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Emphasis on the nature of mental constitution — mental inherit-
ance, instinctive tendencies, individual differences — and the
possibilities and limitations of modifying mental constitution
by educational agencies.
Open to juniors and seniors.

19. Mental Tests. Two hours credit. Professor Berry.

Nature and purpose of mental tests; relationship between mental
and physical traits; analysis of mental constitution; technique
of testing; principles of test construction; individual and group
tests. Special attention will be given to the Binct, Army, Otis,
Pressey, and National Research Council tests as a means of
classifying school children. This course is intended for super-
intendents, graduates, and others specially qualified.

34a. Seminary in Educational Psychology. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Whipple.

For advanced students. Intensive study of some aspect of edu-
cational psychology.

Enrollment by consent of the instructor.

45fl. Special Studies in Educational Psychology. Credit to be ar-
ranged. Professor Whipple.

For qualified students who wish to undertake minor investiga-
tions, whether experimental or non-experimental, in some phase
of educational psychology. Each student will take his own
problem and his work will be graded by individual conferences
with the instructor.

Enrollment by consent of the instructor.

51. Modem Methods of Teaching. One or two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Courtis.
A discussion of the philosophy, psychology, and educational ex-
perimentation that has changed methods of teaching, with spe-
cial reference to the problem, the project, and the unit-task
methods applied to content and to drill subjects. Assignments
of extra readings and reports will constitute the work for the
second hour of credit.

52a. Introduction to Educational Measurements. Two hours credit.
Professor Courtis.
A course for beginners designed to give educational workers the
point of view, the knowledge, and the skill necessary to apply
scientific methods to the study and improvement of teaching.
It will involve both lectures and laboratory exercises, and will
cover (i) statistical and scientific methods in their application
to education; (2) a knowledge of existing tests and scales for
elementary and high school subjects; (3) a brief review of
recent surveys and educational literature in the field of meas-



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Courses of Instruction 23 r

urement; (4) the uses of measurement as an aid to adminis-
tration, supervision, teaching, and special care of individual
children; (5) measurement of the efficiency of educational
processes, with emphasis mainly upon the subjects of writing,
spelling, and arithmetic.
It is recommended that this course be followed in the second
semester by Course 52^.

///. Administrative Courses,

13. Secondary Education. Introductory Course. Two hours credit.
Professors Edmonson and Davis.
The aim of this course is to give a practical introduction to the
administrative, instructional, and personal problems incident to
the work of the beginning teacher. Among the topics treated
are : discipline ; the technique of the recitation — i, e,, lesson
assignment, questioning, drill, teaching pupils how to study;
examinations; the uses of texts and of supplementary books;
the making of reports and records; extra classroom duties of
teachers; and the personal relation of teachers to the super-
visory officers, the pupils, and the community.
Open to seniors without teaching experience or normal school
training.

i6a. School Administration. Three hours credit. Professor Whitney.
This course is designed for those who have had teaching experi-
ence and who are looking forward to ]>ositions as principals,
supervisors, or superintendents; others may be admitted by
permission. It aims to discuss the chief problems involved in
the organization and management of city school systems.

33. High School Administration. Two hours credit. Professor
Edmonson.

This course is designed to meet the needs of experienced teachers
and prospective superintendents and principals who desire to
make a detailed study of the general problems of organization
and administration of the high school. Among the topics con-
sidered are : the aim of the secondary school ; the supervision
of classroom work; educational and vocational counseling;
problems of discipline; the control of student activities, etc.

Open to students with teaching experience.

4Sa, Seminary in the Administration of Secondary Schools. Two
hours credit. Professor Davis.
This seminary is intended for graduate students desiring to pur-
sue research study in the field of high school administration.
The more significant problems of the administration of second-
ary schools will be investigated analytically and constructively
by the class as a unit, and in addition each student will be



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232 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

expected to select a topic for special investigation and carry
forth his research under the direction of the instructor.
Seniors may, by permission, also be admitted to this course.

$0. The Junior High School. Two hours credit. Professor Davis.,
This course will seek to discover the conditions and motiv^
which have produced the junior high school ; to sketch the his-
torical development of the reform; to consider the essential
educational and administrative principles which must deter-
mine its future growth; to outline the essential elements of
the program of studies and the curricula within it; to con-
sider the best modes of school discipline and instruction which
must operate in its work ; and to formulate a concrete plan of
procedure in inaugurating and perfecting the entire reform
movement
Open to senior and graduate students.

57. Secondary Education. Advanced Course. Two hours credit.
Professor Davis.
This course is designed primarily for teachers of experience, high
school principals, and superintendents who desire to consider
the larger problems of classroom instruction. It is also open
to graduate students without teaching experience and to seniors
with normal school training. While the course deals with
some of the topics treated in Course 13, it seeks to consider
them in a more thoroughgoing manner than is done in the
elementary course. Among the topics treated are : the broaden-
ing purposes of high school instruction; bases of economy in
learning; supervised study; how and what to mark; standard
tests of high school subjects; examinations; certificating high
school teachers ; and agencies of personal growth in service.

/r. Industrial' Education,

In addition to the courses outlined below, courses in "Trade
Analysis," "Methods of Teaching Shop Subjects," "Theory and
Practice of Teaching Related Subjects," and "The Compulsory
Part-time School" will be given in Detroit and Grand Rapids
as needs may require. For further information concerning
these courses, consult Assistant Professor E. Lewis Haves or
Professor Cleg Murtland, of this department, at Cass Tech-
nical High School, Detroit, or Professor Thomas Diamond,
care of Board of Education, Grand Rapids; or write to Pro-
fessor George E. Myers at the University.

61. Administration of Vocational Education. Two hours credit.
Alternate Saturdays. Professor MVERS.
This course aims to meet the needs of those upon whom rests
responsibility for taking the lead in vocational education in



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Courses of Instruction 233

their respective communities. Among the topics considered are :
the State Board in Charge of Vocational Education, its organ-
ization and relation to local boards of education; determining
local needs; laying out an adequate program; standards re-
quired in order tQ obtain Federal and State aid provided under
the Smith-Hughes Law; selection and supervision of teachers;
placing graduates and other vocational students; follow up
work; means of keeping the schools or classes in touch with
changing conditions in industry.

62. An Introduction to Vocational Education. Lectures, discussions,
and reports. Two hours credit. Professor Mysrs.

This course aims to give the student an introduction to the field
of vocational education, with special reference to industrial
education. Among the topics considered are: definition of
terms vocational education, industrial education, pre-vocational
education, practical arts, industrial arts, household arts, manual
training; relation of vocational education to liberal education;
social factors involved in vocational education; responsibility
of society, of the employer, and of the worker; how vocational
education has been given in the past; failure of past methods
under modern industrial and economic conditions; important
factors in modern industrial organization affecting the problem
— specialization of processes, standardization of product, piece
work and bonus systems, efficiency movement; corporation
schools; Y. M. C. A. schools and classes; place of vocational
education in a comprehensive program of public education;
types of vocational schools and classes and the functions of
each«

68. The Compulsory Part-time School. Two-hours credit. Professor
Myers.

This course aims to meet the needs of those who are to teach or
supervise in the part-time schools which Michigan cities are
required to establish under the new law. Among the topics
treated are: origin and development of part-time education;
why made compulsory; purposes and functions of part-time
schools; the Michigan law; determining the needs of a given
community; classification oif part-time pupils; the curriculum;
methods of teaching; follow-up work; vocational counseling;
dealing with employers.

SECOND SEMESTER

A. Introductory Course. Lectures, readings, reports, discussions.

Professor • .

This is a repetition of Course A of the first semester.



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234 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

I, Historical Courses,

2. History of modern Education. Lectures, assigned readings,
papers, and discussions. Two hours credit. Professor Jack-

SOK.

This course is similar to Course i in aim and method of treat-
ment. It deals with the progress of society and related edu-
cational problems from the Renaissance to the present time,
and attempts to show the origin and evolution of present theory
and practice in education.

37. The History of Education in the United States. Two hours credit.
Professor Jackson.
This course aims to consider the more important present-day
problems in the organization, administration, and adjustment
of public education in the United States in the light of their
historical development.

38^. Seminary in the history of Education. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Jackson.
This is a continuation of Course sSa of the first semester. Open
also, with permission of the instructor, to seniors and graduate
students who have not pursued Course 38^.

//. Theoretical Courses.

5. £ducf;tir.nal Psychology. Lectures, assigned readings, reports
and discussions. Two hours credit. Professors Whipple,
Berry, and Jackson.

[6. Principles of Education. Readings, reports, discussions. Two
hours credit. Professor Whitney.
This course is designed to meet the needs of those students who
desire to secure broad backgrounds of educational thought and
practice. Special consideration will be given to the construct-
ive aims and methods of education as implied in a democratic
society. Omitted in 1920- 1931.]

33. Psychology and Education of Exceptional Children. Two hours
credit • Professor Berry.
Extent and significance of individual differences in relation to
education and society ; classification of exceptional children ;
means of selection; psychological characteristics; educational
possibilities; subject matter and methods of instruction;
advantages and disadvantages of the special class or school;
history of subnormal and supernormal children after leaving
School.



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Courses of Instruction 235

34ii. Seminary in Educational Psychology. Ttvo hours credit. Pro-
fessor Whipple.

For advanced students. Intensive study of some aspect of edu-
cational psychology — this year "The Psychology of Character."

Enrollment by consent of the instructor.

45^. Special Studies in Educational Psychology. Credit to be ar-
ranged. Professor Whipple.
This is a -continuation of Course 45a of the first semester. Other
students, however, who have not pursued Course 45a may, by
permission of the instructor, be admitted to the course.

51. Modern Methods of Teaching. One or two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Courtis.
This is a repetition of Course 51 of the first semester.

52^. Introduction to Educational Measurements. Two hours credit.
Professor Courtis.
This is a continuation of Course 52<z, given the first semester,
with emphasis here mainly upon the subjects of composition,
reading, and geography.

58^. Educational Problems. Two hours credit. Alternate Saturdays,
Professor Berry.

The problem selected for this semester is the psychology and edu-
cation of school children of average intelligence who . have
special abilities or disabilities.

This course is primarily intended for teachers, principals, and
superintendents in service.

///. Administrative Courses,

4a, Observation and Special Methods in Greek and Latin. One hour
credit. Professor Crittenden.

Lectures, readings, conferences, and critiques.

Practical application of the principles of class management ; aims
and values of the classics; the courses of study; outlines of
the work as regards quantity, quality, and method ; special con-
sideration of the stress to be laid upon such features as pro-
nunciation, vocabulary, syntax, translation, etc.; examination
of some of the text-books now in use.

Twenty hours of high school observation are required of each
student.

Not open to juniors.

l4h. Observation and special Methods in German. One hour credit.
Assistant Professor Hildner.
Lectures, conferences, reports, readings, and discussions.
The aim of this course is to consider principles of the recitation
unit, to give opportunity ^or the observation of these principles



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236 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

as applied in practice, and to consider the principles under-
lying the teaching of modern language. Such problems as
text-books, pronunciation, proper use of translation will be
given careful attention.
Twenty hours of high school observation are required of each
student. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

4r. Observation and Special Methods in English. One hour credit.
Professor Rankin.

Lectures, conferences, and collateral readings.

The aim of this course is to consider the fundamental principles
of a class recitation and to offer to students in Education
opportunity to observe the practical demonstration of these
principles in teaching composition and literature. Careful con-
sideration is given to formal grammar, the aims, values, and
methods of teaching composition and literature, the courses of
study, and such other factors as pertain to the instruction of
English in the high schools. Students are required to observe
twenty recitations during a semester.

Not open to juniors.

4d. Observation and Special Methods in History. One hour credit.
Professor Davis.

Lectures, conferences, reports, readings, and discussions.

The aim of this course is to give inexperienced but prospective
teachers of history an opportunity to study the special prob-
lems of the classroom and to consider the special aspects of
methods involved in history teaching in secondary schools.
The work will consist of lectures and exercises dealing with
such topics as the aims of history teaching; the relation of
history to literature, biography, and science; the sequence of
the various divisions of the subject ; the proportionate emphasis
to be accorded different phases of history; the organization of
material; the use of text-books and note-books; the use of
outline maps, charts, blackboards, reference books, source
material, pictures, lantern slides, and other illustrative helps;
tests and examinations; reports and reviews; lesson planning;
types of recitation ; the art of questioning ; assignment of les-
sons, and other topics involving the technique of the recitation.

Each student will be required to spend twenty hours during the
semester observing the classroom work in the Ann Arbor High
School.

Not open to juniors.

4e. Observation and Special Methods in Mathematics. One hour
credit. Professor Karpinski.
lectures, readings, and conferences.
The application of the principles of class management to concrete



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Courses of Instruction 237



situations; the aims and values of mathematical study; the
course in mathematics for the secondary school; classification
and critical consideration of special methods and modes; com-
parison of text-books. Twenty hours of high school observa-
tion during the semester.
Not open to juniors.

4/. Observation and Special Methods in Botany. One hour credit.
Professor Pollock.

Lectures, conferences, reports, and discussions of observations.
Twenty hours of observation during the semester of Botany
teaching in the Ann Arbor High School. One hour per week
for conference.

In the conference hour there will be considered : First, the labo-
ratory and its equipment; then the educational value of the
natural sciences, how this value is to be obtained, and its rela-
tion to the method of teaching the subject. Lastly, a course
of study for Botany will be discussed in detail, with reasons
for the choice of material. A detailed outline for a number
of field trips will be worked out. The phases of botany espe-
cially valuable as a basis for agriculture will be indicated.

Not open to juniors.

4^. Observation and Special Methods in Zoology. One hour credit.
Assistant Professor La Rue.

Lectures and conferences on such topics as the following: The
aim and value of the zoological course in secondary schools,
the content of the course, literature, the planning of the labora-
tory, choice of apparatus, purchase of supplies, etc.

Twenty hours of observation work with reports on the teaching
of Zoology in the Ann Arbor High School will be required.

For practical training in laboratory methods prospective teachers
of Zoology should elect Courses i8 and i8j in Zoology in the
same year with this course or prior to it.

Not open to juniors.

4A. Observation and Special Methods in Physics. One hour credit.
Assistant Professor Rich.

This course is open only to seniors who are completing the
requirements for recommendation as teachers in Physics. See
under Physics.

Lectures, conferences, readings, reports, discussions, on such sub-
jects as the relative emphasis to be placed on the various parts
of a high school course in Physics ; the choice and the planning
of laboratory experiments and the correlation of laboratory
work with text-book work ; the comparison of various labora-
tory methods, note-books, and manuals; the selection and care
of apparatus for lecture table and laboratory; the advantages



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23^ College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

and the disadvantages of separate courses for boys and girls;

the use of supplementary material, "household" physics,

"practical" physics, etc.
Twenty hours of high school observation during the semester.
Not open to juniors.

41'. Observation and Special Methods in French. Ong hour credit.

Professor Canfikld.
I^ectures, readings, conferences, and reports.
Twenty hours of high school observation are required of each

student.
Not open to juniors.

13. Secondary Education. Introductory Course. Two hours credit*

Professor Davis.
This course is a repetition of the one given the first semester.

14. Social Education. Lectures, readings, theses, reports. Two hours

credit. Professor Whitney.
A study of the school as a social f.actor in its relation to the
home, the community, the state, and the church. Among the
topics treated are: the social basis of education; the social
extension of the school; continuation schools; school and the
business world; parental schools; the juvenile court; self-
governing clubs ; the boy problem ; education and crime ; indus-
trial education; agricultural education; athletics; course of
study; six-year high school; social study period and recitation,
and high school fraternities.

16^. School Administration. Readings, reports, discussions. Three
hours credit. Professor Whitney.
This course is a continuation of ida; it is opened to others of
teaching experience, by permission. It aims to consider scien-
tific methods of organization and supervision. Among the
topics treated are: individual differences in their relation to
retardation, elimination, and promotion of pupils; standards
of efficiency ; school surveys ; school financing ; budget making ;
standardization of school buildings, etc.

17. Comparative School Systems. Lectures, prescribed readings, and
reports. Two hours credit. Professor Davis.
This course is designed to present the essential features of the
school systems of the United States, England, Germany, and
France to compare these systems with each other, and to judge
of the efficiency of each in the light of their respective educa-
tional aims and national ideals. Among the topics treated are :
organization, supervision, curriculum, methods of teaching, con
tinuation schools, technical schools, universities, etc.
Oi>cn to senior and graduate students.



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Courses of Instruction 239

18. The High School Program of Studies (Curriculum). Two hours
credit. Professor Davis.

This course traces briefly the historical development of the pro-
gram of studies (curriculum) in secondary schools; seeks to
discover the principles of program construction; considers the
criticisms directed against the existing high school programs
of studies; attempts to valnate each of the subjects found
today in the high school, to judge of its scope, time allotment,
and position in the course, and to suggest modes of its corre-
lation and general methods of its presentation; makes a study
of typical programs ; and endearors to formulate a satisfactory
program of the high schools of today.

Open to senior and graduate students.

48^. Seminary in the Administration of Secondary Schools. Two hours
credit Professor Davis.
Course 48^ is a continuation of Course 48a. Students who have
not pursued Course 48a may, however, by the consent of the
instructor, be permitted to take this course.

IV. Industrial Education.

60. Methods of Teaching Industrial Subjects. Two hours credit.
Professor Myers.
This is a general course in methods for those teaching or prepar-
ing to teach in day, part-time, or evening industrial schools
and classes. Among the topics treated are: preparation for
the first session of the class; organizing the class; principles
governing selection and arrangement of industrial teaching
material; choice of problems and projects; the demonstration
method; the method of illustration and the use of models,
sketches, pictures, and other illustrative material; the lecture
method ; the experimental method ; use of lesson sheets ; inspect-
ing and criticizing pupils' work; lesson planning; planning
and conducting shop excursions; tests and examinations; rec-
ords and reports; keeping up with changing conditions in
industry.

68. The Compulsory Part-time School. Two hours credit. Professor
Myers.
This course aims to meet the needs of thQse who are to teach or
supervise in the part-time schools which Michigan cities are
required to establish under the new law. Among the topics
treated are : origin and development of part-time education ;
why made compulsory; purposes and functions of part-time
schools; the Michigan law; classification of part-time pupils;
the curriculum; methods of teaching; follow-up work; voca-
tional counseling; dealing with employers.



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^40 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

69. Vocational Counseling. Two hours credit. Professor Mybrs.

This course, which is planned primarily for teachers in vocational
and part-time schools, should be of great value to high school
and junior high school teachers. Among the topics treated are:
present methods of entering occupations; social and economic
waste involved; conditions and principles underlying \\\t pres-
ent situation; pre-vocational courses; self-analysis as a basis



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 21 of 75)