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Economics 2
Electives


3
13



16



16



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Curricula in Business Administration



163



Economics 9
Economics 15
Economics 38
Electives


THIRD

3
3
4
6


YEAR

Economics 6
Economics 10
Economics 39
Electives


3

2

4
7




x6




16


Economics 8
Economics 11
Economics 32
Economics 37
Economics 46
Electives


FOURTH

2
2

3
3
3
3


YEAR

Economics Sa
Economics 12
Economics 33
Economics 47
Electives


2
2
a
3
7



16

Railway Administration



16



This program is designed to meet the needs of four classes of
students: (a) those who wish to enter the administrative department
of railways, (b) those who desire to become attached to federal or
state railway commissions, (c) persons preparing for the statistical
or appraisal work of banking or brokerage houses and, (d) those
desiring to understand the transportation problem as a part of a gen-
eral education.

FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER

Courses Hours Courses Hours

Rhetoric i 3 Rhetoric 2 3

Mathematics i 4 Mathematics 2 4

Electives 8 Electives 8



Economics i
Mathematics 51
Electives



15

SECOND
5

3
8



YEAR

Economics 2
Economics 6
Electives



15

3

3

10



Economics 15
Economics 38
Civil Engineering 20
Electives



16

THIRD YEAR

3
4

2

7
16



Economics 32
Economics 39
Civil Engineering 21
Electives



16



3
4
2

7
16



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164 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts



FOURTH


YEAR




Economics 36 3
Economics 37 3
Economics 46 3
Mechanical Engineering 24 3
Civil Engineering 22 2
Drawing 12 2


Economics 16
Economics 36a
Economics 47
Civil Engineering 23
Electives


2
3
3
2
6


16




16


Insurance





The following program is designed for the student who intends
to enter the actuarial profession, either in life or casualty insurance,
or who expects to undertake statistical work of an advanced nature.
While the actuarial and mathematical phases of insurance are em-
phasized, it may be pointed out that the training thus secured fre-
quently leads to other lines of official work, such as secretarial, man-
agerial, and executive. The first two years of this program may be
taken with profit by any student in business administration who de-
sires to obtain a working knowledge of financial mathematics and its
applications to business.

Students who have completed the first two years of the program
in Accounting are prepared to take Course 48 in Insurance Account-
ing. This would fit them for responsible positions in various home
office departments of insurance companies and state departments of
insurance. It would not be necessary for them to take the advanced
courses in Mathematics required of those intending to enter the
actuarial profession.

Students taking the program in General Business or the pro-
gram in Banking may fit themselves for similar positions by adding
Mathematics 51 and 52 in the second year and Course 48 in Insurance
Accounting in the third or fourth year.

For further information, students are advised to consult the pro-
fessor in charge, 405 Mason Hall, and the special announcement of
courses in financial, statistical, and actuarial mathematics.



FIRST SEMESTER



Courses
Rhetoric I
Mathematics
Electives



FIRST YEAR

SECOND SEMESTER

Hours Courses Hours

3 Rhetoric 2 3

4 Mathematics 2 4
8 Electives 8



15



15



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Program in Mental Testing



165



Mathematics 51
Mathematics 3 or 3E
Economics i
Elect! ves



Mathematics 53
Mathematics 49
Mathematics 13
Economics 38
Electives



SECOND YEAR

3 Mathematics 52

or 5 Mathematics 4 or 4E

5 Economics 2

or 2 Electives

16

THIRD YEAR

3 Mathematics 54



2
3

4
4

16



Mathematics 50
Mathematics 14
Economics 39
Electives



5 or



3
5
3
4

16



3

a

3

4
4

16



FOURTH YEAR



Mathematics 55
Mathematics 59
Mathematics 67
Economics 46
Electives



16



Mathematics 56
Mathematics 60
Mathematics 68
Economics 47
Economics 48
Electives



4

2
2

3

2

3

16



SUGGESTED COURSE OF STUDIES FOR STUDENTS WHO

DESIRE TO PREPARE FOR MENTAL TESTING

IN SOCIAL CLINICS

In the sophomore year, Philosophy %e and 8// in the junior year,
Sociology 19 and 20, Philosophy 21, 2^c ; in the senior year and
graduate years, Sociology 28 and 30, Philosophy 24^, and at least
c'/.v/// hours of research in special problems. In this connection op-
portunity will be offered for the inspection of and work in the char-
itable institutions in Detroit It is recommended that students elect
Mathematics 49 and 50 with the necessary preliminary courses, Phil-
osophy 28 and 29, Sociology 23 and 23a. Students who have in mind
preparation for work as emplo3rment manager should in addition elect
courses in business administration and economics; those who pre-
pare for positions in connection with city school systems and for vo-
cational guidance should elect courses in education, particularly in
educational psychology and administration. A master's degree is ad-
visable for those who prepare for this work.



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1 66 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts



CURRICULUM IN PHYSICS

Recent industrial development has been characterized by the ap-
plication of Physics to many kinds of technical problems. Although
the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts offers no special
degree in Physics, the following outline is presented as rieeting the
needs of students who may wish to follow the profession of indus-
trial physicist. The program may be varied somewhat widely accord-
ing to the needs and tastes of the individual, and may readily be
adapted to the requirements of prospective teachers. Upon the suc-
cessful completion of the program as outlined the graduate will be
prepared to practice his profession upon the same footing as the grad-
uate chemist or engineer.

High school physics is a prerequisite for Physics I, which must
also be preceded or accompanied by a course in plane trigonometry.
Students entering college with credit in preparatory physics may
elect Physics i in the first year if they have credit in trigonometry,
or if they elect Mathematics I at the same time. This procedure is
strongly recommended. For those who enter college without pre-
paratory physics, however, there is provided a course. Physics Z,
which may be taken in the first year, and may be followed by Physics
I either the second semester of the first year, or the first semester of
the second year.

The program as outlined gives room for such elective studies as
will satisfy the group requirements, for excellent preparation in
mathematics, and for adequate attention to the cognate subjects,
chemistry, astronomy, geology, and mineralogy. It cannot be too
emphatically stated that mathematical equipment is necessary for
success in physics. It must, however, be borne in mind that the view-
points of these two sciences are somewhat apart, and that neither
familiarity with mathematics nor interest in popular science will guar-
antee success in a subject so broad and so fundamental as physics.

The programs suggested for the undergraduate years are as fol-
lows. Electives and alternatives must be so chosen as to satisfy the
group requirements for graduation (see page 138).

PROGRAM OF STUDIES

FIRST YEAR



FIRST SEMESTER




SECOND SEMESTER




Courses


Hours


Courses


Hours


Rhetoric I


3


Rhetoric 2


3


French or German


4


French or German


4


Mathematics I


4


Mathematics 2


4


Physics I


4


Physics 2


4



15 «5



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Curriculum in Chemistry 167

SECOND TEAR

Physics 5 4 Physics 6 4

Physics la I Physics 2a I

Mathematics s or sE 4 or 5 Mathematics 3 or 4£ 4 or 5

Astronomy I or 3 Astronomy a or 3

Chemistry 4 Chemistry 4 or 5

History i or la or 4 History 2 or 2a or 4

Economics i 5 Economics a 3


An elective from the language group, a continuation perhaps of
the language taken in the first year, may be substituted in this pro-
gram, either for the Astronomy or Chemistry, or for the History or
Economics. Physics la and 2a are suggested in case time is available.

THIRD YEAR

Courses Hours Courses Hours

Physics 7 4 Physics 8 4

Mathematics 4b 4 Chemistry 3 or 8 4 or 5

Mathematics 57 2 Mathematics 58 2

Philosophy I 3 Philosophy 9 3

German or French 4 German or French 4

Physics 9 and 10 may be taken instead of Mathematics 57 and 58.

FOURTH YEAR

Physics 9 2 Physics 10 2

Physics 23 or 25 4 or 2 Physics 12, 18, or 14 2

Mathematics 9 3 Mathematics 12 3

Mathematics 5 or 11 2 or 3 Physics 38 I

Physics 37 I Elect! ves 8

♦Electives 4 or 6

Physics 6, Economics I, or a language may be taken the second
semester.

Not more than sixteen hours a week may be elected except by
special permission obtained from the Committee on Extra Hours in
accordance with the rules of the College (see page 142).

CURRICULUM IN CHEMISTRY

The Curriculum in Chemistry has been devised for students reg-
istered in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts who desire
to prepare themselves for professional work in chemistry. The
Boai-d of Regents of the University, at their May meeting, 1914, au-
thorized the preparation of a program of studies leading to the de-
gree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. The requirements of the

* Students planning to spfccialize in Physics should confer with the
members of the departmental faculty.



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i68 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts in regard to admission,
election of studies, grades, discipline, and graduation apply to stu-
dents taking the curriculum in, chemistry, except for some modifica-
tions of the group requirements. Students who complete either of the
programs of study outlined below will satisfy the requirements for
graduation leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry.

The degree of Master of Science in Chemistry will be conferred
after a full year's graduate training in chemistry, following the
completion of all requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science
in Chemistry.

Students intending to take the curriculum in chemistry should
also enroll with the enrollment committee of the chemical faculty at
the beginning of their University residence. This committee consists
of Professors Smeaton, Willard, and Bartell. Students in their sec-
ond, third, or fourth years of University residence may prepare
themselves to become candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Sci-
ence in Chemistry upon completing the required courses, or their
equivalents, as outlined in the programs of study. Students in this
course are advised to remain for at least one summer session during
the period of University residence, to provide opportunity for more
elective work than is permitted by the schedule of studies during the
first three years. Those planning to go on with graduate work are
urged to take such additional courses in French and German as will
enable them to become thoroughly cognizant of the scientific litera-
ture in both these languages. They should also take additional
courses in mathematics dealing with graphical methods.

PROGRAM OF STUDIES



t Students entering without French, German, or Chemistry.

FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER*

Hours Hours

French i or German I 4 French 2 or German 2 4

Rhetoric I 3 Rhetoric 2 3

Mathematics I 4 Mathematics 2 4

Chemistry I 4 Chemistry 2 4

15 15^

t Students presenting two units of French or German for admission
will take French or German 3 and 4 the first year and German or French
I and 2 the second year.

• Sttidcnts beginning chemistry the second semester must elect Chem-
istry lb and follow this with either Chemistry 2b or 2E the first semester
of the next year, or with Chemistry 2 in the summer session. The latter
course is advised.



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Curriaitum in Landscape Design



169





SECOND


YEAR




Physics I
Mathematics 3^
French or German
Chemistry 3


4
3

4
5


Physics 2
Mathematics 4^
French or German
Chemistry 5


4
3
4
5




16




16




THIRD YEAR**




Chemistry 7
Chemistry 28
Elective— Group III


5
5
6


Chemistry ya
Chemistry 8
Chemistry 59
Elective—Group III**


5
4
2
6




16




17




FOURTH


[ YEAR




Chemistry 13

Physics 5

Technical Chemistry or

Metallurgy
Elective


4

4

4
4


Chemistry 15

Electives in Chemistry or

Metallurgy
Elective


2

6
8



16



16



Students entering with one unit of Chemistry will take Chemistry
2b or lE, followed by Chemistry 3, in the first year, Chemistry 5
and 28 the second year, and Chemistry 59 in the first semester of the
third year.

General correspondence concerning the curriculum may be ad-
dressed to the Director of the Chemical Laboratory, The University,
Ann Arbor. Inquiries concerning entrance requirements or credit for
advanced work should be addressed to Dean J. R. Effinger, or to the
Registrar.

CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPE DESIGN

The Curriculum in Landscape Design is organized as a special
program of study in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts,
and leads to a special degree (Master in Landscape Design). It
requires a minimum of five years* college work. The program is as
follows :

•• Permission to elect 17 hours in the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts is granted to applicants for extra hours who have a record
for superior scholarship.



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170 College of Literaiure, Science, and the Arts



PROGRAM OF STUDIES






FIRST


YEAR




FIRST SEMESTER


SECOND SEMESTER






Hours




Hours


Rhetoric i


3


Rhetoric 2


3


Foreign Language
Mathematics i
Geology la
Drawing 21


4
4
3

2


Foreign Language
Botany I
Geology 6a
Drawing 22


4
4
3
2




SECONC


YEAR




Foreign Language or Foreign Language (or

Botany 7) 4 Botany 26) 4
Survejdng i 3 Surveying 2 4
Drawing 23 2 Drawing 24 2
Landscape Design i 3 Landscape Design 2 3
Landscape Design 3 3 Landscape Design 4 3
Summer Session at Camp Davis: Surveying 3, 8 hours.




THIRD YEAR




Political Science 3


3


Political Science 4


3


Drawing 4a
Architecture i


3

3


Architecture 4
Architecture 21


3

2


Drawing 25
Landscape Design 5 or
Elective


a

13 3

a


Landscape Design 6
Landscape Design 14
Elective


3

3

I




FOURTH YEAR






Hours




Hours


Civil Engineering 40
Drawing 26
Landscape Design 7
Landscape Design 5 or
History
Elective


2
2

4
13 3

3
3 or 4


Civil Engineering 26
Drawing 27
Landscape Design 8
Landscape Design 14
Landscape Design 16
Elective


2
2
4
3

2

3




FIFTH


YEAR




Landscape Design 9
Landscape Design 11
Elect! ves


4

4

4 or 6


Landscape Design 10
Landscape Design 12


6
6



Students entering the course on advanced standing and others
preparing for some special phase of the landscape profession may,
by permission of the Professor in charge and at his discretion, sub-
stitute other courses of equivalent time value for some of those speci-
fied above.

The following courses are recommended as electives:



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Curriculum in Landscape Design 171

Zoology I and 6 Political Science 3 and 4.

Botany 7, 13, 14, 17, and 23. Civil Engineering 41 and 43.

Mineralogy i. Geology 15 and 29.

History i, 2, 12, 16, and 17. Economics I.

Physics I and 2. Fine Arts I, 3, 5, 6, and 8.

Forestry I, 2, 5, 20, 22, and 23.

Not more than sixteen hours a week may be elected except by
special permission obtained from the Committee on Extra Hours in
accordance with the rules of the College (see page 142).

The object of the curriculum is primarily to train professional
landscape designers, and hence it includes lines of study which are
essential to a liberal college education in addition to the technical
studies. Courses i, 2, and 5, in the department of Landscape Design
are open to all students except freshmen.

No one will be allowed to complete all the courses in landscape
design as an undergraduate. At least the last year of work must be
taken as a graduate student.

The privilege of taking certain electives in the College of Engi-
neering is granted to students enrolled in this program.

A special bulletin on the Curriculum in Landscape Design,, con-
taining the required program and other information, may be obtained
by addressing the Secretary of the University. Correspondence con-
cerning the course may be addressed to Professor Aubrey Tealdi,
The University, Ann Arbor. Inquiries concerning the requirements
for entering the University, or for credit for advanced work, should
be addressed to Dean J. R. Effinger, or to the Registrar.

Curricultim in Park Management

The following program is planned for the student who wishes
to fit himself for the position of City and Country Park Superin-
tendent, Estate Superintendent, of Landscape Construction Superin-
tendent. It includes a balanced program in natural science, engi-
neering, landscape design, and forestry.

PROGRAM OF STUDIES

FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER

Hours Hours

Rhetoric i 3 Rhetoric 2 3

Foreign Language 4 Foreign Language 4

Botany i 4 Zoology i 4

Drawing 21 3 Mathematics i 4
Landscape Design i 3



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172 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts





SECOND


YEAR




Political Science i


3


Political Science 2


3


Foreign Language
Surveying x
Botany 13
Landscape Design 3


4
3
3
3


Landscape Design 2
Surveying 2
Botany 14
Landscape Design 4


3

4
3
3




THIRD


YEAR




Geology i
Political Science 3


3
3


Geology 6a
Economics 32


3
3


Zoology 7

Landscape Design 13
Forestry 2


4
3

2


Botany 8

Landscape Design 6

Landscape Design 14


4
4
3




FOURTH


YEAR




Botany 17
Forestry 9

T^andscape Design 7
landscape Design 9


4

4
4
4


Forestry 6
Forestry 10
Landscape Design 10
Civil Engineering 26
Civil Engineering 40
Economics 34





CURRICULUM IN FORESTRY

The Curriculum in Forestry is organized as a special program of
study in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and leads
to special degrees (Bachelor of Science in Forestry and Master of
Science in Forestry). The requirements for the degree of Bachelor
of Science in Forestry are stated on page 139. The prescribed cur-
riculum there referred to is as follows :



PROGRAM OF STUDIES




Four-Year


Ctirriculum




FIRST


YEAR




FIRST SEMESTER

Hours


SECOND SEMESTER


Hours


Rhetoric I 3
Botany i 4
Mathematics i 4
Chemistry i 4


Rhetoric 2
Zoology I
Mathematics 2
Chemistry 2
Forestry 22


3

4

4
4
I



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Curriculum in forestry 173

SECOND YEAR

Surveying 12 4 Surveying 13 4

Botany 13 4 Botany 14 4

Physics I 4 Mineralogy 9 a

Mineralogy i 4 Forestry i 4

Forestry 2 a Forestry 6 j

Summer Session at Camp Davis: Surveying 3, 8 hours.

THIRD YEAR

Forestry 5 4 Forestry 8 4

Forestry 7 4 Forestry 10 4

Forestry 13 3 Forestry 14 3

Forestry 4 2 Geology 15F 3

Geology i£ 3 Botany 24 2

FOURTH YEAR

Forestry 3 2 Forestry 16 2

Forestry 9 4 Forestry 18 2

Forestry 15 4 Forestry 20 3

Forestry 19 3 Economics lE 3

Botany 17 4

Not more than sixteen hours a week may be elected except by
special permission obtained from the Committee on Extra Hours in
accordance with the rules of the College (see page 142).

Master of Science in Forestry

Men intending to become candidates for the degree of Master
of Science in Forestry should consult with the faculty of Forestry
immediately upon entering the University, so that their program of
studies may be properly arranged at the very beginning.

There are two main classes of such forestry students:

(A) Those who enter this University as undergraduates with
the intention of taking the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry
at the end of their fourth year, and the degree of Master of Science
in Forestry at the end of the fifth year.

(B) Those who begin the study of forestry as graduate stu-
dents (except candidates for the doctorate). Such students require
two years to complete the course^ in forestry, and receive the degree
of Master of Science in Forestry. '

In addition to the above, there are two other classes of forestry
students :

(C) Candidates for the doctorate (Doctor of Philosophy or
Doctor of Science) may elect one or both minors in forestry.



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174 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

(D) Special students will be admitted to the work in forestry
provided they have training and experience sufficient to warrant their
taking any of the forestry courses.

A special bulletin describing the curriculum in forestry, and con-
taining the required program and other details, may be obtained by
addressing the Secretary of the University. General correspondence
concerning the curriculum may be directed to the Professor of For-
estry, The University, Ann Arbor. Inquiries concerning entrance
requirements or credit for advanced work should be addressed to
Dean J. R. Effinger, or to the Registrar.

Important Notice

Students entering the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
with intention of taking the Curriculum in Forestry should inform
the committee on Elections of that intention, in order that their
election of studies may be made in accordance with the prescribed
program given above.

All Forestry students entering the University with advanced
standing and those transferring from some other course to that of
Forestry, should consult the faculty of the department of Forestry
before making their elections.

The Curriculum in Forestry is prescribed throughout, and must
be taken in order given above. No deviations may be made from
this order except by written permission of the Professor of Forestry.

Before making elections each semester, all Forestry students
should consult with a committee of the Forestry faculty appointed
for that purpose.

TEACHER'S DIPLOMA AND TEACHER'S CERTIFICATE

The aims of the University in providing instruction in Educa-
tion are as follows:

1. To fit the University student for the higher positions in the
public school service.

2. To promote the study of education as a science.

3. To teach the history of education, and of educational systems
and doctrines.

4. To secure to teaching the rights, prerogatives, and advantages
of a profession.

5. To give a more perfect unity to our State educational system
by bringing the secondary schools into closer relations with the
University.



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Fellowships, Scholarships, Loati Funds, Prises- 175

Teacher's Diploma

The Teacher's Diploma is given to a student in connection with
his bachelor's degree, provided he has taken eleven hours in Educa-
tion, including course 4a, b, c, d, e, f, g, A, or t.

The diploma is also given to a graduate student at the time of
receiving a master's or a doctor's degree, provided he has pursued
teaching as a major or a minor stady, or has otherwise satisfactorily
completed an equivalent amount of pedagogical work.

Teacher's Certificate

By authority of an act of the State Legislature, passed in 189 1
and amended in 1903, the Board of Regents, acting upon the recom-
mendation of a Faculty of this College, gives a Teacher's Certificate
to any person who takes a bachelor's, master's, or doctor's degree,
and also receives a Teacher's Diploma as provided above. By the
terms of the act, the certificate given by the Regents **shall serve as
a legal certificate of qualification to teach in any of the schools of
this State, when a copy thereof shall have been filed or recorded in
the office of the legal examining officer or officers of the county,
township, city, or district."

TEACHER'S APPOINTMENT COMMITTEE

An appointment committee representing the Faculty of the Col-
lege of Literature, Science, and the Arts has been constituted for the
purpose of assisting men and women who are studying, or have
stadied, under this Faculty, to secure positions as teachers. This
service is performed gratuitously, in the interest of students of the
University, past or present, and of superintendents of schools and
boards of education wishing to employ teachers. Persons desiring to
reach this committee should address their communications to the
Secretary of the Appointment Committee, The University.



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 15 of 75)