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6. Inorganic Preparations. Three to se^'en hours credit. Deposit,
$5. Professor Lichty.
Students electing this course must have completed Course 30.
Course 6 involves the study of chemical reactions and principles
as they apply to the preparation of the commonly used chem-
icals; a study of the properties of these chemicals, the condi-
tions under which they remain in solution, if they are soluble,
and their uses in chemical operations and as illustrative mate-
rials in teaching.

7j. Organic Chemistry. Continuation of Course 7. Five hours
credit. Deposit, $10. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory
work. Professor Gomberg, Assistant Professor Sciioepfle, and
Mr. Sullivan.

•8. Elementary Theoretical and Physical Chemistry. Four hours
credit. Lectures and recitations. Professor Bigelow.
This course must be preceded by Course 3 or 3^. It may be
elected by students planning to take the seven-year Combined
Literary-Medical Curriculum, on the completion of Course 3a.
Physics 2 is strongly recommended.

9. Inorganic Chemistry. Descriptive and experimental lectures, in-
cluding selected topics. Three hours credit. Lectures and
recitations. Professor Lichty.

Course 9 must be preceded by Course 3 or 3*2 or an equivalent.

This course is intended for those students who need or desire a
brief review and coordination as well as considerable extension
of the work already done in General and Inorganic Chemistry.

10. Organic Chemistry. Four hours credit. Lectures and recitations.
Assistant Professor Schoepfle.

Course 10 must be preceded by Course 3a or 3^.

This course is intended for students preparing to enter the Med-
ical School or the Homoeopathic Medical School, and for stu-
dents who desire a shorter and more elementary course than
Courses 7 and ^a, Given both semesters.

General and Physical Chemiatry:

13. Physical-Chemical Measurements. Three to eight hours credit.
Deposit, $5. Laboratory work. Professor Bartell, Dr. Fer-
guson, and assistants.
The work of this course includes : molecular weight determina-
tions by vapor density, freezing point, and boiling point meth-
ods ; determination of velocity of chemical reaction, viscosity,
surface tension, solubility, etc.; optical measurements with re-
fractometer, polarimeter, and spectroscope ; electrical measure-



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Courses of Instruction r99

ments such as conductivity, transport numbers, and electro-
motive force, including work with the hydrogen electrode.

The eight hours which are required for the completion of all
the work in Course 13 may be divided between two semesters.

The course must be preceded or accompanied by Courses 5 and 8.

[ 14^. Applied Electrochemistry. Two hours credit. Lectures. Dr.

Ferguson.
This course must be preceded by Course 14.
A study of the application of the principles of electrochemistry

to analytical and industrial processes.
Omitted in 1920-1931.]

[i4r. Applied Electrochemistry. Laboratory. Two hours credit. Dr.
Ferguson.

This course must be preceded or accompanied by Course 14&.

The course includes practice in electro-deposition of metals,-
electrolytic oxidation and reduction processes, preparation by
electrical means of inorganic and organic compounds and prep-
arations requiring the electric furnace. Omitted in 1920- 192 1.]

14^. Advanced Electrochemistry. Two hours credit. Lectures. Dr.

Ferguson.
This course is a continuation of Course 14 and follows up the

development of the theory of electrochemistry in more detail

than is possible in Course 14.
Course 14^ must be preceded or accompanied by Course 8.

15. History of Chemistfy and Development of Chemical Theory.

Two hours credit. Lectures and seminary. Professor Smbaton.

16. Laboratory Research in Inorganic Chemistry. Credit to be

arranged. Deposit, $5. Professors Bigei.ow and Lichty.

18. Laboratory Research in Physical Chemistry. Credit to be ar-

ranged. Deposit, $5. Professors Bigelow and Smeaton.
Courses 16, 18, and 21 are intended for advanced students. They
are open to persons who receive special permission from the
instructor. Students electing these courses roust be able to
read French and German, and roust have a knowledge of in-
organic, organic, rnd analytical chemistry.

19. Seminary. Significance of Radioactive Phenomena in Chemistry.

One hour credit. Professor BiGEi.OW.
Course 19 must be preceded by Course 8 and 13. Permission
must be obtained from the instructor to elect this course.

20a. Chemical Reading in French. Two hours credit. Professor Lee.
This course is of the same nature as Course 20, Chemical Reading
in German. Elect as French 9E.



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200 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

21. Research in Physical Chemistry. Credit and hours to be arranged.
Deposit, $5. Professor Bartell and Dr. Ferguson.
The course is open only to students who have had the funda-
mental courses in physics and chemistry.

23. Advanced Theoretical and Physical Chemistry. Two hours credit.

Lectures. Professor Baktell.
This course is a continuation of Course 8. It includes the gen-
. eral subject of chemical equilibrium and covers the special
topics, thermochemistry, the phase rule, chemical statics and
dynamics, in more detail than is possible in Course 8.

24. Theory and Practice of Exact Measurements, with laboratory

practice in calibration, and construction of apparatus. Lec-
tures and laboratory work. Two or three hours credit. De-
posit, $5. Dr. Ferguson.
Special permission must be obtained from the instructor in order
to elect this course.

25. Chemistry of Colloids. Two hours credit. Lectures. Professor

Bartell.
This course is intended primarily for advanced students spccial-
/ izing in Chemistry and in Bio-Chemistry. It must be preceded
by the fundamental courses in physics and chemistry, and is
open only to those obtaining permission from the instructor.

26. Actinochemistry. One or two hours credit. Lectures, seminary,

and laboratory work. Deposit, $5. Dr. HoDGES.
This course will deal with the relations between radiant energy
and chemical reaction, particular attention being paid to the
photographic process. The laboratory work will deal largely
with the processes of photography. It must be preceded by
Course 8.

Analytical Chemistry:

27. Chemistry of the Rarer Elements. One hour credit. Lectures.

Assistant Professor Carney.
A study of the occurrence, reactions, analytical determination and
uj-es of the rarer elements, especial attention being paid to
tliose of commercial importance. Lectures and recitations.

28. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Three to five hours credit.

Deposit, $10. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Pro-
fessor Wll.LARD.
This course includes the analysis of coals, alloy steels, iron ores,
silicates, and unknown minerals or alloys. If elected for three



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Courses of Instruction 201

hours, the remaining two hours, which make up the complete
course, may be elected at another time.
Course 28 is open to those who have taken Course 5, and Course
2 in Physics.

29. Elementary Chemical Microscopy. Two hours credit. Labora-

tory work. Assistant Professor Carney.

30. Library Method in Chemistry. Two hours credit. Lectures.

Mr. Cole.

This course is primarily intended to familiarize students with
the Chemical Library and its use, in order to facilitate their
advanced work in chemistry. Specific problems in chemistry
will be assigned and the student will be expected to look up
and report upon the original literature bearing upon them.

Course 30 must be preceded by Course 3 or 3<z.

31. Independent Work in Mineral Analysis. Laboratory Work. Five

hours. Deposit, $10. Professors Campbell and Wili^rd. .
Course 31 must be preceded by Course 28. It is desirable that
this course be preceded by Course 27 and also by Course 2
in Mineralogy.

34. Chemical Reading. Reading and seminary work. One hour
credit. Professor Campbell,
Course 34 requires special permission.

36. Research in Inorganic Chemistry. Special attention will be given

to the chemical constitution of metals, silicates, or other sub-
stances of importance. Credit to be arranged. Deposit, $5.
Professor Campbell.
Course 36 must be preceded by Course 28 and such courses in
physical or organic chemistry as may be necessary to prepare
the student to cairy on the work satisfactorily.

37. Original Investigation in Analytical Chemistry. Laboratory

work. Credit to be arranged. Deposit, $5. Professors Camp-
bell and WiLLARD.
Course 37 must be preceded by Course 28 and such courses in
physical or organic chemistry as may be necessary to prepare
the student to carry on the work satisfactorily.

Organic Cbemistry:

42. Organic Chemistry. Two hours credit. Deposit, $10. Recita-
tions and laboratory work. Assistant Professor Sciioepfle
and Mr. Sullivan.
Course 42 must be preceded or accompanied by Course 10.



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202 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts



42a. Organic Chemistry. Continuation of Course 42- Two hours
credit. Deposit, $10. Recitations and laboratory work. As-^
sistant Professor Schoepfle and Mr. Sullivan.

43. Advanced Organic Chemistry and Ultimate Analysis. Labora-

tory work and reading. Two to five hours credit. Deposit,
$10. Professor Gomberg and Assistant Professor Schoepfle.

44. The Chemistry of Alkaloids. Four hours credit. Deposit, $10.

Lectures and laboratory work. Assistant Professor Glover.
Course 44 must be preceded by Courses 5 ^^^ 7-

44^. Food and Drug Analysis. Three to five hours credit. Deposit,
$10. Laboratory work with reference reading. Assistant Pro-
fessor Glover.
Course 44^1 must be preceded by Courses 5 and 7.

46. Seminary in Organic Chemistry. Lectures and reading. Two
hours credit. Professor Gomberg.
This course is intended primarily for students engaged in research
work in organic chemistry, and can be elected only by special
permission.

49. Research in Organic Chemistry. Laboratory work. Credit to
be arranged. Deposit, $5. Professor Gomberg and Assistant
Professor Schoepfle.
Course 49 requires special permission.

Industrial and Engineering Chemistry'*':

51. Engineering Materials. The same as Course 51, given the first
semester. Professor A. H. White, Assistant Professors Up-
thegrove, and Baker, and Mr. Brown.

53. Fuels and their Utilization. The same as Course 53, given the

first semester. Professor Badger.

54. Salts, Acids, and Alkalies. The same as Course 54, given the

first semester. Assistant Professor Baker.

59. Technical Gas Analysis. The same as Course 59, given the first
semester. Deposit, $5. Mr. Geniesse.

summer session of 1 93 1
For Undergraduates.

I, General and Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours credit. Professor
Lichty, Mr. Britton, and Assistant.

• Other courses in Technical Chemistry arc announced by the De-
partment of Chemical Engineering. Election of these other courses is
subject to the rule governing the election of studies in other Colleges.



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Courses of Instruction 203

2. General and Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours credit. Profes-

sor Smeaton, Mr. Brixton, and Assistant.

3. Qualitative Analysis. Five hours credit. Mr. CoLi, and Assist-

ants.

For Graduates and Undergraduates.
6s. Inorganic Preparations. Two to four hours credit. Professor

LiCHTY.

5. Quantitative Analysis. Five hours credit. Professor Willard,
Mr. Ross, and Assistant.

28. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Three to five hours credit.
Professor Willard, Mr. Ross, and Assistant.

los. Organic Chemistry. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor

SCHOEPFLE.

42. Organic Preparations. Two to Jour hours credit. Assistant
Professor Schoepfle, and Mr. Snow.

8E. Elementary, Theoretical, and Physical Chemistry. Three hours
credit. Dr. HoDGES.

13. Physical Chemical Measurements. Three to eight hours credit,

i)T, Ferguson, Dr. Hodges, and Assistant

14. Electrochemistry. Two hours credit. Dr. Ferguson.

15. History of Chemistry and Development of Chemical Theory from

remote times to the present. Two hours credit. Professor

SXTEATON.

33a. Chemical Technology of Fuel Utilization. One hour credit,
Mr. Brown.

35. Technical Gas and Fuel Analysis. Two hours credit, Mr.
Brown, and Assistant.

iia. Drug Assaying and Pharmacopoeial Testing. Four hours credit.
Assistant Professor Glover.

44J. Analysis of Foods, Drugs, Etc. Three or five hours credit. As-
sistant Professor Gi.OVER.

For Graduates.

37. Original Investigation in Analytical Chemistry. Credit to be
arranged. Professor Willard.



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•204 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

39. Laboratory Work in Chemical Technology and Chosen Subjects.
Three to eight hours credit. Professor Leslie^ Assistant Pro-
fessor Upthegrove, and Mr. Brown.

16. Laboratory Research in Inorganic Chemistry. Credit to be ar-
ranged. Professor Lichty.

43' Organic Synthesis and Ultimate Analysis, Two to four hours
credit. Assistant Professor Schoepfle.

18. Laboratory Research in Physical Chemistry. Credit to be ar-
ranged^ Professor Smeaton.

21. Laboratory Research in Physical Chemistry. Credit to be ar-
ranged. Dr. Ferguson, and Dr. Hodges.

Metallurgyf

FIRST SEMESTER

6. Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. Class work. Two hours credit.

Hours to be arranged. Assistant Professor Wood.

A detailed study of the methods employed in the production of
the various iron and steel products; thermal studies of some
of the major operations; correlation of the physical properties
of the metals and their heat and mechanical treatments.

Open to those who have completed Course 3 in Chemistry.

7. Metallurgy of the Non-ferrous Metals. Class work. Two hours

credit. Hours to be arranged* Assistant Professor Upthe-
GROVE.

This course covers the conversion practice for copper, zinc, lead,
tin, and aluminum and the production of non-ferrous alloy
castings.

Open to those who have completed Course 3 in Chemistry.

8. Metallography of Metals. Class and laboratory work. Two

hours credit. Hours to be arranged. Assistant Professor
Upthegrove.

In this course a special study is made of the microscopic con-
stituents of iron and steel and the common non-ferrous metals.
The eflfect of heat treatments, mechanical working and com-
position on the structure and properties are also studied.

Open to those who have completed Metallurgy 6.

10. Seminary on the Theory of Steel and Properties of Metallic Solu-
tions. One hour rredit. Professor Campbell.



t Other courses in Metallurgy arc announced by the department of
Chemical KngineerinR. Klection of these other courses is subject to the
rule governing the election of studies in other Colleges.



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Courses of Instruction 205



SECOND SEMESTER

6. Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. Same as Course 6, the first se-
mester. Assistant Professor Wood.

8. Metallography of Metals. Same as Course 8, the first semester.
Assistant Professor Upthegrovb.

loa. Continuation of Course 10. One hour credit. Professor Camp-
bell.

CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

(Group I)

The following courses do not require a knowledge of Greek or of
Latin. The large collection of lantern slides and photographs owned
by the University makes it possible to illustrate all these courses
fully. The collection of casts of ancient sculpture in the Art Gallery
is also utilized in the courses in ancient art. A more complete state-
ment of the material at hand for the study of Roman Archaeology
is given under the department of Latin.

For courses in Greek and Roman Art, formerly announced here,
see the department of Fine Arts.

FIRST SEMESTER

4. Ancient Greek Life. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor

ROBBINS.

The life of the Greeks will be fully illustrated from objects of
art, especially vase paintings. Special attention will be given
to Greek houses, temples, armor, dress, amusements, athletics,
art, and crafts.

Lectures, illustrated with stereopticon ; assigned readings.

33. Greek Vases. Illustrated lectures and assigned readings. Two
hours credit. Professors Winter and Bonner.
The decorated vases of the Greeks will be studied partly as
objects of art and partly as documents of Greek history, civil-
ization, and literature. The lectures will be illustrated by lan-
tern slides and by plates from the University's collection of
archaeological material. The first part of the course, dealing
with the history and technique of Greek ceramics, will be
given by Professor Winter/ the second part, dealing with the
interpretation of mythological scenes and of pictures suggested
by episodes in literary works, will be conducted by Professor
Bonner.



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2c6 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

SECOND SEMESTER

2a. Monumental History of the City of Rome. A survey of the
monuments of art of diflferent periods, with special study of
the Forum, the Imperial palaces, and other topographical
groups of special importance. Lectures, illustrated. Three
hours credit. Professor Winter.

lib. Roman Life as Illustrated by Works of Art and Objects of Com-
mon Use. The Roman house and home life, dress, social activ-
ities, athletics, trades, professions, the circus and theater, public
ceremonies, and the transformation of Roman society under
the empire. Lectures, with stereopticon illustrations, plates,
and the study of specimens in the University collections. Three
hours credit. Professor Kelsey. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

6. Greek Mythology. Two hours credit. Professor Bonner.

Illustrated lectures and assigned readings. Classical myths will

be treated with special reference to their influence on modem

literature.
Students may enter this course after the first week of the semester

only by special permission of the instructor.

8. Topography and Monuments of Ancient Athens. Illustrated
lectures and assigned readings. Two hours credit. Room A,
Memorial Hall. Professor Winter.



DRAWING
Engineering Drawing

first semester

I. Geometrical Drawing. Ttiw, three, or four hours credit. As-
sistant Professor Finch.

4. Descriptive Geometry I. Lectures and Drawing. Two hours

credit.

4a. Descriptive Geometry and Shades and Shadows. Three hours
credit. Assistant Professor Bennett.

5. Descriptive Geometry II. Lectures and Drawing. Two hours

credit.
Course 5 must be preceded by Course 4, of which it is the con-
tinuation.

5<j. Perspective and Stereotomy. Two hours credit. Assistant Pro-
fessor Bennett.



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Courses of Instruction 207

10. Free-Hand Lettering. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
Palmer.

12. Statistical Charting. Two hours credit. Professor GoULDlNG.

SECOND SEMESTER

I. Geometrical Drawing. Two, three, or four hours credit. Assist-
ant Professor Finch.

4. Descriptive Geometry I. Lectures* and Drawing. Two hours

credit,

4a, Descriptive Geometry and Shades and Shadows. Three hours
credit. Assistant Professor Bennett.

5. Descriptive Geometry II. Lectures and Drawing. Two hours

credit.
Course 5 must be preceded by Course 4, of which it is the con-
tinuation.

5j. Perspective and Stereotomy. Two hours credit. Assistant Pro-
fessor Bennett.

10. Free-Hand Lettering. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
Palmer.

12. Statistical Charting. Two hours credit* Professor Goulding.

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

Six courses will be given in the College of Engineering. Sec
the chapter on that College.

Free-Hand Drawing and Painting

The aim of the instruction in free-hand drawing and in painting
is to teach accurate observation of form, proportions, light and shade,
and color, and their artistic representation and interpretation, both
as a matter of general education and as part of a more specific train-
ing for teaching, in pictorial or decorative art, or in architecture.

For the general student, Courses 21, 22, and 24 will give an ele-
mentary training in drawing and painting. Course 30 provides more
advanced work in painting; Courses 25, 26, and 27, more advanced
training in drawing. Course 23 is a special course in the drawing of
ornament for students of architecture and decoration, while Course
35 is primarily for architectural students, although open to others.
Outdoor sketching and painting can best be studied during the sum-
mer session.



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2o8 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

At present there are no classes in portrait painting nor painting
from the costume model, but such instructions can, under certain con-
ditions, be arranged for groups of students who have specially ad-
vanced preparation.

The drawing is done in pencil, crayon, charcoal, and pen and ink,
from various kinds of objects and models, including ancient, medi-
eval, Renaissance, and modern ornament and sculpture. Rapid sketch-
ing from the figure is carried on as part of Courses 27 and 28 to
stimulate simple indication of essentials.

The painting is done mostly in water colors, although non-archi-
tectural students may paint in oil.

Still-life painting in water color or oil cannot be studied profit-
ably without some preliminary training in free-hand drawing (Draw-
ing 21 and 22). For drawing from the living model some prelimi-
nary training is required from the antique (Drawing 25 and 26).

All the courses are given both semesters and instruction is given
in Courses 21 to 26, inclusive, every morning and afternoon. The
hours for these and other courses are shown in the schedule of the
Colleges of Engineering and Architecture published at the beginning
of each semester.

In general, six hours class work per week for a semester are
required for a two-hour credit course. A given course must be
elected with a single instructor and in periods of not less than two
hours consecutively. Advancement in all these courses is individual,
depending on the progress made by the student and determined largely
by work done without criticism.

BOTH SEMESTERS

21. Free-Hand Drawing. Titro hours credit. Introductory Course.

Mr. Makielski, Mr. Barnes, Mr. O'Dell, Miss Heller.
Drawing from simple forms in line and light and shade.
Free-Hand perspective.

22. Free-IIand Drawing. Two hours credit. Continuation of

Course 21. Mr. Makielski, Mr. Barnes, Mr. O'Dell, Miss
Heller.
Drawing from simple forms.

23. Free-Hand Drawing. Two hours credit. Mr. Barnes, Mr.

O'Dell.
Drawing from decorative forms and portions of the figure.
Primary for students of architecture and decoration.
Must be preceded by Drawing 22.

24. Water Color Tainting. Two hours credit. Mr. Makiei.ski, Mr.

Barnes.
Painting from still life in monochrome wash and in water colors.
Must he preceded by Courses 21 and 22 or their equivalent.



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Courses of Instruction 209

as and 26. Free-Hand Drawing. Two hours credit each, Mr.
Makiblski^ Mr. Barnes.
Drawing from the full figure.

27 and 28. Free-Hand Drawing. Two hours credit each, Mr.
Makielski.
Drawing from life. Figure sketch class.

Admission to these courses is limited to those who have satisfac-
torily completed the preceding courses or their equivalent.

30. Water Color Painting. Two hours credit, Mr. Barnes.

Painting in water color from still life. This course must be
preceded by Course 24 or its equivalent.

[33. Clay Modeling. Two hours credit. Not given in 1920- 1921.]

35. Pen and Ink Drawing. One or two hours credit. Elective. Mr.
Barnes.

Students not registered in Architecture should have the equiv-
alent of six credit hours in free-hand drawing before taking
this course.

For regular students of architecture this course must be preceded
by Courses \a, 21, 22, and 23, in Drawing and Architecture 5.

SUMMER session OF I92I

An Arts course for supervisors, art instructors, grade teachers,
and school principals will be given by Miss Grattan, Supervisor of
Art in the public schools of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. See later chapter.

ECONOMICS

(Group III)

Political Economy and Business Administration

Political Economy. — ^The instruction in Political Economy is
arranged to meet the needs of three classes of students. The first
class comprises those whose principal work lies in other departments
of instruction, but who desire a cursory introduction to the science.
Students of this class are advised to take Courses I and 2, unless
their time is very limited, in which case they may take Course \a.
The second class comprises those who desire to make a fairly thor-
ough study of economics, but who have not time to take the advanced
or the semi-professional work offered. Such students are advised to



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 18 of 75)