United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Labo.

OSHA reform : coverage and enforcement : hearing before the Subcommittee on Labor of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, first session, on examining the scope of coverage and enforcement of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of online

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Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. Senate. Committee on LaboOSHA reform : coverage and enforcement : hearing before the Subcommittee on Labor of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, first session, on examining the scope of coverage and enforcement of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of → online text (page 17 of 17)
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on Airliner Cabin Environment in 1986 made eight recommendations to
improve cabin air. The FAA has not acted on o ne of them. Only one
recommendation has been implemented — the dpmestic smoking ban — and
that was by congressional legislative action.



99

Cabin temperature, a component of air quality evaluation, is so
relevant to passenger comfort, it is not an issue thought to need
regulation. Yet an ongoing situation at American Flagship/Eagle brings
the issue into question. An incident occurred on July 10, 1993 where the
cabin temperature exceeded 100 degrees as the airplane taxied out for
take-off . The SD-360 aircraft had no air conditioning available on taxi
while the passengers and crew were confined in the sweltering heat for
25 minutes before the captain returned to the gate. Passengers
complained of nausea from the extreme heat. After complaining about
being dizzy and having a hard time breathing, the only flight attendant
on board fell unconscious . Paramedics were called to meet the flight at
the gate. To further aggravate the situation, beverages were not
available for the passengers. No drink service was scheduled for the
flight and this aircraft type has no running water in the galley or
lavatory. Hence, no beverage was available for passengers to take
medication or for the flight attendant to provide a damp towel if
passengers felt faint.

The outcome of the July 10 Incident would have been different had
OSHA been the agency with jurisdiction. OSHA requires drinking water
to be available to all employees which in this case may have prevented
the flight attendant from falling unconscious . Additionally, OSHA has
inspectors to follow-up on complaints. There could have been toxic
emissions from the malfunctioning air conditioning system on the
aircraft that could have compounded the effects of the extreme heat. In
contrast, the FAA has no formal system for filing occupational health
or safety complaints and no inspectors to investigate.

APFA joins other flight attendant unions in urging the passage of
OSHA Reform legislation, S.575, and we strongly support provision
4(B) (1) which extends OSHA regulations to employees not currently
covered by OSHA.

Thank you for the opportunity to submit these comments. Feel free
to contact me at 703/548-0608 with questions.



Sincerely,
Joan B. Wages



100



wo



36 Drew Avenue

Highland Falli, N«w York 10928

April 23, 1991

American Federation of Government Employees

West toliit Local ^

Building 635

West Point, New York 10996

TO VfHOH IT MAY CONCERN i

I am a former Federal employee who was retired on dleablllty
In June, 19/9. The dlagnoele was COPD. (CongeBtlve Pulmonary
Dleease)

For 15 years prior to the time of my retirement In 1979, I
...rkod for Englno«r» Plumbing and Heating Dlwlalon a« " Heating

Equlpmfint MfchonJLc. I wai oxposod to tho effoulB of onboBtoB on

a daily baala throughout my time In the Plumbing & Heating
Division. Much of the work assigned to me consisted of repairing
asbsBtos-coated furnaces and pipes. I was required to split up,
carry, remove and replace furnaces and pipes which were covered
In asbestOB, replaced fireboxes and 1000 galllon water tanks. X
was also required to clean furnaces and In general expose myself
to other asbestos debris then commonly found In all heating
ducts, tunnels and basements at West Point. OILen the air wa»
cloudy with agbestos particles and other debris. Me often spilt
the furnace/pipe coverings with our bare hands. No particular
precautions werei ever recommended or required.

Because of progressive difficulty in breathing on exertion
and Bhortness o£ breath, I gradually becamo unable to continue In
that position. Disability retirement was recommended by my
personal physician and West Point Hospital doctors.

The difficulty in breathing which caused my disability
retirement has increased. I am not able to do any manual labor
at all because of shortness of breath, labored breathing and
coughing spasms. The quality of my life and the lifestyle of my
family has been seriously affected by my disability. My Income
is limited to my retirement annuity. 1 have not been abl« to do
any gainful work since my retirement from west Point.

Please provide me with information required to participate
with other former Federal employees who are similarly dioabled by
the effects of asbestos in the workplace.



nenpectfully yourii



A|lfred^J. Treac
SS# 126-20-4806




Senator Metzenbaum. The subcommittee is adjourned.
[Whereupon, at 4:15 p.m., the subcommittee was adjourned.]



ISBN 0-16-043999-X



780160




439995



90000






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Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. Senate. Committee on LaboOSHA reform : coverage and enforcement : hearing before the Subcommittee on Labor of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, first session, on examining the scope of coverage and enforcement of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of → online text (page 17 of 17)