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for vocational choice; English teaching as a means of pre-
senting occupational information ; special course in occupational
information ; psychological tests ; placement in relation to voca-
tional counseling ; vocational counseling in the compulsory part-
time school.

SUMMER SESSION OF I921

/. Historical Courses

S27. The History of Education in the United States. Two hours
credit. Professor Jackson.

//. Theoretical Courses

55. Psychology of Education. Two hours credit. Professor Berry.

56. Principles of Education. Two hours credit. Professor Whitney.

SiQfl. Introduction to Mental Testing. Two hours credit. Professor
Thukstone.

Si9^. Individual Intelligence Testing. Two hours credit. Professor
Jackson. - ,

Si9f. Group Intelligence Testing. Two hours credit. Professor
Whipple.

Si 9^. Advanced Mental Testing. Two hours credit. Professor
Thurstonb.

S33. Psychology and Education of Exceptional Children. Two hours
credit. Professor Berry.

S45. Minor Problems in Educational Psychology, Credit to be ar-
ranged. Professor Whipple.

52a. Introduction to Educational Measurements. Two hours credit.
Professor Courtis.

S53a. Tests and Scale Construction. Advanced Course. Two hours
credit. Professor Courtis.

S56<i. Psychology of the Common Branches. Two hours credit. As-
sistant Superintendent Packer.



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Courses of Instrtiction 241

///.Administrative Courses,

Si2a. Social Education. Tivo hours credit. Professor Burnham.

Si6^. School Adminislration. T700 hours credit. Professor Whitney.

S32. High School Administration. Two hours credit. Superintendent
Sexton.

S4ia. Administrative Problems of the Large High School. Two hours
credit. Professor Davis.

S50. The Junior High School. Two hours credit. Professor Davis.

S57. Secondary Education. Advanced Course. Two hours credit.
Superintendent Sexton.

S8ofl. Rural Education. Ttvo hours credit. Professor Burnham.

S8ia. Principles of Method. Two hours credit. Superintendent
Butler.

S82J. Business Management in the Public Schools. Two hours credit.
Assistant Superintendent Packer.

S83tf. School and Personal Hygiene. Two hours credit. Director
RowK.

S84a. Administration of Physical Administration. Two hours credit.
Director Rows.

/V, /ndustrial Education.

S68.The Compulsory Part-time School. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Myers.

569. Vocational Guidance and Placement. Two hours credit. Pro-

fessor Myers.

570. Methods in Foremanship Training. Two hours credit. Super-

visor Smith, and Professor Diamond.

S66. Methods of Teaching Mechanical Drawing. Two hours credit.
Mr. Keppler.

S65. Methods of Teaching Industrial Mechanics and Science. Tivo
hours credit. Assistant Professor Hayes.

572. The Social and Economic Background of Vocational Education.

Two hours credit. Professor Murtland.

573. Teaching General Continuation Subjects in the Part-time School.

Two hours credit. Professor Murti.and.



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242 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

ENGLISH

Courses 3, 30 sd, 5a, 5*, 6, 6a, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18,
iSa, 19, 20, 21, 21a, 22, 23, 23fl, 26, 27, 28, 30, 31, and 32 will ordi-
narily be found suitable for graduate students.

Courses I and 2 will satisfy the requirement in English in the
Literary- Law curriculum and in the other combined curricula.

Students who are preparing to teach English are strongly advised
to elect at least one course from the following group: 3 (Old Eng-
lish) ; $c (Chaucer) ; 7 (Historical English Grammar). Graduate
students who have had one of these courses as undergraduates are
advised to elect a second course from this group in their first year of
graduate study.

Consultation Hours. — During the registration period, Septem-
ber 20 to 24, a departmental representative, daily, 10 to 12, Room
ao8, T. H.

FIRST SEMESTER

I. English Literature. Historical outline, with assigned readings.
Threg hours credit. Assistant Professors Humphreys, Gin-
GERiCH, and Fries, Dr. Raymond, Dr. J. R. Moore, and Mr.

KUYPER.

3. Old English. Three hours credit. Professor S. Moore.

This course is intended to provide students with a solid basis for
the study of English grammar and the history of the English
language; to give them a first-hand acquaintance with some
representative prose works of the Old English period; and to
prepare them to read Beowulf in its original form.

3^. Chaucer. Three hours credit. Professor S. Moore.

After making a careful study of the Prologue and learning the
essential facts in regard to the pronunciation and inflections
of Chaucer's language, students will go on to the more rapid
reading of about six of the Canterbury Tales,

4. Shakespeare. Two hours credit. Professors Strauss and

TiLLEY.

A critical reading of Othello, Twelfth Night, and Henry V,
The plays studied are so chosen that this course may be
elected with credit two years in succession. Course 4 must
be preceded by Courses i and 2 or an equivalent.

5rt. The English Drama before Shakespeare. Three hours credit.

Professor Tilley.
Lectures on the earlier forms of the drama up to Shakespeare,

together with an intensive study of two of the more important

plays of the period.
Open^to those who have had a course in Shakespeare.



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Courses of Instruction 243

6. English Literature from Milton to Pope. Three hours credit.

Assistant Professor Humphrsys.
A study of the rise of Classicism in English literature, and of
the progress of the movement through the Restoration and
Queen Anne periods.

7. Historical English Grammar. Three hours credit. Professor S.

Moore.
An elementary study of the historical development of the sounds
and inflections of modem English.

13. Introduction to the Poetry of Browning. Three hours credit.
Professor Strauss.
A study of selections from the Dramatic Lyrics, Dramatic Ro-
mantes. Men and Women, and Dramatis Personae. The course
is designed primarily for juniors and seniors.

18. The Development of the English Novel. Three hours credit.
Professor Strauss.
Open to seniors and graduate students.

A study of the rise of the novel in England as an art form,
with an attempt to discover the principle of its development

ao. Studies in Spenser, with special reference to the Faery Queen,
Two hours credit. Professor Tii.ley.
Lectures and readings, with the consideration of special problems
centering about Spenser.

[31. Seminary in English Philology. Two hours credit. Professor
S. MOORK.
The subject for 1921-1923 will be selected after consultation with
the class from the following : Old English historical grammar ;
Old English dialects; Middle English historical grammar;
Middle English dialects; problems in Modern English gram-
mar. Omitted in 1930- 192 1.]

33. Contemporary Drama. Two hours credit. Dr. J. R. Moore.

A study of the drama of the present day, with special attention
to the inter-relations of the English drama with that of the
continent.

33. Middle English. Two hours credit. Professor S. Moore.

The purpose of this course is to trace the process by which Old
English developed, through the stage represented by the lan-
guage of Chaucer, into Modern English, and to give the stu-
dent some acquaintance with the literature of the thirteenth
and fourteenth centuries.
Open to students who have had Courses 3 and 3r or their equiv-
I d)?9tS/ ai^d tQ others who obtain special permission.



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244 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

24. The English Bible, its Literary Aspects and Influence. Two
hours credit. Assistant Professor Humphreys.
The King James Version will be used in class. A leading aim
of this course (together with Course 25) will be to acquaint
the student with the Scripture Story as material for literary
allusion and illustration. The course may be taken in con-
nection with or following Course I.

[26. Ben Jonson. Two hours credit. Professor Tilley.

The course will consist of the critical reading of two of Jon-
son's representative plays, together with lectures on his rela-
tion to Shakespeare and other contemporary dramatists.

Omitted in 1920- 192 1.]

27. Studies in Modern English Literature. Primarily for graduate
students. Two hours credit. Professor Strauss.
In 1920-1921 the subjects for study will be selected from the
following: The Classical Movement; Restoration Comedy;
Eighteenth Century Essayists; the Rise of Romanticism;
Development of the Novel; Nineteenth Century Fiction;
Browning's Major Works; Present Tendencies in the Drama.

30. Wordsworth and His Contemporaries. Two hours credit. As-
sistant Professor Gingericii.
A considerable portion of Wordsworth's works will be read in
class. Wordsworth's place in the Romantic Movement in
English literature will be fully considered. Coleridge, Scott,
Byron, Shelley, and Keats will be studied in relation to the
Romantic Movement.

32. Milton. Two hours credit. Dr. RAYMOND.

A study of Milton's poetry, the major part of which wiU be
read in class. The artistic and religious backgrounds of these
works, represented by the influence of the Classics, the Scrip-
tures, and the ideals of the Puritan movement, will be discussed.

Course 32 must be preceded by Courses i and 2 or an equivalent.

33' English Prose of the Victorian Era. Two hours credit. Dr.
Raymond.
A study and interpretation of representative works of the fol-
lowing writers: Macauley, Carlyle, Newman, Ruskin, Arnold,
Huxley, Pater, and Stevenson.
This course will include a general consideration of the social
and intellectual movements of the Victorian age, as revealed
through its prose literature.

SFXOxXD SEMESTER

I. English Literature. Historical outline, with assigned readings.
Three hours credit. Mr. KuYPER.
This is a repetition of Course i of the first semester, and is



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Courses of Instruction 245

intended for those who» beginning the study in the second
semester, wish to elect Courses i and 2 in chronological order.

2. English Literature. Historical outline, with assigned readings.
Three hours credit. Assistant Professor Humphreys, Gin-
GERiCH, and Fries, Dr. Raymond, Dr. Moore, and Mr.

KUYPER.

Course 2 is a continuation of Course I.

Sti, Chaucer. Two hours credit. Professor S. MooRE.

The course consists of rapid reading of the work of Chaucer

not read in Course 3c, with lectures and reports.
Open to students who have had Course 3^ or its equivalent.

4a, Shakespeare. Two hours credit. Professor Tilley.

A critical reading of Hamlet, Wintev^s Tale, and Richard //.
(The plays studied are so chosen that this course may be
elected with credit two years in succession.)

56. The English Drama, from Shakespeare to the Closing of the
Theatres, 1642. Three hours credit. Professor Tiu-EY.
Course Sb is a continuation of Course 5a.

ta. English Literature from Pope to Wordsworth. Three hours
credit. Assistant Professor Humphreys.
Course 6a is a continuation of Course 6. It deals with the fur-
ther history of English Classicism, through the time of John-
son; with the rise and progress of Romanticism through the
same period, and to the end of the Eighteenth century; and
with the relation of the Eighteenth century novel to general
conditions in life and literature.

8. Beowulf. Three hours credit. Professor S. Moore.

Reading of the text, with study of the meter and literary char-
acteristics of Old English poetry. Open to students who have
had Course 3 or its equivalent.

9. Modern English Grammar. Three hours credit. Professor S.

Moors.
A study of Modem English Grammar in the light of the his-
torical development of the language and from the point of
view of the psychology of speech.

12. Shikespeare Seminary. The plays studied are: A Midsummer
Night's Dream; The Merchant of Venice; As You Like It;
The Tempest; Richard III; the two parts of Henry IV;
Henry V; Romeo and Juliet; Hamlet; Othello; King Lear;
Macbeth; Coriolanus. Two hours credit. Professor Strauss.
Open to seniors and graduate students. Each member of the
seminary is required to present a report on one of these plays.



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246 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

I3tf. The Poetry of Browning. Three hours credit. Professor Strauss.
A study of several of Browning^'s major works, such as Pippa

Passes, Paracelsus, A SouTs Tragedy, etc.
Course 13a should be preceded by Course 13.

14. American Literature. Authors studied : Irving, Cooper, Bryant,
Emerson, Hawthorne, Longfellow, Whittier, Poe, Holmes,
Thoreau, Lowell, Howells, and James. Two hours credit.
Assistant Professor Gingerich, and Dr. Raymond.

Representative works of the authors named are studied and
compared with masterpieces of British authors, and an attempt
is made to discover the distinctively American element.

Sections I, II, and III are designed for upperclassmen only.
Sec. IV is open to graduate students only.

[16. Old English Poetry. Two hours credit. Professor S. Moore.
Critical reading of the short poems embodying Germanic mate-
rial, and of representative works of the caedmonian and Cyne-
wulfian schools of Christian poetry; examinations of the lit-
erary problems connected with the texts that are read. For
students who have had Courses 3 and 8. Omitted in 1920-
1931.I

i8<i. Prose Fiction of the Nineteenth Century. Three hours credit.
Professor Strauss.
Course 18a is a continuation of Course 18. Lectures, discussions,
and readings in the works of Scott, Austen, Bulwer-Lytton,
Disraeli, Dickens, the Bront^ sisters, George Eliot, Trollope,
Reade, Kingsley, Meredith, Blackmore, Hardy, Stevenson, and
others. Open to students who have completed Course 18, and
to others who receive permission.

[aia. Seminary in English Philology. Two hours credit. Professor
S. Moore.
This course is a continuation of Course 31. Omitted in 1920-
1921.]

22a. Technique of the Drama. Two hours credit. Dr. J. R. Moore.
A practical study of dramatic form and structure based upon

analysis of modern plays and upon recent critical literature.
This course is a continuation of Course 22.

2$a. Middle English. T700 hours credit; hours to be arranged. Pro-
fessor S. Moore.
This course is a continuation of Course 33.

35. The English Bible, Its Literary Aspects and Influence. Assistant
Professor Humphreys.
Course 35 is a continuation of Course 24.



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Courses of histruction 247

3$. Studies in Modern English Literature. Primarily for graduates.
Two hours credit. Professor Strauss.
Course 28 is a continuation of Course 27.

31. Wordsworth and His Contemporaries. Two hours credit. As-

sistant Professor Gingerich.
Course 31 is a continuation of Course 30.

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

2a. Outline History of English Literature. Two hours credit. Dr.
Raymond, and Dr. Moore.

14. American Literature. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
GiNGFRicir, Dr. Raymond, and Dr. Moore.

4. Shakespeare. Two hours credit. Professor TiiXBY.

34. The English Bible, Its Literary Aspects and Influences. Two
hours credit. Assistant Professor Humphreys.

5. Chaucer. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Fries.

$c. History of English Drama. Two hours credit. Professor Tili^y.
3^. Anglo-Saxon. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Fries.
3^. History of the English Language. Two hours credit. Professor

TiLLEY.

30. Wordsworth and His Contemporaries. Two hours credit. As-
sistant Professor Gingerich.

27^. Studies in Modern English Literature. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Strauss.

32. Eighteenth Century Romanticism. Two hours credit. Assistant

Professor Humphreys.

19a. The Poetry of Tennyson. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
Gingerich.

13a. Introduction to the Poetry of Browning. Two hours credit,
Professp- Strauss.

18^. The Development of the English Novel. Two hours credit. Dr.
Mooue.

32a. Milton. Two hours credit. Dr. Raymond.



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24^ College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

FINE ARTS

The aim of the courses offered in this department is to give the
student a knowledge of the origin and development of the Fine Arts
throughout the ages. Together with the history of their growth arc
studied their principles, technique, appreciation, and criticism, and
the relation of the art of the various peoples to their history, religion,
literature, and daily life.

A general knowledge of history is presumed. A knowledge of
Latin and Greek and ability to read French, German, and Italian
will be of assistance in advanced courses.

It is strongly urged that the couries be elected in their numerical
sequence. Coarse I is offered each semester and is prerequisite for
all others. None of these courses are open to freshmen.

Consultation Hours. — Professor Cross will meet students for
consultation at his office in Memorial Hall, M, W, F, from 9:30 to
10, and at 3.

nRST SEMESTER

I. General Introductory Course in the Fine Arts. The origin, devel-
opment, and essential principles and technique of Architecture,
Sculpture, and Painting, including a brief survey of their
history from prehistoric times to the present. Text-book, S.
Reinach's ApoJh, Illustrated lectures, required reading, and
written tests. Three hours credit. Professor Cross.
This course or its equivalent, satisfactory to the instructor is a
prerequisite for all other courses in this department

3. Greek Art. The history of the Fine Arts among the Greeks, to
the Roman period, with a preliminary survey of Egyptian and
Mesopotamian art. Special attention is given to the great
sculptors of the Fifth and Fourth Centuries, B. C. Illustrated
lectures, required reading, written tests. Three hours credit.
Professor Cross.

5. Italiaa Renaissance Art. The history of the Fine Arts in Italy
in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries, with special attention
to the development of Italian painting. Illustrated lectures,
required reading, written test. Three hours credit. Professor
Cross.

SECOND semester

I. General Introductory Course. A repetition of Course i of the
first semester. Three hours credit. Professor Cross.

[4. Roman and Mediseval Art. The history of the Fine Arts in the
Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, and Mediseval periods,
with special attention to Roman and Gothic architecture. Illus-
trated lectures, required readings, written tests. Three hours
credit^ Professor Cross. Omitted in 1920-1921.]



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Courses of Instruction 249

6. The Renaissance Outside of Italy. The history o£ Spanish,
French, Flemish, Dutch, German, and English Reniiissance Art
(including the Nineteenth Century). Illustrated lectures, re-
quired reading, written tests. Three hours credit. Professor
Cross.

8. American Art. The history of the Fine Arts (architecture,
sculpture, and painting) in the United States from Colonial
tim-js to the present. Illustrated lectures, required readings,
written quizzes. Three hours credit. Professor Cross.

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

fa. General Introductory Course in Fine Arts. Two hours credit.
Professor Cross.
JOtf. Oriental Art. Twd hours credit. Professor Cross.

FORESTRY

Most of the courses in Forestry are intended primarily for the
training of professional foresters, but are open to all students of the
University who are properly prepared to take them and who obtain
the permission of the professor in charge.

However, a certain number of courses are now offered by the
Forestry department that are non-technical in character and- are open
to all students oif the University without special preparation* The
aim of these courses is to enable students in other departments to
become informed with regard to certain fundamental phases of for-
estry work and forestry conditions in their relation to our national
business and general welfare. These general courses are 21, 22, 23,
24, and 34a.

All Forestry courses are given in the Natural Science building.

(For further information regarding Forestry courses, see the
special Forestry Announcement.)

Consultation Hours. — ^Throughout registration week, September
20 to 24,, Professor Roth, or his representative, will be in Room
F 214, N. S., 10 to 12 daily, to consult with studfnts and advise them
in their elections.

first semester

I. Introduction to Forestry. Two hours credit. Lectures. Profes-
sor Roth.

A general presentation of the subject, its history, objects^, meth-
(^s, as well at its economic importance.

Prerequisite: Botany i.

3. Timber. Two hours credit. Lecture and laboratory. Assistant
Professor Watson.
Continuation of Course 4.



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250 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

5. Silvics. Four hours credit. Three lectures and one laboratory
or field period. Professor Young.

Life history of the stand of trees in the forest from its start to
maturity and death. The factors of site (climatic, soil, physio-
graphic, and biotic) in their relation to the occurrence of forest
and the development of forest types and stands of timber.
The reaction of the stand on the site. Study of the principal
forest types in the several regions of the United States. Field
methods for the study of site conditions, of the silvical char-
acters of species and their behavior in stands.

Prerequisites: Botany 13 and 14, and Forestry i and 6.

7. Forest Mensuration. Four hours credit. Two lectures and two
laboratory or field periods. Assistant Professor Craig.
Timber estimating and scaling; methods of surveying and map-
ping of forest lands ; methods used in forest investigations for
measuring volumes of single trees and yield in volume of entire
stands.
Prerequisites: Surveying 13 and 13, Botany 13 and 14, Mathe-
matics I and 3.

9. Silviculture. Four hours credit. Three lectures and one field

period. Professor Young.
Study of natural reproduction of the forest. TTiinning practice

and the care of stands to improve their condition and growth.
The various methods of reproduction and care are considered

especially with reference to their application to conditions in

the United States and Canada. Instruction in marking trees

to be cut in thinnings and final harvest.
Prerequisites: Forestry 5 and 6. Geology 15 must precede or

accompany this course.

1 1 j-r. Special or Advanced Work in Forestry. This course may be
elected only by special permission of the professor in charge.
Two, three, or four hours credit.

This course is elected as :

iia. Management. Professor RoTiT.

11^. Silviculture and Timber. Professor Young.

lie. Protection and Utilization. Assistant Professors Craig and
Watson.

13. Forest Utilization. Three hours credit. Lectures and field work.
Assistant Professor Craig.

Methods of realizing upon forest resources. Uses of timber,
points of production and market. Methods of manufacture,
costs and values. Minor forest products. Logging and saw-
milling. Stumpage valuation. Timber sale contracts and sale
administration. Miscellaneous forest uses.

Prerequisites: Surveying 12 and 13 and Forestry 1.



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Courses of Instruction 251

15. Forest Management. Four hours credit. Lectures. Professor
Roth.
Forest regulation ; surveys and reports of forest properties ; prep-
aration and revisions of forest working plans. Division of
forest into working units; size, form, use, and importance of
the working section, the lot, or compartment, and the catting
series. Considerations entering into the choice of species, meth-
ods of silviculture, choice of rotation, regulation of cut, or
harvest ; the lines and extent of improvements, methods of util-
ization and protection, and the relation of these principal lines
of work as they affect the working plan. The Normal Forest.
Detailed plans and bookkeeping in Forestry.
Prerequisites : Forestry 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, and 14.

19. Forest Protection. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Wat-
son.

Enemies of the forest as they affect the work of the forester.
Forest laws, trespass and trespass procedure. Occurrence, pre-
vention, and suppression of forest fires. Rating of protection
costs to hazards and values. Planning and operating fire pre-
venting and fire fighting systems. Preventive and protective
measures in attack by insects and fungi. Meteorological and
other damages.

Prerequisites: Forestry 4, 9, and 10; Botany 17,

21. Conservation with Special Reference to the Forest Resources of
the United States. One hour credit. Lectures. Assistant Pro-
fessor Watson.

Development of the Public Land Policy of the United States;
characteristics and status of the natural resources; forest prod-



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