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work. Assistant Professor Ehlers.
A study of the local flora, giving training in the technique of

ideniification and classification of plants.
This course must be preceded by Course I or Course la.

(\ Mycology and Pathology. Lectures, field and laboratory work.
Four hours credit. Professor Kauffman.
To be preceded or accompanied by Courses i or la, and 7 or 8.
TTiis course aims at a general introduction to the morphology.



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Courses of Instruciion 187

physiology, and classiHcation of fungi, together with their arti-
ficial cultivation and their relation to disease. It is adapted
to students in general botany, to teachers, and to those pre-
paring to specialize in pathology. It should be followed by
Courses 19 and 20.

8. Comparative Morphology of Plants. Four hours credit'. Pro-
fessor Davis.

Prerequisite : Botany i or la.

This is a study of the morphology and life histories of repre-
sentative types and gives a basis for discussion of the relation-
ships and the probable evolution of the chief groups of plants.
The fungi receive a less proportionate degree of attention, since
their structure and evolution is considered in Course 6.

10. Principles and Practice in State and Federal Plant Inspection.
Lectures, field and laboratory work. Three hours credit. To
be preceded or accompanied by Course 6. Professor Kauff-

MAN.

[12. Microscopy of Potable and Polluted Waters. Two hours credit.
Professor Pollock.
This course is primarily for students in sanitary engineering.
It is intended to give a knowledge of the organisms frequently
found in water supplies, giving them bad tastes or odors, as
well as a knowledge of those organisms which are concerned
in the purification of polluted waters or of sewage. Students
will learn to recognize the commoner organisms concerned in
these processes, and to understand how their biological activi-
ties are related in pollution and purification.
Omitted in 1920-1921.]

14, Forest Botany. Continuation of Course 13. Four hours credit.
Lectures, field and laboratory work. Assistant Professor
Ehlers.
The first part of the semester will be spent in the study of the
development, structure, and function of the tissues of woody
plants. The last part of the semester will resume the outdoor
study of forest plants.

I5tf, Genetics. Three hours credit. Professors SiiULL and Bartlktt.
A continuation of Course 15.

[16. Morphology, Physiology, and Classification of Liverworts, Mosses,

and Ferns. Lectures, field and laboratory work. Three hours

credit. Professor Kauffman.
To be preceded or accompanied by Course 7 or 8. Given in

alternate years.
Course 16 deals with the identification of the Archegoniates and

the biological facts and theories which they illustrate. Omitted

in 1920-1921.]



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1 88 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

[i8. The Biology of the Fresh Water Alg.e. Lectures, field and
laboratory. 7' /tree hours credit. Professor Kauffman.
This course deals with the special morphology, the biological
significance, and the classification of the fresh water algae. To
be preceded by Botany 7 and 8. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

20. Advanced Mycology and Pathology. Conferences, readings, field
and laboratory work. Three, five, or eight hours credit. Pro-
fessor Kauffman.
See Course 19, of which this may be made a continuation.

20a. Seminary in Mycology. One hour credit. Professor Kauffman.
Admission only by permission of the instructor.

22. Comparative Anatomy of Vascular Plants. Three or five hours
credit. Chiefly laboratory work. Assistant Professor Tupper.

Prerequisites : Botany 4, and either 8 or 14,

A comparative study of the internal structures of the vascular
plants, with emphasis upon the characters of value in identifi-
cation, classification, and wood technology.

26 Experimental Physiology. Four hours credit. Professor New-
combe.

A study of the relation of plants to their environment as mani-
fested by the phenomena of nutrition, growth, and irritability.

To be preceded by at least one semester of college botany. This
is a more technical course than Course 7, but is not open to
students who have passed Course 7.

26a. Experimental Physiology. Advanced course. Three or more
hours. Professor Newcombe.

28. Plant Cytology, continued. Four hours credit. Lectures and
laboratory work. Professor Davis.
A continuation of the field of study opened by Course 27, and
requiring that course as a prerequisite. During the second
semester the lectures consider such subjects as spermatogenesis,
oogenesis, fertilization, apogamy, apospory, determination of
sex, xenia, hybridi2ation, etc. The laboratory work illustrates
certain features of the lecture program. Offered in alternate
years.

[30. Geological History of Plants. Lectures, assigned reading, and

demonstrations. Two hours credit. Professor Bartlett and

Assistant Professor Tupper.

A survey of the literature of paleobotany and a summary of the

evidences with regard to the phylogcny of the plant groups.



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Courses of Instruction 189

Students will be given an opportunity to become acquainted
with the technique used in the investigation of the minute
structure of coal and other plant fossil material. To be pre-
ceded by Botany 4 and 8.
Omitted in 1920- 1921.]

[32. Biochemistry of Plants. Three hours credit. Professor Bartlett.
A survey of the compounds elaborated by plants, from the stand-
point of plant physiology. Prerequisites: Botany 7 or 26, 8
and organic chemistry. Offered in alternate years. Omitted in
1920-1921.]

34. Current Literature of Botany. Continuation of Course 33« One
hour credit. Professor Newcombe.

36. Botanical Readings in German. One hour credit. Professor Lee.

40. Investigations in the Classification and Distribution of Special
Groups of Flowering Plants. Three or more hours credit.
Assistant Professor Ehlers.

42. Investigations in Physiology. This work may be elected as 42^,
three hours credit; 42b, five hours; 42c, eight hours; 42d, ten
hours. Professor Newcombe.

44. Investigations in the Role of Fungi in Soil Biology. This work
may be elected as 44^, three hours credit; 44b, five hours; 44c,
eight hours; 44d, ten hours. Professor Pollock.

46. Investigations in the Bacterial Diseases of Plants. This work
may be elected as 46a, three hours credit; 46b, five hours; 46c,
eight hours; 4'bd, ten hours. Professor Pollock.

48. Investigations in Cytology and Genetics. This work may be
elected as /fia, thrte hours credit; /fib, five hours; 4^c, eight
hours; 4%d, ten hours. Professor Davis.

50. Investigations in Mycology and Pathology. This work may be
elected as 50<i, three hours credit; 50^, five hours; 50f, eight
hours; Sod, ten hours. Professor Kauffman.

52. Investigations in the Physiology of Reproduction in Algse, Mosses,
or Ferns. This work may be elected as 52<i, three hours credit;
$2b, five hours; 52r, eight hours; 52^, ten hours. Professor
Kauffman.

54. Investigations in Genetics and Biochemistry of Plants. This
work may be elected as 54a, three hours credit; 54^, five hours;
S4C, eight hours; 54^, ten hours. Professor Bartlett.



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I90 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

SIMMER SESSION OF I92I

For Undergraduates.

I. Elements of Botany. Four hours credit, or one unit for entrance.
Professor Davis and Mr. Gustafson.

For Graduates and Undergraduates,

3. Microbiology of Soil, Air, Water, and Food. Two to four hours
credit. Professor Pollock.

3a. Microbiology. Two or four hours credit. Professor Pollock.

2s. AlgiB, Liverworts, Mosses, and Ferns. Four hours credit. Pro-
fessor Kauffman.

20. Advanced Mycology, and Pathology. Three or six hours credit.
Professor Kauffman.

6j. Mycology and Plant Diseases. Four hours credit. Professor
Kauffman.

Ss. Systematic Botany. Two hours credit. Mr. Gustafson.

For Graduates.

42, 44. Research in Physiology, Soil Biology, and Nutrition of Soil
Fungi. Four, six or eight hours credit. Professor Pollock.

47. Investigations in Cytology and Genetics. Credit to be arranged.
Professor Davis.

50. Research in Plant Pathology. Four, six, or eight hours credit.
Professor Kauffman.

52. Research in Mycology. Four, six, or eight years credit. Pro-
fessor Kauffman.

For the description of the courses in Zoology and Botany to be
given at the Biological Station at Douglas Lake, Cheboygan County,
see the chapter on the Summer Session.

Business Administration

(See Economics)



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Courses of Instruction 191



CHEMISTRY

(Group II)

Students who expect to specialize in Chemistry are urged to
follow, as far as possible, the sequence of studies in chemistry and
related subjects as giyen in the "Curriculum in Chemistry." A special
bulletin describing this curriculum may be obtained from the Regis-
trar or from the Director of the Chemical Laboratory, Room 220,
Chemistry Building.

The courses numbered i to 12 give work upon the foundation of
chemistry in its several divisions. A sufficient number of these courses
must be completed before entering upon the advanced studies of the
science, or its special application to the industries and professions.
Of the more advanced studies. Courses 13 to 26, inclusive, are in Gen-
eral, Inorganic, and Physical Chemistry; Courses 27 to 40, inclusive,
in Analytical Chemistry; Courses 41 to 50, inclusive, in Organic
Chemistry; Courses 51 to 60, inclusive, in Industrial and Engineering
Chemistry. Other courses* in Technical Chemistry are announced
by the department of Chemical Engineering.

Consultation Hours. — Throughout registration week, September
20 to 26, Professor Smeaton will be in Room 474, Ch., 10-12 daily,
to advise those desiring to elect courses in chemistry.

FIRST SEMESTER

FonncUition Cohtms in Chemistry:

I. General and Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours credit. Deposit,
$S. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Professor
BiGELOW and assistants.
Students electing Course i are expected to elect Course 2 the fol-
lowing semester, as these form one complete whole and should
properly be considered one coarse extending throughout the
year. All elections, including those of upperclassmen, must be
made through the classification committee.

2b. Ccneral and Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours credit. Deposit,
$5. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Professor
Smeaton and assistants.
This course is for students who have had chemistry, but not the
full equivalent of Courses i and 2. An examination will be
held within the first four weeks and those considered inade-
quately prepared will be transferred to Course i. All elec-
tions, including those of upperclassmen, must be made through
the classification committee.

• Election of these other courses is subject to the rule governing the
election of studies in other colleges.



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192 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

A. General and Inorganic Chemistry. Six hours credit. Deposit,
$5. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Professor
LiCHTY and assistants.
Course A is required of all first year students in the Colleges of
Pharmacy and Dental Surgery. Others may elect the course
only by special permission.

aE. General and Inorganic Chemistry. Five hours credit. Deposit,
$5. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Dr. Hodges
and assistants.
Course 2E is required of all first year students in the College
of Engineering who have presented entrance chemistry. Others
may elect the course only by special permission.

3. Qualitative Analysis. Five hours credit. Deposit, $10. Recita-
tions and laboratory work. Assistant Professor Carney, Mr.
McAlpine, and Mr. Cole.
Students who have completed Course 2 or 2b with the grade. D
may not elect Course 3 at all. Students who may not elect
Course 3 must elect Course $a, and follow this with Coarse $b,
before taking Course 5.

3<i. Qualitative Analysis. Fcur hours credit. Deposit, $10. Recita-
tions and laboratory work. Mr. Soule.
Course $a is not a complete course in itself, and it must be fol-
lowed by $b before higher courses in Analytical Chemistry
are taken. Course $a must be preceded by 2 or 2b,

Sb. Qualitative Analysis Four hours credit. Deposit, $10. Recita-
tions and laboratory work. Mr. Cole.
Course sb must be preceded by $a.

5. Quantitative Analysis. Beginning Course. Five hours credit.
Deposit, $10. Recitations and laboratory work. Professor
WiLLARD and Assistant Professor Meloche.

This course includes the theory and practice of gravimetric and
volumetric analysis and gravimetric separations.

Course 5 must be preceded by Course 3 or $b.

7. Organic Chemistry. Five hours credit. Deposit, $10. Lectures,
recitations, and laboratory work. Professor Gomberg, Assistant
Professor Schoepfle, and Mr. Sullivan.

All students electing Course 7 should elect Course ya in the fol-
lowing semester, ihe two courses being considered as a single
course extending through the year. These courses are intended
for students who are specializing in Chemistry or Chemical
Engineering. All graduate students who elect organic chem-
istry as either the major or a minor subject should take Courses
7 and 7a, and not Course 10.

Course 7 must be preceded by Course 3 or $b.



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Courses of Instruction 193

10. Organic Chemistry. Four hours credit. Lectures and recita-
tions. .Mr. Snow.

This conrse is intended for students preparing to enter the Med-
ical School or the Homoeopathic Medical School, and for stu-
dents who desire a shorter and more elementary course than
Courses 7 and ^a, Given both semesters.

Course lO must be preceded by Course 3 or 3/1.

General and Physical Chemiatry :

8E. Elementary Theoretical and Physical . Chemistry. Three hours
credit. Lectures and recitations. Professor Bartkll.

This course is intended for students in Chemical Engineering
and may be taken by others only by special permission. Spe-
cial attention will be paid to the study of chemical equilibrium,
velocity of chemical reactions, and applications of ph3rsico-
chemical theory.

This course must be preceded by Chemistry 3 or 3^, and Physics
2. A knowledge of calculus is also required.

13. Physical-Chemical Measurements. Three to eight hours credit.

Deposit, $5. Laboratory work. Professor Bartell, Dr. Fer-
guson, and assistants.

The work of this course includes molecular weight determinations
by vapor density, freezing point, and boiling point methods;
determination of velocity of chemical reaction, viscosity, surface
tension, solubility, etc.; optical measurements with refracto-
meter, polarimeter, and spectroscope; electrical measurements
such as conductivity, transport numbers, and electromotive
force, including work with the hydrogen electrode.

The eight hours which are required for the completion of all
the work in Course 13 may be divided between two semesters.
The course must be preceded or accompanied by Courses 5
and 8.

14. Electrochemistry. Two hours credit. Lectures. Dr. Ferguson.
This course constitutes an elementary treatment of the funda-
mental principles of the subject. The course must be preceded
by Physics 2.

Courses 14, i^, i^b, and 14^ are designed to meet the rapidly
increasing demand, by the electrochemical industries, for men
who have a knowledge of the principles of electrochemisti y
and their application to industrial processes.

14/7. Electrochemistry. Deposit, $5. Two hours credit. Laboratory

work. Dr. Ferguson.

This course must be preceded or accompanied by Course 14. It

includes experiments to illustrate the general principles of

electrochemistry, such as measurements of electrical conduc-



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194 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts



tivity, resistance of primary and secondary cells, current by
means of coulometers, single electrode and decomposition poten-
tials, overvoltage, transport numbers, electromotive force; use
of the hydrogen electrode; and methods of electrochemical
analysis.

15. History of Chemistry and Development of Chemical Theory.

Two hours credit. Lectures and seminary. Professor
Smeaton.

16. Laboratory Research in Inorganic Chemistry. Deposit, $5. Credit

to be arranged. Professor Bigelow, Professor Lichty.

18. Laboratory Research in Physical Chemistry. Deposit, $5. Credit

to be arranged. Professor Bioelow, Professor Smeaton.
Courses 16, 18, and 21 are intended for advanced students. They
are open only to persons who receive permission from the
instructor. Students electing these courses must be able to
read French and German, and must have a knowledge of in-
organic, organic, and analytical chemistry.

19. Seminary. Significance of Radioactive Phenomena in Chemistry.

One hour credit. Professor Bigelow.
Course 19 must be preceded by Courses 8 and 13. Permission
must be obtained from the instructor to elect this course.

20. German Reading. Two hours credit. Professor Lee.

The object of this course is to familiarize the student with the
technical terms used in German chemical literature. Classical
treatises as well as important articles in current German chem-
ical journals will be read. This course is equivalent to Ger-
man 9E.

21. Research in Physical Chemistry. Credit to be arranged. Deposit,

$5. Professor Bartell and Dr. Ferguson.
This course is open only to students who have had the funda-
mental courses in physics and chemistry.

22. S|>ectroscopic Analysis and Use of the Spectroscope. Two hours

credit. Lectures and laboratory work. Deposit, $5. Professor
Lichty.
Course 22 must be preceded by Course 3a.

Analytical Chemistry:

28. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Three to five hours credit.
Deposit, $10. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Pro-
fessor WiLLARD.
This course includes the analysis of coals, alloy steels, iron ores,
silicates, and unknown minerals or alloys. If elected for three



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Courses of Instruction 195

hours, the remaining two hours, which make up the complete
course, may be elected to another time.
Course 28 is open to those who have taken Course 5, and Course
2 in Physics.

29. Elementary Chemical Microscopy. Two hours credit. Labora-
tory work. Professor Carney.

31. Independent Work in Mineral Analysis. Laboratory work. Five

hours credit. Deposit, $10. Professors Campbell and Willard.

Course 31 must be preceded by Course 28. It is desirable that

this course be preceded by Course 27 and also by Course 2 in

Mineralogy.

34. Chemical Reading. Reading and seminary work. One hour
Credit, Professor Campbell.
This course is adapted to students who intend to carry on research
such as is given in Courses 36 or 37. As not more than five
can be accommodated, permission should be obtained before
electing the course.

36. Research in Inorganic Chemistry. Special attention will be given

to the chemical constitution of metals, silicates, or other sub-
stances of importance. Credit to be arranged* Deposit, $5.
Professor Campbell.
Course 36 must be preceded by Course 28, and by such courses
in physical or organic chemistry as may be necessary to pre-
pare the student to carry on the work satisfactorily.

37. Original Investigation in Analytical Chemistry. Laboratory work.

Credit to be arranged. Deposit, $5. Professors Campbell and
Willard.
Course 37 must be preceded by Course 28 and by such courses
in physical or organic chemistry as may be necessary to pre-
pare the student to carry on the work satisfactorily.

Organic Chemistry:

42. Organic Chemistry. Two hours credit. Recitations and labora-

tory work. Assistant Professor Schoepfle and Mr. Sullivan.
Course 42 must be preceded or accompanied by Course 10.

43. Advanced Organic Chemistry and Ultimate Analysis. Laboratory

work and reading. Ftve hours credit. Deposit, $10. Profes-
sor Gomberg and Assistant Professor Schoepfle.
Course 43 must be preceded by Courses 7 and ya.



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196 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

44a. Food and Drug Analysis. Thre^ io five hours credit. Deposit,
$10. Laboratory work with reference reading. Assistant Pro-
fessor Glover.
Course 44a must be preceded by Courses 5 and 7.

45. Advanced Organic Chemistry. The chemistry and manufacture
of dyes and intermediates. Lectures and reading. Tivo hours
credit. Assistant Professor Schoepfle.
Course 45 must be preceded by Courses 7 and 7a.

49. Research in Organic Chemistry. Laboratory work and reading.
Credit to be arranged. Deposit, $$. Professor Gomberg.
Course 49 can be elected only by special permission.

Industrial and Engineering Chemistry:

51. Engineering Materials. Lectures and recitations. Three hours

credit. Professors A. IL White, and A. E. White, Assistant

Professors Upthegrove, and Baker, and Mr. Brown.
An elementary study of the manufacture and properties of the

ferrous and non-ferrous alloys, cements, clay products, and

protective coatings.
This course must be preceded by Chemistry 3, 2b, or aE.

52. Fuels and their Utilization. Lectures and recitations. One hour

credit. Professor Badger.

A descriptive study of fuels and their combustion, either directly
or after conversion into gas or coke, and of regenerative fur-
naces and the means of obtaining high temperatures.

This course must be preceded or accompanied by Course 3, and
Course 2 in Physics.

54. Salts, Acids, and Alkalies. Lectures and recitations. Two hours

credit. Assistant Professor Baker.

A descriptive study of the evaporation of salts and their separa-
tion from one another by fractional crystallization, of the
manufacture of sulphuric, nitric, and hydrochloric acids, of
the manufacture of alkali and chlorine by the older chemical
processes and by electrolytic processes, together with consid-
eration of some other electrolytic and electrothermal processes.

Course 54 must be preceded by Courses 8 or 8£ and 52, and by
Course 2 in Physics.

55. The Industrial Chemistry and Organic Compounds. Four hours

credit. Lectures and assigned reading. Professor Leslie.

Among the subjects treated are: starch, glucose, and sugar; fer-
mentation and distillation; fats, oils, and soaps; bleaching and
dyeing; tanning; paper manufacture.

Course 55 must be preceded by Courses 7, 'ja, and 52. Course
54 is advised.



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Courses of Instruction 197

5q. Technical Gas Analysis, including Caloriraetry and Photometry.
Two or three hours credit. Deposit, $5. Laboratory work.
Mr. Geniesse and Mr. Carr.
Course 59 must be preceded or accompanied by Course 5.

SECOND SEMESTER

Foundation Courses in Chemistry:

I ^'.General and Inorganic Chemistry. Four Jiours credit* Deposit,
$5. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Professor
LiCHTY.
This course is essentially the same as Course i given the first
semester. It oflfers an opportunity for those entering the Uni-
versity at the opening of the second semester to commence
the study of chemistry, but no student will be admitted who
might have elected Course i. Special permission must be
obtained from the instructor in order to elect this course.

2. General and Inorganic Chemistry. Continuation of Course i,

the hours and credits being the same in both semesters. De-
posit, $5. Professor Smeaton and assistants.

2E, General and Inorganic Chemistry. Same as 2E the first semes-
ter. Deposit, $5. Dr. Hodges and assistants.

3. Qualitative Analysis. Five hours credit. Recitations and labora-

tory work. Deposit, $10. Assistant Professor Carney, Mr.

Mc Alpine, and Mr. Cole.
This course is the same as Course 3, given in the first semester.
By special arrangement with the instructor this course may be

elected for seven hours credit. Four recitations, M\ Tu, Th, F,

at 10. Room 410. Laboratory work four half days, Mr.

Mc Alpine.

$a. Qualitative Analysis. Four hours credit. Deposit, $10. Recita-
tions and laboratory work. Mr. Cole and Mr. Soule.
This course is the same as Course sa, given in the first semester.

$b. Qualitative Analysis. Four hours credit. Deposit, $10. Recita-
tions and laboratory work. Mr. Cole.
Course $b must be preceded by 3a.

5. Quantitative Analysis. Beginning Course. Five hours credit.

Deposit, $10. Recitations and laboratory work. Professor

Willard and Assistant Professor Meloche.
This course includes the theory and practice of gravimetric and

volumetric analysis and gravimetric separations.
Course 5 must be preceded by Course 3 or 3^.



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198 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 17 of 75)