University of Michigan.

Catalogue of the University of Michigan online

. (page 10 of 75)
Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 10 of 75)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


tholomew bequeathed to the University of Michigan property on the
income of which is to be established a scholarship of the value of
five hundred dollars annually.

Anna M. Chandler Scholarship Fund. — The Alumni of tne Mar-
quette, Michigan, High School have given to the University the sum
of one thousand dollars to be known as the Anna M. Chandler Loan
Fund, in honor of Miss Anna M. Chandler, A.B., 1874, for thirteen
years superintendent of schools of Marquette. The money is admin-
istered as a loan fund, preference being given to graduates of the
Marquette High School.

The Henry Strong Scholarships. — The heirs of the late Henry
Strong, of Lake Geneva, Wis., have established in memory of their
father, three scholarships of the value of two hundred fifty dol-
lars each.

The James L. Babcock Scholarship Fund. — The late James L.
Babcock, of Ann Arbor, Michigan, bequeathed to the University the
sum of five thousand dollars in trust, to be loaned out and kept at
interest, said interest to be used annually and perpetually to help
educate a worthy young man or worthy young woman as the case
may be. The income, known as the James L. Babcock Scholarship
Fund, is administered by the President and Secretary of the Univer-



Digiti



ized by Google



112 The University



sity and the Professor of Music in the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts ; and is awarded each year to a student who is especially
interested in music and who desires to elect work in the department
of Music. The student selected must, in addition to being especially
interested in the subject of music, have attained at least an average
standing in other subjects at the University, and if, during any year,
no condidate meeting the conditions can be found, the income from
the fund is added to the principal. The holder of this fellowship for
1920- 192 1 is Bertrand Harris Bronson.

Marsh Scholarships, — In 1916 the late Elia M. Walker bequeathed
to the University the sum of ten thousand dollars, the income of
which is to be used for the establishment of two or more scholarships
named in honor of the donor's parents, John Pitt Marsh and Fanny
Ransom Marsh.

William James Olcott Scholarships. — In June, 1916, Mr. Wil-
liam J. Olcott, of Duluth, Minnesota, gave to the University the
sum of five thousand dollars for the establishment of a scholarship
open to students in the College of Engineering. The amounts awarded,
when repaid, shall accumulate towards the foundation of further
scholarships.

McGowan Loan Fund. — In November, 1915, Mrs. Josephine P.
McGowan gave to the University the sum of five hundred dollars
for the establishment of a loan fund for needy students in the Col-
lege of Literature, Science, and the Arts, in memory of her husband,
the late Hon. Jonas H. McGowan, Regent of the University from
1870 to 1877.

John Frank Dodge Loan Fund. — In November, 191 5, Mr. John
F. Dodge, of Detroit, gave to the University the sum of $10,000 for
the establishment of a loan fund for worthy juniors and seniors in
the College of Engineering.

F. M. Hamilton Loan Fund. — In December, 1915, the heirs of
the late Francis M. Hamilton, A.B., 1869, of Ann Arbor, gave to the
University the sum of one thousand dollars for the establishment of
a loan fund.

Eliza Mosher Loan Fund. — In April, 19 16, the New York Alum-
nae Association gave to the University the sum of one thousand dol-
lars to establish a loan fund for women of the University in honor
of Dr. Eliza Mosher, the first Dean of Women.

Michigan Daughters of the American Revolution Loan Fund. —
In April, 19 16, the Daughters of the American Revolution of the
State of Michigan gave to the University money for the establish-
ment of a loan fund for senior women in the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts.



Digiti



ized by Google



Fellowships, Scholarships, Loan Funds, Prises 113

Newell and Nancy Eddy Avery Memorial' Loan Scholarship
Fund, — A donor who prefers to remain unknown has given to the
University the sum of five thousand dollars, the income of which is
to be used to establish a loan fund for junior and senior women in
the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.

Florence Huson Scholarship, — In 1916 the late Dr. Florence
Huson bequeathed to the University the sum of six thousand dollars
for the establishment of a scholarship for women students, to be
administered as a loan fund.

Alice Hostner Preble Scholarship Loan Fund, — Friends of Dr.
Robert B. Preble, of the Class of 1889, and Mrs. Robert B. Preble,
of the Class of 1888, have given to the University the sum of $2,500
for the establishment of a scholarship loan for women students to
be known as the Alice Hosmer Preble Scholarship Loan Fund, in
memory of and to continue the work of Mrs. Preble.

The George C. Caron Scholarship Fund, — In January. 191 7, Dr.
and Mrs. George C. Caron, of Detroit, gave to the University the sum
of $2,000 for the establishment of a scholarship in memory of their
son, the late George C. Caron, Jr., of the Class of 1914. The bene-
ficiaries are to be seniors giving special attention to journalism or
seniors in the Homoeopathic Medical School. The scholarship is
administered as a loan fund.

The Jane Turner Memorial Gift Fund, — In January, 191 7, Miss
Mary E. Turner, of Detroit, gave to the University the sum of $3,500
to be used as a loan fund for women students in the University.
This fund is named in memory of her sister, the late Jane Owen
Turner, a student during the year 1896-1897.

Jane Turner Loan Fund, — In April, 1917, Miss Mary E. Turner
gave to the University the additional sum of fifteen hundred dollars
to be used as a loan fund.

Richard Nelville Hall Memorial Fund, - ln March, 191 7, the
parents and friends of Richard Nelville Hall, of Ann Arbor, who
lost his life while engaged in the ambulance service in connection
with the French Army in Alsace, December 24, 191 5, gave to the
University the sum of two thousand dollars for the establishment
of a loan fund in his memory.

Barbour Scholarships, — In June, 191 7, the Hon. Levi L. Bar-
bour, of Detroit, gave to the University the sum of $100,000 for the
establishment of scholarships for women students coming from
oriental countries. In January, 1920, Mr. Barbour made a further
gift of $250,000 to this fund. The holders of these scholarships for
the year 1920- 192 1 are Probhabati Das Gupta, Me Tsung Dong, Kita
Fukui, Ai Lan Giang, Asha Latika Holdar, Ai D. Kiuchi, Gien Tsiu



Digiti



ized by Google



114 The University



Liu, Matsu Matsumoto, Sugi Mibai, Zok Tsung Tsao, and Helen
I.ee Wong.

Educational Loan Fund. — In June, 191 7, an alumnus gave to
the University the sum of one hundred dollars to be used as a loan
fund for students taking work in education.

Paul Whcfle? Warriner Scholarship in Engineering, — In June,
1920, Eugene C. Warriner, A.B., 1891, A.M., 1912, and his wife, Ellen
Wheeler Warriner, A.B., 1891, gave to the University the sum of
three hundred dollars as a loan scholarship to be known as the Paul
Wheeler Warriner Scholarship in Engineering, in memory of their
son, a member of the Class of 1920, who died in Ann Arbor, March
5, 1917.

George //. Benzenberg Trust Fund. — In September, 1920, George
Henry Benzenberg, C.E., 1867, gave to the University the sum of
$20,000 in Liberty Bonds, the income from which is to be used as a
loan fund for worthy and needy students in the College of Engi-
neering.

Good Government Club Prize. — The income of the sum, originally
five hundred dollars, which has since grown to twelve hundred del'
lars, presented to the Board of Regents by the Good Government
Club of the University, is available, under the conditions of the gift,
in the form of books to be awarded as a prize to that student of the
graduating class in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
who has done the most distinguished work as an undergraduate in
the field of political science.

Michigan Menorah Society Prize, — Mr. Julius Rosenwald, of
Chicago, Illinois, has given to the University of Michigan an annual
sum of one hundred dollars, to be awarded as a prize for an essay
by an undergraduate of the University of Michigan, on a topic deal-
ing with the literature, the history, and the achievements of the
Jewish people. He has offered this prize with a view of stimulating
a general and intelligent interest in a field which promises so well
for the disclosing of one of the sources of our modem civilization,
the Hebraic, the other being the Hellenistic. The prize is known as
the "Michigan . Menorah Society Prize," a society organized at the
University for the study of Hebraic culture and ideals, which Mr.
Rosenwald desires to encourage.

The award is made by a committee of three, appointed by the
President of the ITniversity, one member, however, to be nominated
by the Michigan Menorah Society.

The award is given only for essays showing sufficient merit. In
case the judges should conclude that none of the essays presented
deserves recognition, the year succeeding two prizes will be offered,
each in the sum of one hundred dollars. If two essays should be of
equal merit, the judges may divide the prize equally, awarding to
each essay the sum of fi^ly dollars.



Digiti



ized by Google



Digiti



ized by Google



Digiti



ized by Google



Fees and Expenses 115



STUDENT SELF HELP

While the University does not undertake t.o furnish manual labor
or other opportunities for work to students, yet a considerable number
find opportunities in the city for remunerative labor, to assist in
defraying their expenses. A word of caution is needed, however.
Students should not undertake so much outside work as to interfere
with their studies or injure their health. They should arrange their
recitation schedules so as to leave uninterrupted periods for working.

The Students' Christian Association maintains free of charge em-
ployment bureaus for men, whereby many students are assisted in
finding positions to earn money. AH women students desiring em-
ployment should apply to the Dean of Women before settling their
class schedules.



FEES AND EXPENSES

In view of the fact tliat no variation can be made from the
rule that all fees are due and payable in advance for the entire
year, no prospective student should come to Ann Arbor for reg-
istration without a sum sufficient to cover all his fees for the
entire year. Students coming from foreign countries should par-
ticularly note this fact. .

All Fees Must be Paid in Advance or at the Time of Regis-
tration. — A by-law of the Board of Regents provides that no student
or graduate shall be allowed to enjoy the privileges of the University
until he has paid all fees that are due. The matriculation and annual
fees must be paid in full at the lime of registration. The laboratory
fees and other special fees are payable at or before the time of en-
rollment in the class. The graduation fee and the teacher's diploma
fee must be paid before the candidate is recommended by the faculty.
Those graduating or taking a teacher's diploma on Commencement
Day must pay the required fee on or before a fixed date preceding
Commencement Day, which date will be posted in due season by the
Secretary. Holders of fellowships or of scholarships are required
to pay the matriculation fee (if not already paid), the annual fees,
'graduation fee, laboratory expenses, and other similar charges, the
same as the other students of the school or college in which their
work lies.

Residence. — The burden of registering under proper residence is
plaeed upon the student; and it is the duty of each student at regis-
tration, if there be any possible question of his right to legal resi-
dence in Michigan, under the rules of the Regents, to raise the ques-
tion with the registration officer and have such question passed upon
and settled by the proper officers of the University, previous to regis-



Digiti



ized by Google



ii6 The University



tration. Residence in Michigan cannot be gained while one is en-
rolled as a student at the University. Any student who registers
improperly under this rule shall, when discovered, be required to
pay not only the proper non-resident fees but shall be assessed as
an addition to the annual fee for that year, the sum of $io. Students
of foreign birth are required, on first registering in the University,
to furnish legal evidence of the citizenship of themselves or, if minors,
of their legal guardians.

Matriculation Fee. — Every student, before entering a school
or college of the University, is required to pay a matriculation fee.
This fee, which, for citizens of the United States, legally resident in
Michigan, or their warcjs, is t^n dollars, and for others, twenty-five
dollars, is paid but once, and entitles the student to the privileges
of permanent membership in the University. Aliens who have their
first naturalization papers will be regarded as citizens of the United
States.

Annual Fees. — (See also "Fee for Second Semester." In addi-
tion to the matriculation fee, every student has to pay an annual fee
for incidental expenses, and, in some schools or colleges, a small
additional fee for special purposes. These fees are paid the first
year of residence at the University, and every year of residence
thereafter. Resident graduates are required to pay the same annual
fee as undergraduates. The annual fees .in the several schools and
colleges of the University are as stated below. By "Michigan stu-
dents" is meant those who are citizens of the United States, legally
resident in Michigan, or their wards.

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts: For Michigan stu-
dents, eighty dollars for men, seventy-six dollars for women ; for all
others, one hundred five dollars for men, one hundred one dollars for
women. Students in the College who are pursuing a combined cur-
riculum, and, in consequence, are registered at the same time in one
of ,the professional Schools are required to pay the annual fee due
from students in such professional Schools instead of the annual fee
of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.

Colleges of Engineering and Architecture: For Michigan stu-
dents ninety- five dollars for men, ninety one dollars for women; for
all others, one hundred twenty dollars for men, one hundred sixteen
dollars for women.

Medical School, (including laboratory fees) : For Michigan stu-
dents, one hundred forty dollars for men, one hundred thirty-six
dollars for women ; for all others, one hundred sixty- five dollars for
men, one hundred sixty-one dollars for women. The fee required for
graduate students who pursue special advanced laboratory courses in
this School is, in addition to the ordinary laboratory expenses, ten
dollars for each course taken.



Digiti



ized by Google



Pees and Expenses 117

Law School : For Michigan students, one hundred five dollars^
for men, one hundred one dollars for women ; for all others, one hun-
dred twenty- five dollars for men, one hundred twenty-one dollars for
women.

College of Pharmacy : For Michigan students, ninety- five dollars
for men, ninety-one dollars for women; for all others, one hundred
twenty dollars for men, one hundred sixteen dollars for women.

Homoeopathic Medical School, (including laboratory fees) : For
Michigan students, one hundred forty dollars for men, one hundred
thirty-six dollars for women ; for all others, one hundred sixty- five
dollars for men, one hundred sixty-one dollars for women.

College of Dental Surgery : For Michigan students, one hundred
forty dollars for men, one hundred thirty-six dollars for women ; for
all others, one hundred seventy-five dollars for men, one hundred
seventy-one dollars for women. A further charge of ten dollars a
year is made to cover the cost of certain special supplies provided by
the University.

Graduate School : For Michigan students, eighty dollars for
men, seventy-six dollars for women ; for all others, one hundred five
dollars for men, one hundred one dollars for women. The fee re-
quired from graduate students who are granted the privilege of pur-
suing studies for an advanced degree in absentia is ten dollars for
each year of registration.

Fee for Part Time Students : Persons actively engaged in teach-
ing in public, parochial, or private schools, who are regularly ad-
mitted as students in the College of Literature, Science, and the
Arts, or the Graduate School, may elect not more than five hours a
week, upon the payment of a fee of ten dollars in lieu of the regular
annual fee. Such students must pay the matriculation fee, the same
as other students, and are subject to the same rules as are all other
students regarding the time of registration, etc. This privilege of
enrolling at an annual fee of ten dollars is extended to students in
the Graduate School who have completed their course work for the
doctor's degree, but have not completed the thesis requirement, and
to practicing engineers and physicians.

Second Semester Fee. — A student who registers at the begin-
ning of the second semester is required to pay 60% of the prescribed
annual fee (see refund of fees (g) below).

LATE REGISTRATION.— Registration (i. e. enrollment, pay-
ment of fees, and classification) must be entirely completed be-
fore the first day of the semester. Students failing to complete
their registration before the first day of each semester are re-
quired to pay a late registration fee of five dollars.

Refund of Fees. — (a) No student will be entitled to a refund
except after surrender to the Secretary of the University of the



Digiti



ized by Google



ii8 The University



student's original receipt from the Treasurer of the University and
the surrender of all tickets issued to such student for athletic events
not yet having occurred. Students should scrupulously preserve all
receipts.

(b) No refund will be made to any student expelled, suspended,
or requested to withdraw on account of conduct or poor scholarship.

(c) No refund or reduction of matriculation fee is made except
in case of those withdrawing within the first two weeks after regis-
tration.

(d) Any student who withdraws voluntarily and in good stand-
ing not more than two weeks after his registration shall be entitled
to a refund of his entire annual fee, together with the matricula-
tion fee.

(e) A student who withdraws thus more than two weeks and
less than eight weeks after his registration is entitled to a refund of
one-half his annual fee.

(f) A student who withdraws thus more than eight weeks after
the beginning and not later than the end of the semester of registra-
tion is entitled to a refund of 40% of his annual fee.

(g) The 40% refunded to students enrolling at the beginning
of the second semester (see "Second Semester Fee" above) shall be
included in determining any further refund to withdrawing students
under (d) and (e) above.

(h) A student who transfers at the beginning of the second
semester from one school or college to another in which the annual
fee is higher shall be required to pay an additional amount sufficient
to bring the total fee to that in the latter school or college.

Fee for Special Entrance Examinations. — An applicant for
admission to any college of the University who presents himself for
the entrance examinations at a date later than that announced in the
University Catalogue is required to pay the University Treasurer a
fee of five dollars before he can receive permission to take the
examinations.

IvABORATORY EXPENSES. — Students who pursue laboratory courses
in chemistry, are required to pay for the materials and apparatus
actually consumed by them. The deposits required in advance are
different for the different courses, ranging from five to twenty dollars.
The laboratory expenses of students vary with their prudence and
economy. In the chemical laboratory the average expense for each
course is about four dollars and fifty rents per credit hour.

The laboratory deposit must in all cases be paid to the Treasurer
of the University before the student may enroll in the class.

Gymnasium Expenses. — A charge of two dollars a year is made
for the rental of a locker in Waterman gymnasium, one dollar for
a locker in Barbour gymnasium.



Digiti



ized by Google



Fees and Expenses 119

Graduation Fee.— The fee for graduation is ten dollars. The
by-laws of the Board of Regents prescribe that no person shall be
recommended for a degree until he has paid all dues, including the
fee for graduation.

Teacher's Diploma. — ^The fee for the Teachers' Diploma is two
dollars, which must be paid in advance of recommendation.

Special Certificate in Business Administration. — The fee for
the Special Certificate in Business Administration is two dollars,
which must be paid in advance of recommendation.

Fees for Summer Session. — (a) In the Colleges in which the
session is eight weeks in length a uniform fee of thirty dollars for
the session is required of all students, (b) In the Medical School,
which is six weeks in length, the fee is thirty dollars for laboratory
and demonstration courses, and thirty-five dollars for clinical courses.
(c)In the Law School a uniform fee of thir'ty-seven and one-half
dollars is required.

Fees stated include laboratory fees, excepting that a cash deposit
is required to cover the cost of material used and unusual breakage
in the laboratories of Chemistry, Hygiene, and Bacteriology. All
students are entitled to the privileges of the University Health Service.

Other Expenses. — Expenses for board and room vary consider-
ably with the taste and means of the individual student, and may be
regarded as approximating such expenses in cities of similar situation.
The annual expenses of students, including clothing and incidentals,
are on the average, somewhat over six hundred dollars. The Univer-
sity does not undertake to furnish manual labor to students; yet a
number find opportunities in the city for remunerative labor. For
further statement concerning student employment see page 115.

There are no dormitories for men, and no commons connected
with the University. The Michigan Union maintains bureaus of in-
formation regarding rooms and board, and provides other special
facilities for new men students. Four residence halls for women
accommodate about three hundred women. There are also a consider-
able number of approved houses for women conducted as cottage
dormitories. Women students should, in advance of their arrival,
communicate with the Dean of Women regarding lodgings. (See
page 97.)



Digiti



ized by Google



G>llege of Literature, Science,
and the Arts



The College of Literature, Science, and the Arts owes its name
to a provision in the legislative act under which the University was
organized in the year 1837, the nomenclature Department being
changed to College by the Board of Regents in January, 19 15. Its
aim is to cover the broad field of general university study of the
ancient and modern languages and literatures, or history, philosophy,
mathematics, science, and the liberal arts, as distinguished from the
more special work of the professional schools in engineering, medi-
cine, law, pharmacy, and dentistry; and it offers a large number of
courses of instruction, from which the student is allowed to choose
such as he is qualified to pursue.

The Graduate School formerly maintained in connection with
this College has been reorganized to include graduate work through-
out the University, and is under the direction of a Dean and an
Executive Board.

The academic year extends from Tuesday, September 27, 1921,
to Monday, June 19, 1922.



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSIONf

ADMISSION OF CANDIDATES FOR A DEGREE

[For admission to advanced standing, see page 136.]

[For admission of students not candidates for a degree, see

page 137.]

Admission to this College is gained only by examination or by

certificate. Applicants for admission must be at least sixteen years

t It is rarely necessary to come to Ann Arbor for a personal inter-
view. Arrangements for admission can be made by mail, provided the
communications are complete and definite and the credentials are oilicial.
Applicants for admission on advanced standing from other colleges or
normal schools should address the Dean. Those seeking admission as
freshmen should address the Registrar.



Digiti



ized by Google



Requirements for Admission 121

of age, and must have completed the reqairements for admission as



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 10 of 75)