University of Michigan.

Catalogue of the University of Michigan online

. (page 25 of 75)
Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 25 of 75)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


No knowledge of the Greek language is required for this course.

14. Greek Mythology. Professor Bonner. Elect as Classical Archae-
ology 6.

30. Topography and Monuments of Ancient Athens. Illustrated lec-

tures and assigned readings. Professor Winter. Elect as
Classical Archaeology 8.

32. Christian Literature and Institutions in the Apostolic Age. Two
hours credit. Assistant Professor Robbins. Elect as Hellenistic
Greek 6.

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

loj. The Greek Drama Studied in Translations. Tioo hours credit.
Professor Bonner.

igs. Ancient Greek • Life. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor
Robbins.

Hellenistic Greek

Students who wish to enter these courses are expected to have
had Couises A and B in Classical Greek. See the description above.

FIRST SEMESTER

I. Elementary Course. The Gospels according to Mark, Matthew,
and Luke, with grammatical study of Hellenistic Greek. Stu-
dents should provide themselves with one of the standard texts,
such as Westcott and Hort, Nestle, or Souter (Oxford text).
Three hours credit. Assistant Professor Robbins.

3. The Pauline Epistles, /-and // Corinthians, Romans, Reading
and interpretation. T7uo hours credit. Assistant Professor
Robbins.

5. History of the New Testament. Professor Sanders.

This course deals with the origin and dates of the various books
of the New Testament, and then traces the history of the text
through versions and manuscripts down to the age of printing.



Digiti



ized by Google



Courses of Instruction 275

SECOND SEMESTER

2. The Acts of the Apostles and the Fourth Gospel. Three hours

credit. Assistant Professor ROBBINS.
This course may be taken, if desired, as two separate parts, viz. :
2a. The Acts of the Apostles. Two hours credit,

2b. The Fourth Gospel. One hour credit.

4. The Pauline Epistles. Galations I and //, Thessahnians, Ephe-
sions. Two hours credit. Assistant Professor Robbins.
In place of one or two of the Epistles, the class may interpret
selections from the works of the Apostolic Fathers, if such
reading be preferred.

6. Christian Literature and Institutions in the Apostolic Age. Two
hours credit. Assistant Professor Robbins.

This course deals with the history and contents of the books of
the New Testament, the circumstances under which they were
written, early Christian literature outside of the New Testa-
ment, the history of the Apostolic Age, and those phases of
contemporary paganism which affect Christian history. Lec-
tures, assigned readings, and class discussions.

A knowledge of Greek is not required of students electing the
course.

SUMMER SESSION OF I92I

2s. The New Testament in Greek. Two hours credit. Assistant Pro-
fessor Robbins.

History of Religions

FIRST SEMESTER

19. Elementary Phenomena of Religion. Two hours credit. Profes-
sor Bonner.

A study of primitive forms of religion, such as fetichism, ani-
mism, ancestor-worship, magic, etc. The subject will be illus-
trated not only from the religion of the Greeks and other
ancient peoples, but also from the religious practices of modern
peoples living under primitive conditions of civilization. Lec-
tures, assigned readings, and reports.

For other courses in the history of Religions, see under Semi lies.

Journal Club

Analysis and criticism of important articles in the domain of
Greek and Latin languages and literatures, Greek and Latin grammar
and lexicology, Greek and Roman history, archaeology, and antiqui-
ties, by members of the classical faculty, and of the Greek and Latin
seminaries. Fortnightly, throughout the year.



Digiti



ized by Google



276 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Hebrew

(See Semitics)

Hellenistic Greek

(See Greek Language and Literature)

HISTORY

(Group III)

Students entering upon historical work are, as a rule, required
to take iirst either Courses i and 2, dealing with the history of
Europe since the seventeenth century, or Courses la and 2a, dealing
with the history of England, or Courses lb and 2b, dealing with the
history of Greece and Rome. The order advised is i before 2, or la
before 2a, or lb before 2b; but those who find it necessary to begin
their work in history the second semester may take 2 before i, or 2a
before la, or 2b before 'i^. Students who intend to take advanced
work in history should elect these introductory courses (either i and
2, or la snd 2a, or i^ and 2b) as early as possible after' entering col-
lege, preferably in the first year.

Juniors and seniors may elect these introductory courses only
by special permission, and for three hours credit instead of four.

As soon as the introductory work is completed, students may
elect courses in one or more of the following fields : American history
(13, 14. I5» 37) ; ancient history (7, 8) ; English history (3, 4, 5, 6) ;
history of the Middle Ages and age of the Renaissance And Reforma-
tion (9, 10); modem European history (11, 12); Latin-American
history (51, 52, 53, 54). 'fhese courses lead on to more advanced
work in each field, and students are advised to consult with those in
charge of such work concerning choice of courses.

Registration of Students Preparing to Teach History in the
Schools. — Students who expect to teach history and kindred subjects
in the schools, and who desire recommendation from members of the
department of history, should register with the department as early
as possible in their course, preferably by the beginning of their junior
year. They may thus have special guidance in planning their work
for the end in view.

Such students will be regarded as in one or another of three
groups — C, B, A, — according to the degree of preparation sought.

In Group C will be those who specialize in some other subject,
and pursue history only as a minor. These students,: to receive any
statement from members of the department of history, must do, aside
from introductory work in college, at least six hours in each of two
main fields outside of that in which the introductory work was done.
(By "main fields** is meant such divisions as Ancient, Medieval,
Modern, English, American.)

In Group B will be those who specialize in history, but cannot
go further (at least temporarily) than the bachelor's degree. For



Digiti



ized by Google



Courses of Instruction 277

such students the minimum requirement, aside from the introductory
work, will be at least six hours in each of three main fields outside
of that in which the introductory work was done, and at least one
of Courses 21 and 22. (Courses 21 and ?2 are of pro-seminary char-
acter.)

In Group A will be those who would go far enough with their
studies to prepare for positions in the better high schools and the
junior colleges — who would plan then to go at least as far as the
master's diegree. For such students the minimum requirement in
history will be, aside from (he introductory work: (i) in courses
other than pro-seminary or seminary, thirty-six hours, distributed so
as to include six hours in each main field outside of that in which
the introductory work was done; (2) in pro-seminary and seminary,
at least one of Courses 21 or 22, and four hours of seminary.

In addition to the requirements in history, students will be ex-
pected to do some work in certain other subjects— especially political
science, economics or sociology, and foreign language and literature;
and according to circumstances, geography, psychology, and phil-
osophy.

TTie advice given to registering students, in regard alike to work
in history and to work in other fields, will be determined largely by
individual needs. The registration will be in charge of Professor
Dow.

Consultation Hours. — ^Throughout registration week, September
20 to 24: Professors Turner and Frayer^ daily, 10 to 12, Rooms
202, 207, T. H.

FIRST SBKESTBR

Primarily for Undergraduates,

I. The General History of Europe, from the seventeenth century to
1815. Four hours credit. Lectures and quizzes. Professor
Frayer, Mr. LbcAS, Mr. Carroll, Mr. Ryskamp, and reading
assistants.

This course and Course 2 deal with Europe since the Tliirty
Years' War. The rise of Prussia and of Russia, the decline of
Spain, the ascendancy of France, the great Revolution and the
Napoleonic empire are the chief subjects for study during the
first semester ; the growth of nationalities and changing indus-
trial, social, and political conditions, and the recent history of
Europe in the nineteenth century.

Courses i and 2 are not open to those who have taken or are
taking Courses la and 2a, Juniors or seniors may elect this
course only by special permission, as Course

loi, and will receive but three hours credit.

Ij. The General History of England to the Accession of James 1.
Four hours credit. Lectures and quizzes. Professor Turner,
^ Dr. SvtT\}^7i^9}if and reading assistants.



Digiti



ized by Google



tyS College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

This course and Course 2a are designed to give some idea of
the character and culture of the people of England, and of the
development of institutions which were afterwards brought to
America. Narrative and military history will not be neglected,
but emphasis will be put upon social and economic matters and
the development of the constitution and of English law.

Courses la and 2a are not open to students who have taken or
are taking Courses i and 2. Juniors or seniors may elect this
course only by special permission, as Coarse

loia, an J will receive but ihr^e hours credit,

lb. The History of Greece and the Near East to 20i B. C. Four

hours credit. Professor BoAK.
This course begins with a brief survey of the rise of civilization

in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the other countries of the near

east ; discusses the pre-Hellenic civilization of the i^gean basin,

and traces the history of the Greeks to the beginning of the

Roman conquest of the Hellenic world.
This is an introductory course, designed (like Courses i and la)

primarily for freshmen. Juniors or seniors may elect this

course only by special permission, as Course

10 1 ^, and will receive but three hours credit.

[5. The History of England from the Beginnings of the American
Revolution to the Reform Bill of 1832. Three hours credit.
Discussions on lectures and assigned reading. Professor
Cross. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

6. The History of England from the Reform Bill of 1832 to the
Close of the Great War. Three hours credit. Discussions on
lectures and assigned readings. Professor Cross.

9. Europe in the Middle Ages, from Rome to Feudalism. Lectures,
reading, and discussions. Three hours credit. Professor Dow.
This course treats the history of our western world during one
of the chief stages of its evolution — that when Rome gave way
before invaders from Germany and Arabia, and the peoples of
modern Europe took on their broader lines ; when thought and
life came to be moulded increasingly by the Christian church,
and the papacy advanced to a large role in both church and
secular affairs; and when feudalism in some form became the
most widely controlling factor in political and social arrange-
ments.

[11. The Rise of Prussia as a Factor in European History in the

Seventeenth, Eighteenth, and Nineteenth Centuries. Lectures,

reading, and quizzes. Three hours credit. Professor Frayer.

Although the history of Prussia will be strongly emphasized, the



Digiti



ized by Google



Courses of Instruction 279

general development of modem Germany will be treated; and
a comparative study will be made of the influence exerted by
the Enlightened Despotism of the eighteenth century.
Open only to juniors and seniors. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

iij.The Revolutionary and Napoleonic Period in Europe (1789-
18 1 5. lectures, assigned reading, special reports, and discus-
sions. Tkr^e hours credit. Professor Frayer.
This course will deal somewhat generally with the political, social,
and economic conditions in Europe under the Old Regime, and
much more intensively with the period of the French Revolu-
tion and Napoleon. The f>ermanent influences of this period,
and especially the relation of the French Revolution to modem
world conditions, will be considered. A reading knowledge of
French is recommended. Open only to juniors and seniors.

14. The Political and Constitutional History of the United States.
Lectures and quizzes. Three hours credit. Lectures and
quizzes. Professor Van Tyns.

This course, supplemented by Course 15 in the second semester,
covers the history of the United States from the outbreak of
the Revolution to the Civil War. Special attention is given
in this semester to the divergent English and American political
theories, the methods of organizing the Revolutionary War,
the European diplomatic entanglements, the relations of the
Continental Congress and the states, the efforts to solve the
problem of imperial organization, the Constitutional Conven-
tion, and the Federalist organization of the new government.

This course should be taken in the sophomore 3rear by those who
propose to make a special study of American History.

16. The History of the United States in the Civil War and Recon-
struction. Three hours credit. Lectures, reading, and quizzes.
Professor Philups.
This course treats of the causes and process of secession; the
problems and conduct of the war, and the theories and readjust-
ments in industry, society, and government which followed the
collapse of the Southern Confederacy.

For Upperclassmen and Graduates.

3. The Constitutional and Legal History of England, to Magna
Charta. Three hours credit. Lectures, discussion on lectures
and assigned reading. Professor Cross.
The aim of this course is to explain the formation of the English
constitution and to trace the origin and development of English
institutions, political and legal. It should be of particular
interest to those who intend to study law. It is open to juniors
and seniors who have had an introductory course, and, by spe-
cial permission, to those who have not.



Digiti



ized by Google



28o College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

[7a, The Constitutional Development of the Greek States to the End
of the Fifth Century. Lectures, reports, and discussions. Thr^e
hours credit. Professor Boak.
This course traces the development of political institutions and
systems of government in. the Greek states from their origins
until the fall of the Athenian Empire, with special considera-
tion of the Athenian democracy. Omitted in 1931-1921.]

7*. Greek Political Theories of the Fourth Century and the States
of the Hellenistic Age. Lectures, reports, and discussions.
Three hours credit. Professor Boak.
This course treats of the theories of state of Plato and Aristotle,
of the rise of federal states, of absolute monarchy, of bureau-
cracy, and of the other political developments of the Hellenistic
Age- '. i .l«t^

[19^. Social Europe in Medieval Times. Lectures, ' reading, and dis-
cussions. Two or three hours credit. ■ Professor Dow.
This course treats briefly of social reconstruction from Roman
to feudal times, and then more especially of noble, cleric,
peasant, artisan, and trader in the midst of feudalism, and of
the chief social changes arising with the progress of commerce
and industry, the development of towns, and the buiFding of
regional and national states. Concerning the part of towns-
people in these changes, attention will be given particularly to
France and the Low Countries. Omitted in 1920- 192 1.]

20a. The Renaissance. Lectures, reading, and discussions. Two or
three hours credit. Professor Dow.
This course treats of society, thought, and life in and beyond
Italy from the twelfth to the seventeenth century. Attention
is given chiefly to the conditions or currents that made for
intellectual changes, and to the most outstanding persons rep-
resenting those changes.

21. Studies in Medieval and Early Modem Times, conducted as a
pro-seminary. Two or three hours credit. Professor Dow.
This course gives opportunity for special study of some subject
relating to the Middle Ages, Renaissance, or Reformation;
each member of the class selecting a subject according to his
preference and equipment. But the main object of the course
is to provide guidance for the beginner in more advanced or
independent study. The matters emphasized concern chiefly
preparation of a bibliography and critical use of documents
and works.

38. The History of the South, Colonial and Ante-Bellum. lectures,

reading, and quizzes. Three hours credit. Professor Philups.

An economic, social, and political study. The plantation syitem,



Digiti



ized by Google



Courses of Instruction 281

with its dependence upon staple crops, unfree labor, free trade,
and local autonomy, is taken as a key to the development and
policy of the South. The first semester's work, extending to
1820, deals chiefly with the development of the regime within
the South.

[51. The History of Latin American. Lectures and quizzes. Three
hours credit.
This course will deal with the European background of Spanish
and Portuguese America, the conquest, the native civilizations,
and the institutions and life of the colonial period. A reading
knowledge of Spanish will be of considerable value. Omitted
in 1 920- 1 92 1.]

[53. The History of the Pacific Area. Lectures and quizzes. Three
hours credit.
The history of the activities of European peoples and of the
United States in the Pacific Ocean and the adjacent regions;
and the development of the native races of the Far East, such
as the Chinese and Japanese ; with a consideration of the
present situation and problems within that area. Omitted in
1920-1921.]

[55. The Spaniards in North America. Lectures and quizzes. Three
hours credit.
This course deals particularly with the history of the Spanish
occupation of Mexico and with Spanish settlements in the
present territory of the United States; also with the develop-
ment of republican Mexico. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

[57. The History of Spain. Lectures and reports. One hour credit.
This course deals with the development of the institutions of the
Iberian peoples, both before their transplanting in America
and parallel with their growth in the colonies. Among the
subjects treated are: the Roman and Saracen influences, the
rise of Castile and Aragon, the establishment of a strong mon-
archy by the Catholic Kings and the early Hapsburgh, the
Decadencia, the Bourbon revival Portugal under the House of
Aviz, the Church, the cities and the cortes, and the relation of
art and literature to the national life. The course is especially
designed for prespective teachers of Spanish and for those
who intend to take Course 51 and 52. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

Primarily for Graduates,

59. Seminary in American Revolutionary History. Tiuo hours credit.
Professor Van Tyne.
This course is intended to oifer training in the investigation of
historical problems, and practice in the handling of original



Digiti



ized by Google



282 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

material. The work in 1920-192 1 is concerned with a series of
historical problems in preliminaries of the American Revolu-
tion, chosen for the purpose of illustrating various methods of
research. Open only to graduates and to seniors obtaining
special permission.

23. Seminary in English History. Two hours credit. Professor

CilOSS.
This course is devoted to the investigation of topics mainly in
the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The work of 1920-
192 1 will be concernjed with the Puritan Revolution. Open
only to graduates, and to seniors with the permission of the
instructor.

25. 5?eminary in Medieval and Early Modern European History.
T7U0 hours credit, or more by special permission. Professor Dow;
The members of the class cooperate with the instructor in the

study of a subject from the courses, and may work individually

on other subjects. Open only to graduates.

41. Seminary in American History. Two hours credit. Professor
Phulips.
Intensive research by students upon assigned topics, and discus-
sion of reports presented. Open only to graduates and to
seniors obtaining permission of the instructor. The principal
field for study will be American negro slavery as a working
regime and as an issue in public discussion.

47. Seminary in Modern European History. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Turner.

In 1920- 192 1 this seminary will have to do with certain selected
problems in English and in European history.

Open only to graduates, and to seniors obtaining special per-
mission.

SECOND SEMESTER

Primarily for Undergraduates.

2. The General History of Europe since 18 15. Four hours credit.
Professor Prayer, Mr. Lucas, Mr. Carroll, Mr. Ryskamp,
and reading assistants.
This course forms a continuation of Course I. The class will be
organized in the same way as in the first semester, with lec-
tures and quiz sections, as announced under Course I. Juniors
or seniors may elect this course only by special permission, as
Course

102, and will receive but three hours credit,



Digiti



ized by Google



Courses of Instruction 283

2a. The General History of England, from the Accession of James I
to 1920. Four hours credit. Professor Turner, Dr. Stephen-
son, and reading assistants.
This course forms a continuation of Course la. The class will
be organized in the same way as in the first semester, with
lectures and quiz sections, as announced under Course la.
Juniors or seniors may elect this course only by special per-
mission, as Course

loaa, and will receive but three hours credit.

2b. The History of Rome, to 565 A. D. Four hours credit. Profes-
sor BOAK.
This course forms a continuation of Course i^. The class will
be organized in the same way as in the first semester, with
lectures, quiz sections, hours, and rooms as announced under
Course i^. Juniors or seniors may elect this course only by
special permission, as Coarse

\02b, and will receive but three hours credit.

32. The Origin and Development of the British Empire. Lectu.res,
reading, and discussions. Three hours credit. Professor Cross.
This course will include a study of such present problems as the
Egyptian and Indian questions and Imperial Federation.

10. Europe from Feudal to National Times. Lectures, reading, and
discussions. Three hours credit. Professor Dow.
This course treats of institutions, problems, and efforts in the
western world when the feudal regime and the church were
at their height ; and then of various changes in the time of the
Renaissance and Reformation. It is designed primarily for
the sophomore or junior year, and, when possible, should be
preceded by Course 9 or equivalent general preparation in the
earlier Middle Ages.

12. Europe Since 1870. Lectures, assigned reading, special reports,
and discussions. Three hours credit. Professor Frayer,
Starting with the completion of Italian and German unity, the
course will treat of the recent diplomatic history of Europe,
the formation of the Triple Alliance and the Triple Entente,
the growth of intense national rivalries, Germany as a colonial
and naval power, the Moroccan and Balkan questions, and the
outstanding causes of the Great War.

[13. The History of Colonial America. Lectures, with assigned read-
ings and quizzes. Three hours credit.
The expansion of Europe into the New World, with emphasis
upon study of the English colonics. The coarse will deal with



Digiti



ized by Google



284 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

European origins, political and economic development, colonial
society and culture, the frontier, imperial rivalries, and inter-
colonial relations, and especially with relations between colonial
and imperial governments. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

15. The Political and Constitutional History of the United States.
Lectures and quizzes. T/iree hours credit. Professor Van
Tyne.
Course 15 is a continuation of Course 14, and deals with the
reform movements of the Jeffersonian democracy, the develop-
ment of national feeling, the westward movement and the rise
of the political power of the West, the Jacksonian type of
democracy, slavery and abolition, party entanglement in the
slavery issue, and the final clash of the northern and soathem
social systems upon the frontier border beyond the Mississippi.

17. The United States in Recent Decades. Lectures, readings, and
quizzes. Three hours credit. Professor Phillips.
In sequence to Course 16, this course treats of the political, eco-
nomic, and social history of the United States from about the



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 25 of 75)