United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Gove.

Special Senate investigation on charges and countercharges involving: Secretary of the Army Robert T. Stevens, John G. Adams, H. Struve Hensel and Senator Joe McCarthy, Roy M. Cohn, and Francis P. Carr. Hearings before the Special Subcommittee on Investigations of the Committee on Government Operati online

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Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. Senate. Committee on GoveSpecial Senate investigation on charges and countercharges involving: Secretary of the Army Robert T. Stevens, John G. Adams, H. Struve Hensel and Senator Joe McCarthy, Roy M. Cohn, and Francis P. Carr. Hearings before the Special Subcommittee on Investigations of the Committee on Government Operati → online text (page 1 of 6)
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Given By

4ZS, SUET. OF DQGUIvlSNT^



iM-t'^"^ jtr-



SPECIAL SENATE INVESTIGATION ON CHARGES
AND COUNTERCHARGES INVOLVING: SECRE-
TARY OF THE ARMY ROBERT T. STEVENS, JOHN
G. ADAMS, H. STRUVE HENSEL AND SENATOR

JOE McCarthy, roy m. cohn, and

FRANCIS p. CARR



HEARING

BEFOKE THE

SPECIAL SUBCOMMITTEE ON
INVESTIGATIONS OF THE COMMITTEE ON

GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS

UNITED STATES SENATE

EIGIITY-THIBD CONGRESS

SECOND SESSION
PURSUANT TO



S. Res. 189



PART 54



JUNE 7, 1954



Printed for the use of the Committee on Government Operations




UNITED STATES

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON : 1954



Boston Public Library
Cuperintcndent of Documents

OCT 2 7 1954



COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS
JOSEPH R. MCCARTHY, Wisconsin, Chairman
KARL E. MUNDT, South Dakota JOHN L. McCLELLAN, Arkansas

MARGARET CHASE SMITH, Maine HENRY M. JACKSON, Washington

HENRY C. DWOKSHAK, Idaho JOHN P. KENNEDY, Massachusetts

EVERETT MCKINLEY DIRKSEN, Illinois STUART SYMINGTON, Miseouri
JOHN MARSHALL BUTLER. Maryland THOMAS A. BURKE, Ohio

CHARLES E. POTTER, Mi.hifian

Richard J. O'Melia, General Counsel
Walter L. Reynolds, Chief Clerk



Special Subcommittee on Investigations
KARL E. MUNDT, South Dakota, Chairman
EVERETT MCKINLEY DIRKSEN, Illinois JOHN L. McCLELLAN, Arkansas
CHARLES B. POTTER, Michigan HENRY M. JACKSON, Washington

HENRY C. DWORSHAK, Idaho STUART SYMINGTON, Missouri

Ray H. Jenkins, Chief Counsel
Thomas R. Pkewitt, Assistant Counsel
Robert A. Collier, Assistant Counsel
SoLis HoEwiTZ, Assistant Counsel
Charles A. Maker, Secretary

n



CONTENTS



Tape

Index I

Testimony of —

ITorwi<z, Solis, assistant ccunsel, Special Subcommiftee on Investi-
gations 2171

Lucas, John J., Jr., appointment clerk to tbe Secretary ct tbe

Army 2142, 2172

Pike, Mrs. Jane K , secretary to the Secretary ot the Army 2112

Rhodes, Theodore R., shorthand reporter for the Department cf the
Army 2142

III



SPECIAL SENATE INVESTIGATION ON CHARGES AND
COUNTERCHARGES INVOLVING: SECRETARY OF THE
\RM Y ROBERT T. STEVENS, JOHN C. ADAMS, H. STRUVE
HENSEL AND SENATOR JOE MCCARTHY, ROY M. COIIN,
AND FRANCIS P. CARR



MONDAY, JUNE 7, 1954

United States Senate,
Special SuBCOMMrrTEE on Investigations of the

CoMMIT-raE ON (jOVERNMENT OPERATIONS,

Washington, D. V.
The subcommittee met at 10:15 a. m., pursuant to recess, in the cau-
cus room of the Senate Office Building, Senator Karl E. Mundt, chair-

"' l"rerent! Sector Karl E. Mundt, Republican, South Dakota ; Sena-
tor Everett McKinley Dirksen, Re])ublican, Illinois; Senator Charles
E. Potter, Kepublican, Michigan; Senator Henry C. Dworshalc, Ke-
Publican, Idaho; Senator John L. McClellan, Democrat, Arkansas;
Senator Henry M. Jackson, Democrat, Washington; and Senator
Stuart Symingtou, Democrat, Missouri.

A.l'^o present: Rtiy H. Jenkins, chief counsel to the subcommittee;
Thomas R. Prewitt, assistant counsel; Charles Maner, assistant
counsel;andRuthY. Watt, chief clerk. i t, tit ^i .i „

Principal participants present: Senator Joseph -l^- .^^c^'^^W,'
United States Senator from the State of Wisconsin; Koy M. Cohn,
chief counsel to the subcommittee; Josej^h N. Welch special counsel
for the Army ; and James D. St. Clair, special counsel for the Army.

Senator Mundt. The committee will please come to order. \\ e de-
layed momentarily because we just discovered that part of the evidence
we want to read into the record is locked up in my safe :n my othce.

By the time we get through with our preliminary remarks

Senator McCleli.an. I can be questioning the man on the monitor-

"' Senator Mdndt. The Chair would like to welcome our guests this
pretty Monday morning and tell vou that we are happy to have you
as our guests, to attend these committee hearings, and to remind you
cf a standing conunittee rule which the Chair has repeated many,
many times during these liearings. That rule is to the effect that
there are to be no audible manifestations of approval or disapproval
of any kind at any time during these hearings. To enforce the rule
and maintain order, the uniformed officers that you see before you,
and the plain clothesmen scattered through the audience have stand-
ing instructions from the committee to remove from the room imme-
diately, politely and firmly, anyone who for reasons best known to



2142 SPECIAL INVESTIGATION

hinipplf, mi<xht choose to violate the terms by which he entered the
coniinittee room, namely, that he refrain from audible manifesta-
tions of approval or disapi)roval.

Our audiences have been magnificent and your cooperation has
been splendid. We resume this morning where we left off Friday
afternoon, reading into the record the monitored calls that have be-
come part of the evidence in this controversy.

And so we will ask Mr. Lucas, and his two associates to take the
stand, and the first calls of the monitored calls that will be in evidence
are those of ISenator JVlcClellan. That is pursuant to the agreement
we made with Senator McClellan Friday afternoon, and he was called
away shortly before the meeting ended.

So, whichever of the monitors covered Senator IMcClellan's calls,
will take the stand at the witness table. Senator McClellan will begin
by asking some preliminary (juestions, and by that time I am sure
that the calls themselves will have come down from the oflice upstairs.

Senator McClellan.

TESTIMONY OF JOHN J. LUCAS, JE., MRS. JANE E. PIKE, AND
THEODORE E. RHODES— Resumed

Senator McCleli.an. Mr. Rhodes, you have already been sworn and
you have been testifying to certain calls, telephone calls that you
monitored ?

Mr. Rhodes. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. Regarding this controversy ?

Mr. Rhodes. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. Did you monitor any calls of the Secretary
of the Army made to me?

Mr, Rhodes. Yes, sir; I did.

Senator McCleij^an. How many ?

Mr. RjioDES. One, sir.

Senator McClellan. I don't have a copy of them. How many have
you altogether ? Do you have two copies there ?

Mr. Rhodes. We only have one copy, sir.

Senator Mc(^lellan. If I had a copy, we could proceed. You only
monitored one ?

Mr. Rhodes. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. What date was it?

Mr. Rhodes. The 20th of February, sir.

Senator McClellan. February 20?

Mr. Rhodes. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan, Is that the first call that was monitored?

Mr. Rhodes. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. What are the dates of the others that you
have there?

Mr. Rhodes. Mr. Lucas has one of March 1.

Senator McClellan. March 1 ?

Mr. Rhodes. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. What others do you have?

Mr. Rhodes. That is all, sir.

Senator McClellan. Well, I thought there were three of them,
some



SPECIAI INVESTIGATION



2143



Mr Welch. I think there are 3, and I think Mrs. Pike has 1.

Senator McClellan. 1 want them by date sc that 1 can present them
in chronolocrical order. ^^.,1-1.1^

Mr. Rhodes. February 21, Mrs. Pike had that one.

Senator McClellan. That is February 21, and you monitored two,
or which did you monitor?

Mr RiiooES. I monitored the one on February 20, sir.

Senator McClellan. Mr. Rhodes, and who monitored the one on

March 1 ?

Mr. Rhodes. Mr. Lucas, sir.

Senator McClellan. The other one was February what; was that
the 21st, you say?

Mr. Ri'ioDES. Yes. sir; Mrs. Pike.

Senator McClellan. That is Mrs. Pike?

Mr Rhodes. Yes, sir. , • ^ 1 ^i ^a

Senator McClellan. If you will arrange now to introduce them and
testify to them in chronological order, I would appreciate it. 1 ours
is February 20?

Senato'^McCLELLAN!^'! don't have a copy before me, but let's pro-
ceed. I don't know what is in it. On February 20, what call do you
have?

Mr. Rhodes (reading) :

9:55— SA phoned Sen. John McClellan.

Senator McClellan. The Secretary of the Army called me?

Mr. Rhodes. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. What did he say i

Mr. Rhodes (reading) :

SA I appreciated vour time yesterday afternoon and I will tell you why I
call?ci this morning. "When I found out what Senator f'^':%^ih.ysf dress w^^^^
which I didn't find out until this morning-it happened to be the 1 en Eyck Hotel
in Albany-1 telephoned him a few minutes ago, because I t'i""^"t/t w, s the
fair and proper thin.', that I should tell him that I had been up on the Hill and
talLd w?th you and other members of the committee yesterday afternoon and
us wha I saw. and. of course. Senator McCarthy didn't like that at all and he
hopped on me pretty hard, and 1 told him I was not going to let General Zw cker
aDnear at that public hearing up there on Tuesday morning; maybe eventually
we would ha?e to produce him, hut I was not going to let him go through again
what he had gone through before. . ^ ,^ , , , x.

Senator McClellan. I wonder if he denied that statement?

SA.

Senator McClellan. Do you know what statement was referred to?

Mr. Rhodes. I ,• j . q

Senator McClellan. What statement was relerred to f

Mr. Rhodes. I presume the statement of General Zwicker. 1 do

not know, sir.

Senator McClellan. All right. Proceed.

Mr. Rhodes (reading) :

SA I have understood, John-I don't know whether this would tie in with

your information— that it has all been stricken from the record.

Senator McClellan. I can't get a copy until Monday, probably. _„ , „t

SA. I think you are going to find that out, but I have a statement on my desk

this morning from General Zwicker

Senator McClellan. I couldn't get a copy of what until Monday, a

transcript of the hearings?



2144 SPECIAL LWESTIGATION

Mr. Rhodes. I presume so; yes, sir.
Senator McClellan. All right, proceed.
Mr. Rhodes (reading) :

SA. I think you are going to find that out, but I have a statement on my desk
this morning from General Zwicker, which covers all those statements and as
I told you, I think his Captain, a medical man, was with him and I can produce

Senator McClellan. I tell you what we will do ; we will find out the name of
the reporter that took that and I will call him for an accurate transcriot of
what happened and what was stricken.

SA. I think that is very important.

Senator AIcCiJCLr^N. I don't know the name of the reporter, but I will find
out who and I will call on him for an accurate transcript.

SA. Now, the Senator was— maybe to use tJie word "abusive" would be a little
strong— he was very rough with me on the telephone and he said, "You mean
you are going to continue to cover up communists and not let these officers
appear?" And I said, "You know, Joe, I wouldn't cover up a communist any
more than you would." I am interested in doing the right kind of a job but
I am also interested in preserving the morale of our professional otficer corps
and I feel that is a duty I took on under my oath of olfice. He asked me if
I would accept a subpoena for ten o'clock Tuesday morning and I said "I will
take that under advisement." He said, "Are you refusing the subpoena?" I
^^1 ,^ m^ "^^ refusing it, I am not accepting it. I will take it under advise-
ment. Then he hung up the phone. He wouldn't go beyond that. He really
batted me pretty hard and said I would learn that you couldn't operate that
Wcy, or something of that kind. As it stands now, John, he says that I am
subpoenaed for ten o'clock Tuesday morning and, as I say, I have taken it under
advisement. I want to talk to not only my counsel, but also various members
of the committee to see what the best thing to do now is.

Senator McClellan. I thought you were going to request appearance?

SA. I was in due time. I don't even know what committee it is I presun^e
it is the subcommittee, although he didn't say so. I am perfectly willin<'' and
delighted to appear before the committee, whatever is the appropriate time
I want to satisfy myself that Tuesday morning is the appropriate time

Senator McClellan. I would let it rest for the moment. You don't have the
subpoena?

SA. I don't have it now.

Senator McClellan. If you get one that is all right. To get ahead of the
thing now, I would announce to the press that I was going to reoiiest the
opportunity to appear. ^

SA. I think that is a good suggestion.

Senator McClellan. Talk to your attorney about it. Say you are requesting
to ai)pear or the opportunity to appear.

SA. I think there is a lot of merit to that.

Senator McClellan. Beat him to the punch. Talk to your counsel about
that. Just announce that you definitely have requested the opportunity to
appear.

SA. I think that has got a lot of merit.

Senator McCijsli.an. Just beat him to the punch.

Senator McClellan. That was on February 20?

Mr. Rhodes. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. The Secretary called me regarding the pros-
pect of his appearing before the committee ?

Mr. Rhodes. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. It was after he had come to see me the day
before ?

Mr. Rhodes. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. The conversation occurred at the time he was
talking to all the Senators on the committee?

Mr. Rhodes. Yes, sir.

Senator :McClellan. Do you have another one ? Wlio has the next
one?

Mr. Rhodes. Mrs. Pike, sir.



SPECIAL INVESTIGATION 2145

Senator McClellax. You have already testified, haven't you, Mrs.
Pike?

Mrs. Pike. Yes, sir; I have. ., , . , ,^ ,1

Senator McClellan. You have testified with respect to some other
calls that you monitored?
Mrs. Pike. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. Do you have any call there from the Secretary
of the Army to me, which you monitored?
Mrs. Pike. I do.

Senator McClellan. What is the date of it?
Mrs. Pike. February 21, 1954.
Senator McClellan. February 21, 1951?

Mrs. Pike. That is right, sir. -, .. 1 . .. • ,

Senator McClellan. All right, will you read it, whatever it is i
ISIrs. Pike. The time is 5 p. m. ,, , ^ , . ^

Senator McClellan. Now, that is a call the Secretary made to me i
INIrs. Pike. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. That you monitored?
Mrs. Pike. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. All right, proceed.
Mrs. Pike (reading) :

S/^ called Senator AleClellan saying: Wanted to bring you up to date. You
saw the nublieity. I thought it was time to make a statement and tied to my
name I am issuing this afternoon a short statement telling the people I have
told Zwicker not to appear and why. I go on to say if the permanent subcom-
mittee calls upon me to appear before it, I will be glad to do so. Thus far I hfive
not received any formal notification, which is a fact. Only thing I know is tliat
McCarthy as he hung up on the phone said-you can consider yourself sub-
poenaed—and before I could ask where (he was in New lork) he bung up So I
consider I have no formal notification. Put it in the public statement that I am
not seeking or asking Committee to appear, but if they desire me to appear I will
be only too glad to comply. On basis of some stuff in paper did not want it to

appear I was asking to be heard I am willing to be heard if called but I

certainly appreciate the way you and Stu and Senator Jackson have viewed this
thing and the last thing I want to do is to muddy the waters like volunteering to
appear when you gentlemen might have an idea of having this hearing deferred.
Senator McClellan. At that time he had decided he didn't want to
voluntarily appear, as I had suggested to him, did he?
Mrs. Pike. It would seem so. .

Senator McClellan. Well, the day before you heard it ; one read the
day before where I suggested if he wanted to appear, to announce it,
if he wanted to appear, didn't you?
Mrs. Pike. Yes, sir. . -, t ,

Senator McClellan. Now, he has changed his mmd, and he says
that he does want to do that.

Senator McCarthy. Could I have that reread. I didn't so under-
stand the passage, and I thought he was saying he was willing to
appear. Will you read the last paragraph over.
Senator McClellan. Read it.

Senator McCarthy. He says, "I am willing to appear and willing
to be called."

Senator McClellan. "If called."
Mrs. Pike (reading) :

So I consider I have no formal notification, put it in the public statement
that I am not seeking or asking committee to appear, but if they desire me to

40020°— 54— pt. 54 2



214G SPECIAL INVESTIGATION

appear I will be only too fihul to comply. On basis of some stuff in paper, did
not want it to appear that I was askinj: to be heard .... I am willing to be
heard if called but I certainly appreciate the way you and Stu and Senator
Jackson have viewed this thing and the last thing

Senator McCarthy. What is that?
Mrs. Pike, "have vieAved this thing."
Senator McCarthy. "Have viewed this thing"?
Mrs. Pike. That is right. [Reading :]

and the last thing I want to do is to muddy the waters like volunteering to appear
when you gentlemen might have an idea of having this hearing deferred.

This will make unmistakably clear to everyone in the paper tomorrow morning
that I am not asking to be heard but am available and willing to come at any
time committee asks me to. Imagine this release which is getting into the hands
of the press about now will bring forth some comment from Senator McCarthy
but just what that will be remains to be seen. One point I make in the release
is that I say— (read portions of release about thus far not been called if
called . . .)

And then he read portions of release —

but thus far not being called, and if called—

quoting from the press statement. [Reading :]

Because of the importance of this subject, hearing be open to press .... think
It a matter of great importance and should be public ....

Sen. McClellan asked— you want a public hearing?

S/A said yes, and added— personally I would much rather have it deferred
until Stu gets back because I know of his great interest and active part he would
take. From my standpoint would like it deferred . . .

Sen. McClellan asked— what did Mundt say to you?

S/A answered— he was very much distressed over the quotes I gave him from
Gen. Zwicker and I told him I was telling him not to appear. Talked along
lines I talked with you. Mundt was highly distressed and anxious to see the
record but noncommittal.

Sen. McClellan have tried to take position . . . until I see the tran-
script.

There is something left out.

Senator McClellan. I have tried not to take a position until I see
the transcript ?

Mrs. Pike. There was a slight omission, and I have an indication
of that.

Senator McClellan. It doesn't make sense as it is ?

Mrs. Pike. No, sir, I will say. Let me read it again, then, sir. I
missed some, picking up with, "have tried to take position," I missed
some more, indicated by dots, "until I see the transcript. They said
I could not get it until Monday which is probably true." [Reading:]

S/A said— I put this in statement, "I have asked Senator McCarthy to supply
me with complete copy of original transcript as recorded "

Sen. McClellan. did you say without any deletions? Did you put that in?

^/-^ I bave released it but I will clear that up next time.

Sen. McClellan —

Here again I missed some, sir, and I liave indicated so with dots.

oci?^"' ^IcClellan— ..... if it is not in there I will call the reporter and
ask hira to read them. Could the reporter destroy them?

S/A said— don't believe a reputable tirm could. I have sworn affidavit with
regard to this matter. I don't want to give this affidavit, obviously, to the press.
I he hrst time I am going to give it to anybody is to the committee.

That is all of that conversation.

Senator McClellan. All of that conversation was a result of the
Secretary calling me?



SPECIAL INVESTIGATION 2147

Mrs. Pike. Accordiiifr to my notes, yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. Do you have another one?

ISIrs. Pike. I do not.

Senator ]\IcClellan. What date is that ? Is that Sunday ?
" IMrs. Pike. It is, sir.

Senator McClellax. Did he call me at home or was I at the office ?

INIrs. Pike. If I made the note, I didn't put it down on my transcript,
sir.

Senator McClellan. All right, is that all you know, is that all you
monitored ?

Mrs. Pike. That is all I did.

Senator McClellan. All right. Now, the next one.

Mr. Lucas, you have been sworn and you have already testified to
some other calls that you monitored ?

Mr, Lucas. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. Do you have a call that you monitored in
which I called Secretary Stevens ?

Mr. Lucas. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. ^Yhnt is the date of it ?

Mr. Lucas. March 1, 1954.

Senator ]\IcClellan. The time of the day ?

Mr. Lucas. 3 : 05 p. m.

Senator McClellan. Do you have any other? Did you monitor
any other calls?

Mr. Lucas. No, sir.

Senator McClell^vn. Then, if I understand the two that have pre-
ceded, in which the Secretray called me, and this call that you now
are about to testify to, constitute all of the calls, either to or from the
Secretary by me that were monitored?

Mr. Lucas. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. All right, proceed and place this call in the
record.

Mr. Lucas (reading) :

McClellan. I haven't gotten to see you around here lately.

Stevens. I could use a lot of vrords but you know what I mean.

McClellan. I never was so surprised when you got off over there in that gang
without anybody with you. Of course, they told you they wanted to work things
out.

Stevens. That is about it.

McClellan. My remarks are not critical. We were left out of it. I just had
to take the position it was a Republican quarrel.

Stevens. Uh huh.

Senator McClellan. That was a pretty sound position, wasn't it?

All right, proceed,

Mr. Lucas (reading) :

McClellan. I am going downstate this week-end . . .
Then I indicated by dots, it was something left out.

Senator McClellan. Tell what the subject matter was that was
left out? ':

Mr. Lucas. I don't have it down here, sir, but I made a note on this
transcript that —

(Nothing further in this conversation pertained to the McCarthy-Stevens-
Monmouth matter.)



2148 SPECIAL INVESTIGATION

Senator McCi.kllan. Don't yon know if you will read your notes
that I called him about an ROTC unit for a college in my State?

Mr. Lucas. I have a recollection that at some point sir, you did, and
I suppose that would be it.

Senator McClellan. I want you to be sure about it. Refer to your
notes.

Mr. Lucas. I will check it, sir.

Senator :\I(('lellax. I know I called him about an EOTC unit in
my State. He hadn't been to see me as he promised, and I started
the conversation by saying, "Haven't been around here lately," and
then you took down what he said ?

Mr. Lucas. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. You left out the balance of it. Refer to your
notes. I want you to be able to testify if I didn't call him about an
ROTC unit in Bartlesville. That is my recollection, and I think you
will find that is correct.

Mr. Lucas. I know you did call him on that subject, sir.

Senator McClellan. I did not call him on this subject. He brought
up the subject himself; didn't he?

Mr. Lucas. Yes, sir.

Senator McClellan. That is all.

Mr. Welch. Senator McClellan — Mr. Chairman,

Senator Mundt. Mr. Welch?

Mr. Welch. Would it be satisfactory to you. Senator, if we were to
say to you our understanding is that you talked about the ROTC?

Senator McClellan. It is satisfactory to me, because I know what
I did. If anybody else is not satisfied, I want him to be able to sub-
stantiate it.

Mr. Welch. Thank you, sir.

Senator McCleli,an. Is there any question about it, Joe?

Senator McCarthy. Not about that. I would concede you called
about that. I would like to ask the witness some questions when it
gets to my turn.

Senator Mundt. We will go around the clock in the regular order.
Counsel Jenkins, have you any questions?

Mr. Jenkins. No questions^ Mr. Chainnan.

Senator Mundt. I have no questions about Senator McClellan's
calls. I would like to question Mr. Lucas on the general procedure.
Am I to understand that the only notes you took on the call are those
dealing with the so-called McCarthy controversy, or that you simply
didn't transcribe the rest of Senator McClellan's call ?

Mr. Lucas. I simply didn't transcribe the rest of Senator McClel-
lan's call, because it didn't seem to have anything to do

Senator Mundt. That was relevant. In your notebooks the full
notes would be there of his calls?

Mr. Lucas. Yes, sir.

Senator Mundt. Senator Dirksen ? Senator Jackson ?

Senator Jackson. No questions.

Senator Mundt. May I say to the Senator from Arkansas, our
procedure has been, if you want to follow the same, the Senator has
had his calls read — to let the press have them to make exact copies,
and then they go to the reporter.



SPECIAL IXVKSTIGATION 2149

Senator McClellan. Mr. Chairman, it has been testified to in the


1 3 4 5 6

Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. Senate. Committee on GoveSpecial Senate investigation on charges and countercharges involving: Secretary of the Army Robert T. Stevens, John G. Adams, H. Struve Hensel and Senator Joe McCarthy, Roy M. Cohn, and Francis P. Carr. Hearings before the Special Subcommittee on Investigations of the Committee on Government Operati → online text (page 1 of 6)