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Combined Curricula 151

maintain a uniform record of goodf scholarship. The work is under
the direction of a Committee of five members representing the two
Colleges. With the consent of the Committee in charge, a candidate
for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, who has been a student in the
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, for at least one year,
and has 90 hours or more' hours of credit, of which at least 30 hours
have been earned in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
of this University, may enroll upon the combined course; that is,
while continuing his registration in this college he may also register
in the College of £)ental Surgery, provided the work he has dready
completed includes a sufficient number of the courses enumerated
below to enable him to complete within one year the specific require-
ments described in the following paragraphs.

Students who desire to enter upon the Combined Curriculum in
Letters and Dental Surgery must, before May 15 of the year preced-
ing double registration, file with the Registrar, on a blank to be
obtained from him, a petition to be granted the privilege.

When the student so registered in the two colleges has com-
pleted the first year of the dental curriculum, and not less than 90
hours in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, he will be
recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, provided be has
completed the requirements for graduation from the latter college
(see page 138), and provided his work has included the following
courses, and satisfied the group requirements:

Rhetoric, 6 hours, including Courses i and 2.

French and German, 16 hours of either one, and 8 hours of the
other. (Each unit of Fre;ieh or German offered in the pre-
paratory work reduces by 4 hours the requirement in that
Language.)

English, 6 hours.

History, 8 hours.

Electivcs from Group III, 4 hours.

Physics, 8 hours, including laboratory work.

Chemistry, general, qualitative, and organic, 12 hours for stu-
dents presenting Chemistry for entrance, otherwise 16 hours.

Zoology, 10 hours.

Botany, 4 hours.

Total, 90 hours.

Suggested electives: Latin or Greek, 8 hours; Philosophy, 3
hours; Phy sical Chemistry, 3 hours.

t The applicant will be expected to have earned at least one and one-
third times as many points as hours.



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152 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts



COMBINED CURRICULUM IN LETTERS AND NURSING

Students who so desire, may obtain the degree of Bachelor of
Science in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and the
Nurse's diploma, from the Training School for Nurses, by enrolling
on the Combined Curriculum in Letters and Nursing. This privilege
is open only to students, who throughout their course, maintain a
uniform record of good* scholarship. The work is under the direction
of a joint committee of five members, representing the college and
school. With the consent of the committee in charge a candidate for
the degree of Bachelor of Science, who has been a student in the
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts for at least one year,
and has 90 or more hours to her credit, of which at least 30 hours
have been earned in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
of this University, may enroll on the combined curriculum; that is,
while continuing her registration in this college she may also register
in the Training School for Nurses, provided the work she has already
completed includes a sufficient number of the courses enumerated be-
low to enable her to complete within one year the specific require-
ment described in the following paragraphs.

All students who desire to enter upon the Combined Curriculum
must, before May 15 of the year preceding double registration, file
with the Registrar, on a blank to be obtained from him, a petition
to be granted that privilege.

When the student so registered in the college and school has
completed the two years of the prescribed curriculum in Nursing and
not less than ninety hours in th^ College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts, she will be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts,
provided she has completed the requirements for graduation from the
latter College (see page 138), and provided her work has included the
following courses, and satisfied the group requirements :





FIRST


YEAR




FIRST SEMESTER




SECOND SEMESTER




Rhetoric I
Chemistry I

Recommended Electives
History I
Botany I
Foreign Language


HOURS

3
4

4
4
4


Rhetoric
Chemistry 2
Zoology I

History 3
Foreign language


HOURS

3

4
4

4
4


Total


15


Total


15



• The applicant will be expected to have earned at least one and one-
third times as many points as hours.



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Combined Curricula



153





SECOND


YEAR


Rhetoric


3


Rhetoric 4


Chemistry 3a
Zoology 9


4
5


Chemistry 10
Zoology II


Recommended Electives :






Physics I
Foreign Language


4
4


Physics 2
Foreign Language


Total


16


Total




THIRD


YEAR


English I
Sociology 19
Psychology 8a
Philosophy I


3

4
3
3


English 2
Sociology 29
Bacteriology 2


Recommended Electives:
Public Speaking i


3


Psychology 8*
Psychology 28
Hygiene i


Total


16


Total




FOURTH


YEAR



2

4
16



3

2

3
16



Elementary Nursing; Elementary Materia Medica; History of Nurs-
ing and Nursing Ethics; Application of Nursing Principles by
Demonstration and Practice; Nutrition and Foods; Hygiene.

FIFTH YEAR

Pediatric Nursing; Nursing in Contagious Diseases; Symptomology ;
Materia Medica; Orthopedic Nursing; Urinalysis; Nursing
Principles.

Throughout the fourth and fifth years practical work is given in the
University Hospital coordinately with the theoretical instruction,
so arranged as not to interfere with successful pursuit of the
studies which the College accepts in lieu of the usual work of
the senior college year.



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154 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts



SUGGESTED PROGRAMS IN THE CLASSICAL LANGUAGES
AND IN LATIN OR GREEK AND MODERN LANGUAGE

The division of subjects among the years of the college coarse
indicated below is desirable, but not mandatory. The number of
hours mentioned is the number to be elected each semester.

Candidates for the Teacher's Diploma should elect Coarse 7 in
Philosophy, (General Psychology) in the second year, four hoars of
Education in the third year, and seven in the fourth year. Other-
wise the work of the fourth year is wholly elective. The groap re-
quirements for graduation should be completed by the end of the
third year.

CLASSICAL PROGRAM



FIRST YEAR

HOURS
Greek 4

Latin 4

Mathematics, or a Laboratory

Science 4

Rhetoric 3



SECOND YEAR

irouRs

Greek 3 or 4

Latin 3 or 4

History (preferably Greek

and Roman), or other

third group subjects 3 or 4



THIRD YEAR



Greek
Latin
Third Language



HOURS

3 or 3

3 or 4

4



♦LATIN— MODERN LANGUAGE PROGRAM



FIRST YEAR

HOURS

Latin 4

Modern Language 4

Mathematics, or a Laboratory

Science 4

Rhetoric 3



'HOURS
SECOND YEAR

Latin 3 or 4

Modern Language 3 or 4

History (preferably Greek
and Roman), or other
third group subjects 3 or 4



THIRD YEAR



HOURS

Latin 2 or 4

Modern Language 3 or 4

Third Language 4



• The Latin-Modern Language Program may be converted into a
Greek-Modern Language Program by the substitution of Creek for Latm
wherever it occurs in the above program.



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Program in Foreign Languages iS5

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS SPECIALLY

INTERESTED IN THE STUDY OF FOREIGN

LANGUAGES

Freshman Year

Two foreign languages, 8 hours (Greek, Latin, French, Spanish,
or German), a

Mathematics, or a Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or
Physiography), 4 hours.

Rhetoric, 3 hours.

All Freshman subjects continue throughout the year.

Sophomore Year

Two foreign languages continued, 8 hours, each semester.

Third foreign language begun, 4 hours, each semester, b

Philosophy 7 (Psychology), 3 hours, and Zoology 3, i hour, first
semester, and Philosophy i, 3 hours, second semester, c; or

Mathematics, or English, or Science, or History (General, or
English, or Ancient), 4 hours, throughout the year.

Junior Year

Languages of main interest, 5 or 6 hours, each semester.

Third group requirement, 4 or 5 hours, each semester, chosen
from Education A, I, 2, and 5, Political Science, i and 2, Philosophy,
History, or Sociology, d

Other electives, 2 hours each semester.

Senior Year

Major language work should not exceed 6 hours each semester.
Minor language work should not exceed 4 hours each semester.
Other electives, 6 or more hours, each semester.

Notes

a. Continuation of one or both of the languages studied in the
high school is recommended ; two new languages should not be begun
in the same year.

b. Students specially interested in the study of Latin are recom-
mended to begin Greek at this time, if it has not been taken pre-
viously; those presenting four units of Latin and two of Greek for
admission are advised to continue both Latin and Greek in the first
year, begin German or French in the first semester of the second
year, and begin French or German in the first semester of the third
year.

c. The student should complete the second group requirement
during Ihe year; by electing Psychology candidates for the Teacher's
Diploma will at the same time be meeting one of the requirements
for that diploma.



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io6 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

d. Candidates for the Teacher's Diploma should elect 4 or 6
hours in the department of Education during the year. The third
group requirements must be completed during the year.

e. Candidates for the Teacher's Diploma will elect enough hours
in the department of Education to complete the requirements of eleven
hours.

CURRICULUM IN JOURNALISM

Requirements for Admissioii

Admission to the curricula in Journalism is restricted to persons
who are candidates for a degree in the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts. Candidates may enroll with the Chairman of the Com-
mittee at any time not later than the beginning of the senior year,
though an earlier enrollment is desirable.

Program of Study

In the selection of studies and the apportionment of hours, as
indicated below, two classes of students have been taken into account :
(A) those who wish to pursue a general course, (B) those who wish
to fit themselves for a particular kind of writing or a special depart-
ment of a newspaper. The elections may be modified to meet the
needs of individuals.

The specific courses in journalism are given in the department of
Rhetoric, where a description of them will be found.



GENERAL CURRICULUM



Newspaper Work

Other Courses in Rhetoric

English

Foreign Language

History

Political Science



HOURS
18
12
10
16
16



Economics xo
Sociology 4
Philosophy 3
Law 3
Science (including Psychol-
ogy) 12
Electives 10



B



SPECIAL CURRICULA
I.
For students who wish to specialize in History, Government, and
Politics.



HOURS




hoi;rs


Newspaper Work 14


Political Science


16


Other Courses in Rhetoric 12


Economics


10


English 10


Sociology


4


Foreign Language 16


Law


6


History 20


Science


12



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Curricttla in Business Administration 157



2.

For students who wish to specialize in Economics and Sociology.


HOURS

Newspaper Work 14
Other Courses in Rhetoric 12
English 10
Foreign Language 16
History 14


HOURS

Economics 24
Sociology 12
Law 6
Science 12





HOURS


Political Science


6


Economics


20


Sociology


4


Law


6


Science


12



3.

For students who wish to specialize in reviewing, and in dra-
matic art, and musical criticism.

HOURS HOURS

Newspaper Work 18 History 14

Other Courses in Rhetoric 15 Philosophy 7

English 20 Music (or other arts) 12

Foreign Language 24 Science 12

4.
For students who wish to specialize in technical journalism.

HOURS

Newspaper Work 18

Other Courses in Rhetoric 15

English 10

Foreign Language 16

History 14

Special Lectures

Lectures upon newsgathering, newswriting, copy reading, edi-
torial writing, newspaper management, and other important features
of newspaper method and procedure, will be given in the course of
the year by prominent newspaper men.

For printed information concerning the requirements for admis-
sion to the University, dates of entrance examinations, conditions of
admission to advanced standing, or requirements for graduation, ad-
tlress the Secretary of the University, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Cor-
respondence on these subjects should be addressed to Dean J. R.
Eflinger, or to the Registrar. Correspondence on the courses in jour-
nalism should be addressed to Professor F. N. Scott, Ann Arbor,
Michigan.

CURRICULUM IN TRAINING FOR SECRETARUL WORK

All the various collegiate courses constituting a program of
studies in training for secretarial work are offered. Students desiring
to pursue such a program will be assisted in selecting and arranging
these courses.



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158 College of LitercUurc, Science, and the Arts



CURRICULUM IN MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATION

The curriculum in municipal administration is organized as a
special program of study leading to the degree of Master of Arts,
or Master of Science, in Municipal Administration. The last year
of work must be pursued in the Graduate School, but many of the
prescribed courses should be thken as undergraduate work.

The program of courses is designed to meet the needs of all
those who aim to take an active part in the guidance of municipal
affairs. It should be of greatest utility in training for municipal
office, whether of bureau, division, or department head, of mayor,
or director under the commission form of city government, or of
city manager ; and for such public or semi-public positions as director
of bureaus of municipal reference and research or as civic and com-
mercial secretary.

It is desirable that students intending to pursue this program
should communicate as early as practicable in their academic period
with the chairman of the Committee on the Program of Courses in
Municipal Administration. An announcement of this program is
issued in the form of a special bulletin by the University and may
be obtained by addressing the Secretary of the University. General
correspondence concerning the course may be directed to the Chair-
man of the Committee, Professor Robert T. Crane, Bureau of Gov-
ernment, University of Michigan. Inquiries regarding entrance re-
quirements or credit for advanced work should be addressed to Dean
J. R. Effinger, or to the Registrar.

The privilege of making certain elections in the College of Engi-
neering, the Medical, or the Law School, is granted to students en-
rolled in this curriculum. ^

In addition to the requirement of elementary courses in Political
Science and Political Economy, each equivalent to six semester hours
work, twelve semester hours of science, and twelve semester hours of
foreign language, the courses listed below are either required or
elective for students looking forward to a degree in municipal ad-
ministration :

Municipal Government, 6 hours; Municipal Administration, 4
hours; Administration of Municipal Finance, 2 hours; Local Gov-
ernment, 2 hours; Public Finance, 3 hours; Principles of Account-
ing, 3 hours; Municipal Accounting, 2 hours; Mathematical Theory
of Finance, 3 hours ; City Planning and Civic Improvement, 3 hours ;
Water Works, 3 hours ; Sewerage, 2 hours ; Sanitary Science, i hour ;
Municipal Engineering, 2 hours; Roads and Pavements, 2 hours;
Specifications and Contracts, i hour; Highway Laboratory, 2 hours;
Municipal Lighting, 2 hours; General Hygiene, 3 hours; Adminis-
tration of Health Laws, 2 hours; Problems in Sociology, 3 hours;
Community Problems, 2 hours; Municipal Corporations, 2 hours;
Public Officers, 2 hours.



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Curricula in Business Administration 159



CURIUCULA IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The Curricula in Business Administration are suggested four-year
programs of study arranged for students who are regularly enrolled
in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and who are can-
didates for a degree. They are intended to meet the needs of those
persons who desire to fit themselves, by a combination of liberal
culture and professional studies, for positions as executives and ex-
perts in industrial establishments or the public service.

Such programs are now offered in General Business, Accounting,
Banking, Insurance, and Railway Administration. The programs
Qover four years of undergraduate study. Of the 120 semester hours
required for the bachelor degree, from 70 to 100 hours are pre-
scribed, of which between 2$ and 50 hours are of a professional or
technical character.

Persons desiring to pursue these programs must gain admission
to the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, as candidates for
a degree, or to the Graduate School. They are then expected to enroll
with the Secretary of the Committee on Business Administration at
the beginning of their first year of residence or as soon thereafter
as possible, but not later than the beginning of their last year of
residence.

It is not intended that the precise requirements set forth in these
programs shall be rigidly insisted upon. Under the advice of the
Secretary of the Committee, the student will be permitted to modify
his program or arrange one better adapted to his special needs. In
all cases, however, students must take courses i and 2 in Mathe-
matics, and a minimum of 30 hours in Political Economy and Busi-
ness Administration, exclusive of Courses i and 2. (For the purpose
of this requirement. Courses 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 67, and 68 in
Mathematics will be considered as Business Administration.) In addi-
tion to these requirements all students must observe the restrictions
governing their election established by the faculty of the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts. Students enrolled in these pro-
grams having 60 hours to their credit and a good record for scholar-
ship may, with the consent of the Committee, elect in the College of
Engineering the courses designated in these programs. For all such
courses elected outside the College of Literature, Science, and the
Arts an authorization blank, properly filled out, must be secured
from the Secretary of the Committee. The credit so obtained out-
side of the College will be counted toward the literary degree, only
on condition that the student finishes the four-year program in which
the outside course occurs.

Any student who, in covering the work required for the degree
of Bachelor of Arts, completes any one of the suggested programs
of study, or any similar program which may be approved by the
Committee on Business Administration, as outlined above, will be
entitled to receive, m addition to his diploma, a special certificate
conferred by the Board of Regents upon the recommendation of the
Faculty.



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i6o College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Students who have secured a bachelor's degree as a result of
studies along other lines will find in the more advanced courses here
offered an opportunity for a profitable specialization ; and the rules
governing graduate work will apply to graduate students who enroll
themselves as students in these courses. Those interested in this
grade of studies should consult the Annual Announcement of the
Graduate School.

Graduate students who complete satisfactorily an approved pro-
gram of study in Business Administration extending for at least one
year will be entitled to receive a special certificate, whether or not
they are candidates for graduate degrees.

A special announcement of the Curricula in Business Adminis-
tration may be obtained by addressing the Secretary of the Univer-
sity. Correspondence concerning the courses may be directed to Pro-
fessor I. Leo Sharfman, Ann Arbor. Inquiries concerning require-
ments for entering the University, or credit for advanced work, should
be addressed to Dean J. R. Effinger, or to the Registrar.

SUGGESTED PROGRAMS OF STUDY

In order to make clear the character of the work offered in
Business Administration, there are inserted at this point, in tabular
form, five suggested programs of study.

In the selection of electives the student should consult the in-
structor in charge of the particular program in which he is interested.

Not more than sixteen hours a week may be elected except by
special permission obtained from the Committee on Extra Hours in
accordance with the rules of the College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts.

General Btisiness

This program includes a balanced arrangement of studies se-
lected from each department of business administration: law, ac-
counting, finance, commerce, and the executive art. It is recom-
memled to students who desire to prepare themselves to become gen-
eral executives, that is to say, who desire to prepare themselves for
such positions as that of branch manager, office manager, general
superintendent, sales manager, employment manager, or superintend-
ent in charge of industrial relations. It is further recommended to
students who intend to specialize in graduate years, or who are not
yet decided in what direction their advanced work will be carried.

FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER

Courses Hours Courses Hours

Rhetoric i 3 Rhetoric 2 3

Mathematics i 4 Mathematics 2 4

Electives 8 Electives 8

15 15



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Curricula in Business Administration



i6i



Economics i
Economics 38
Electives


SECOND

5

4
7

16


YEAR

Economics
Economics
Electives


2

39


3

4
9

16


Economics Q
Economics 15
Economics 31
Electives


THIRD

3
3
3

7

16


YEAR

Economics
Economics
Economics
Economics
Electives


6
10
32
33


3

2

3

2
6


Economics 3
Economics 31a
Economics S2a
Economics 46
Electives


FOURTH

3
2
2
3

6


YEAR

Economics
Economics
Economics
Electives


33a

34

47


2
2
3
9



16



16



Accounting

This program is intended (a) for those who wish to enter the
profession of public accounting, (b) for those who expect to occupy
positions as accountants in financial, manufacturing, mercantile, or
public utility industries, (c) for those who are preparing themselves
for positions as accountants or statisticians to municipalities and reg-
ulative bodies such as railroad or public service commissions, and
(d) for those who are intending to teach accounting.

Students who have completed the first two years of the program
in Accounting are prepared to take Course 48 in Insurance Account-
ing. This would fit them for responsible positions in various home
office departments of insurance companies and state departments of
insurance. It would not be necessary for them to take the advanced
courses in Mathematics required of those intending to enter the
actuarial profession.

FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER

Courses Hours Courses Hours

Rhetoric I 3 Rhetoric 2 3

Mathematics i 4 Mathematics 2 4

Electives 8 Electives 8



15



15



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i62 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts







SECOND


YEAR




Economics I
Economics 38
Mathematics 51
Electives


5
4
3

4


Economics 2
Economics 39
Mathematics 52
Electives


3

4
3
6






16




16






THIRD


YEAR




Economics
Economics
Economics
Economics
Electives


4
9

40


3
3
3
3

4

16

FOURTH


Pxonomics 6
Economics 10
Economics 43
Electives

YEAR


3

2

3
8

16


Economics 37
Economics 44
Economics 46
Electives


3

2

3
8


Economics 16
Economics 36a
Economics 42
Economics 43a
Economics 47
Electives


2

3

2
2
3
4



16



16



Banking

This program is designed for students who expect to enter bank-
ing or allied fields. Its aim is to enable the student to master the
principles underlying financial operations and, at the same time, to
provide him with a foundation of cultural studies.





FIRST


YEAR




FIRST SEMESTER

Courses
Rhetoric I
Mathematics I
Electives


Hours
3
4
8


SECOND SEMESTER

Courses
Rhetoric 2
Mathematics 2
Electives


Hou
3

4
8




15




15


Economics I
Electives


SECOND
II


YEAR



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