United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Labo.

Oversight of the Legal Services Corporation, 1984 : hearing before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-eighth Congress, second session, on review of the Corporation's documents to ascertain whether there are any problems with the agency's policies that need to be online

. (page 39 of 42)
Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. Senate. Committee on LaboOversight of the Legal Services Corporation, 1984 : hearing before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-eighth Congress, second session, on review of the Corporation's documents to ascertain whether there are any problems with the agency's policies that need to be → online text (page 39 of 42)
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Procedures" which outlines the use of the requests for assistance as an on-
going needs assessment mechanism.

7) Lack of adequate on-going funding in field programs, state support
units, LSC Regional Office and the five regional training centers is the major
obstacle.

8) Attached is a memo to the Policy Board on "Proposed Activities."
Additionally, the Board has directed the Project to develop a comprehensive
plan for the next 15 months. This plan will focus 75% of the Project's resources
to "management in times of change" and 25% to development of manager
skills.

9) See answer to Question 8.

10) Ihe planning has become more detailed as the work has evolved.



499



11) Coordination of work with other NTCC memhers has been an area
of special concentration of the Project. Management training and technical
assistance plays a significant role in the substantive priorities of the other
NTCC members.

12) On-going contact is maintained with all of these organizations.

All of them are eligible for contracts for the benefit of field program activities.
See the attached "Report on Requests and Work Done."

13) None

i^) Assisting individuals/organizations in the legal services community
to coordinate through clearinghouse activities is an inherent function of the
Project through requests for assistance. Additionally, the Project sponsors
the Materials Resource Center making available written and audio-visual
materials. Finally, the Project regularly publishes articles in the Clearinghouse
Review , NLADA Briefcase , NLADA Cornerstone , and various regional training
newsletters.

15) Developmental activities are part of all priority areas undertaken
by the Project. See the attached "Report on Requests and Work Done" and
memo on Proposed Activities.

16) See copies of first pages of all Management Project consultant
contracts attached.

17) Included with copies attached in response to question 16.

18) See attached "Report on Requests and Work Done" and memo
on "Proposed Activities."

19) See attached evaluation of LSC materials.

20) No.



500



21) None.



22) See attached "Report on Work Done" and Memo on "Proposed
Activities."

23) None
2'>) None



501




^^^CNAi .zGAi

-D & DEFENDER

ASSOCIATiCN

'625 K STREET. NW

i;GnTH FLOOR

,VASH. 20006

■202) 452-0620



'•■A



MEMORANDUM

TO: Anita Henry

Coordinator for Decentralization in Training

FROM: Wayne Pressei, Director, [Management Project

DATE: August 5, 1982

RE: Semi-Annual Report of Management Project



Report Covering Period October 1, 1981, to April 30, 1982



1.
2.

3.
4.
5.

6.



9.

10.
11.

12.
13



Center Name - NLADA Management Project

Center Director - Wayne M. Pressei

Report completed by Wayne Pressei and Beverly Brown

Grantee - National Legal Aid & Defender Association

Address of Center ^ NLADA, 1625 K Street, N.W., 8th Fir.
Washington, D.C. 20006



Staff

Wayne M. Pressei

Sue Corrigan



Director Planning and overall
directing



Management
Specialist



implementing workpl^.r
Administrator Administering projeci



Beverly Brown

None

Total Funding Received - $1,200,000.00

MLADA's fiscal year ends 12/31/82.

None

Attached as Exhibit A is a copy of the listing
of Management Project Policy Board members.

Exhibit B delineates positions of Boar'd members.

Dates of Policy Board meetings 1/1/82 through 6/30/82:
March 26, I '"'B? -ind .hirir- .""-. 1 nsr- .



CHANGE WITHOUT COMPROMISE



502



14. I have attached as Exhibit C as copy of the workplan
presented to the Policy Board at its Atlanta June meeting,
Note : The Management Project Policy Board may direct the
Project to work in areas outside the attached memo. The
Board also directs the Project in predetermined specific
activities in the detail proposed.

15. The Management Project has provided the following technical
assistance grants:

Nevada Legal Services - The MP has contracted with a
consultant to provide technical assistance in the planning
for execution and follow-up for statewide meeting of staff,
local boards and state boards and clients to consider
recasting priorities, implementing strategies and deliver-
ing mechanisms to achieve priorities.

Legal Services of New Jersey, Inc. - To cover costs of
two statewide 800 numbers for area codes (202) and (609)
and to develop recorded tapes on specific legal subjects.

In addition to the above grants, the MP has administered
$167,000 in grants allocated to the nine LSC Regional
Offices. Exhibit D lists these grants by program.

These listings do not reflect current activity level
Since May 1, 1982, the MP has been finalizing contracts
and implementing work on over UO requests.

16. I have attached as Exhibit E financial reports for the
Management Project covering 1981 and 1982 expenditures.

17. This will also be reflected in the financial reports.

18. No equipment has been purchased in excess of $5,000.

The Management Project has retained the foilowin^ii
consultant services in excess of $2,500 in addition
to the consultants hired under the regional office
allocations listed in Exhibit D.

Brenda Gardner ($25/hour, 20 hours/week, 80 hours/month)
Duties include development of workplan papers on Project
priorities, develop mechanisms to identify, train, monitor
evaluate consultants, as well as contracts. To review
incoming proposals in interim of hiring MDA.



Semi-Annual Report
to Anita Henry ( LSC )
Page Three



503



18. (cont.) No prior approval is required by Corporation

for contracting of consultants.

19. None



504

Exhibit A

NLADA MANAGEMENT PROJECT
Policy Board



John Garland, Chairperson

Legal Services of the Coastal Plains
P. O. Box 56t

Ahoskie, North Carolina 27910
(919) 332-5 12«t

Laura DeJesus

P.O. Box 301

Fajardo, Puerto Rico 006if8

(809)863-3513

John Dooley

1^1* East Terrace
Burlington, Vermont 05401
(802) 862-7019 (home)
(802) 863-5888 (work)

Maggie Howell

2821 Fulton Street
Toledo, Ohio 43610
(419) 243-8620

Ernest 3ones

Community Legal Services
Sylvania House
Juniper and Market Streets
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107
(215) 893-5300

Art Lucero

Legal Services Corporation
Denver Regional Office
1726 Champa Street, Suite 500
Denver, Colorado 80202
(303)837-5981

Norman Metzger

Legal Services Organization of Indiana
107 N. Pennsylvania, Suite 300
Indianapolis, Indiana 46204
(317)639-4151



Rachel Miller

1626 Meserve

Pomona, California 91766

(714)622-2152

Robert D. Raven

40th Floor

One Market Plaza

San Francisco, California 94105

(415) 777-6294

Ada Shen-3af fe

Evergreen Legal Services
506 Second Avenue
2018 Smith Tower
Seattle, Washington 98104
(206) 464-5933



1



Annie Smart

276 3eff Davis Street
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
(504) 387-2755



70802



Robert Spangenberg

Abt Associates

55 Wheeler Street

Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138

,,(617) 492-7100

Dr. Marilyn Swears

Alabama Consortium of Legal Services

500 Bell Building

207 Montgomery Street

Montgomery, Alabama 36104

(205) 264-1471



505



Exhibit B



MANAGEMENT PROJECT POLICY BOARD MEMBERS



Member
John Garland
Laura DeJesus
John Dooley
Maggie Howell
Ernest Jones
Art Lucero
Norman Metzger
Rachel Miler
Robert Raven
Ada Shen-Jaffe
Annie Smart
Robert Spangenberg
Marilyn Swears



Delineation

Project Director

Client

Consultant

Client

Program Director

Regional Office Staff

Project Director

Client

Private Attorney

Associate Project Director

Client

Senior Consultant

Management Specialist



506




^



N«10NALL£GAL

AlD&OeeMDB?

ASSOOAnON

1625KSTOEI,NW

EIGHTH FLOOR

WASH DC 2CC06

(202)452-0620



ExhibiL C



MEMORANDUM



TO: Management Project Policy Board

FROM: Wayne Pressel, Director

DATE: June 11, 1982

RE: Proposed Activities

**********************

The purpose of this memo is to outline the specific activities for the
Management Project from July 1, 1982, through December 31, 1982. These
areas are the product of needs assessment and planning based on the priority
areas chosen by the Policy Board at its March, 1982, meeting. There were
two major sources of information and analysis. The first was data gathered
through informal field contacts at meetings: individuals at Private Bar
Involvement Conferences, groups at Project Director Meetings and
workshops at a recent Office of Field Services Conference. Additionally, I
have reviewed proposals submitted to the Project, as well as written
analyses of past efforts. The second was a series of three papers focused on
each of the original priorities and based on extensive field program
interviewing.

There is an inherent limitation to the planning. The information from
the field is not unanimous; in fact, central themes have been slow to
emerge. Part of the reason is the uncertainty of the future. Part is the
trauma of the past. The need to actively work in the field now is
predominant, making rigid or detailed planning inappropriate. There are
concrete efforts which need attention, and it is my expectation that the
field work itself will teach us much about future directions. Flexibility to
change direction is crucial.



The following itemized narrative outlines my current choices. My job
as Director is to flesh out priorities into real activities and to accomplish
them. There are, however, two roles which the Policy Board needs to play.
The first is to offer substantive input and reaction to my planning. The
second is to support the Project's UMpleinentation.



507



and to accomplish them. There are, however, two roles which the Policy
Board needs to play. The first is to offer substantive input and reaction to
my planning. The second is to support the Project's implementation.



I. New Delivery Structures

The legal services community has undergone severe stress from both without
and within. Retrenchment came before field programs had completed expansion,
and the unknowns of the future have compounded the trauma. Most programs have
grappled with substantive law priorities; the need now is for field programs to
structure their work. Field programs need to examine their delivery structures to
ensure that their organizations are best designed to accomplish the goals they have
established.

The adveni of private bar involvement is certainly the most striking national
innovation; however, technical assistance monies are already available through
other national grants. There are, however, several new delivery structures needing
attention. Self-help clinics, telephone intake/advice/referral systems, modified
circuit riding, as well as increased legislative and administrative advocacy, state
and regional coalition-building and other forms of policy advocacy are all known
examples calling for development. What programs need is to decide what fits best,
and who has done what. The Project will address the issues of new delivery
systems by both direct technical assistance and training. There are two tasks a
program faces in deciding upon its delivery structure. The iirst is an examination
of the organization as it is currently constituted. The second is being aware of the
spectrum of alternatives (roni which to choose. Few programs have the internal
expertise to accomplish the first, and lewer yet the national perspective to know
the second. The initial strategy will be to offer programs trained consultants: (1)
to assist field staff to understand their current structures (2) to expose programs to
the experiences of others as well as to wholly new ideas in delivery structures and
(3) to help programs plan foi the implementation of chosen delivery structures.
board, stall, clients and othei program constiluencies would be represented.
Although the Management Project cannot undertake the responsibility of



508



restructuring programs, it can and should stimulate the field to reexamine its
delivery structures and to able to choose new directions. Training at Project
Director's meetings and other forums will supplement the technical assistance.

n. Manager Development

Much of the foregoing hinges upon the continued skills development of legal
services managers. Local programs must become more responsible for the
improvement of their own internal management. Currently, most field programs
are not able to assume this burden. While the Project should not create
dependencies by local programs, it must strongly encourage field managers to
improve become better at their daily jobs. Two specific areas appear from the
needs assessment: new Project Director training and supervisory skills training.
As for training new Project Directors, the Management Project will design an
economical package stressing solving the immediate problems of individual
Directors coupled with a "buddy system," to provide relevant and continuous
support. The iraining will be offered through LSC Regional Offices. As for
supervisory skills, the Project will co-sponsor training using the PAWS II package.

in. Planning

Though hardly a new subject, field program planning skills need to be
simplified and reinforced. Virtually every program is facing continual changes and
uncertainties. Historical work in planning skills has been viewed as cumbersome
and complicated. The Project will train field program managers to plan their
activities within the local limitations of the setting. Thinking through
alternatives, determining what is to be accomplished and identifying what is
necessary to do to achieve the ends are basic considerations whether the
program is hiring replacement staff or designing an entirely new delivery
structure. Simplified planning will also ensure that all relevant groups are
involved while avoiding elaborate process.

Training is an appropriate strategy because it is necessary that the programs
continually strengthen the planning skills of its local managers. No amount of
resources through the Management Project could meet the daily plannig needs of
the field through technical asbistanct-. The initial training will focus on Regional



509



Office and State Support Center staff in order to provide a large pool of people
who in turn can directly assist field progranas in their planning efforts. The
Project will also offer workshops at all regional Project Director meetings (ten
one-day sessions). Ten sessions will occur in the next six months. The training
methodology will concentrate on plannng around participants' actual problems of
the participants. Again,

IV. Measurement and Improvement of Effectiveness

This is one part of the productivity formula. Programs need to be able to
evaluate how well they accomplished their goals. Accountability to both clients
and Congress demands this assessment; moreover, internal needs for staff
satisfaction and program direction require it. The major problem is to decide
what to do about measuring and improving effectiveness. The chosen option is
for a diversified plan of assisting field programs to attempt various techniques
without advocating a single approach. As for measurement, one part of the
strategy is to offer consultant productivity teams to selected programs who wish
to be examined closely using several standards from case reports and to field
interviews. Another approach will be to develop and test a self-assessment tool
for local use without direct consultant intervention. A third strategy is to
sponsor small meetings of field programs who have conducted assessments of
their effectiveness to develop new methods. As for improvement, the strategy
will be to fund a limited number of activities proposed by field programs related
to increasing effectiveness. Here the impetus will come from the field. It is
currently most important to experiment.

V. Measurement and Improvement of Effectiveness

This is the other part of the productivity formula. This issue focuses on
how well the program uses available resources. Again, the need to maximize the
impact of people and money is crucial, and again, there must be multiple
strategies. Certainly, program consolidation, shared administrative functions
and streamlining technologies are examples of current efforts. The chosen
strategies arc siinilar to those lor the irieasurement and improvement of
effectiveness. Demonstration projects and self-assessment tools will be the



37-965 O— 84 33



510



experimental works. Rather than discussion groups, however, the Project will
make use of the currently operating mechanisms by publicizing them nationally.
Again, the improvement strategy is to solicit proposals from the field. The
Project will need the flexibility to try all avenues.

VI. Fundraising

The ability of a program to raise money for its work is indisputably
critical. Fundraising is also an issue which has had considerable development in
legal services. The current need is two-fold. First, information concerning
techniques, such as creating foundations, establishing filing fee arrangements
and passing direct state-funding statutes, is scattered. This data needs to be
collected and made available. The main strategy is to put those interested in
these techniques in contact with those experienced in the particular fundraising
methods. It is essential that the work complements and not duplicates current
efforts by others. Second, the specific money-raising method of interest from
client trust accounts needs attention. While two states have put plans into
action, over twenty others are in progress. In the first six months of Florida's
voluntary program, the Bar Foundation collected over $165,000 from the trust
funds of only SO^f firms. Coordinated assistance with the private bar will ensure
both that as many states as possible will put such plans into effect and that poor
clients will receive the benefits. The chosen strategy is to co-sponsor a national
training event to heighten national legitimacy, as well as to assess technical
assistance needs. Further cooperative work would be planned.



I

i



511




NAHONAL LEGAL

AID & DEFENDER

ASSOCIATION

1625 K STREET, N.W.

EIGHTH aOOR

WASH.. DC. 20006

(202) 452-0620



Kxl-iibiL U



LSC Regional Allocations



Boston

Vermont Legal Aid $ 1,6X7.00

Greater Boston Legal Services 1,713.00

Regional Office 2,000.00

Pine Tree Legal Assistance 500.00

Regional Office 500.00

New York

NY Shared Services Corporation 2,500.00

Regional Office 2,700.00

Mid Hudson Legal Services 750.00

Western New York 7,525.00

Legal Services of the Virgin Islands 3,899.00

Western New York Programs 1,^-66.40

Western New York Consortium 532.00

Seattle

Oregon Legal Services 3,000.00

Legal Services for S.E. Wyoming 500.00

Legal Services for S.E. V\^oming 435.00

Legal Aid Services of Multoimh Bar Assn. 720.00

Evergreen Legal Services 2,460.00

Chicago Region 20,565.00

Philadelphia

Law Coordination Center 8,527.00

Legal Services of New Jersey 8,527.00

Virginia

Legal Services of Northern Virginia 10,000.00

W. Virginia Legal Services Plan 5,000.00

Legal Aid of Central Michigan 2,350.00

Lcffil Aid Sociol.y of Cirinci.nal/i 650.00

Atlanta Region 40,000.00

Denver

Colorado Coalition for Legal Services 5,000.00

Colorado Coalition for LeRfil Services 10,347.00

Califor-riiii Indian Lt:gai L;ervict;a 1,800.00

DNA-Peoples legal Services 2,200.00



CHANGE WITHOUT COMPROMISE
NLADAftOlh Annual Conleienco • Boston. Massacnuselis • NovemCiei 1Q-VL19S2



512



San Francisco

Legal Aid of San Pfeteo

Legal Services of Northern Califomis

Legal Aid Society of Alameda County



$ 500.00

1,500.00

14,235.00



I



513



Exhibit E



NLADA MANAGE^ENT PROJECT
Financial Report - 1/1/82-6/30/82



INCOME



Balance forward 12/31/81
Project Directors Grant
Interest (5/31/82)




$1,038,678.77

1,815.03

13,961.64


$1,054,455.44


EXPENSES









Overhead




$ 180,000.00




Personnel
Salaries
Fringe


$23,549.92
9,840.66


33,390.58




Office Administration






Rent

Equipment

Telephone

Duplicating

Printing

Office Supllies

Postage

Delivery

Pulbications


$ 5,000.00

1,235.75

2,803.63

609.18

209.15

726.47

1,299.81

55.55

14.95


11,954.49




Miscellaneous








Personnel Recrut.
Moving Exp.


$ 2,045.21
4,084.02


6,129.23




Travel








Policy Board
Staff


$13,553.28
11,370.59


24,923.87




Consultants








Contracts
Travel


$ 8,958.52
401.97


9,360.49


(265,758.66)
$ 786,881.75



514




NLADA MANAGEMENT PROJECT
Financial Report - 10/31/81-12/31/81



NATDNAL LEGAL

AID & DEFENDER

ASSOCIATION

1625KSTREaN.W, INCOME
EIGHTH FLOOR

(2021452 0620 Le^l Services Corporation

10/31/81 $411,667.00
11/30/81 238,333.00
12/31/81 550,000.00

Interest accrued



$1,200,000.00
25,097.00



$1,225,097.00



EXPENSES



Salaries




$ 0.00




Fringe




0.00




Printing




46.00




Delivery




4.10




Duplicating




37.62




Office Supplies




161.75




Personnel Recruitment




771.47




Staff Travel




513.47




Policy Board Travel




1,129.68




Registration




615.00




LSC Regional Allocations *


166,667.00


(186,418.23


Balance of


Grant 12/31/81




$1,038,678.77



♦Report on LSC Regional Allocations attached.



I



515




"^l^nCNAL LEGAL

AID & DEFENDER

ASSOCIATION

1625 K STREET, NW

EIGHTH FLOOR

WASH DC 20006

!202) 452-0620



:'.aI:-iI^-L'. II



LSC Regional Allocations



Boston

Vermont Legal Aid

Greater Boston Legal Services

Regional Office

Pine Tree Legal Assistance

Regional Office

New York

NY Shared Services Corporation

Regional Office

Mid Hudson Legal Services

Western New York

Legal Services of the Virgin Islands

Western New York Programs

Western New York Consortium

Seattle

Oregon Legal Services

Legal Services for S.E. Wyoming

Legal Services for S.E. Wyoming

Legal Aid Services of Multomah Bar Assn.

Evergreen Legal Services

Chicago Region

Philadelphia

Law Coordination Center
Legal Services of New Jersey

Virginia

Legal Services of Northern Virginia
W. Virginia Legal Services Plan
Legal Aid of Central Michigan
Legal Aid Society of Cinncinati

Atlanta Region

Denver



1,617.00

1,713.00

2,000.00

500.00

500.00



2,500.00
2,700.00

750.00
7,525.00
3,899.00
1,466.40

532.00



3,000.00
500.00
435.00
720.00

2,460.00

20,565.00



-J, 527.00
8,527.00



10,000.00

5,000.00

2,350.00

650.00

40,000.00



Colorado Coalition for Legal Services
Colorado Coalition for Legal Services
California Indian Legal Services
DNA-Peoples legal Services



5,000.00

10,347.00

1,800.00

2,200.00



CHANGE WITHOUT COMPROMISE



I



516

San Francisco

Legal Aid of San i%teo ' 3 3qq qq

Legal Services of Northern California 1 500' CO

Legal Aid Society of Alameda County 14 ,'235' 00



I



I



517



— ooOoo—

NATIONAL LEGAL AID AND DEFENDER ASSOCIATION

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEAR ENDED

DECEMBER 31, 1983

WITH COMPARATIVE TOTALS FOR 1982

WITH THE INDEPENDENT

AUDITORS' REPORT THEREON

— ooOoo—






518



NATIONAL LEGAL AID AND DEFENDKU ASSOCIATION
DECEMBER 31, 1983



Table of Contents



Independent Auditors' Report

Balance Sheet Exhibit A

Statement of Support, Revenue and
Expenses and Changes in Fund Balances Exhibit B

Statement of Changes in Financial Position Exhibit C

Notes to Financial Statements

Supplemental Schedules



lt



Page No.



519



mm CiTlifii'il I'ul>lic Ai'couiit.'iiils

JL/Ucas,

ucker &Co.



T



733 15TH STREET, N.W., SUITE 926, WASHINGTON, D.C. 20005 (202) fiSO-291 1



March 29, 1984



INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT



The Board of Directors

NatJoneil Legal Aid and Defender Association



We have examined the balance sheet of the National Legal Aid and Defender Association
as of December 31, 1983, and the related statements of support, revenue and expenses
and changes in fund balances and changes in financial position for the year then ended.
Our examination was made in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards and,
accordingly, included such tests of the accounting records and such other auditing
procedures as we considered neccssfiry in the circumstances. The financial statements of
the National Legal Aid and Defender Association for the year ended December 31, 1982,
were examined by other auditors whose report dated February 23, 1983, expressed an
unqualified opinion on those statements.

In our opinion, the financial slaleinents referred to above present fairly the financial
position of the National Legal Aid and Defender Association as of December 31, 1983,



Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. Senate. Committee on LaboOversight of the Legal Services Corporation, 1984 : hearing before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-eighth Congress, second session, on review of the Corporation's documents to ascertain whether there are any problems with the agency's policies that need to be → online text (page 39 of 42)