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to give students a knowledge of this important business prob-



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220 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

lem as well as lo fit the needs of those students who wish to
prepare themselves for positions as employment managers.
Prerequisites : Courses I and 32, or their equivalent.

[34/z. Problems in Employment Management. Twf hours credit.
Assistant Professor Edmonds.

In this course the more important phases of employment man-
agement will be developed by means of reports and discussion.
Current problems in the employment field will be covered.

This is an advanced course following Course 34.

Prerequisites : Course 34 and the consent of instructor. Omitted
in 1920- 192 1.]

36rt. Railway Accounts. Lectures, readings, and reports. Three hours
Credit, Assistant Professor Schmitt.

This course undertakes a study of the standardized system of
accounts prescribed for railroads by the Interstate Commerce
Commission. It deals with construction, revenue, expense, in-
come, profit and loss, and balance sheet accounts. This course
gives special emphasis to the use of accounting statements by
operating officers, by public service commissions, and by in-
vestors in railway securities.

Graduate students or special students who desire intensive train-
ing in railway accounts and statistics may secure two hours
additional work during the second semester by enrolling in
Course 18.

38. Principles of Accounting, I. Four hours credit. Lectures, reci-
tations, and laboratory. Professor Paton, Mr. Walker, Mr.
Ross, and Mr. Taggart.
This is a repetition of Course 38 of the first semester.

38£. Principles of Accounting. Three hours credit, Mr. J. P.
Adams.
This course is intended primarily for students whose work lies
in professional departments, particularly engineering. The sub-
ject matter of the course is similar lo that of Course 38. Spe-
cial attention is given to the problems of maintenance and
depreciation, and to the analysis of transactions involving in-
terest calculations. No regular laboratory work is required,
but problems and exercises are assigned which illustrate tech-
nique as well as principles.

38/^. Elements of Accounting. Two hours credit. Dr. Hauhart.

This is an elementary course designed to meet the needs of stu-
dents of pharmacy. The work of the course consists primarily
in a study of the principles of the double-entry system, and in
the construction and analysis of simple financial statements.
Some attention is given to business papers and clerical routine.
Literary students are not admitted.



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Courses of Instruction 221

39. Principles of Accounting, II. Four hours credit. Lectures, reci-
tations, end laboratory. Professor Paton, Assistant Professor
ScHMiTT, Dr. Hauhart, Mr. J. P. Adams, and Mr. Walker.
This is a continuation of Course 38. It is also open (with per-
mission) to students who have completed Course 38J5. The
work of this course includes a study of the accounts and trans-
actions involving partners' equities, capital stock, surplus and
reserves, and liabilities ; the transactions dealing with principal
and interest, including such topics as the treatment of bond
discounts and premiums, sinking funds, etc. ; the problems of
the organization and construction period; the bases of revalu-
ation; depreciation policies and methods; and the intangible
assets. A considerable time is devoted to the construction and
analysis of detail and summary financial statements. The
course concludes with a brief statement of some of the charac-
teristics of the more important special branches of accounting.

42. Municipal and Institutional Accounting. Tw6 hours credit, Mr.

Walker.

An inquiry into the technique of municipal accounts, and a study
of municipal finance and budget maJcing, constitute the first
part of this course. Later, attention is directed to the methods
of accounting peculiar to such public and semi-private enter-
prises as educational institutions, hospitals, etc.

Courses 38 and 39 are prerequisites.

43. Auditing and Special Accounting Systems. Three hours credit.

Assistant Professor Scitmitt.

This is an advanced course designed to meet the needs of stu-
dents who have a professional interest in accounting. In
studying the technique of auditing, C. P. A. examination ques-
tions are largely used for illustrative material. During the
semester each student is required to prepare a report on a
special system of accounts for some particular line of business
such as retailing, building, brokerage, farming, etc.

Courses 38 and 39 are prerequisites.

43/?. Income Tax Procedure. Two hours credit. Professor Paton.

In this course are considered the important features of the income
and excess-profits tax program of the federal government, with
especial reference to their relation to accounting.

Courses 38 and 39 are prerequisites.

47. Business Law, II. Lectures, reading, and discussion of selected
cases. Three hours credit. Mr. Wolaver.

For a f'ull description of the scope and character of this course,
see Course 46 given in the first semester, of which it is a con-
tinuation and by which it must be preceded.

This course is not open to students intending to pursue the pro-
fessional study of law.



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222 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

48. Insurance Accounting. T'wt? /lours credit.

This course will be given by a non-resident expert insurance
accountant and actuary. It is open only to students who are
specializing in actuarial science.

50. Mathematical Theory of Statistics. Introductory Course. Two

hours credit. Elect as Mathematics 50. Assistant Professor
Carver.
This course deals with the elementary theory and applications
of mathematical statistics, and will include a study of such
topics as averages, measures of dispersion, and coefficients of
correlation.

51. Introduction to the Mathematical Theory of Interest. Three

hours credit. Elect as Mathematics 51. Professor Glover.

The aim of this course is to explain and illustrate the applica-
tion of mathematics to financial transactions to such an extent
as may be of interest and value to the general student.

It must be preceded by Course i (or lE).

The attention of students who desire to specialize in statistical
and actuarial mathematics is called to a note concerning the
arrangement of their work in this Announcement under Mathe-
matics.

52. Introduction to the Mathematical Theory of Insurance. Three

hours credit. Elect as Mathematics 52. Professor Gi.ovER.
Course 52 is open to those who have completed Courses i (or
lE) and 51 in Mathematics.

56. Advanced Mathematical Theory of Interest and Life Con-
tingencies (II). Four hours credit. Elect as Mathematics 56.
Professor Glover.

60. Mathematical Theory of Statistics. Advanced Course. T7(fo
hours credit. Elect as Mathematics 60. Mr. Barnard.

68. Seminary in Casualty Actuarial Theory. Three hours credit.
Elect as Mathematics 68. Assistant Professor Carver.

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

Is. Elements of Political Economy I. Principles. Four hours credit.
Dr. Hauhart, and Mr. J. P. Adams.

las. General Economics. T700 hours credit. Mr. EuniN.

$s. Labor Problems. Two hours credit. Mr. Lubin.

6s. Railway Problems. Two hours credit. Mr. J. P. Adams.

9^. Banking. Tiao hours credit. Assistant Professor Calhoun.



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Courses of Instruction 223

lOs. Money and Foreign Exchange. Two hours credit. Assistant
Professor Calhoun.

1 5 J. Corporations. Tiuo hours credit. Professor Sharfman. .

3 1 J. Marketing. Two hours credit. Professor Griffin.

33^. Foreign Trade. Two hours credit. Professor Griffin.

Z7s, Corporation Finance. Two hours credit. Professor Sharfman.

38^. Principles of Accounting I. Four hours credit. Professor Paton.

29J. Principles of Accounting II. Four hours credit. Assistant Pro-
fessor SCHMITT.

43X. Auditing Theory and Practice. Two hours credit. Assistant Pro-
fessor SCHMITT.

Sociology

. Work in Sociology should begin with Course 19, which is now
given in both semesters. It is open to sophomores only in their second
semester; that is, to those who have about forty-five hours credit.

The courses in applied sociology are in close relation to the social
agencies carrying on practical work in Detroit, which afford facilities,
especially to graduates, for such studies as are practicable only in a
large city. Additional credit is given for field work in connection
with some of the courses.

See r«uggestions on page 165 regarding elections for students desir-
ing to prepare for mental testing in social clinics.

Consultation Hours. — At the opening of each semester, to advise
with students regarding elections, 10 to 12, Room 205, Ec.

FIRST SEMESTER

19. Principles of Sociology. Lectures, quiz, and thesis. Four hours
credit. Lectures and recitations. Professor Cooley, Mr.
Holmes, and Mr. Fink.

Sophomores may not elect this course until their second semester ;
that is, when they have about forty-five hours credit.

Senior students, or juniors who are taking one of the combined
curricula, may, by special permission, elect it as 19^, three
hours credit, without the quiz.

This coarse aims at a systematic study of the underlying prin-
ciples of social science. The general plan followed is to begin
with personal relations in their simplest and most direct form,
proceeding thence to the more complex forms of association.
Cooley's Human Nature and the Social Order and Social
Organization are used.

Each student is required to write a thesis, which must be based
in part on personal observation.



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224 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

igg. Principles of Sociology for Gradaate Students. The lectures are
the same as for Course 19. A special quiz section is conducted
by Professor Cooley. The thesis is expected to be of higher
grade than in the undergraduate course.

28. Criminology. Three hours credit. Lectures and recitations. Pro-
fessor Wood.
This course deals with the development of criminological theory,
individual and social factors in crime, modern methods in the
treatment of criminals, and the causes and treatment of juve-
nile delinquency. It must be preceded or accompanied by
Course 19.
In connection with this course visits will be made to prisons,
reformatories, and other institutions that relate to problems of
delinquency. When such visits are arranged it is expected that
members of the class go. Members of the class are permitted
to attend the psycho-pathological clinic held in connection with
classes in the Medical School.

University Credit for Field Work. — In connection with courses
of a practical character it will be iK)ssible for a few advanced
students to obtain additional credit for field work done under
the supervision of one of the Detroit social agencies, such as
the Associated Charities or the Children's Aid Society. Three
hours a week, exclusive of the time spent in travel between
Ann Arbor and Detroit, continued during a semester, will
entitle the student to one hour of University credit. The great
demand at the present time for social workers with experience
makes it of advantage to students looking to social work as an
occupation to get as much practical experience as they can in
connection with their class work in the University.

Students wishing such credit must make definite arrangements
with the instructor in charge at the beginning of the semester,
and report to him as often as every other week. It must also
have been regularly elected.

3. Labor Problems. Three hours credit, Mr. LUBIN.
(See under Political Economy.)

26. The Family. Two hours credit. Professor Wood.

This course treats of the development of the family as a social
institution ; the structure of the primitive family and its rela-
tion to early social organization ; kinship and marriage sys-
tems; the effect of economic progress upon the family in early
times ; the family in early limes ; the family in the modern
era; its relation to the state and to economic and religious
institutions; factors in contemporary problems of the family.
Lectures, assigned readings, and thesis.



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Courses of Instruction 225

22. Rural Sociology. Two hours credit, Mr. Holmes.

The purpose of this coarse is to present rural life, not as a thing
by itself, but as a phase of the general social life. The inter-
dependence of city and country is considered. The various
forces that are operating to remake the occupation of agricul-
ture, and the community life of rural people are discussed.
Some attention is given to the problems that are peculiar to
country institutions such as the church and the school.

This course must be preceded or accompanied by Course 19.

23. Seminary in Principles of Social Work. Two hours credit. Pro-

fessor Wood.
This course is intended for those who mean to follow some phase
of social work as a profession. Students are required to select
some topics with the approval of the instructor, and to pre-
pare upon this topic a series of papers to be read and dis-
cussed in the class room. Special permission must be obtained
before electing the course. Graduate students may be assigned
additional work and receive ihreg hours credit,

24. Social Process. Two hours credit. Professor Cooley.

An advanced course in psychological sociology intended for those
who, in Course 19, have shown aptitude for such work.
Cooley*s Social Process and perhaps other texts will be used.
Special permission must be obtained before electing it

25. Seminary in Social Theory. Intended especially for candidates

for the Doctor's degree. Two hours credit. Professor CoOLEY.

SECOND SEMESTER

19. Principles of Sociology. Lectures, quiz, and thesis. Four hours
credit. Lectures and recitations. Professor Cooliy, Mr.
Holmes, and Mr. Fink.
This is a repetition of the Course 19 given in the first semester.
It is open to sophomores, but in no case to freshmen. Senior
students, or juniors who are taking one of the combined cur-
ricula, may, by special permission, elect it as iga, three hours
credit, without the quiz.
For description, see under first semester.

19^. Principles of Sociology for Graduate Students. The lectures
are the same as for Course 19. A special quiz section is con-
ducted by Professor Cooley.
The thesis is expected to be of higher grade than in the under-
graduate course.

21. Social Evolution. Two hours credit, Mr. Holmes.

The origin and development of social institutions are considered
for the purpose of making clear the organic unity of society.



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226 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Some attention is devoted to heredity and related topics of
fundamental interest. The orig^in of man, and of race, and
the evolution of various human institutions such as language,
law, religion, the family, and the state, are considered.
This course must be preceded or accompanied by Course 19.

27. Immigration. Two hours credit. Mr. Holmes.

The purpose of this course is to give the student an understand-
ing of the problems connected with the influx of great num-
bers of foreigners into our midst. The racial and national ele-
ments among our immigrants, the occupations they enter, their
mode of living, their influence in the formation of classes, and
what their "assimilation" involves, are some of the topics dis-
cussed.

This course must be preceded or accompanied by Course 19.

29. Community Problems. Two hours credit. Professor Wo<M).
This course presents a survey of community problems, and of

public and private agencies that have developed in their solu-
tion. Emphasis is laid upon the growth of the community
consciousness, and upon the endeavor to standardize community
life in accordance with it. Among the topics discussed are:
housing, city-planning, recreation, Americanization, public
health, and the organization of social forces making for wel-
fare.

Lectures, assigned readings, class discussion. Each student is
required to prepare a paper upon some subject within the field.

This course must be preceded or accompanied by Course 19.

See note regarding field work in connection with Course 28.

30. Problems of Poverty. Three hours credit. Professor Wood.
This course presents in a systematic way the facts concerning

poverty, discusses the underlying individual and social causes
of destitution, and the methods which society has adopted for
its amelioration or elimination. The course begins with a dis-
cussion of the feeble-minded, insane, inebriates, and other
classes of the unfit or inefiicient. Survey is then made of some
of the more objective causes of poverty, such as sickness and
unemployment. The attention of the student is directed to
modem methods for the care of dependent classes, and stu-
dents will be required to visit local and state institutions when
practicable.

This course must be preceded or accompanied by Course 19.

See note regarding field work in connection with Course 28.

23^. Seminary in Principles of Social Work. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Wood.
This course is intended for advanced students who are preparing
to follow some phase of social work as a profession. Each



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Courses of Instruction 227

student is assigned a special line of study on which he makes
a series of reports. Special permission is required before elect-
ing the course. Graduate students may be assigned additional
work and receive three hours credit.
See note regarding field work in connection with Course 28.

24. Social Process. Two hours credit* Professor Cooi.ey.

This is an advanced course in psychological sociology (the same
as that offered in the first semester), intended for those who,
in Course 19, have shown aptitude for this line of work.
Cooley's Social Process, and perhaps other texts, will be used.
Special permission must be obtained to elect it.

25J. Seminary in Psychological Sociology. Advanced study of theory.
Intended especially for candidates for the Doctor's degree.
Two hours credit. Professor Coolev.

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

19J. Social Organization. Two hours credit, Mr. Holmes.

22X. Rural Sociology. Two hours credit, Mr. Holmes.

27X. Immigration. Two hours credit. Mr. Holmes

28j. Criminology. Two hours credit. Professor Wood.

291. Community Problems. Two hours credit. Professor Wood.

EDUCATION

(Group III)

General Statement. — Course 7 in Psychology is prerequisite
to work in Education. It should be taken in the sophomore year.
This course does not count towards the Teacher's Diploma.

The aims of the courses in Education are :

1. To offer to prospective high school teachers, normal school
teachers, principals, and superintendents the necessary technical train-
ing for their profession.

2. To present educational history and problems in their more
philosophic and scientific aspects so as to be of value to all Univer-
sity students, whether they intend to become teachers or not.

3. To offer to mature students and to teachers of experience,
who may wish to elect work in Education as a major or minor sub-
ject, direction and facilities leading to higher degrees.

The courses are arranged with reference to five fairly distinct
phases of education, the historical, the psychological, the administra-
tive, the experimental, and the industrial.



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228 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Requirements for Admission. — ^Two years of academic prepara-
tion are prerequisite to work in Education. This requirement may
be waived in special cases.

iNrAODUCTORY COURSES. — Course A is a prescribed introductory
course and must precede or accompany other courses in Education.
It should be pursued either the first or second semester of the junior
year. Courses i, 2, 5, and 46 are elective introductory courses and
may also be pursued in the junior year. All other courses, except
by special permission of the head of the department, are open only
to seniors, graduate students, and prospective superintendents and
principals.

Superintendents and Principals. — Students looking forward to
superintendencies and principalships should pursue, in addition to
the work required for a teacher's diploma, courses in advanced
administration, including a course in tests and measurements and in
experimental education.

Observation. — ^Arrangements have been made between the Uni-
versity and the Public Schools of Ann Arbor whereby students in
Education are given opportunity to study methods of teaching the
various subjects of the curricula in the high school. Students seek-
ing a teacher's diploma are classified into groups and required to
observe expert teaching of their major and minor subjects. Observa-
tion is accompanied by written reports, conferences, and collateral
reading.

Teacher's Diploma. — Candidates for the Teacher's Diploma are
required to complete eleven hours of credit in this department, includ-
ing Courses A and 4 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, or 1). Advanced credit
from other universities or from colleges or normal schools will be
granted toward such diploma as consideration of individual cases may
warrant. No credit will be given for experience in teaching.

Graduate Courses. — Courses leading to the Master's or Doctor's
degree are offered for advanced students in Education. These courses
must be preceded by Course A and two other courses, or the equiva-
lent of such courses.

Departmental Conference. — All graduate students majoring in
Education meet with the departmental staflF every alternate Monday
evening from 7 to 9 o'clock. (No credit.)

Saturday Classes. — Saturday classes will be arranged for teach-
ers, principals, and superintendents now in service if there is sufficient
demand for such work. See Courses 58 and 61, outlined below. For
specific information pertaining to this work, address the head of the
department of Education, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Consultation Hours. — ^The instructors in this department will
have consultation hours as follows :

Professor Whitney, id to 12 daily during registration week.
Room 102, T. H.



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Courses of Instruction 229



FIRST SEMESTER

A. Introductory Course. Lectures, readings, reports, discussions.
Two hours credit. Professors Whitney and Edmonson.
This course aims to gi.ve the beginning student of Education an
acquaintance with the general field as a fundamental basis for
further study and investigation. Among the topics treated are :
meaning of education; cultural, vocational, and recreational
education; organization and status of public education; special
aims of elementary, secondary, and higher education ; programs
of study; legal, social, and professional status of teachers;
certification of teachers; characteristics of childhood and ado-,
lescence ; education literature ; education associations ; profes-
sional courses in Education in the University.
This course is prerequisite to all other courses in Education for
all students without teaching experience.

/. Historical Courses,

I. History of Ancient and Mediaeval Education. Lectures, assigned
readings, papers, and discussions. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Jackson.
This course will trace the development of educational theory and
practice in its relation to the political, social, religious, and
intellectual conditions of the periods treated. It will seek in
connection with this background to develop the meaning in
the social process of the aim, subject matter, method, and
organization of education, and thus provide a sound 'basis for
appreciation and criticism of present educational conditions.

37. The history of Education in the United States. Two hours credit.
Professor Jackson.
This course aims to consider the more important present-day
problems in the organization, administration, and adjustment
of public education in the United States in the light of their
historical development.

Z%a. Seminary in the History of Education. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Jackson.
Intensive study of assigned topics in the history of education,
and discussion of written reports presented. Open to graduates
and seniors.

//. Theoretical Courses.

5. Psychology of Education. Lectures, assigned readings, reports,
and discussions. Two hours credit. Professors Whipple,
Berry, and Jackson.
The aspects of psychology that possess educational significance.



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230 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 20 of 75)