United States. Inland Waterways Commission.

Preliminary report of the Inland Waterways Commission. Message from the President transmitting a preliminary report online

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17,761,191



The following table shows the total river traffic at St. Louis for the
period 1890-1906. The tonnage received b}' steamboats and barges
is still of some importance, although a noticeable decrease is shown
in the years 1904 and 1905. The greatest decline was effected hj the
falling off in tonnage received b}' rafts and that shipped by steam-
boats and barges. The total tonnage by river, although showing a
steadj' decline for the period, shows a material gain for the year
1906 over both 1904 and 1905. The increase was principally from
the Ohio and Illinois rivers.

Table 21 — Receipts and shipments via river at St. Louis, 1890-1906
[From St. Louis Merchants' Exchange Reports]



Year.



1890.
1891.
1892.
1893.
1894.
1895.
18%.



Received

by
steam-
boats
and
barges.



Tons.
530,790
450.050
.556,980
472.895
455, 175
410, 145
587, 755

1897 507, 105

1S98 449, 525

1899 394,650

1000 ; I 438,670

1901

1002

1903

1904



Received

by
rafts.



412,255
386,045
33,5,710
291, 425

1905 1 288, 640

1906 1 325, 900



Tons.

132,940

142,090

130, 220

126, 510

128,335

98,685

84,010

69,565

57,060

72,960

73,340

50,550

30,875

4,700

3,945

1,210

1,770



Shipped

by
steam-
boats
and
barges.



Tons.
601,862
512,930
502, 215
436,900
363,080
303,355
572, 410
469,365
399,583
203,205
245,580
209,271
224,262
212, 207
82, 565
80,575
89,185



Total

receipts

and

ship-
ments.



Tons.

1,265,592

1, 105. 070

1,189,415

1,036,305

946, 590

812, 185

1,244,175

1,046,035

906, 16S

(i69, 815

757, 590

672,076

641, 182

552,617

377,935

370, 425

416,855



156



REPOET OF THE INLAND WATERWAYS COMMISSION



The receipts and sliipments of grain, flour, cotton, lumber, and
coal at St. Louis by the Mississippi Eiver and by rail are shown in
the following tables. It will be noted that a general decrease of
river traffic in the later years is shown for all of the commodities
named with the exception of that of coal received from the Oliio
River. In most cases there has been a material gain for the vear
1906 over that of 1905.

Table 22 — Receipts and shipments of grain o via rail and river at St. Louis, 1895-1906
[From St. Louis Merchants' Exchange. Reports]



Year.



1895

1896

1897

1898

1899

1900

1901

1902

1903

1904

1905

1906



Receipts.



Via river. Via rail



Bushels.

1,964.297

1,555,097

819, 438

1,327.763

1,293,411

1,831,503]

1,943,2021

2, 40S, 700|

554, 454i

835, 431

864,010

866, 199



Bushels
30, 885, 984
49. 579, 247
56.781,201
52, 945, 452
46, 950, 320
59.313.301
5S, 100, 596
68, 028, 372
68, 204, 532
61, 505, 507
60, 975, 001
79, 405, 510



Total.



Shipments.



Receipts and shipments.



Via river. Via rail. Total. Via river. Via rail



Bushels.
32,850,281
51,134,344,
57, 600, 639i
54, 273, 215j
48, 243, 737
01,144,804!
60, 049, 798'
70,437,072|
68, 758, 986'
62, 340, 938
61,839,01ll
80,271,7091



Bushels.
2, 040, 631
11,652,027
6, 813, 450
7, 276, 668
2, 669, 180
3. 943, 266
2.975,974!
3, 900, 041 i
3, 295, 141

155,-355
87, 628;

136, 455



Bushels.
17, 043, 272
20,791,121
32, 889, 506
38.317,507
29, 234, 279
39, 254, 806
42, 849, 364
44, 704, 18(i
51,609,930
54, 796, 9(B
49.546,816
60, 203, 917



Bushi
19, 683,
32, 443,
39, 702,
45, 594,
31,903,
43, 198,
45, 825,
48, 604,
54, 905,
54, 952,
49, 634,
60,400,



Is. Bushels
'MS' 4,604,928
14813,207,124
956) 7,632,888
175, 8,004,431
459 3,962,591
5, 774, 769
4,919,176
6,308,741
3,849,595
990, 786
951,638
1,002,654



Bushels.
47, 929, 256
70,370,368
89, 670, 707
91, 202, 959
76, 184, 605
98, 568, 107
100,955,960
112,732,558
119.814,462
116,302,470
110,521,817
139. 669, 427



Total.



Bushels.
52, 534, 184
83, 577, 492
97,303,595
99,867,390
80, 147, 196
104, 342, 876
105, 875, 136
119,041,299
123, 664, 057
117,293,256
111,473,455
140,672,081



n Wheat, com, oats, barley, and rye.



Table 2.3 — Varieties of bulk grain and total of all grain shipped from St. Louis to New
Orleans via Mississippi River boats, 1870-1903

[From St. Louis Merchants' Exchange Reports]



Year.


Wheat.


Com. Rye.


Oats.


Total.


1870


Bushels.
66,000


Bushels.


Bushels.


Bushels.


Bushels.
66,000
312, 077


1871


309,077
1,711,039
1,373,969
1,047,794

172,617
1,737,237
3, 578, 057
2,857,056
3,585,589
9,804,392
8, 640, 720
2, .529, 712
9, 029, .509
4,496,7&5
8,180,039
7,501,730
7,365,340
5,844,042
12,398,9.55
8,717,849
1.482,731
3 228,645
3,293,808
1,263,310
1,2.51,803
S,a5S,087
3,827,963
3,006,488
1,748,517
2,871,870

5a5, 705

226,400
1,025,221




3,000


1872






1,711,039


1873








1,373,969

1, 423, 046

308, 578


1874


365,252

135,961
37,142

a51,453
1,876,639
2,390,897
.5,913,272
4,197,981
5,637,391
1,435,043
1,318,688
50,000

743,439
3,973,737
1,247,9.52
l,6.51,a50
1,409,440
fi, 940. 215
5,149,708
3, 710, .360
1,042,193

483,614
1,732, .563
1,191,032
2,747,994

2»1,720

169,241
1,828,244
2,308,714
1,724,220




10,000


1875




1876






1,774,379


1877


171,843
609,041
1.57,424
45,000
22, 423
15,994
205,430
344,864
36,093




4,101 353


1878


108,867
30,928


5,451,603


1879


6,164,838
15,762,664
12,993,947

8,333,417
11,059,808

6, 647, .558


1880


1881


132,823
150,320
389,826
487, 221
401, 787
598, 7.55
217, 722
160,584
89, 707
89, 900


1882


1883


1884


1885

1886


8,667,919
8,834,924


1887




11,556,799


1888;....




7, 252. 578


1889

1890


17,432


14, 1.58, 044
10, 217, 249


1891


4.5,600


8, 468, 546


1892


36,587
75,430
40,000


8,414,940


1893




7, 079. .598


1894




2, 345, 503


isa5




1, 7*5, 417


1896




436, .5.58


10. .527. 208


1S97


190,968
212,720


265,379 ^ 47.-1 .^l9


1S9S .


633,505
249,098
273,049


6,600,707
2,233,235


1899


1900




3, 314, 160


1001




2, 36;^, 949


1902

1903


28,212


28,409


2, .591,7^5
2, 749, 441











COMMERCE ON INTERIOR RIVERS



157



Table 24 — Receipts and shipments of flour via rail and river at St. Louis
[From St. Louis Merchants' Excliange Reports]





Receipts.




Shipments.


Receipts and shipments.


Year.


Via
river.


Via rail.


Total.


Via
river.


Via rail.


Total.


Via
river.


Via raU.


Total.




Bbls.


Barrels.


Barrels.


Bbls.


Barrels.


Barrels.


Barrels.


Barrels.


Barrels.


1890


09,023


1,160,352


1,229,975


542, 156


2,338,108


2, 880, 324


611,779


3, 498, 520


4, 110, 299


1891


48,040


1,304,994


1,353,640 380,946


2, 386, 900


2, 707, 906


429,592


3,091,954


4,121.546


1892


78, 957


1,376,385


1,455,342 342,488


1,971,250


2,313,738


421,445


3,347,635


3,769,080


1893


00, 173


1,104,852


1,171,025 |27o,108


1, 709, 019


2,044,727


341,281


2, 874, 471


3,215,752


1894


08, 031


1,193,278


1,201,309 1284,834


1,883,554


2,108,388


352, 805


3,076,832


3, 429, 697


1895


93,847


919, 497


1,013,344 1345,380


1,800,273


2, 145, 659


439, 233


2, 719, 770


3,159,003


18911


M, 001


1,204,000


1,348,001 200,052


l,739,42f»


1,940,081


290, 053


3,004,029


3,294,682


1897


100, OSO


1,222,070


1,329,050 1205,608


1,413,075


1,618,683


312, 588


2, 635, 145


2,947,733


1898


50,075


1,302,013


1,358,088 ! 72,428


1,511,684


1,584,112


128, 503


2, 813, 697


2,942,200


1899


59, 2S5


1,455,030


1,514,315 1 87,849


1,939,792


2,027,641


147, 134


3,394,822


3,541,950


1900


49, 070


1,819,400


1,869,070 107,927


2, 427, 279


2, 535, 200


157,597


4,246,679


4, 404, 276


1901


23, 038


2,147,510


2,170,548 83,046


2,878,517


2,961,503


106,084


5,026,027


5,132,111


1902


2"(5, 173


2, 197, 512


2,217,085 70,242


2,614,209


2, 684, 461


90, 415


4,811,721


4, 902, 136


1903


20, 545


2,314,150


2,340,695 27,470


3,099,626


3,127,096


54,015


5,413,776


5, 467, 791


1904


13,905


2,341,655


2,355,560 j 26,735


3,279,463


3, 306, 198


40,640


5,621,118


5, 661, 758


1905


8,055


2,521,725


2,529,780 ! 18,254


3,454,355


3,472,609


26,309


5,976,080


6,002,389


1900


11,400


2,393,345


2,404,745 1 17,760


2, 660, 185


2, 677, 945


29,160


5, 053, 530


5,082,690



Table 25 — Receipts of cotton via rail and river at St. Louis
[From St. Louis Merchants' Exchange Reports]



Year.



By
lower
Missis-
sippi
River
boats.



By
Cumber-
land and
Tennes-
see river
boats.



Total,
river.



Total,
rail.



Grand

total,

river

and rail.



1889-90..
1890-91..
1891-92..
1892-93. .
1893-94. .
1894-95. .
1895-96. .
189fr-97. .
1897-98. .
1898-90. .
1899-1900
1900-1901
1901-2. . .
1902-3...
190a-4. . .
1904-5...
1905-6...



Bales.
12, 198
11,449
8,167
3,605
2,137
7,842
5,930
9,841
6,065
10, 237
6,922
3,491
4,039
2,785
872
1,112
1,974



Bales.
1,341
3,149

2,444
1,259
1,308
1,371

528
1,823

440
1,254

250
1,216

670
2,735

646
1,927
2,241



13,539
14, 598
10, 611
4,864
3,445
9,213
6,458
11,664
6,505
11, 491
7,172
4,707
4,709
5,520
1,518
3,039
4,215



Bales.
525, 371
691, 871
713,017
469, 160
621,976
917, 072
559, 225
558, 749
892, 724

1,016,882
873,079

1, 108, 818
928, 126
739, 483
522,069
674,619
546,876



Bales.
538,910
700, 469
723, 628
474, 024
625, 421
926, 285
565,683
570, 413
899, 229

1,028,373
880, 251

1,113,525
932, 835
745,003
523, 587
677, 658
551,091



Table 26 — Receipts of lumber at St. Louis via rail and river, 1902-1906
[From St. Louis Merchants" Exchange Reports]



1902.



1904.



1905.



1906.



By rail cars..

By river:

Lumber feet. .

Shingles pieces..

Lath do

Pickets do

Logs superficial feet. .



131,576

51,957,800

6,455,000

7,067,000

216,000

1,561,830



125,847

33,083,600

3,271,400

428,800



124,045



21,663,800
658,000



4,426,000



146, 741
5,312,800



137,083
11,773,300

""34,'356'L !!!!!!!!!!

3,' 747,'366' " 7,' i76," 766' I " " 8^ 958,' 800



158



REPORT OF THE INLAND WATERWAYS COMMISSION



Table 27 — Shipments of lumber from St. Louis via rail and river, 1902-1906
[St. Louis Merchants' Exchange Reports]



By rail cars. .

By river feet. .



1902.



71,727
2,086,000



81,572
1,836,000



1904.



76, 101



1905.



1906.



85,988
1,435,000



97,441
1,841,000



a Shipments lor 1904 not available.

Table 28 — Receipts of coal at St. Louis via Ohio River, 1902-1906
[St. Louis Merchants' Exchange Reports]



Year.


Tons.


1902


58,500


1903




107,680


1904


101,200


1905


125,755


1906


160, 120







Below are embodied a series of tables showing the receipts and
exports of grain at New Orleans and the movement of river traffic
in the same commodities:

Table 29 — Receipts and exports of grain at New Orleans, 1878-1907

[From monthly summary of commerce and finance, 1900, and from annual report New Orleans Board

of Trade, 1906]



Year.



1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878,
1879
1880,
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886,
1887,
1888,
1889,
1890,
1891,
1892,
1S93,
1894.
1895,
1896,
1897,
1898,
1899.
1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.
1905.
1906.
1907.



Flour.



Received.



Barrels.
1,046,024
1,001,504
804,242
791,701
631,602
639, 304
019, 461
626, 418
042. 460
729, 749
726, 291
692,303
602,609
694,263
624,852
671, 331
675,924
640, 373
652,873
842,064
766,252
756,068
655,291
647, 525
516, 310
747, 879
734,027
647,796
535,371
561,147
528, 471
505,428
497, 143
520, 577
766,218



Ex-
ported.



Barrels.

54,006

176,745

74, 219

93, 792

34, 208

38,082

40,230

102, 361

60,543

66,119

83,935

35, 572

25,430

24,832

54,125

43, 152

31,646

44,276

52,015

225, 841

117,878

133,075

91,140

268, 154

345, 017

295, 472

462,462

378,306

571,209

530, 162

1,162.719

660, 129

783, 108

1,219,867

855,808



AVheat.



Received.



Bushels.

896

325. 287

145, 485

82,812

110,561

1,048,857

3, 128. 914

5.169.497

6,707,982

2,890,698

2, 372, 430

1,551,591

95,906

1,039,466

4.368,951

1,484,951

1,583,385

1,593,275

10, 604, 450

14,592,156

13,181,944

2, 390, 353

868,944

3, 852, 623

10,642,166

12,657,877

11,874,589

7, 440, 472

24, 7%, 841

17,250,250

11,218,975

1,737,015

809,600

5, 473, 800

5,318,200



Exported.



Bushels.



265,788

206, 399

37, 102

105,271

838,088

2, 796, 669

5, 344, 510

4, 420, 614

6. 100, 233

7; 089, 361

648,337

1,590,124

30, 702

4, 345, 553

1,566,297

960,949

1,523,014

10, 336, 186

14,207,443

12, 896, 734

2,925,541

836, 202

3,853,337

10,356,248

12, 795, .542

11,562,812

8,055,397

24, 485, 807

10, 505, 284

11,897,486

2,089,814

584. 334

5,675,8^3

5,181,165



Com.



Received.



Bushels.

6,097,522

5,080,402

3, 465, 909

4, 202, 022

5, 580, 150

7,996,361

7,023,191

11,177,045

11,508,685

4,024,325

10,853,264

6,092,398

8,059,486

8, 195, 998

8,352,999

7,001,185

14,933,398

13,780,264

3, 354, 773

7,501,128

7,611,607

4,381,173

9,927,676

25, 989, 094

27,559,482

19, 74S, 497

22,041,796

23,292,659

11,904,615

2,791,633

12,756,740

4,580,357

25,052,020

19, 339, 812

9,051,000



Exported.



Bushels.

946, 457

1,244,963

197, 4^3

1,639,756

2,824,921

6,025,664

3,909,589

9,205,984

7,797,557

245,987

6, 378, 158

6,051,507

6, 644, 639

8,553,913

7,505,816

4,949,723

11,812,859

12,028,362

1,912,173

7, 379, 678

6,506,333

5,441,448

8,756,706

25,292,502

27, 714, 472

20, 735, 569

21,939,586

23, 403, 453

12,471,703

2,074,917

12,998,4.39

5,309,214

21,937,962

17,337,450

8,402,993



Oats.



Received.



Bushels.
2,267,596
1,868,840
1,727,232
1, 166, 432
1,169,524
1,687,436
1,780,872
1,139,852
1,598.180
1,490.254
1, 560, .353
1, 728, 559
417,880
439, 633
1, 320, 152
523, 740
1,170,582
3, 320, 225
3, 442, 420
4, 469, 495
3, 495, 630
2,204,820
3,018,241
3,046,315
3,799,972
4,265,955
3,563,115
4,972,067
4,902,106
2, 522, 891
4,067,254
2,435,875
2, 309, 000
6,497,146
4,627,500



Ex-
ported.



Bushels.
22,228
56,081
18,025
25,002



2,800

3,220

4,890

449

6,047

8,278

3,442

1,683

11,121

2,186

1,478

358

26, 434

1,891

9,103

122,633

12,712

23,790

262, 143

1,294,518

1,662,956

923,729

1,569,192

1,996,409

ISO, 521

35,581

43,200

894, 143

5, 417, 779

1,964,639



COMMERCE ON INTERIOR RIVERS



159



Tablk 30 — Receipts of flour and grain at New Orleans via rail and river, 1897, 1898
[From Monthly Summary of Commerce and Finance, 1900]





1897.


1898.




1897.


1898.


Flour:

Rail

River


...barrels..
do....

do....

..bushels. .
do....

do....

do....

do....

do...


371,293
143,071


688,002
59,277


Wheat:

Rail

River

Total..

Rye:

Rail

River

Total..


..bushels..
do....

do....

do....


9,392,555
1,449,111


9,711,110
2, 946, 761


Total..


514, 364


747,879


10,841,666


12,657,877


Corn:

Roil


23, 048, 322
4,522,723


16, 723, 167
3,025,330




17, 500


River


do....

do....


268, 170


265, 183


Total..


27,571,045


19.748,497


268, 170


282, 683


Oats:

Rail

River


2,604,884
1,231,550


3,191,458
1,074,497




Total . .


3, 836, 434


4,265,955





Table 31 — Grain shipments from St. Louis and grain movements at New Orleans,

1868-1906

[Compiled from reports of New York Produce Exchange]



Year.


Shipments

from
St. Louis
by river.


Total re-
ceipt.s at
New Or-
leans.


Exports

from
New Or-
leans.


Year.


Shipments

from
St. Louis
by river.


Total re-
ceipts at
New Or-
leans.


Exports
from

New Or-
leans.


1868


Bushels.


Bushels.
6,540,404
5,975,831
7,272,794
6,895,617
9,819,365
8.334,100
7,287,813
5,348,086
5,585,089
6,867,371
11,332,784
12, 108, 262
17,538.980
19,8(^,887
8, 405, 477
15,104.921
9,865,937
8,593,272
9,675,127
14,042,102


Bushels.


1888


Bushels.
7,252,578
14,158,044
10,217,249
8,468,540
8,415,210
7,079,598
2,345,503
1,735,417
10,527,208
5, 475, 342
6, 600, 707
2.233.235
3, 314; 160
2, 363, 949
2,541,7.35
2,749.441


Bushels.

9,009,876
17,770,501
18,693,764
17,770,885
26,845,029
24,289,181

9,313,930
13,814.861
32,888.032
42.270,220
36,9.55,012
37,655,608
35,923,490
41,603,502
22,021,702
28, 100, 7.39

8,753,247
28,770,620
31,361,357


Bushels.
6, 765, 982
14,942,980
13,752 221


1869






1889


1870


66,000
312,077
1,711,039
1,373,969
1,423,036
308,578
1,774,379
4,101,353
5,451,603
6,164,838

15,762,664

12,993,947
8,333,417

11,059,508
6,047,558
8.6(i7,9l9
8,834,924

11,556,799




1890


1871




1891


12,550,810
21,953,834
19,525,600
8,379 701


1872




1892


1873


1,119,073
1,510,751
403,832
1,676,858
2,930,192
7,416,217
6,884,381

14,020,033

12,292,071
0,366,767

12,002,264
5,810,142
7,935,815
9,183,141

11,867,984


1893


1874


1894


1875


1895


9,616,698
29,425,682
39,624,908
35,428,041
34,602,295
33,250,014
38,753,369
18,512,069
25,415,172

8,269,774
22,026,855
27,468,374


1876


1896


1877


1897


1878


1898

1899


1879


1880


1900

1901


1881


1882

1883

1884


1902

1903

1904 .. . .


1885


1905




1886


1906




1887











160



REPORT OF THE INLAND WATERWAYS COMMISSION



TRAFFIC ON VARIOUS RIVERS AND CANALS

The following is a table of traffic on some of the smaller rivers and
canals throughout the country. There has been a general increase
on most of the rivers from year to year. There has also been a
material gain for the year 1907 over both 1905 and 1906, the traffic
aggregating 2,955,444 tons for the routes named.

Table 32 — Freight transported on various rivers and canals, 1902-1907
[From Monthly Summary of Commerce and Finance]



Rivers and canals.



1902.



1903.



1905.



1906.



Barren River, Ky., Lock 1

Big Sandy River, Ky., and W.

Va., Lock 3 or 2. ..!

Black Warrior River, Ala., Lock

12 (formerly 3)

Canal at the Cascades, Oreg

Coosa River, Ala., Lock 2 or

Lock3

Cumberland River, Term., Lock

A



Tons.
41,231

251,911

16, 105
25,308

3,226



Des Moines Rapids Canal

Green River, Ky., Lock 1

Kanawha River, Great Lock 11.
Kanawha River, Little Lock 5. .
Kentucky River, Ky., Lock 4. . .

Muscle Shoals Canal, Tenn

Muskingum River, Ohio, Lock 1.

Rough River, Ky., Lock 1

Wabash River, Ind., Lock 1

Yamhill Lock, Oreg



55, 781

392,847

977, 101

69, 706

48, 665

7, 188

37,380

25,977

1,594

1,718



Tons.
36,949

289, 499

32, 134

37,848

2,106



34, 815
450, 739



101,801

9,691

58, 264

34,390

1,771

997



Tons.
39,945

305, 892

14,625
33, 173

576



47,440
374, 853



102, 129

10, 562

29,351

35,446

1,662

3,394



Tons.
52,432

146,413

12,530
41,390

2,584

87,382

20, 895

400, 120

.,511,872

106, 520

134, 324

17, 796

38,070

59, 696

6,014

2,785



Tons.
35,583

241,409

15, 150
48,305

2,815

63,379

34,447

375,919

1,208.023

142,006

144,255

26, 878

27, 872

34, 112

5,597

3,304



Tons.
38,526

174,587

20,340
65,934

1,612

79, 415

23,994

424, 770

1,725,525

108, 75li

191,311

21,101

42,828

28, 754

6,312

1,673



NAVIGATION ON THE COLORADO



In a letter to the Bureau of Corporations, dated January 30, 1907,
Mr. J. A. Mellon, master of the steamer Cochan, operating on the
Colorado River, gives the following brief history of transportation on
that stream:

In tlie year 1851 it became necessary for the United States to establish a military
post at Yuma. The troops marched from San Diego. To supply the troops by tlie
desert route was found impossible and a contract was let by the quartermaster to G. A.
Johnson to transport 75 tons by water from San Francisco to Yuma. Johnson .shipped
the stores on the schooner Sierra Nevada to the mouth of the Colorado, with lumber
enough on deck to build flat boats for the river transportation, and with the same he
cordelled the freight to Yuma, making a successful trip. The next contract let was
for 100 tons, and a man by the name of Turnbull was the successful bidder. He
shipped the goods to the mouth of the river on the Invincible, and with material for
building a small boat, which he named the Uncle Sam. His boat did not have power
enough to stem the current of the Colorado. When he reached a point 50 miles from
Yuma he landed his freight and from there it was hauled to Yuma by teams. The
charge for hauling it was so great that it broke Turnbull. The next contract was
awarded to George A. Johnson, and he built a steamer which he named the General
Jessup. Johnson formed an association with Ben Hartshorn and another man of the
name of Mintron, and the firm was known from that time (1853) until the year 1871 by
the name of G. A. Johnson & Co. Their agent in San Francisco was George F.
Hooper, who was also sutler at Yuma from 1853 until the Southern Pacific Railroad
reached Yuma in April, 1877. George A. Johnson was connected with the transpor-
tation of all Government and all other stores from San Francisco to El Dorado Canyon,
on the Colorado River. The river route was 525 miles and the sea route was 1,950
miles by the Pacific and Gulf of California. In 1871 G. A. Johnson & Co.
incorporated under the name of the Colorado Steam Navigation Company and put



COMMEECE OF TNTEETOE EIVEES 161

on the steamships Neivhorn and Montana to connect with the river boats. These
ships made a trip from San Francisco every twenty days to the moiitli of the river.
Previous to 1871 freight was received on the river boats from sailing vessels, with an
occasional steamship, when there was a rush of Government supplies and troops.

Civilian freight first became an item on the Colorado River in 1859 when the Gila
placer mines were struck, and from that time until the Southern Pacific Railroad
reached Yuma there was a steady increase in river trade.

Mr. Mellon estimates that there were 110 men employed on the
boats and barges and in the shipyards on the river, belonging to the
Colorado Steam Navigation Company. Ho continues:

"When the railroad reached a point 30 miles from Yuma in March, 1877, the P. I.
Company, a branch of the Southern Pacific Railroad, bought out the Colorado Steam
Navigation Company, and from that year until 1886 the P. I. Company ran the river
boats in connection with the Southern Pacific Railroad. In September, 1886, the
P. I. Company sold their interests to Polhamus & Mellon, who controlled the trade
until 1903, at which time Polhamus withdrew, and at present the transportation is
controlled by Joe J. Thornton, J. A. Mellon, John Gandolfo, Frank Monaghan, and
Dan Murphy. They own the steamer Cochan and the barge Silas J. Lewis. The
Cochan is 237 tons, custom-house measure. She is 157 feet over all and 32 feet
beam, and draws 20 inches of water when light, and for every 10 tons of freight
displaces 1 inch of water. The barge Silas J. Lewis is 150 feet over all, 32 feet
beam, 4 feet deep. She measures 100 tons, draws 7 inches without load, and carries
11 tons to every inch you sink her in the water, or 178 tons on a draft of 2 feet. We
are not incorporated, although we work under the name of the Colorado Steam Navi-
gation Company, the reason for which is that I have been on the boats constantly
since 1863, first with G. A. Johnson & Co., then with the Colorado Steam Navi-
gation Company, next with the P. I. Company, which still retains the name of the
Colorado Steam Navigation Company, and when Polhamus and I bought out the
boats we continued to call it the Colorado Steam Navigation and so down to the present
time.

Mr. Mellon states that the profits of his company are far less now
than before the advent of the railroad into Arizona. He states that
the Cochan was built in 1899 at a cost of $26,000, starting on her first
run January 7, 1900. The barge Silas J. Lewis was, according to
his statement, launched September 29, 1901. Referring to the sub-



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