United States. Congress. House. Committee on Un-Am.

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Brigade in 1937 at the age of 23. lie was another of the members of this
Communist-controlled outfit who graduated into the ranks of UE officials.

In keeping with the Communist Party line of the day, Matison participated in
a Boston demonstration demanding a second front in 1942 (see Daily "Worker,
May 7, 1942).

James Mattes, UE Director of Organization

Since his retirement from the armed forces in October 1945, the power of James
Matles in the UP^KMWA has grown by leaps and bounds. It is safe to say that
neither Albert J. Fitzgerald nor Julius Emspak is a more dominant figure in the
affairs of the UERMWA than James Matles. He was a key figure in the union
prior to his entering the armed forces of this country.

James Matles, although still a young man, is an old-time Communist. At the
age of 24 (in 1933), he had already attained prominence as a Communist leader
in the trade-union field. At that time he was secretary of the Steel and Metal
Workers Industrial Union. This latter union was an affiliate of the Trade Union
Unity League. In those days the Communist Party liad its own federation of
trade-unions known as the Trade Union Unity League which was headed by
William Z. Foster, national chairman of the Communist Party.

According to the Daily Worker of November 6, 1933, James Matles publicly
endorsed the program of the Communist Party.

The best evidence that Matles is a Communist is to be found in the following
statement which he signed for release to the press : "Only the Communist Party
as the party of the working class represents the interests of tne entire working
population * * *."

Matles and three of his fellow officers in the UERMWA sent greetings to the
American Shxv Congress in August 1944. The American Slav Congress is the
principal Communist-front organization for persons of Slavic descent in the
United States. It has been cited as subversive by Attorney General Clark.

Numerous former Communist Party members are able to identify Matles as a
member of the parts'. He is still an alien, having been born in Hungary and
never naturalized.

Edward Matthews, UE international representative, delegate to 19/(7 UE con-
vention

Edward Matthews is international representative of the United Electrical,
Radio, and Machine Workers of America, CIO, in charge of that union's dealings
with Westinghouse. That highly responsible position makes it clear that Mat-
thews is one of the key figures in the UERMWA.

Matthews was a member of the National Labor Committee Against War, an
affiliate of the seditious American Peace Mobilization.

New significance has been added to affiliation with the American Peace Mobili-
zation by virtue of a recent decision of the United States Supreme Court. One
Morton Friedman was dismissed from his Federal job with the War Manpower
Commission because he had been affiliated with the APM. Friedman appealed
his case to the courts, which sustained the Government. The case was carried
to the Supreme Court, which, in the middle of March 1947, refused to review it,
thus, in effect, upholding the verdict of the lower courts.

Matthews has been identified as a member of the Communist Party in sworn
testimony before a congressional committee.

William Mauscth, field organiser, UE Local II46, Minneapolis delegate to 1948 UE
convention

William Mauseth is a self-declared member of the Communist Party (see New
Leader, January 3, 1948).

Mauseth was a speaker for the Communist-controlled Civil Rights Committee
in Minneapolis (see Sunday Worker, May 5, 1940).

He was a member of the Minnesota State Committee To Free Earl Browder
(see Daily Worker, November S, 1941).

He was also a signer of the nationally organized Citizens Conunittee To Free
Earl Browder (see Sunday Worker, January 25, 1942).

95613—49 — pt. 1 10



670 COMMUNIST INFILTRATION OF LABOR UNIONS

On the twentieth anniversary of the Daily Worker, Mauseth sent his greetings
to that newspaper of the Communist Party (see tlie Worker, January 9, 1944).
Mauseth wrote the Daily Worker, as follows: "Please accept my greetings and
congratulations upon the twentieth anniversary of your service to the American
labor movement. Yours for speedy victory over the enemies of the people."

Mauseth was 1 of the 550 signers of the Civil Rights Congress manifesto
defending the Communist Party (see the Worker, May 25, 1947).

Victoria Mazzie, field organizer, UE Local 1225, field organiser, UE Local JpS

Victoria Mazzie is a member of the Communist Party. In 1940, she was
described as a member of the Young Communist League in an article in the Daily
Worker which told of a protest rally in front of the French consulate in New
York. Speakers at this Communist Party demonstration included Robert Minor
and Peter V. Cacchione (see Daily Worker, April 10, 1940).

Victoria Mazzie was also a candidate for Congress from Brooklyn on the
Communist Party ticket (see Daily Worker, August 5, 1940).

Clifford T. McAvoy, TIE international representative

Clifford T. McAvoy has been identified as a member of the Communist Party
by Salvatore M. Vottis in sworn testimony before the Committee on Un-American
Activities of the House of Representatives (see hearings, July 25, 1947).

McAvoy was ousted from his position as deputy welfare commissioner of New
York City as a result of charges of communism against him.

McAvoy has long been known as a veteran Communist fellow traveler, even if
not a member of the Communist Party. His affiliations with Communist-front
organizations include the following :

American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born.

American Society for Cultural Relations with Italy.

Citizens Committee for Harry Bridges.

Citizens Emergency Conference for Interracial Unity.

Committee for Citizenship Rights.

Committee for Equal Justice for Mrs. Recy Taylor.

Council for Pan American Democracy.

National Council of American-Soviet Friendship.

National Federation for Constitutional Liberties.

Nevt' York Committee for Protection of Foreign Born.

New York Conference on Inalienable Rights.

New York State Conference on National Unity.

Open Letter for Closer Cooperation with the Soviet Union.

S<'happes Defense Committee.

School for Democracy.

Soviet Russia Today.

Statement Defending the Communist Party.

Statement Against United States Policy in Mexico.

Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade.

Win-the-Peace Conference.

Bernard J. McDonongh, president, UE Local 1119, Chicago, delegate to 19'it and
1948 UE conventions

Bernard J. McDonough is unquestionably a member of the Communist Party.
This conclusion is based on the fact that he is the president of the People's
Publishing Association, the organization which published the Communist Party
newspaper in Chicago, the Chicago Star (see Chicago Star, May 15, 1948).

McDonough is candidate for auditor in Illinois on the Progressive Party ticket,
the party of Henry A. Wallace and the Communists (see Chicago Star, May 15,
194S).

McDonough signed the Civil Rights Congress manifesto defending the Com-
munist Party (see the Worker, May 25, 1947).

James McLeish, international UE vice president, president, UE district 4, delegate
to 1947 and 1948 UE convention

James McLeish's record of Communist affiliations is such as to mark him
definitely as a Communist.

In May 1946, McLeish was a sponsor of a conference, held in Newark, N. J.,
for the purpose of raising funds for the Communist Party's newspaper, the Daily
Worker. This affiliation alone is sufficient to indicate where McLeish's ideologi-
cal sympathies lie. He was also a member of the Committee to Sponsor the
Daily Worker and the Worker 1945 fund campaign. In January 1944, McLeish



COMMUNIST INFILTRATION OF LABOR UNIONS 671

was one of 144 CIO Communist leaders who publicly hailed the Daily Worker
on the occasion of its twentieth anniversary.

McLeish was a participant in the April 6 peace rally (1940) which was staged
by the Communists as a part of a Nation-wide movement leading up to tlie forma-
tion of tlie seditious American Peace IMohilization. Always obedient to the line
of the Communist Party, McLeish hailed the twenty-fourth anniversary of the
Bolslievik Revolution and joined the Kremlin's cry for "a second front." This
latter position taken by McLeish was diametrically opposed to his position at
the April C peace rally.

Under the auspices of the Civil Rights Congress, McLeish signed a public mani-
festo in defense of the Communist Party (see tlie Worker, May 25, 1947). The
Civil Rights Congress appears on Attorney General Clark's list of subversive
organizations.

He was also affiliated with the Citizens Committee to Free Earl Browder. He
was a member of the Citizens Nonpartisan Committee for the reelection of
Benjamin J. Davis, Jr., to the city council. Davis is a publicly avowed member
and leader of the Communist Party.

McLeish was also affiliated with the Committee for Jewish Writers and Artists,
a Communist-front organization which staged a pro-Soviet rally at the Polo
Grounds, New York City, in 1943.

He was a sponsor of the End Jim Crow in Baseball Committee.

In December 1943, McLeish was a member of the Reichstag Fire Trial Anni-
versary Committee which was set up to honor Georgi Dimitrov, former head of
the Communist International.

Wesley Mitchell, executive hoard member; UE district council 4, delegate to 19^7
and IdJfS conventions

Wesley Mitchell sent May Day greetings to the Daily Worker in 1946 when
he was a member of the strike committee at the Phelps-Dodge plant at Eliza-
beth, N. J. ( see Daily Worker, April 28, 1946) .

Mitchell signed the Civil Rights Congress manifesto defending the Communist
Party (see the Worker, May 25, 1947).

Herbert Morais, UE research assistant, international office

The Rapp-Coudert committee of the New York State Legislature found in 1942
that Herbert Morais, then a member of the faculty of Brooklyn College, was a
member of the Communist Party. As a result of his exposure by the Rapp-Cou-
dert committee, Morais was forced out of his position in Brooklyn College. The
committee found that Morais used the Communist Party alias "Richard Enmale."
The name "Enmale" was derived from the tirst syllables of the names of Engels,
Marx, and Lenin — the three founding fathers of the Communist movement.

Today, Herbert Morais is a member of the faculty of the Jefferson School of
Social Science. This is the Communist Party's training school which is on Attor-
ney General Clark's list of subversive organizations.

A few years ago. International Publishers brought out a volume of Jack Hardy
which was entitled "The First American Revolution." Jack Hardy's real name
is Dale Zysman. Under the latter name, he taught in the New York public
schools until his membership in the Communist Party was highlighted by expos-
ures of the Special Committee on Un-American Activities of the House of Rep-
resentatives and later by the Rapp-Coudert committee of the New York State
Legislature. The First American Revolution was a part of the Comnumist Party's
program to rewrite American history according to the theories of communism.
Herbert Morais, under the alias of Richard Enmale, wrote the preface to Jack
Hardy's First American Revolution.

Herbert Morais was an editor of New Currents. New Currents was the organ
of the American Committee of Jewish Writers, Artists and Scientists. It was
subsidized by the Sound View Foundation, repository of Communist I'arty funds.
The Sound View Foundation was headed by three well-known Communists, Alfred
Hirsch, Robert W. Dunn, and Joseph R. Brodsky. It dispensed funds to Com-
munist enterprises only. For example on April 20, 1943, it made out a check
to the Daily Worker for $1,000.

Morais has written for the Communist Party's New Masses (see issue of June
11, 1946). He has been a contributing editor of the Communist quarterly. Science
& Society, and contributed an article entitled "Marx and Engels on America" to
the winter 1948 issue of that publication.

Morals' position In the UE organization is one of great strategic importance.
He is assistant to James Matles.



672 COMMUNIST INFILTRATION OF LABOR UNIONS

Sylvia Muth, member executive board, TIE Local 103, Camden, N. J., delegate to
lOJtl UE convention

Sylvia Muth was a delegate to the 1941 convention of the American Peace
Mobilization and a signer of the petition of the Citizens Committee to Free Earl
Browder, both of which organizations were notoriously controlled by the Com-
munist Party (see Daily Worker, May 2, 1941).

Miss Muth is a member of the small Communist group which controls UE Local
103, the local of the UERMWA which has collective-bargaining relations with
the very important Radio Corp. of America at Camden, N. J.

Tom Neill, business agent, TIE Local 427, Hoboken, N. J., former executive secre-
tary, UE national veterans committee

At the height of the Communist sabotage strikes in this country during the
period of the Stalin-Hitler pact, Tom Neill signed a statement defending the Com-
munist Party which received a full-page spread in the Daily Worker (see Daily
Worker, March 5, 1941).

Neill was one of the American delegates to the World Youth Conference held
in London, October 31 to November 9, 1945. This gathering was under the com-
plete domination of Communists from many countries. It set up a new Com-
munist international called the World Federation of Democratic Youth.

Neill signed the Civil Rights Congress manifesto defending the Communist
Party (see the Worker, May 25, 1947).

Russell Nixon, UE Washington legislative representative

As early as 1940, Russell Nixon appeared as one of the signers of a petition
to Governor Olson of California, to free Sam Darcy. Darcy, whose real name
is Dardeck, had been extradited by the State of California from Pennsylvania
where he was State chairman of the Communist Party. Darcy was wanted in
California for false registration as a voter in 1934. This i>etition was circulated
and published by the National Federation for Constitutional Liberties. This
latter organization was cited as subversive by Attorney General Clark. The
NFCL was subsequently merged, in the spring of 1946, with the International
Labor Defense to form the Civil Rights Congress, also on Attorney General
Clark's list.

Came the war, and it was the same old story. In spite of his obvious Communist
connections, Nixon was given a commission in the Army. He was released from
military service when wires were pulled for his appointment to an extremely
important office, namely, that of American member of the German external-
property commission, with the assent of the State Department. Although he was
the American member of this commission, Nixon listened to his Moscow master's
voice and fought furiously for Russian j)articipation in the search for German
assets in western Europe. When defeated on this Soviet-inspired front, he
resigned with a blast against the State Department, charging, among other tilings,
a plot against Russia. The State Department promptly abandoned diplomacy
long enough to call Nixon a liar, in effect.

Immediately on his resignation from his post in Germany, Nixon resumed hia
job with the UERMWA in Washington, and again became active in Communist-
front organizations. He was a member of the resolutions committee of the Win-
the-Peace Conference held in Washington in April 1946. This was the confer-
ence where one of the principal Communist fronts of recent years was launched,
namely, the National Committee To Win the Peace.

In February 1946, Nixon was the principal speaker at a mass meeting In
Washington, D. C, under the auspices of the International Workers Order which
the FBI has called one of the largest of the Communist-front organizations.

During the war, Nixon was a principal speaker for the National Wartime Con-
ference of the Professions, the Sciences, the Arts, etc. This, too, was an obvious
front of the Communist Party.

Nixon was a speaker at the Communist May Day Rally in Philadelphia in
1948. One of his colleagues on the program was Louis Weinstock, a member of
the national committee of the Communist Party (see the Worker, April 28, 1946).

He was a .sponsor of a Communist front which called itself the National Con-
ference on the German Problem (see official press release, March G, 1947).

He was a speaker for the Civil Rights Congress, one of the organizations listed
as subversive by Attorney General Clark (see Daily Worker, October 6, 1947).

He was affiliated with the National Council of American-Soviet Friendship,
also branded as subversive by Attorney General Clark (see Soviet Russia Today,
November 1947 ) .



COMMUNIST INFILTRATION OF LABOR UNIONS 673

Nixon participated in the National Legislative Conference on Naturalization
and Deportation which was held in Washington at the call of the American
Committee for Protection of Foreign Born (see the Lamp, January-February
194S).

He has contributed articles to the Communist magazine, Soviet Russia Today,
issues of January, March, May, and June. 1918.

He was a speaker in Chicago for the Communist front which called itself the
Committee To Defend the Bill of Rights (see Chicago Star, June 5, 1948).

Andrew Overgaard, business agent, TIE Local .'i20

Andrew Overgaard has been a member of the Communist Party for many
years.

In 1933, Overgaard publicly declared liis support of the Communist Party
program along with such UE leaders as James Matles and James Lustig (see Daily
Worker, November 6, 1933).

In 1934, Overgaard was secretary of the Trade Union Unity Council, a Com-
munist Party organization headed by William Z. Foster.

Overgaard supported the friends of the Soviet Union. He had gone to Moscow
as a delegate to the Red international of labor unions.

Victor Pasche, leader, UE Local 301, Schenectady

Victor Pasche is a member of the editorial committee which publishes the
Eletcrical Union News, official organ of local 301 at the General Electric plant in
Schenectady, N. Y.

Pasche has been associated with Communist-front groups for a number of
years. In 1940, he was a sponsor of the American Committee for Democracy and
Intellectual Freedom when that Communist-front organization was agitating
against the Rapp-Coudert investigation into communism in the State-supported
schools of New York.

In 1938, considerable publicity centered on the issue of Simon W. Gerson's
position as administrative assistant to the borough president of Manhattan.
Victor Pasche was one of the Communists and fellow travelers who rushed to the
defense of Gerson (see Daily Worker, February 10, 1938) .

Henry Phillips, delegate to IdJfl UE convention from TJE Local Ji2'i

Henry Phillips attended a Communist Party training .school for UE organizers
in February 1938. At the conclusion of the course of study, Phillips and his
fellow students (one of whom was Ruth Young) adopted a resolution calling for
the building of a more powerful Communist Party looking toward a Communist
revolution in the United States.

Ernst Pollock, busines agent, UE Local JfSl, Neicark, delegate to 19.'f7 and 19^8 UE

conventions

Ernst Pollock signed the Civil Rights Congress manifesto defending the Com-
munist Party. ( See The Worker, May 25, 1947. )

Pollock also signed the Civil Rights Congress statement denouncing the recent
indictment of 12 national leaders of the Communist Partj'. (See Daily Worker,
September 23, 1948.)

On September 25, 1948, Attorney General Clark cited the Civil Rights Congress
as a subversive organization.

Sol Potegal, business manager, UE Local Jf27, Bayonne, N. J.

Sol Potegal and his fellow officers of what was then known as District 12 of
the United Electrical and Radio Workers endorsed the American League Against
War and Fascism in a letter dated October 6, 1937.

Potegal was affiliated with the Citizens Committee To Free Earl Browder. ( See
Daily Worker, March 16, 1942.)

Potegal sent greetings to the Daily Worker on the occasion of the twentieth
anniversary of that Communist Party newspaper. (See The Worker, January
9, 1944.)

James Price, UE international vice president, UE president, District 1, delegate
to W-iy and 1948 UE conventions

James Price is a member of the National Wallace-for-President Committee, the
outstanding Communist-front movement at the present time. (See press release,
March 23, 1948. )

Price sponsored the Communist-controlled United May Day Conference in
Philadelphia in 1946. (See Daily Worker, April 4, 1946.)

Price signed the Civil Rights Congress manifesto defending the Communist
Party. ( See the Worker, May 25, 1947. )



674 COMMUNIST INFILTRATION OF LABOR UNIONS

Archie Rappaport, leader, VE District 4

Archie Rappaport was a student in a Communist Party training school for
UE leaders in February 1938. At the conclusion of the course of study Rappaport
and his fellow students adopted a resolution calling for a more powerful Com-
munist Party and looking toward a Soviet America.

Rappaport was a delegate to the convention of the American Peace Mobiliza-
tion in April 1941. At the meeting of this notorious Communist-controlled organ-
ization he signed a petition of the Citizens Committee to Free Earl Browder.
(See Daily Worker, May 2, 1941.)

Marie J. Reed, business agent, UE Local 7S5, Cleveland, delegate to 19Jf7 and
19Jf8 UE conventions

At the height of the Communist sabotage strikes during the period of the
Stalin-Hitler pact in 1941, Marie J. Reed signed a statement in defense of the
Communist Party, a statement which received a full-page spread in the Daily
Worker. ( See Daily Worker, March 5, 1941. )

Under the auspices of the Civil Rights Congress, Miss Reed signed a manifesto
defending the Communist Party. ( See the Worker, May 25, 1947. )

Henry Rhine, UE international representative, delegate to 19^7 and 1948 UE
conventions

Henry Rhine works for the UERMWA in the eastern Pennsylvania region or
UE District 1. He is a member of the Communist Party.

Late in 1933 Rhine was appointed a junior assistant in the NRA in Wash-
ington, D. C. For 6 years he was national organizer of the United Federal
Workers of America, CIO. Since 1943 he has been working for the UERMWA
in district 1.

Rhine has been a teacher at the Philadelphia School of Social Science and Art,
the Communist Party's training school in Philadelphia.

Rhine is prominent in UE negotiations with the important Radio Corp. of
America.

Ben Riskin, UE international representative, delegate to 1948 UE convention

Ben Riskin has been a member of the Communist Party for many years. His
party membership book, issued for the year 1943, was numbered 37414 and was
made out to "R. Burns."

Riskin was the originator of the idea of the portal-to-portal suits.

In 1935 he was an associated editor of the New Order, official organ of the
International Workers Order. The IWO is an auxiliary of the Communist Party.
An official memorandum of the FBI, dated ]\Iay 7, 1942, described the Interna-
tional Workers Order as "one of the strongest Communist organizations." The
masthead of the New Order for April-May 1935, shows Ben Riskin as one of the
magazine's associate editors. The table of contents given on this masthead
indicates that Ben Riskin was the author of an article entitled "May 1, 1935."
This issue of the New Order was a special May Day issue.

Excerpts from Riskin's article in the New Order read as follows :

"Over one-sixth of the earth has been established a workers' and farmers' land,
rising with incredible speed to a state of real general security and comfort,
crowned with an ever-growing richness of science and life.

"Like rats in a corner, the bosses with their backs against the wall resort to
their last resort — war. They hope to distract the attention of the workers from
them to 'foreign foes' — that is, to brother workers, gleefully hoping that the
damned nuisances will end the problem of unemployment by killing one another
off and make lots of profits for the bosses through munitions and high prices on
necessities in the meantime.

"And thus we find our present problems already outlined. * * * They are
the fight against imperialist war and thus for the defense of Soviet Russia and
Soviet China, the only workers' and farmers' lands."

These quotations clearly reflect Riskin's Communist attitudes toward American
industry and leave no doubt whatever that Riskin is a member of the Com-
munist Party.

In 1937 Riskin was on the staff of People's Press, a Communist Party-line
publication which was used as the official organ of the UERMWA.

Subsequently People's Press changed its name to Trade Union Service, Inc.


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