United States. Inland Waterways Commission.

Preliminary report of the Inland Waterways Commission. Message from the President transmitting a preliminary report online

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Section 1. Be it enacted by the general assembly of the State of Louisiana, That the
governor of the State of Louisiana is hereby authorized to appoint a board of commis-
sioners to be known as the "board of commissioners of the port of New Orleans," said
board to consist of five members, who shall be citizens of the United States and reside
within the port limits of New Orleans, in the parish of Orleans, Jefferson, or St. Bernard,
and at the time of their appointment must be prominently identified with the com-
merce or business interests of the port of New Orleans. One of said commissioners
shall be appointed for a term of three years, one for four years, one for five years, one
for six years, and one for seven years. At the expiration of their term their successor
shall be appointed by the governor for a period of five years each. The board shall
have the power to fill the unexpired term should any vacancy occur through death,
resignation, or other cause.

Power to regulate traffic — Constituted body corporate — Charges it may impose, etc.

Sec. 2. Be it further enacted, etc., That said board of commissioners shall have the
power to regulate the commerce and traffic of the port and harbor of New Orleans in
such manner as may, in their judgment, be best for its maintenance and development.
They shall have and enjoy all the rights, powers, and immunities incident to corpo-
rations. They shall be empowered and it shall be their duty to take charge of and
administer the public wharves and landings of the port of New Orleans, to construct
new wharves where necessary, and to erect sheds on the wharves and landings to pro-
tect merchandise in transit; to place and keep the wharves and landings in good con-
dition; to maintain sufficient depth of water, and to provide for lighting and policing
such wharves and sheds and landings. To defray said expenses they shall charge upon
shipping visiting the port of New Orleans, for the use of wharves, etc., of the port of
New Orleans, the following rates: All seagoing vessels shall pay 2 cents per day, based
upon the gross tonnage, for the first three days, and the sum of 1 cent per day for the
next three ensuing days, making a maximum charge of 9 cents on the gross tonnage,
and thereafter said vessel shall be free from charge for a period of thirty days.

That any part of a day shall be considered a full day as to the above charges, and
the above charges shall be based upon a single voyage.

Where sheds are provided by said board of commissioners, shipping using same shall
pay an additional charge. Said charge shall not exceed, in any case, the cost of con-
stniction, maintenance, and management of said improvements, provided nothing in
this act shall apply to wharves owned by riparian proprietors, already constructed or
hereafter constructed in accordance with provision of article 290 of the Constitution,
whether individuals, firms, or corporations and maintained and used by the owner
or owners or lessees, (As amended by Act 36, 1900, p. 44.)

Relation between charges and expenses

Sec. 3. Be it further enacted, etc.. That should the income within the maximum
rates herein authorized be more than sufficient to carry out the duties of the com-



150 REPOET OF THE INLAND WATERWAYS COMMISSION

mission, they shall make said charges conform to the necessary expenditures. The
charges on barges, steamboats, and other river craft and luggers, shall be carefully
calculated by the commissioners and the reduction of same shall accord with the
charges on seagoing vessels. (As amended by Act 36, 1900, p. 44.)

Repeal of certain latvs and retaining others

Sec. 4. Be it further enacted, etc., That all laws and ordinances regarding the ap-
pointment and fees governing harbormasters, masters, and wardens, wharfingers, wharf
supeiintendents, and any and all laws in conflict with this act are hereby repealed, and
the authority and control heretofore vested in them is hereby vested in the board of
commissioners for the port of New Orleans, who shall employ sufficient persons to be
known as deputy commissioners not exceeding five, who shall under dii-ection and
supervision of the board perfoiin the duties now devolving upon the harbormasters,
master, and wardens, wharfingers, etc.

All laws within the jurisdiction of this commission and ordinances of the city of
New Orleans imposing penalties for violating the rules and regulations governing the
management of the wharves and landings, in force and effect, July 9, 1896, shall
remain in force and effect and may be enforced by said commissioners. (As amended
by Act 36, 1900, p. 44.)

Right to purchase and expropriate whanes

Sec. 9. Be it further enacted, etc.. That the board of commissioners herein created be,
and is authorized and empowered to acquire by purchase or expropriation, the lease
of the whai-v'es now held by the Louisiana Construction and Improvement Company,
or of any other wharves and landings, and it is made the duty of the co mm on councU
of New Orleans to provide for the payment of the price of such purchase or expropria-
tion, out of the funds imder their control: Provided, That the price to be paid shall
be satisfactory to the said council. Said commission shall have the power to expro-
priate any property, wharves, or landings necessary to be expropriated for the benefit
of the commerce of the port and harbor of New Orleans in accordance with the ex-
propriation laws of this State. (As amended by Act 36, 1900. p. 44.)

The amendatory act of 1900 reduced the prescribed wharfage and
dockage charges and extended the power of the board of commis-
sioners to acquire property by purchase or expropriation to any
propert}'', wharves, or landings necessary to be acquired for the
benefit of the commerce of the port.

STATISTICS OF COMMERCE ON INTERIOR RIVERS

TRAFFIC ON THE OHIO AND MONONGAHELA

The movement of coal dowTi the Ohio is one of the most important
factors in relation to the traffic of that river. From the Mononga-
hela, Big Kanawha, and other rivers tributary to the Ohio large quan-
tities of coal are hauled in barges to all of the important cities located
on this river. St. Louis, Memphis, New Orleans, and other important
cities, also receive a great quantity by way of the Ohio and Missis-
sippi rivers.

In Table 11 will be seen a comparison of coal traffic hauled by
the rail Imes, and that carried by boats on the Monongahela and Ohio
rivers, to Pittsburg and beyond, 1900-1906.

The shipments by rail have increased gradually and that of the
river likewise, except for the 3^ear 1904, when a noticeable decrease is
sho^\^l. The tonnage hauled by water averaged about 30 per cent
for the period showTi. This striking proportion of coal traffic hauled
by water brings out the importance of the Monongahela River as a
navigable waterway.



COMMEECE ON INTERIOR RIVERS



151



Table 11 — Shipments of coal to and through Pittsburg by rail and river from 1900 to 1906
[From Geological Survey, Mineral Resources of the United States]



Transportation route.


1900.


1901.


1902.


1903.


1904.


1905.


1906.


Pennsylvania R. R.:

To Pittsburg and vi-


Tons.
1,792,448
\, All, 211

481,587
990,082

3,298,470

150,000
6,500

2,234,770
4,469,540


Tons. Tons.
2,051,361 2,062,422
1,407,643; 1,701,431

464,204 580,241
1,157,966 1,231,314

3,933,001 4.965.541


Tons.
1,851,348
2,211,347

442,866
1,305,565

5,068,885

96, 377
47,895

9,775,667
325,767


Tons.
1,968,596
2, 386, 163

545, 720
1, 190, 568

5, 689, 611

91, 101
53, 584

8,929,868
245, 651


Tons,
a 2, 126, 670
a 2, 728, 232

597,280
1,387,215

6,098,553

C)

9, 467, 360

372,222
ff 1,055,848


Tons.


To west of Pittsburg.. .

Baltimore and Ohio R. R.:

To Pittsburg district. . .

To west of Pittsburg...

Pittsburg. Cinciimati,

Chicago and St. Louis

R. R...




Alleghenv Valley Rwy . : c

To Pittsburg district. . .

To west of Pittsburg...
Pittsburg and Lake Erie
R. R.:

Local and Pittsburg. ..

To west of Pittsburg...
Pittsburg, Chartiers and


163, 809
19, 755

1,789,327
5,367,980

410,764


163,303
15,602

18,873,150
360,763


, '' 5, 107, 413
d22, 419, 496


Wheeling and Lake Erie 1
R. R 1




Total by rail














14,900,674


16, 766, 410


19,953,767


21,125,717


21, 100, 862


23,833,380


27,526,909


Monongahela River locks:
To Pittsburg district's.
To west of Pittsburg...


3,260,393
2, 557, 470


4, 662, 127
3, 283, 353


5,686,022
3,619,905


6, 303, 365
3,069,299


4,173,992
2, 811, 584


5,558,541
3,926,319


6,840,816
2,883,965


Total by water


5,817,863


7,945,480, 9, .305, 927


9, 372, 664


6,985,576


9,484,860 9,724,781


Total shipments


20, 718, 537


24,711,890j29,259,694


30, 498, 381 128, 086, 438


33,318,240


37,251,690


Per cent hauled by rail.

Per cent hauled by water. .


72
28


68
32


68
32


69
31


75
25


72

28


74
26



a Includes shipments over the Allegheny VaUey Railway, now practically a part of the Pennsylvania
system.

b By rail to Pittsburg district.

c Coal originating on this road only. Does not include coal received from the Pennsylvania R. R.
and forwarded over the Allegheny VaUey Rwy.

d By rail to west of Pittsburg.

« Included in Pennsylvania R. R. shipments.

/ Exclusive of tonnage delivered to Pittsburg and Lake Erie R. R., which is included in shipments
reported by that company.

g West Side Belt, and Wabash Pittsburg Tenninal railways.

h Including coal mined in pools Nos. 1 and 2 and consumed by works along the Monongahela River.

Table 12 shows in more detail the movement of coal by rail and
by water to Pittsburg, and to west of Pittsburg. As will be noted,
more than half of the coal to Pittsburg is carried by water, the pro-
portion of the water carriers being 57 per cent in 1906. To west
of Pittsburg the boat lines have only the cities on the Ohio River
for delivery and show only a small proportion of this traffic.

Table 12 — Movement of coal {tons) to and through Pittsburg, 1900-1906, showing totals
to Pittsburg district and xvest of Pittsburg

[From Geological Survey, Mineral Resources of the United States]





To Pittsburg district.


To west of Pittsburg.




Year.


By rail.


By water.


Total
Pittsburg
district.


Per
cent
by
wa-
ter.


By rail.


By water.


Total to

west of

Pittsburg.


Per
cent
by
wa-
ter.


Total
ship-
ments.


1900...




3,260,393
4, 662, 127
5,686,022
6,303,365
4, 173, 992
5,558,541
6,840,816








2,557,470
3,283,353
3,619,905
3,069,299
2,811,584
3,926,319
2,883,965






20,718,537
24,711,890
29,259,694
30,498,381
28,086,438
33,318,240
37,251,690


1901...














1902...
1903. . .
1904...
1905. . .
1906...


5,385,017
5,160,275
5,083,535
5,463,012
5,107,413


11,071,039
11,463,640
9,257,527
11,021,553
11,948,229


51
55
45
50
57


14,568,750
15,965,442
16,017,327
18,370,368
22,419,496


18, 188, 655
19,034,741
18,828,911
22,296,687
25,303,461


20
16
15
18
11



152



KEPORT OF THE INLAND WATERWAYS COMMISSION



Table 13 shows the movement of coal through the Monongahela
River locks and Davis Island dam for the period 1890-1906. There
has been a general increase in this traffic for the period mentioned
Avith the exception of the year 1904. Apparently 75 per cent of river
coal is consumed in the Pittsburg district, the bulk of the rest being
carried to other Ohio River points.

Table 13 — Movement of coal through Monongahela River locks and Davis Island Dam

1890-1906

[From Geological Survey, Mineral Resources of the United States]



Year.


Passed
through locks
on Mononga-
hela River.


Passed Davis
Island dam,
Ohio River
near Pitts-
burg, a


Difference

approximate

consumption of

river coal at

Pittsburg.


1890 ...


Tons
4,652,104
4, 276, 588
3, 872, 340
3,860,072
4,649,612
4, 183, 596
5,709,252
5,289,838
6, 120, 800
5, 569, 967
5,817,863
7,945,480
69,305,927
9,372,664
6,985,576
9,484,860
9, 724. 781


Tons.
3, 420, 357
2, 893, 752
2,299,294
2, 364, 401
2, 453, 787
2, 393, 873
4, 102, 190
2, 670, 369
2, 979, 494
2,709,140
2,557,470
3,283,353
3, 619, 905
3,069,299
2,811,584
3,926,319
2,883,965


Ton.s.
1,231,747


1891


1, 382, 836


1892


1,573,046


1893


1,495,671


1894


2, 195, S25


1895


1,789,723


1896.


1, 607, 062


1897


2,619,469


1898


3,141,306


1899


2, 860, 827


1900 .


3, 260, 393


1901


4, 662, 127


1902


5, 686, 022


1903


6, 303, 365


1904 ...


4, 173, 492


1905


5,568,541
6, 840, 816


1906. .





o From annual reports Ohio River improvements.

b The coal traffic on the Monongahela is obtained by adding to that which passes Lock 3, the coal
mined and shipped in pools Nos. 1 and 2. In 1902 there were consumed in pools Nos. 1 and 2,
4,080,287 tons river coal; in the harbor l>elow No. 1, including the Allegheny River, 1,605,735 tons of
Monongahela River coal, a total of 5,680,022 tons.

Although the traffic on Monongahela River is largely coal, there are
other commodities of importance. Table 14 shows the principal ar-
ticles of traffic carried between Pittsburg and Fairmont, W. Va., for
the period 1902-1907.

Tajble 14 — Traffic on Monongahela River at locks of maximum tonnage between Pitts-
burg and Fairmont, 1902-1907

[From Montiily Summary of Commerce and Finance, December, 1903-1907]



Articles.


1902.O


1903.1


1904.


1905.


1906.


1907.


Bituminous coal


Tons.


Tons.


Tons.
6,320,660
531,997
522,283
123,791


Tons.
8,489,340
664, 128
737,688
138,789


Tons.

8,902,792

707,001

981,412

80,596


Tons.
10,043,460
724,215


Sand


1


Gravel


!


1,039,415
123,226


other articles.. <


j




1


Total


9,586,686


10,607,738


7,498,731


10,029,945


10,731,801


11,930,316





a Detail statistics not available.

It will be seen that the tonnage of the entire river has increased
gradually with the exception of the year 1904. The movement of
gravel and sand has increased considerably and is next in importance
to that of coal.

The coal traffic at Davis Island Dam also constitutes almost the
entire tonnage at that point, while that of sand and iron and steel



COMMERCE ON INTERIOR RIVERS



153



manufactures follow next in importance. The following table shows
the articles carried both ways during the period 1903-1907:

Table 15— Traffic at Davis Island Dam, 1903-1907
[From Monthly Summary of Commerce and Finance]



Articles.


1903.


1904.


1905.


1906.


1907.


Coal


Tons.

3,069,199

72,050

2,708

55,900

94, 596


Tons.
2,811,584
41,330
16, 163
3,300
62,674


Tons.

3,926,319

130,284

15, 472

110,020

96,287


Tons.
2,883,965
106, 180
12, 130
24, 415
82,507


Tons.
3,206.727
33,955


Iron and steel manufactures




21,621


Sand . ...


682 730


Miscellaneous


76,773




Total


3,294,453


2,935,051


4,278,382


3,109,197


4,021,806





The production of coal in the principal districts in the State of
West Virginia are shown in Table 16. The Kanawha -New River
District, the Norfolk and Western District, and the Monongahela
District are the larger producers in the order named.

Table 16 — Production of coal in West Virginia, 1906
[From "The Coal Trade," by F. E. Saward, 1906, pp. 15 and 16]



District.



Gross tons.



Potomac 1, 633, 517

Monongahela 7, 867, 931

Wheehng 714, 250

Kanawha-New River 11, 034, 257

Norfolk and Western 10, 073, 074



The movement of coal by river and by rail at Cincinnati, Ohio, is
shown in Table 17 for the period 1893-1906. Very great fluctua-
tions occur in both the receipts and shipments, but the general tend-
ency has been to increase. The per cent of receipts on coal hauled
by river durmg the earlier period has been much greater than that
of the later years. The average per cent for the year 1893 was 67 per
cent; for 1903, 49 per cent; for 1905, 45 per cent, and for 1906,
33 per cent. Although this shows a comparatively larger haul by
rail from year to year, nevertheless the traffic by river represents
an approximate average of 60 per cent for most of the period.

Table 17 — Receipts and shipments of coal at Cincinnati, 1893-1906
[From Annual Report of the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce]



Year.



Receipts.



River.



Rail.



Bushels.

1893. ' 54,020,025

1894. 56,713,040
1895.- 41,796,318

1896 . 58, S42, 109

1897. 53,042,776
1898.. 01,315,830

1S99. 52,356,278

1900 44,570,535

1901 51,115,381

1902 00,030,043

1903 55,431,966

1904 43,817,783

1905 72,935,000

13D6 56,739,000



Bushels.
26,592,000
19,745,075
28, 346, 823
20,847,000
25,719,250
20,002,925
31,404,050
28,778,500
40, 275, (XX)
44,570,5.50
5«i,019,925
74, .366, 000
87,885,000
117,218,000



Total.



Bushels.

80,612,025

76,458,115

70,143,141

79,689,109

78,702,026

88,278,755

83,820,328

73,340,035

01,390,981

104,0)00,592

112,351,801

118,183,783

160,820,000

173,057,000



By river.



Per cent.
67

74
60
74
67
69
62
61
56
57
49
37
45
33



Shipments.



River.



Busliels.
2,414,682
812,797
3, 458, 825
2,784,324
3,509,056
1,786,379
1,195,436
2,811,771
5,207,771
6,113,597
2,787,000
3,448,000
0,433,000
5,833,000



Rail.



Bushels.
16,453,000
16,216,500
15.336,500
12,150,000
15, 004, 000
14,921,400
14,043.000
11,780;850
22,047,025
30, 524, 150
3e,oa5,750
41,228,000
57,541,000
93,212,000



Total.



Bushels.

18, 867, 682

17,029,297

18,795 325

14,934,324

19,173,056

10, 707, 779

15,239,a36

14,592,621

27,254,700

So, 037. 747

39,422,750

4-1, 676, 000

63,974,000

90,045,000



B1G73— S. Doc. 325, 60-1 11



154



EEPORT OF THE INLAND WATERWAYS COMMISSION



The commerce passing through the Louisville and Portland Canal
and the Falls of the Ohio at Louisville is shown in Table 18 for the
period 1902-1907. The coal traffic constitutes almost the entire
tonnage, which has had a tendency to remain normal for the period
indicated.

Table 18 — Commerce through Louisville and Portland Canal and the Falls of Ohio

River, 1902-1907

[From Monthly Summary of Commerce and Finance]



Articles.


1902.


1903.


1904.


1905.


1906.


1907.


Coal


Tons.

866,793

13, 472

81,104

51,. 589

a 975, 831


Tons.
1,203,790
24, 923
71,092
67,309
96,720


Tons.
1,498,216
34, .543
45,851
36,043
40,9.59


Tons.
1,592,487
43, 571
49,112
76,818
67, 171


Tons.

1,154,991
35,720
21,012
72, 1.58
60, 023


Tons.
1,476,980


Iron ore and manufactures


25,341
27,046


Miscellaneous merchandise


78,342
44, 690






Total


1,988,789


1,463,834


1,655,612


1,829,159


1,343,904


1,652,399







o Includes total tonnage of all articles over Falls of the Ohio.
TRAFFIC ON THE MISSISSIPPI

The commerce of the Mississippi, although not as great as in former
years, is still of considerable importance. The river as far up as St.
Louis affords good facilities for the operation of packet lines, but
above that point low water frequently prevails during a large part
of the year.

The following tables show the tonnage received and shipped from
St. Louis via rail and river for a period of years and also shows the
rivers to and from which the traffic was carried.

It will be noted on Table 19 that the tonnage received in the earlier
years by river was almost double that of the latter. Shipments from
the Ohio River constituted but a small proportion of the entire traffic
in the earlier years given, while at the present it represents about 50
per cent of the entire river tonnage. The tonnage from the Missis-
sippi proper has fallen off greatly.

Table 19 — Tonnage received at St. Louis via rail and river, 1890-1906
[From St. Louis Merchants' Exchange Reports]



Year.


Upper
Missis-
sippi


Lower

Missis-
sippi


Illinois
River.


Missouri
River.


Ohio
River.


Cumber-
land and

Tennes-


Upper
Missis-
„?ippi
River by

rafts.


Total by
river.


Total by
rail.


Grand
Total.




River.


River.








rivers.










Tons.


Tons.


Tons.


Tons.


Tons.


Tons.


Tens.


Tens.


Tens.


Tons.


1890


128,9r)0


222,075


22,770


21,350


102, .500


33, 135


132, 940


663, 730


9,969,201


10,633,021


1,891


90,865


209,095


31, 190


25,065


6:3,890


29,945


142,090


592.14010,098,729


10.690,869


1892


135, 4.35


212,. 545


49,520


13,065


96.930


49,485


130,220


687,200|ll, 229,005


11,916,205


1893


111,710


216,300


50,605


8,000


.33, 490


52,790


126,510


599, 405


10,408,039


11,007,444


1894.


111,400


219, 195


41,380


5,480


35, 375


42,345


128,335


583,510


9,512,910


10,096,420


1895


78. 170


239,090


30,600


3,270


35, 440


23,575


98,685


508,830


10,489,344


10,998,174


1890


01,165


345, 105


30,325


1,245


62,040


87,275


84,010


671,765


10,703,116


11,434,881


1897


51,435


311,540


38, 130


250


26,915


78,835


69, .565


576,670


11,921,27912,497,949


1898


33,910


311,915


20, 415


790


37, 130


45,365


57,060


500,585


12,962,S50!l3,409,435


1.S90


45, 410


238, 140


32,585


565


39, 440


38,510


71,960


466,610


14.805,872


15,272.482


1900


,50,070


274, 445


20,905


2,725


2,700


87,825


73,340


512,010


15,375,441


15,887,451


1901


68,470


'..';;.■; ss5


27,395


3,860


57,315


21,330


50, 550


462,805


17,4.33,523


17,896,328


1902


38.00.'>


■M.S,!l(l5


13,525


0,030


59,890


19,690


30,875


416,920


18, 01 :0, 809


18, 477, 729


1903


.32, 705


lii(i,i)S5


12,0.35


1,415


111,435


18,035


4,700


340, 410


21,. 580, 403


21,920,813


1904


25, 405


132, .585


9,430


2,685


102, 400


18,920


3,945


295,370


23,319,871


23,615,241


1905


31,190


107,520


8,725


3,580


125,7.55


11,870


1,210


289, 8.5023, 915, 690


24, 205, .540


1906


31,140


106, 670


14,5.50


2,48.5


100, 120


10,9.35


1,770


327,670127,292,617


27,620,287



COMMERCE ON INTERIOR RIVERS



155



On the statement of tonnage shipped from St. Louis it will l)e
observed that the total by river has declined steadily, with an abrupt
drop in 1904. The small traffic to the upper Mississippi and Illinois
rivers has somewdiat increased, but that to the lower Alississippi has
fallen to less than 7 per cent of that in 1890.

Table 20 — Tonnage shipped from St Louis via rail and river, 1890-1906
[From St. Louis Merchants' Exchange Reports]



Year.


sissippi
River.


Lower
Mis-
sissippi
River.


Illi-
nois
River.


Mis-
souri
River.


Ohio
River.


Cum-
ber-
land
and
Ten-
nessee
rivers.


Red,
White,
and
Oua-
chita
rivers.


Total

by
river.


Total

by
rail.


Grand
total.


1890

1891

1892

1893

1894

1895

189G

1897


Tons.
22,547
18,630
51,595
54,230
52, 190
30,780
31,510
30.225
33,805
33.675
36,675
23,392
23, 130
44,855
21,775
25,730
36,000


Tons.
543,805
445, 150
392,635
342,785
281.635
241.155
508.960
4ai,315
339,435
151.135
187,385
158, 493
174,517
146, 498
46,320
35,295
34,905


Tons.
3,620
4,305
7,755
5,785
4,495
7,040

11,780
7,065
8,828
9,090
5,020
9,090

10, 445
8,825
6,605
6,225
7,835


Tons.

10,035

19,280

29, 455

12,775

4,075

5,505

1,355


Tons.

"i',m


Tons.
15,675
22, 435
19,665
21,325
16,535
17,535
18,805
19,760
17,215
9,305


Tons.

6,180

3,130

110

"4,'i56'
1,340


Tons.
601,862
512,930
502,215
436,900
363,080
303,355
572, 410
409,365
399,583
203,205
245,580
209,271
224, 262
212,207
82,565
80, .575
89, 185


Tons.

5,270,850

5,216,228

5,969,754

5, .554, 493

4, 780, 256

5.349,327

5.400,728

6,137,265

7,079,319

8,250,393

9,180,309

10,653,065

11,035,586

12,971,173

13,731,194

15,225,973

17,672,006


Tons.

5,872,712

5.729,158

6,471,%9

5,991,493

5.143,336

5,6.52,682

5,973,138

6,606,630

7,478,902

8, 4



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