United States. Inland Waterways Commission.

Preliminary report of the Inland Waterways Commission. Message from the President transmitting a preliminary report online

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ject of competing boat lines, Mr. Mellon writes that the first competi-
tive boat put on the Colorado was in 1864, the name of the vessel being
Esmeralda and her owner Thomas E. Trueworthy. Owing to True-
worthy's ignorance of navigating the Colorado she went to the wall
and, according to the statement of Mr. Mellon, was sold to G. A. Johnson
& Co. for a nominal sum. Mr. Mellon writes that the next competi-
tive boat was the Ninatilden, in 1868, which appears to have gone
the same way as the Esmeralda. No further competition appears to
have been encountered until 1902, when the Mexican-Colorado Navi-
gation Company was formed in Los Angeles, Cal. In reference to
this organization Mr. Mellon, in his letter, makes the following state-
ment:

They [Mexican-Colorado Navigation Company] put on a small boat called the
St. Vallier. She is 75 feet in length and has been in the hands of the sheriff for a year.



162



REPORT OF THE IISTLAND WATERWAYS COMMISSIOlSr



Mr. Alellon, in his letter, thus summarizes the history of vessel
building on the Colorado River:

Table 33 — Vessels on Colorado River



Name.



Ives



Uncle Sam

Genera 1 Jessup

Colorado No. 1

Explorer Lieut. J. C.

(Government boat).

Cocopah No. 1

Colorado No. 2

Mohave No. 1

Esmeralda

Ninatilden (built in San

Francisco).

Cocopah No. 2

Gila



Class.



Steamer .
....do...
....do...
....do...



.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do.,
.do..



.do.
.do.



When
built.



1852
1853
1856
1857

1858
1862
1864
1864
1865

1S67
1872



Name.



Mohave No. 2

Mohave No. 3

Cochan

St. Vallier (iron)

Searchlight

No.l

No. 2

No.3

No. 4

Black Crook

White Swan

Silas J. Lewis



Class.



Steamer
....do..
....do..
....do..
....do..
Barge...
....do..
....do..
....do..
....do..
....do..
....do..



When
built.



1876
1884
1899
1898
1903
1864
1866
1867
1872
1864
1868
1901



Referring to the subject of barges, Mr. Mellon writes that all of
these except the Silas J. Lewis were rebuilt a number of times.
He ends his letter with this statement:

I have come to the conclusion that any river that has over 4 feet fall to the mile can
not compete with a railroad for freight or passengers.



3. STATISTICS OF COMMERCE ON THE GREAT I^AKES



TOTAL TRAFFIC ON THE GREAT LAKES

A summary of lake traffic at United States ports for the years
1905-1907 is given in the following tables. The various quantities
and units of freight are reduced to their equivalents in net tons.

The principal commodities moved on the Great Lakes and the per
cent which each bears to the total traffic, as shown in tables 34 and 35,
are as follows: Iron ore, 54.4 per cent to 56.5 per cent; coal, 19.8
per cent to 25.8 per cent; wheat, flour, and grain, 6.1 per cent to 7
per cent, and lumber and logs, 3.7 per cent to 6.6 per cent. There
has been a marked increase for the total movement since 1905, the
increase for 1907 over that year for both receipts and shipments being
24 per cent.

Table 3i—Do7nestic shipments on Great Lakes, 1905-1907

[From Monthly Summary of Commerce and Finance, December, 1905, pp. 1908-1913; December, 1906,
pp. 1295-1299; December, 1907, pp. 1165-1169]

[Net tons, thousands]



Articles.



1905. i 1906.



1907.



Coal

Flour

Wheat a

Grain other than wheat b . ..
Manufactured and pig iron c

Salt

Copper c

Iron ore c

Lumber and logs

Unclassified freight «

Total



14, 666

1,257

1,020

2,409

775

565

135

36, 621

4,269

5,629



17,575
1,335
1,432
2,258
1,035
568
131

41,297
3,993
5,986



21,525

1,315

1,900

1,960

787

558

119

45,615

d2.761

6,697



67,346 75.610 ' 83,507



PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL SHIPMENTS



Coal

Flour

Wheat

Grain other than wheat . . .
Manufactured and pig iron .

Salt

Copper

Iron ore

Lumber and logs

Unclassified freight



21.8


23.2


1.9


1.8


1.5


1.9


3.6


3.0


1.1


1.4


.8


.7


.2


.2


54.4


54.6


6.3


5.3


"


7.9



25.8

1.6

2.3

2.4

.9

. 7

.1

54.6

3.3

8.3



a Converted from bushels on basis 1 bushel equals 60 pounds.

i> Converted from bushels on basis 1 bushel com equals 56 pounds; 1 bushel oats equals 32 pounds; 1
bushel barley equals 48 pounds; 1 bushel rye equals 56 pounds.
' Converted from gross to net tons.
d Logs included in unclassified freight.
e Includes flaxseed converted from bushels on basis 1 bushel equals 56 pounds.



163



164



REPORT OF THE INLAND WATERWAYS COMMISSION



Table 35 — Domestic receipts on Great Lakes, 1905-1907

[From Monthly Summary of Commerce and Finance, December, IQO.'i, pp. 1908-1913; December, 1906,
pp. 1295-1299; December, 1907, pp. 1165-1167]

[Net tons, thousands]



Articles.



1905.



1906.


1907.


15,533


19,468


1,338


1,314


1,459


1,874


2,004


1,776


1,044


778


555


560


140


118


41,319


45,572


3,852


3,013


5,934


6,651



Coal 12, 914

Flour 1, 247

Wheat a 1, 028

Grain other than wheat b 2, 1.58

Manufactured and pig iron c 729

Salt 548

Copper c 133

Iron ore c 36, 609

Lumber and logs 4, 317

Unclassified freight d 5, 712



Total 65, 395



73,178 I 81,124



PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL RECEIPTS



Coal

Flour

Wheat

Grain other than wheat . . .
Manufactured and pig iron

Salt

Copper

Iron ore

Lumber and logs

Unclassified freight



19.8


21.2


1.9


1.8


1.6


2.0


3.3


2.7


LI


L4


.8


.8


.2


.2


56.0


56.5


6.6


5.3


8.7


8.1



24.0
1.6
2.3
2.2
1.0
.7
.1

56.2
3.7
8.2



a Converted from bushels on basis 1 bushel equals 60 pounds.

b Converted from bushels on basis 1 bushel barley equals 48 pounds; 1 bushel oats equals 32 pounds;
1 bushel corn equals 56 pounds; 1 bushel rye equals 56 pounds,
c Converted from gross to net tons.
d Includes flaxseed converted from bushels on basis 1 bushel equals 56 pounds.

TRAFFIC THROUGH ST. MARYS FAXLS CANALS.

Below is a summary of lake traffic passing through the St. Marys
Falls Canals and the per cent of each commodity to the total tonnage
for the period 1901-1907.

Table 36— Traffic through St. Marys Falls Canals, 1901-1907

[From Monthly Summary of Commerce and Finance. 1902-1907]

[Net tons, thousands]



1902.


1903.


1904.


4,812


6,938


6,455


891


709


471


2,302


1,841


1,498


666


770


793


198


193


230


62


64


51


121


113


110


24,277


21,655


19,636


1,853


1,710


1,542


779


681


760


35,961


34,674


31,546



1907.



Coal 4, 593

Flour 763

Wheat a I 1 , 584

Grain, other than wheat b 594

Manufactured and pig iron 206

Salt : 62

Copper 99

Iron ore 18,091

Lumberc I i,806

Unclassified freight 605



6,509

577

2,050

941

238

59

106

31,333

1,610



8,740

649

2,528

1,304

391

66

108

35,357

1,467

1,141



11,400

652

2,944

1,043

308

65

90

39,595

1,097

1,023



Total 28, 403



44,271 51,751



58,217



PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL FREIGHT



Coal

Flour

Wheat

Grain, other than wheat ..
Manufactured and pig iron

Salt

Copper

Iron ore

Lumber

Unclassified freight ,



16.2


13.4


20.0


20.5


14.7


16.9


2.7


2.5


2.0


L5


1.3


1.3


5.6


6.4


5.3


4.8


4.6


4.9 ,


2.1


L9


2.2


2.5


2.1


2.5


.7


.5


.6


.7


.5


.8


.2


.2


.2


.2


.1


.1


.3


.3


.3


.3


.3


.2


63.7


67.6


62.5


62.2


70.8


68.3


6.4


5.1


4.9


4.9


3.7


2.8


2.1


2.2


2.0


2.4


1.9


2.2



19.5

1.1

5.0

1.8

.5

.1

.1

68.2

1.9

1.8



« Converted from bushels on basis 1 bushel equals 60 pounds.
ti Converted from bushels on basis 1 bushel equals 48 pounds.
c Difference between other listed articles and total freight.



STATISTICS OF COMMERCE ON THE GREAT LAKES



165



It will be noted that the chief articles of commerce and the per-
centages of the total traffic correspond roughly with those for the
total lake traffic, with the exception of the iron ore. The same prin-
cipal articles carried are iron ore, coal, wheat, lumber, flour and grain.

The following table is a comparison of traffic passing through the
St. Marys Falls Canals with that of the total lake, 1905-1907. Of
the more important articles, iron ore leads A\dth approximately 86 per
cent, copper 78 per cent, coal 49 per cent, flour 48 per cent, grain
other than wheat 50 per cent, and lumber and logs 38 per cent.

The greater amount of tonnage credited to wheat passing through
the canals over that of the total domestic lake traffic is due largely
to the movement from Canadian ports. On the whole, the canal
traffic represents about two-thirds of the total domestic lake traffic.

Table 37 — Comparison of domestic traffic on Great Lakes and total traffic through St.
Manjs Falls Canals, 1905-1907

[Compiled from Tables 34 and 36]
[Net tons, thousands]





1905. 1906.


1907.


Articles.


Total
do-
mestic

lake
traflic.o


Traffic
through

St.

Maiys

Falls

Canals, b


Per

cent

St.

Marys

Falls

Canals

of
total.


Total
do-
mestic

lake
traffic.o


Traffic
through

St.

Marys

Falls

canal s.!>


Per
cent
St.
Marys
Falls
canals

of
total.


Total
do-
mestic

lake
traffic."


Total

through

St.

Marys

Falls

canals. 6


Per

cent

St.
Marys

Falls
canals

of
total.


Coal


14,666
1,257
1,020

2,409

775

565

135

36.621

4,269

5,629


6,509

577

2,050

941

238

59

106

31,333

1,610

848


44.4
45.9

39.1

30.7
10.4
78.5
85.6
37.7
15.1


17,575
1,335
1,432

2,258

1,035

568

131

41,297

3,993

5,986


8,740
649

2,528

1,304

391

66

108

35,357

1,467

1,141


49.7
48.6

57.8

37.8
11.6
82.4
85.6
36.7
19.1


21,525
1,315
1,900

1,960

787

558

119

45,615

2,761

6,967


11,400

652

2 944


53.0


Flour


49.6


Wheat




Grain, other than
wheat .


1 043 ^^ 5i


Manufactured find pig

iron

Salt


308

05

90

39,595

1,097

1,023


39.1
11 6


Copper


75.6


Iron ore

Lumber and logs

Unclassified freight . . .


86.8
39.7
14.7


Total


67,346


44,271


65.7


75, 610


51,751


68.4


83,507


58,217


69.7







o Domestic shipments.



^ Including Canadian traffic.



The following table shows the number and class of vessels by years
from 1881 to 1907 inclusive, together with passengers, passing through
the canals. Beginning with the year 1895, the figures include traffic
passing through the Canadian canal which was opened to commerce
on September 9 of that year. There has been a general increase in
the total passages for the entire period, with the exceptions of the
Tears 1903, 1904. and 1907. The registered tonnage has increased
relatively more; that of 1907 over 1887 being 800 per cent; over
1897, 150 per cent, and over 1902, 38 per cent. It is of interest to
note that although the total passages in 1907 decreased b}- 1,718
over the year 1906, the regi^ered tonnage in turn increased by
2,989,650 net tons. This remarkable condition is due to the fact
that the ore carriers in recent years arc being constructed consider-
ably larger, some of the largest ore boats having been put into serv-
ice durinn; 1907.



166



REPORT OF THE INLAND WATERWAYS COMMISSION



Table 38 — Vessel movement through St. Marys Falls Canals, 1881-1907
[From Monthly Summary of Commerce and Finance, December, 1907, p. 1176]



Years.



1881...
1882. . .
1883. . .
1884. . .
1885. . .
1886. . .
1887. . .
1888...
1889. . .
1890. . .
1891...
1892. . .
1893. . .
1894. . .

1895 a .

1896 . .
1897. . .
1898. . .
1899. . .
1900...
1901...
1902. . .
1903. .

1904 6.

1905 6.

1906 b.

1907 6,



Date of
opening
canal.



May 7
Apr. 21
May 2
Apr. 23
May 6
Apr. 25
May 1
May 7
Apr. 15
Apr. 20
Apr. 27
Apr. 18
May 1
Apr. 17
Apr. 25
Apr. 21

do. ..

Apr. 11
Apr. 26
Apr. 19
Apr. 20
Apr. 1
Apr. 2
May 5
Apr. 14
Apr. 13
....do...



Date of
closing
canal.



Dec. 5

Dec. 3

Dec. 11

Dec. 10

Dec. 2

Dec. 4

Dec. 2

Dec. 4
...do...

Dec. 3

Dec. 7

Dec. 6

Dee. 5

Dec. 6

Dec. 11

Dec. 8

Dex. 14
...do...

Dec. 20

Dec. 16

Dec. 21

Dec. 20

Dec. 15

Dec. 13

Dec. 16

Dec. 17

Dec. 11



Tonnage and class of vessels.



sailing



Number.
1,706
1,663
1,458
1, 709
1,689
2,534
2,562
2,009
2,635
2,872
2,405
3,324
2,955
3,676
4,790
4,391
4,438
4,449
4,776
4,004
4,482
4,368
3,569
2,994
3,263
2,817
2,303



Steam- : ^nregis-
ers *ered

^^^- craft.



Number.
2,117
2,739
2,620
3,609
3,354
4,584
5,968
5,305
6,501
7,268
7,339
8,737
8,379
10, 208
12, 495
13, 404
12,029
12, 461
14,378
14,426
14,372
17,069
14,027
12, 188
17, 197
18, 138
17,245



Number.

181

372

237

371

337

306

825

489

443

417

447

519

674

607

671

820

704

851

1,101

1,022

1,187

1,222

1,000

938

1,219

1,200



Total Registered
passages, tonnage.



Number.
4,004
4,774
4,315
5,689
5,380
7,424
9,355
7,803
9,579
10, 557
10, 191
12,580
12,008
14, 491
17,956
18, 615
17,171
17, 761
20,255
19, 452
20,041
22, 659
18, 596
16, 120
21,079
22, 155
20,437



Net ions.
2,092,757
2,468,088
2, 042, 259
2,997,837
3,035,937
4,219,397
4, 897, 598
5, 130, 659
7,221,935
8, 454, 435
8, 400, 685
10, 647, 203
8, 949, 754
13,110,366
16, 806, 781
17,249,418
17,619,933
18, 622, 754
21,958,347
22,315,834
24,626,976
31, £55, 582
27 736,444
24, 364, 138
36, 617, 699
41,098,324
44,087,974



Passen-
gers.



I< umber.
24, 671
29,256
39, 130
54, 214
36, 147
27,088
32,668
25,558
25, 712
24, 856
26,190
25,896
18,869
27,236
31,656
37,066
40, 213
43,426
49,082
58,555
59,663
59,377
55, 175
37, 695
54,204
63,033
62,758



a From 1895 figures include traffic through Canadian canal, opened to commerce Sept. 9, 1895.
b In 1904, 1905, 1906, and 1907 the dates of opening and closing are for American locks.

The traffic through the St. Marys Falls canals is further outlined
in tables 39 and 40. There has been a steady increase in the
tonnage throughout the entire period, except in 1891 and 1893 and
in 1903 and 1904, when the ore tonnage fell heavily. The importance
of this commodity in the movement of lake tonnage is a most vital
one. During the earlier years, flour, wheat, other grain, and lumber
were more important in the movement of commerce.



STATISTICS OF COMMERCE ON THE GREAT LAKES



167



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Online LibraryUnited States. Inland Waterways CommissionPreliminary report of the Inland Waterways Commission. Message from the President transmitting a preliminary report → online text (page 16 of 83)