with them. The Puritans objected to having Will Warren break the
Sabbath, and one of the church members undertook to remonstrate with him ;
whereupon Will Warren became enraged, and, stealing down from the mountain,
came into Farmington and set fire to a barn. The villagers saw him running away
and gave chase, but Will was too fast for them. He ran in the direction of New
Britain, but got lost in the woods and described a semicircle, so that when he
stopped in the morning he found himself on the bluff directly above Farmington.
He saw the villagers gathered in little knots discussing the fire, and then he saw them
start a bloodhound on his trail. When he heard the bay of the hound he knew he
was in danger, and ran along the mountains to where he knew there was an Indian
encampment. He found two squaws sitting over a fire; he hastily told them his
story, and explained that he would shortly be run down by the hound if the scent



The Farmington Map;azine



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was not broken. One of the squaws seized him in her arms and ran, and never
stopped until she had deposited him in his cave. Of course this broke the scent
and the hound came to a standstill where the woman lifted Warren from the ground.
Early last spring there came through the main street of Farmington a tall, dark
man with a head of thick, straight hair. He wore a Prince Albert coat, patent-
leather shoes, and a derby hat. Under his arm he carried a black case filled with
books. He was a strange combination— a full-blooded Indian and a book agent. He
went from house to house, raising his hat and describing his wares. He spoke un-
derstandable English, discussed modern literature, read with ease, and made a bow
that would have done credit to a dancing-master. He took orders for books, and
when asked if they were to be paid for in advance or on delivery, he replied, "As
you wish." But the books that were to be paid for on delivery never came. Civil-
ization had taught the red man many things, but not trust in his white brother.

Lillian Baynes Griffin.



a /IDusician's IReminiscenccs

Told by Karl Klauser.
[Our older readers must have noticed in these columns once or twice each year, almost from the begin-
ning of our paper, short reports and programmes, very classical, of concerts given in a Young Ladies' School
in Farmington, Ct., under the direction of an earnest, sterling teacher, who all this time seems to have been
more fond of solid good work in a corner, than of the notoriety which musical men, vastly his inferiors, strive
to achieve by advertising rather than by worth. — From Dwight's Journal of Music, March 23, 1S72.]

These few words from a musical authority of so many years ago, show the
estimate that was put on Mr. Klauser's work for the increasing of musical know-
ledge and musical culture here in the Farmington school. It seemed as if some
words from Mr. Klauser himself, reminiscent of these concerts and the famous men
who have visited here from time to time, would be of great interest. His own early
life deserves some mention, varied as it was. Born in St. Petersburg, he lived
some years both in Leipsic and Hambourg. Though devoted to music he was
apprenticed to the book-trade and studied the backs of his books so faithfully —
doubtless the insides also, though he does not speak of that — that in his talk with
President Porter previous to his entering the school, he was asked at what University
he took his degree, so conversant was he with theological and philosophical ques-
tions. But the time came when he was free to devote himself to music, and soon
after that, on his wedding day, he left Havre on a sailing vessel for New York.

"In 1855," Mr. Klauser says, "I came to Farmington as teacher of music in
Miss Porter's School. She had written to Germany, then to Henry Timm, leader
of the New York Philharmonic, to ask that an instructor be recommended to her
— one who would teach ' not fashionable music, but as it is taught in Germany.'
I had been in New York five years but gladly came to Farmington, for life in the
country is more natural than city life. The year after I came, the concerts, now so
enjoyed, were started and given during the first two years in the village assembly
hall and for the public. The first musician to come was Theodore Thomas. He
had been my friend in New York, where he had been trying hard to gain a musi-
cal foothold, and came to see how I was getting along in Farmington — to look



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