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the course should deal with living animals and should emphasize the
functions, activities, and relations to environment of the types selected
rather than their morphology. But the study of types should serve
merely to introduce the student to the local groups to which they
belong. The outlines of the classification of these groups, recogni-
tion in the field of their common local representatives, their habits,
life histories, and ecology should form the larger part of the course.
Emphasis should be placed on facts and principles that have a pecu-
liar local interest and on the economic phases of the subject In the
small towns field work and topics related to agriculture may be em-
phasized. In the cities the work may have to be conducted largely
on types and in the laboratory, but the types of economic importance
should then be selected and the zoological aspects of civic biology
given special attention.

The following text-books are suggested : Needhan[i*s Elementary
Lessons in Zoology; Davenport's Elements in Zoology; Jordan and
Kellogg*s Animal Life; Linville and Kelly's Text-books in General
Zoology; Hegner's Practical Zoology; Hunter's Civic Biology; Pea-
body and Hunter's Elementary Biology; Kellogg's Animals and Man,

Geography and Physiography. — ^The applicant who offers one-
half unit in Physiography should have studied in class a standard
text-book, such as Dryer's Lessons in Physical Geography; Gilbert
and Brigham's Introduction to Physical Geography; Davis's Ele-
mentary Physical Geography; Tarr's New Physical Geography, or an
equivalent. The class work should be supplemented by field excur-
sions. Meteorology is not required for the half unit credit.

One unit credit may be given in Physiography for study con-
tinued through at least one year under a competent instructor, and
with the aid of adequate field excursions and laboratory practice.
Meteorology will be included in such a course of study.

One-half or one unit of credit in Geography will be given for
competent high school instruction in the general principles of geog-
raphy as concerned with the relation of life to its environment, espe-
cially climate, surface, drainage, and soil. The following -texts are
suggested: Salisbury, Barrows, and Tower's Modern Geography;
Dryer's High School Geography. One-half unit of credit will be
given for a course in Economic Geography, based upon a modern
text, such as Smith's Commerce and Industry; Brigham's Commer-
cial Geography. In general credit will not be given for high school
courses in political regional geography.

Introductory Science. — One-half or one unit. Instruction in



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Requirements for Admission 131

Introductory Science should precede all other courses in science and
should preferably be given in the ninth grade.

■ The aim of this course should be to enable the student to in-
terpret his environment and his relations to it. Teachers of Intro-
ductory Science are expected to give instruction also in one of the
other sciences and to have had adequate preparation in one physical
and one biological science. The ground to be covered by the course
should be largely determined by local conditions. The following
text books are suggested: Barber and others, First Course in Gen-
eral Science; Caldwell and Eikenberry, General Science; Snyder,
First Year Science; Weckel and Thalman, A Year in Science,

Physiology. — One-half unit. The anatomy and physiology of
the human body, and the essentials of hygiene. Recitations and
laboratory work, with the aid of charts and models, as treated in
the standard texts. The course should be preceded by at least a
half year of zoology or a course in general biology.

Other Subjects. — In addition to the subjects described above,
other subjects recognized by the high school as counting toward
graduation will be accepted to a maximum of three units. Among
these subjects are the following:

Agriculture, Manual and Industrial Training,

Commercial Branches, Music,

Domestic Art and Science, Normal Training Courses,

Drawing, Public Speaking.

ADMISSION ON EXAMINATION

Applicants for admission who are not entitled to enter on di-
ploma (see page 121) must take the entrance examinations in the
entire fifteen units. They should register with the officer in charge
of the examinations.

The applicant may divide the examination, taking one part either
a year or a semester before the date of his admission, and the second
part at the time of admission. But if he fail to secure the requisite
number of units within the specified time he forfeits all credits for
the subjects he may have passed.

The examination in the several subjects will be in writing and
will be held in Tappan Hall in accordance with the schedules given
below. Applicants presenting themselves too late for the scheduled
examinations are required to pay an examination fee of five dollars.

The College conducts the examinations for admission to all col-
leges of the University. Examinations in those subjects accepted by
other colleges, but not by this, will be provided for on application
to the Registrar.



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13^ College of Literature, Science, mvd the Arts

SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS FOR ADMISSION,
SEPTEMBER, 1921





Monday
Sept. 19


Tuesday
Sept. 20


Wednesday
Sept. 21


Thursday
Sept. 22


Friday
Sept. 23


811




Geometry


Algebra


History


English
Composition


1-3:30


English
Wterature


Physics


German
Greek


French
Spanish


Botany


3 :30-6


Zoology


Physiog.

raphy
Geology


Latin
Physiology


Trigono-
metry
Introductory
Science


Chemistry
Astronomy



SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS FOR ADMISSION,
FEBRUARY AND JULY, 1922





Thursday, Feb. 9
Thursday, June 29


Friday, Feb. 10
Friday, June 30


Saturday, Feb. 11
Saturday, July i


810


English Composition


Algebra
Trigonometry


Geometry


I0-X3


Botany
Zoology


Physiography
Geology


Chemistry


2'A


Htttory


Physics

Introductory

Science


Latin
Greek


4-6


Physiology


French
German
Spanish


English Literature
Zoology



All e.xaminations are held in Room 203, Tappan Hall.

In 1922-1923 these examinations will be held September 18 to 22,
1922, February 8 to 10, 1923, and Jane 28 to 30, 1923, respectively.



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Requirements for Admission 133



ACCREDITED SCHOOLS

The privilege of sending pupils for admission on diploma is
limited to schools that have been approved by the Faculty. On
request of the proper authorities, the Faculty sends an officer of the
University to visit a school and report upon its condition. If satisfied
from the report of this officer that the school is taught by competent
instructors, and is furnishing a good preparation to meet the require-
ments for admission, described on pages 120 to 13 1» the Faculty places
the school on the approved list for a period not exceeding three years
(inclusive of the year of visitation) ; reserving, however, the right to
require another inspection if, within the period specified in each case,
important changes affecting the course of study in the school, or the
efficiency of the instruction, seem to make an examination necessary.
Requests for inspection should be addressed to the High School In-
spector, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

It is not the practice of the University to inspect secondary
schools outside the state of Michigan. However, it is the policy of
the University to give a school outside of Michigan the same status
as that enjoyed with its own state university. Questions concerning
the diploma privileges of schools outside of Michigan should be
addressed to the Registrar of the University.

The list of schools in Michigan accredited to the University for
the year 1920-1921 is given below:

Addison •Benton Harbor

•Adrian Benzonia

•Albion Bergland

Alsonac Berrien Springs

•Allegan " " Emmanuel College

•Alma •Bessemer

Almont 'Big Rapids

•Alpena . . Ferris Institute

Amasa •Birmingham

•Ann Arbor BHssfield

" St. Thomas* School Bloomin^dale

Arcadia •Boyne City

Armada Breckenridge

Athens Brighton

Bad Axe Britton

Bangor Bronson

Baraga Brown City

Barrytown Buchanan

•Battle Creek Burr Oak

Bay City, East Side •Cadillac

West Side •Calumet

•• St. Mary's School Capac

'* Holy Rosary Academy Caro

" St. James Academy Carson City

B^ar Lake Cass City

•Belding Cassopolis

Bellaire Cedar Springs

Bellevue Centerville

• Schools marked bv the asterisk arc also accredited by the North
Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.



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134 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts



Central I^ake

Champion
•Charlevoix
•Charlotte

Chassel
•Cheboygan

Chelsea

Chesaning

Clare

Clinton

Clio
•Cold water

Coloma

Colon

Constantine

Coopcrsville

Corunna
•Croswell
•Crystal Falls

Davison

Dearborn

Decatur

DeckerviUe

Deerfield

Detroit, Annunciation

• " Cass

Cathedral H. S.

• " Central

" Central, Evening

• •* Eastern

** Holy Redeemer

Holy Rosary
" Hudson School

• " Liggett School

• " Nordstrom

• ** Northern

• " Northeastern

• " Northwestern

St. Leo.
*' St. Vincent

• " Southeat^tem

• " Univ. of Detroit Prep.

• " University School

• " Western
Dexter

•Dollar Bay
•Dowagiac

Drydcn

Dundee

Durand
•East Jordan

East Lansing

East Tawas

Eaton Rapids

Eau Claire

Elk Rapids

Elsie
•Escanaba

Evart

Ewen

Fennville

Fenton
•Flint

Flushing



Fowlerville
Frankfort
•Fremont
Oagetown
Galesburg
Galien
Gay lord
•Gladstone

Gladwin
•Grand Haven

Akeley Hall
Goblcville
•Grand Ledge
Grand Marais

Grand Rapids, Catholic H. School
for Boys
" Catholic H. School
for Girls

• " " Central

• " " John Calvin Col.

Prep.
** *• Mt. Mercy Academy

" Sacred Heart
Academy

• " " South

• " " Union
Grandville

Grant

Grass Lake

Grayling

Greenland
•Greenville

Grosse Isle

Gwinn

Hamtramck
•Hancock

•* Suomi College

Harbor Beacti
•Harbor Springs
•Hart

Hartford
•Hastings
•Highland Park
•Hillsdale
•Holland

" Hope College Prep.

Holly

Homer

Hopkins
•Houghton

Howard City
•Howell
•Hudson

Imlay City
•Ionia

•Iron Mountain
•Iron River
•Iron wood

St. Ambrose
•Ishpeming
•Ithaca
•Jackson

" St. John's School
" St. Mary's School



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Requirements for Admission



135



Jonesvillc
'Kalamazoo

• '• Normal H. S.

" Nazareth Academy

Kalkaska

Kent City

Laingsburg

Lake City
*Lake Linden

Lake Odessa

Lakcview

L'Anse
•Lansing

" St. Mary's
•Lapeer

Lawrence

Lawton

Leslie

Linden

Litchfield
•Lowell
•Ludington

" St. Simon's School

Mancelona

Manchester
•Manistea
•Manistique

Manton

Marcellus
•Marine City

Marion

Marlette ^
•Marquette

• " Normal High School
•Marshall

•Maion

Mayville

Mendon
•Menominee

Mesick

Middleville
•Midland

Milan

Milford

Millington
•Monroe

• ** St. Mary's Academy
Morenci

Montague
Montgomery
•Mt. Clemens

" St. Peter's
•Mt. Pleasant

•* " Normal Preparatory

" " Sacred Heart Acad.

•Muskegon

** ^ St. Mary's
•Munising
Nashville
National Mine
•Negaunee
Newaygo
New Baltimore

• Newberry



•Niles

North Adams

North Branch

Northville
•Norway

Olivet

Onaway

Ousted
•Ontonagon

Orchard Lake, St. Mary's

Orion

Ortonvillc
•Otsego

Ovid
•Owosso •

Oxford
•Painesdale
•Paw Paw

Pellston

Pentwater

Petersburg
•Petoskey

Pigeon

Pincknev

Plain well
•Plymouth
•Pontiac
•Port Huron
•Portland

Quincy

Kapid River

Rcttding

Reed City

Republic

Richmond
•River Rouge

" ^* Our Lady of

„ , Lourdes

Rochester

Rockford

Rockland

Rogers City

Romeo
•Royal Oak
•Saginaw, Arthur Hill
• •* East Side

" St. Mary's School

" SS. Peter & Paul's Sch.

St. Charles

St. Clair

St. Ignace

•St. Johns

•St. Joseph

•St. Louis

Saline

Sandusky

Saugatuck
•Sault Ste. Marie

Saranac

Schoolcraft

Scottville

Sebewaing

Shelby



Loretto Academy



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136 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Shephard Union City

•South HavcB Utica

South Lyon Vassar

Sparta Vcrmontvillc

Spring Arbor Academy •Vicksburg

•Stambaugh Vulcan

Standish •Wakefield

Stanton Watervliet

Stevenson Twp. Wayland

Stockbridgc. 'Wayne

•Sturgis West Branch

•Tecumseh White Pigeon

Tekonsha Whitehall

Three Oaks Williamston

•Three Rivers •Wyandotte

•Traverse Citv Yale

" ' St. Francis' School "Ypsilanti

Trenton ** Normal College H. S.

Trout Creek •Ze.iand

CONDITIONAL ADMISSION

No applicant will be admitted who presents less than fifteen units.

An applicant for admission either on examination or diploma,
who presents fifteen anits from the lists on pages 122 and I3I» but who
is deficient in not more than two units there specified as mandatory,
may be admitted conditionally; but any condition thus incurred must
be removed during the first year of residence. No student who has
an admission condition outstanding at the beginning of his second
year of residence will be allowed to enter his classes until such con-
dition is removed.

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING

1. A student who brings a certificate of standing from an ap-
proved college or university, showing that he has satisfactorily com-
pleted at least one year of the curriculum of the institution from
which he comes, may be admitted without examination to equal stand-
ing in this College. A graduate of one 0/ the stronger courses of an
approved normal school, who brings an official certificate explicitly
describing the extent and character of his work, may be given, with-
out examination, such advanced standing as is justified by the course
he has completed.

Advanced credit for work taken by correspondence is granted
only upon examination.

The certificates above referred to must be presented to the Dean
of the Collejje as early as the fifteenth of October (or, if the student
enter at the beginning of the ^econd semester, as early as the first
of March).

2. No advanced credit is granted for subjects studied in the
high school, unless the student has taken a post graduate high school
course of at least one ^emeste^. Such .students may apply for



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Requirements for Admission 137



advanced standing bv presenting to the Registrar on October 21, (or,
if they enter at the beginning of the second semester, on March i) a
statement showing the amount of work done m the subjects in which
credit is asked. The Registrar will thereupon furnish a blank form
for presentation to the professors in charge of the several subjects
designated in the blank, who will determine the amount of credit to
which the applicant is entitled in accordance with one of the follow-
ing conditions :

Either the applicant must pass a satisfactory examination in the
work presented; or the applicant must, during the first year of resi-
dence in the University, creditably complete in the department of
study concerned a course presupposing a s;ttisfactoiy knowledge of
the work for which credit is asked.

All advanced credits shall be subject to revision at the end of
the first year of residence.

Credits must be secured end returned to the Registrar as early
as the first of November (or, if the student enter at the beginning
of the second semester, as early as the fifteenth of March). An
account once closed cannot be reopened without special permission of
the Dean or Registrar.

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS NOT CANDIDATES FOR
A DEGREE

Persons who wish to pursue studies in the College without be-
coming candidates for a degree may be admitted under the following
conditions :

A. Persons over twenty-one and under twenty-five years of age,
not provided for in Section B, may be admitted if they present satis-
factory credentials, showing their preparation for academic work,,
and pass entrance examinations in nine units chosen from those
accepted for entrance (see page 121). Certificates will not be accepted
in place of these examinations. The nine units must include three
units in English and one unit in Algebra. Before the beginning of
the third year of residence, such students must make up the remaining
units required for admission to regular standing.

B. Persons over twenty-one years of age who have taught two
years in schools of grammar or high school grade, and all persons
over twenty-five years of age may be admitted, provided they pass an
examination in English, and show that they are qualified to pursue
profitably the studies that they may desire to take up. In this ex-
amination in English, applicants will be asked to write brief essays
on subjects that will be assigned, and to answer questions on the
rudiments of English Grammar. The examination will be held in
Room 203, Tappan Hall, at 8 a. m. Friday, September 23, 192 1.

Should a student thus admitted subsequently become a candidate
for graduation, he must pass all the examinations for admission rc-



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138 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

quired of such a candidate, at least one year before the time when he
proposes to graduate.

Such students who wish credit for studies pursued before admis-
sion are referred to the rules relating to advanced standing given
above.

C. Persons whose preparatory courses have been interrupted by
reason of military service or other approved war work, may, during
1919-1920 and 1920-192 1, be admitted on trial upon the presentation
of eleven units (at least nine of which shall be from Group I), gained
either upon examination or upon official certification and recommenda-
tion of the principal of an accredited high school. Such students
must completely satisfy the requirements for admission as regular
students within two years after matriculation.



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

Bachelor of Arts

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon students who
have earned one hundred twenty hours of credit (together with one
hundred twenty points*) in accordance with the following require-
ments:

1. The credit must include Courses i and 2 in Rhetoric, which
must be taken in the first year of residence.

2. In addition to the required courses in Rhetoric, the credit
must include at least twelve hours from each of the following three
groups, to be taken by the end of the third year of residence. (In
the case of students who enter with advanced credit, or in other ex-
ceptional cases, the requirement that the group electives must be taken
before the end of the third year may be waived upon application to
the Advisory Committee, through the Dean).

Group I: Ancient Languages and Literatures, Modern Lan-
guages and Literatures, Rhetoric (other than Courses i and 2).

Group II : Mathematics, Astronomy, Physics, Chemistry, Min-
eralogy, Geology, Zoology, Botany, Psychology.

Group III: History, Political Economy and Sociology, Political
Science, Philosophy, Education.

3. To complete the one hundred twenty hours required for grad-
uation, the student may select from the work offered in the announce-



page



• For the definitions and significance of grades and points see rule 4«
i 144.

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Requirements for Graduation 139

ment of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, such courses
as he is qualified to pursue subject only to the rules which follow:

a. Not more than eighty hours of elective studies may be taken
in any one of the three groups specified above.

b. Not more than forty hours may be elected in any one de-
partment of study (as for example, Greek, Philosophy, Mathematics,
History, etc.)* In the department of Economics, however, a maxi-
mum of sixty hours may be elected; provided that not more than
forty hours may be taken in any one of the subdivisions, Political
Economy, Sociology, and Business Administration. In the depart-
ment of Romance Languages also a maximum of sixty hours may be
elected; provided that not more than forty hours may be taken in
any one of the languages falling within that department.

c. At least two-thirds of the work taken in residence beyond
the Sophomore year, must be in courses not open to first year students.

d. Every student, in December of his senior year, will receive
from the Registrar an official statement of verification of his record.

Bachelor of Science

A student who has otherwise completed the requirements for the
degree of Bachelor of Arts and has earned at least sixty of these one
hundred twenty hours in mathematics and the physical and biological
sciences may, at his option, receive the degree of Bachelor of Science,
instead of Bachelor of Arts.

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry is conferred
upon students who have earned one hundred twenty hours of credit
(together with one hundred twenty points) including the prescribed
program of studies to be found on page 167.

Bachelor of Science in Forestry

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry is conferred upon
students who have earned one hundred twenty hours of credit (to-
gether with one hundred twenty points) including the prescribed pro-
gram of «(udies given on page 172.

Bachelor of Science in Medicine

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Medicine is conferred upon
those students who have completed the requirements for the degree
of Bachelor of Arts and the first and second year of Medicine upon
the Combined Curriculum. See page 146.



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I40 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Residence

No candidate will be recommended for the bachelor's degree who
has been in residence at this University, registered solely in the Col-
lege of Literature. Science, and the Arts, less than one academic year
and who has earned while in residence here less than thirty hours
of credit selected from courses offered in this College. The senior
year, or its equivalent, must be spent in residence in this College.

For a matriculated student regularly enrolled in this College a
Summer Session will be considered as equivalent to one-half a semes-
ter's residence.

Degrees with Distinction

Special distinction, to be recorded on the diploma, may be earned
under the following conditions:

a. Students who have at graduation a total number of points
greater by 165 than the number of hours earned in residence shall
be graduated "with high distinction." In other words, in order to
gain high distinction the student must earn at least 45 hours of A
grade, while the remainder of his work done in residence must aver-
age B grade.

b. Students who have at graduation a total number of points
greater by 135 than the number of hours earned in residence shall
be graduated "with distinction." In other words, in order to gain
distinction, the student must earn at least 15 hours of A grade, while
the remainder of his work done in residence must average B grade.

c. Students who have at graduation a total number of points
greater by 120 than the number of hours earned in residence, and
who, because of consistently good work in a subject, receive the
recommendation of the department, may, by vote of the Faculty, be
graduated with special mention in that subject.

Attendance at Commencement

Only those who are present in person or who are especially
excused by the Dean may receive their diplomas on Commencement
Day. Others who have satisfied all the requirement? for graduation,
including the payment of the graduation fee, will receive their degrees
at a subsequent meeting of the Board of Regents.

Graduation Fee

The graduation fee of ten dollars must be paid to the Treasurer
of the University at, least twenty-five days prior to the date of gradua-
tion. The same rule applies to the fee for the Teacher's Diploma ;
candidates for the Teacher's Diploma must have been enrolled with
the Head of the Department of Education for a like period.

The same rule applies also to the fee for the Special Certificate
in Business Administration.



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Requirements for Graduation 141



REGISTRATION

A. All undergraduate students in the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts are required, at the beginning of each year of
residence, to enroll with the Registrar, to pay their fees to the Treas-



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