University of Michigan.

Catalogue of the University of Michigan online

. (page 26 of 75)
Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 26 of 75)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


year 1876 to near the present time.

For U pperclassmen and Graduates,

4. The Constitutional and Legal History of England since Magna
Charta. Lectures, reading, and discussions. Three hours credit.
Professor Cross.
This course is a continuation of Course 3.

8a. The Roman Republic. Lectures, reports, and discussions. Thr-ee
hours credit. Professor Boak.
This coarse is a study of the constitutional development of the
Roman state from its beginning until the end of the period
of the Republic.

[8^. The Roman Empire. Lectures, repor-ts, and discussions. Three
hours credit. Professor BoAK.
This course is a study of the Roman government system from
the foundation of the Principate by Augustus to tde time of
Justinian. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

20b. The Reformation. lectures, reading, and discussions. Two or
three hours credit. Professor Dow.
This course treats of the history of Europe from the fourteenth
to the sixteenth century, with special reference to problems and
measures concerning the church and religion.

22. Studies in Modern Historiography. Two hours credit. Profes-
sor Dow.
This course includes a general survey of the writing of history



Digiti



ized by Google



Courses of Instruction 285

in modern times, and a study (with report) by each member
of the class of the life and work of some outstanding historical
writer.

39. The History of the South, Colonial and Ante-Bellum. Lectures,
reading, and quizzes. Thre^ hours credit. Professor Phillips.
An economic, social, and political study. The plantation system,
with its dependence upon staple crops, unfree labor, free trade,
and local autonomy, is taken as a key to the development and
policy of the South. The second semester's work relates chiefly
to the issues of state rights and slavery in federal politics.

[52. The History of Latin America. Lectures and quizzes. Three
hours credit.
Course 52 is a continuation of Course 51, and deals with the
republican period of Latin America. Stress will be laid upon
present-day conditions, political, social, and economic, and upon
the relations of the republics with the United States. Omitted
in 1920-1921.]

[54. The History of the Pacific Area. Lectures and quizzes. Three
hours credit.
This course is a continuation of Course 53, and deals especially
with developments in the Far East since 1800. Omitted in
1920-192 1.]

[58. The History of Spain. Lectures and reports. One hour credit.
This course is a continuation of Course 57. Omitted in 1920-
1921.]

Primarily for Graduates.

60. Seminary in American Revolutionary History. Two hours credit.
Professor Van Tynr.
Course 60 is a continuation of Course 59. Open only to graduates
and to seniors obtaining permission.

24. Seminary in English History. T7tH> hours credit. Professor
Cross.
This course is a continuation of Course 23. It is open only to
graduate students and to seniors obtaining permission.

26. Seminary in Mediaeval and Early Modem European History.
Two hours credit, or more by permission. Professor Dow.
This is a continuation of Course 25, and is open only to graduates.

42. Seminary in American History. Two hours credit. Professor
Phillips.
Course 42 is a continuation of Course 41.



Digiti



ized by Google



286 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

48. Seminary in Modern European History. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Turner.
Course 48 is a continuation of Course 47.

SrMMF.R SESSION OF 192I

2. Europe Since 1815. Four hours credit. Professor Frayer.
ids. Greek Civilizat'on to 200 B. C. Two hours credit. Professor

BOAK.

26^'. The History of Rome to 565 A. D. Two hours credit. Professor

BOAK.

32ff. The History of the British Empire. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Cross.

12s. The Great War and Reconstruction. Two hours credit. Profes-
sor Phillips.

39J. The History of the Ante-Bellum South. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Phillips.

$oa. The Teaching of History. Two hours credit. Professor Dow.

14X. The Political and Constitutional History of the United States
(1765 to 1800.) Two hours credit. Professor Van Tyne.

i8j. Seminary in American Revolutionary History. Two hours credit.
Professor Van Tyne.

History of Religions

(See Semitics)

Hygiene

(See Medical Sciences)

Insurance

(See Mathematics)

INDO-EUROPEAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE

(Group I)

Sanskrit

The study of Sanskrit is of value to students of the Indo-Euro-
pean (i) languages, (2) literatures, (3) philosophy and religion, (4)
social institutions, and (5) for those preparing to do missionary
work in India. The courses offered below are designed especially
for students of the languages, ancient and modern, and are adjusted
to the needs of those preparing to teach. They are correlated with



Digiti



ized by Google



Courses of Instruction 287

the courses in Comparative Philology, but individual aid and direction
will be given to any who wish to devote themselves to other aspects
of the study.

Before beginning the study of Sanskrit, the student should have
pursued courses in one of the three subjects, Greek, Latin, and Ger-
man, or in lieu of German some one of the other Teutonic languages
or a Slavonic language, for at least four semesters.

FIRST SEMESTER

1. Beginners' Course. Grammar, and exercises in translation and

composition. Text-books: Whitney's Grammar, or Thumb's
Ilandbuch des Sanskrit, and Lannan's Sanskrit Reader. Two
hours credit. Professor Meader.

[3. Advanced Reading: Kalidasa's Cakuntaia. Elements of Prakrit.
One hour credit. Professor Meader. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

[3tf. Rapid Reading of Easy Sanskrit. One or two hours credit.
Professor Meader. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

second semester

2. Interpretation of selections contained in Lanman's Sanskrit

Reader, with elementary studies in the comparative morphology
of the more important cognate languages. Two hours credit.
Professor Meadbr.

[4. Advanced Reading. Selections from the Vedas, One hour credit.
Professor Meader. Omitted in 1920-192 1.]

Old Bulgarian

FIRST SEMESTER

[i. Beginners' Course. Two hours credit. Professor Meader.

This course is designed for students interested in Slavonics or
in Indo-European comparative philology. Omitted in 1920-
192 1.]

Russian

In consequence of the increasing importance of Russia in intel-
lectual, political, and commercial activities, a practical acquaintance
with the Russian language is rapidly becoming a necessity for Eng-
lish-speaking peoples. The courses offered below are especially
designed for students interested in Russian literature, historical
sources, and commercial affairs, and Indo-Eurof>ean comparative
philology, and for those who are preparing to enter the diplomatic
service.



Digiti



ized by Google



288 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts



FIRST SEMESTER

1. Be}(inners' Course. Klements of the language. Selected readings

from Tolstoi and other writers will serve as the basis of the
work. Thrc^ hours credit. Professor Meader.

3. Advanced Russian. Reading, composition, and conversation.

Three hours credit. Professor Meader.

7. Russian Literature in English. Lectures and assigned readings.

Two hours credit. Professor Meader.
No knowledge of the Russian language is required. Conrses 8
and 9 are continuous in character and should. be elected con-
secutively, as each is essential to the understanding of the other.
They are designed for those who desire to pursue the study
of the literature under the guidance of an instructor, without
devoting time previously to the acquisition of the language.
The courses deal mainly with the Age of Catharine, with Push-
kin, Gogol, Dostoevski, Turgenev, Tolstoi, Nekrasov, Chekhov,
Gorki, Andrev, Guprin, and Artsybashev.

SECOND SEMESTER

2. Continuation of Course i. Readings from Pushkin, Lennontov,

Turgenev, and Tolstoi. Three hours credit. Professor Meader.

4. Continuation of Course 3. Three hours credit. Professor

Meader.

8. Continuation of Course 7. Two hours credit. Professor Meader.

10. Interrelations of Russian and Western European Literature. Two
hours credit. Professor Meader.
Course 10 must be preceded by Courses 7 and 8, or an equiva-
lent. It provides an opportunity for more detailed study of
some of the problems treated in Courses 8 and 9.

SUMMER SESSION OP 1 92 1

is. Elementary Russian. Two hours credit. Professor Meader.

"js. Russian Literature in English. Two hours credit. Professor
Meader.

Italian

(See Romance Languages and Literatures)

Journalism

(See Rhetoric)



Digiti



ized by Google



Courses of Instruction 289



LANDSCAPE DESIGN

Courses i» 2, and 5 may be elected by any student above the rank
of freshman, without previous preparation. Courses 3 and 4 may
also be elected by students not specializing in outlined programs in
Landscape Design.

Courses 7 to 12 are designing courses; each period implies three
hours work; and when outside work is necessary, such as stadia
surveying, ground measurement, and inspection, the entire morning
or entire afternoon will be required, at the discretion of the instructor.

Those interested in landscape design are referred to the special
announcement of the Curriculum in Landscape Design, which may be
obtained by application to the Secretary's office.

Students wishing to consult about these courses may do so by
appointment with Professor Tealdi and Assistant Professor Whitte-
MORE during registration week, September ao to 24, and later at
the hours posted in the South Wing, South Corridor. Telephone
University Exchange 152- J, between i and 2 o'clock; City Ex-
change 2430.

nRST SEMESTER

I. Introduction to the Study of Landscape Design. Lectures, col-
lateral reading, and reports. Three hours credit. Professor
Tealdi, and Assistant Professor Whittemore, with occasional
lectures by Mr. SncoNDS.
Course i is designed to give a general knowledge of the variety
of problems to be met with in the practice of landscape gar-
dening. It is not intended as a technical course, such as a
course in construction or design. The general problems are
treated separately and special stress is laid upon the subject
of good taste and common sense in all problems, from the
simple arrangement of the city yard to the laying out of a
country estate. During the 6rst weeks of the semester one
lecture may be omitted and a two-hour or three-hour period
. may be devoted to the actual study of local examples. The
lectures are illustrated by the use of the stereopticon.

3. Study of Materials for Planting Design: Trees and Shrubs.
Lectures, reports, and field work. Three hours credit. As-
sistant Professor Whittemore, with occasional lectures by Pro-
fessor Tealdi.
Course 3 is intended to make the student familiar with the shrubs
and trees generally used in landscape gardening. It is not
intended as a course in botany; courses in botany are pre-
requisites of this course. The aesthetic value of plants are to
be studied; their shape, size, habits, favorite habitat, their
autumn coloring both of leaves and fruit, their general aspects
in autumn and winter. One field trip a week is taken, and a



Digiti



ized by Google



290 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

report of the trip is required. During the second part of the
semester the field trip is omitted; the period is devoted to
laboratory work, when the entire afternoon may be required.
The lectures are illustrated by the use of the stereopticon.

5. Art of Garden Design and Landscape Gardening in England.
Lectures, with collateral reading and reports. Three hours
trtfdit. Professor Tealdi.
The object of this course is to follow the gradual development
of gardening in England from the earliest efforts to present
clay, laying special stress upon the transition of styles and the •
development of the Naturalistic or English style. The lectures
are illustrated by the use of the stereopticon.

7. Design of Home Grounds. Study of local examples of private
grounds. Solution of original problems. Drafting, confer-
ences, and collateral reading. Four hours credit. Assistant
Professor Whittemore.
The work in Course 7 consists chiefly of the application to actual
problems of the knowledge acquired in Courses 3, 4, and 6.
The students are required to work out problems presented to
them in definite form by the instructors, with the same atten-
tion to details which is necessary in actual office practice. The
drafting consists of plans, profiles, colored sketches and fin-
ished drawings.

9. City Planning I : Parks and Park Systems. Four hours credit.
Professor Tealdi.

II. City Planning III: Design of Cemeteries. Four hours credit.
Professor Tealdi.

[13. Planting Design I. Three hours credit. Professor Tealdi.

In Courses 13 and 14 the general knowledge of plants acquired
in Courses 3 and 4 will be applied to the actual use of plants
in Landscape Composition. Lectures, quizzes, drafting prob-
lems, and field work. In the problems the details of planting
composition will be presented in plan, elevation, and per-
spective.

Prerequisites: landscape Design i, 3, and 4. Given in alternate
years. Omitted in 1920-1921.]

SEcoxn semester

2. City Planning and Civic Improvement. Three hours credit. Pro-
fessor Tealdi, and Assistant Professor Whittemore.
There is a growing tendency throughout the state to take up in
earnest the different phases of civic improvement. As this
subject grows to l)e recognized in the state of Michigan as it



Digiti



ized by Google



Courses of Instruction 291

has been iu other states, as a matter of vital importance not
only to municipalities but to every individual, whether in the
country or in the city, there will arise a demand for men and
women to lead the way of civic progress in their communities.
These leaders will be recruited from teachers and other citizens
who have devoted time to a study of this most complex ques-
tion. Course 2 is offered with the express purpose of stimu-
lating civic spirit and a desire for further investigation among
those who would like to keep abreast of the movement for civic
improvement and who are interested in its sane development.
Among the subjects treated are the following: city out-lay,
streets, bridges, squares, public buildings, parks, trees, and
other natural assets, city nuisances, problems of wires and
advertisements as they affect the appearance of the city; dirt,
smoke, and noise as they affect life in the city. Special stress
is laid upon the housing problem, particularly as it is affected
by the Garden City movement
This course may be considered a practical introduction to City
Planning.

4. Study of Material for Planting Design : Trees, Shrubs, and
Perennials. Lectures, planting plans, reports, and field work.
Three hours credit. Assistant Professor Whittemore.
Course 4 is a continuation of Course 3. The trees and shrubs
are studied chiefly in relation to their flowering and leafing
characteristics and their ornamental values in spring and sum-
mer. Hardy herbaceous perennials are studied also along the
same lines. The lectures are illustrated by the use of the
stereopticon.

6. Practice in Design. Study of local examples, sketch plans, re-
ports. Solution of simple original problems based on topo-
graphical surveys. Field work, drafting, and conferences. Four
hours credit. Assistant Professor Whittemore.
Course 6 is open only to those students who have passed satis-
factorily in Courses 3 and 4 or who can satisfy the instructor
that they have done equivalent work.

8. Design of Large Country Places. Four hours credit. Professor
Tealdi, and Assistant Professor Whittemore.
Whereas Course 7 deals with home grounds proper, whether in
the city or in the country, and therefore with moderate sized
and small areas which offer the restricted problems common
in cities and shrubs. Course 8 deals with larger problems in
which the broad lay-out is the main feature. Actual surveys
are used in this and the following courses as the basis of all
problems.



Digiti



ized by Google



292 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

10. City Planning II. Continuation of Course 9. Four hours credit.

12. City Planning IV. The City Plan. Six hours credit.

[14 Planting Design II. Continuation of Course 13. Three hours
credit. Professor Tealdi.
Given in alternate years. Omitted in 1920- 192 1.]

16. Advanced Flower Garden Design. Two hours credit. Professor

Tealdi.
This course follows Coarse 7 and should be taken at the same

time as Course 8.
Prerequisites: Courses i, 3, 4,-5, 6, and 7.

SUMMER SESSION OF 1931

Is. Introduction to the Study of Landscape Design. Two hours
credit. Professor Tealdi.

3J. Trees, Shrubs, and Flowers. Two hours credit. Professor Tealdi.

2s. Civic Improvement. Tivo hours credit. Professor Tbaldi.

15. Planting Design III. Two hours credit. Professor Tealdi.

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

(Group I)

Students especially interested in language study are advised to
elect two foreign languages in the freshman year. Two new lan-
guages, however, should not be begun at the same time. Suggestions
with reference to the grouping of language courses are given on

page 154.

Courses A and B are designed for students entering with two
units in Latin, and should be elected in the first year. A credit of
four hours is given for each course.

Students entering with four units in Latin should elect Courses
I and 2 in the first year, and 3 and 4 in the second year. Course
6a is also open to second year students.

Third year students may elect from Coorses 7, 7a, Jb, 7c, lOa
or lo^, II, 12, 14, 14a, and 16a.

In order to increase the range of work offered to advanced stu-
dents, several of the courses in Latin are given in alternate years,
new courses being introduced as opportunity is thus afforded.

Students who are preparing to teach Latin are recommended to
take Courses 7, loa or 10^, 11, 12, 21, 21a, 22, and 22a. It is advised
that they complete at least Courses I and 2 in Greek, either having
presented two units of Greek for admission and having taken Courses
I and 2 as regular freshman work, or, if Greek be not presented for



Digiti



ized by Google



Courses of Instruction 293

admission, having completed Courses A and B as well as I and 2 in
the University.

All students expecting a recommendation to teach should consult
the head of the department early in their course. Special courses
will be arranged to suit individual needs.

Courses i, la, 2, 3, 4, 4a, 4b, and 6a are intended primarily for
undergraduates. Courses S/, 6g, 7, ya, Jb, yc, ye, 8, loa, lob, 11, 12,
I3> I3^> I4> I4A> I5» 16, i6a, 18, 21, 21a, 22, and 22a are for grad-
uates and undergraduates. Courses 18^, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, and 31
are exclusively for graduates.

Consultation Hours. — During Registration week, September 20
to 24, Professor Crittenden, daily, from 10 to 12. Room 208,
U. H.

FIRST SEMESTER

Y. Elementary Preparatory Latin. This course and Course Z, run-
ning throughout the year, cover the first two units of the
entrance requirements in Latin. Successful completion of the
courses entitles the student to two units for admission; but no
college credit is given. A fee of $10 is charged for each
semester. Dr. Butlbr.

Hi. Virgil Mneid. Translation and interpretation, metrical reading
and studies in Greek and Roman mythology. Four hours
credit. Assistant Professor Meinecke.

Bj. Selections from the Roman Law. Reading and interpretation of
passages from Gains and Justinian. Four hours credit. Pro-
fessor Crittenden.
This course is open to students who have had two years of high
school Latin. It is especially designed for prospective students
of law and legal institutions.

1. Cicero, Essays. Dfe Senectute, De Amicitia; Selections from

Catullus or Ovid. Latin Writing. Four hours writing. Pro-
fessor Crittenden, and Assistant Professor Meinecke.

la. Roman History and Politics. Four hours credit. Professor
Crittenden.
Readings from selected Latin authors, designed to be of value
to students of law and political science. If desired, this course
may also be elected for three hours credit,

2. Livy, Book I or XXI. Plautus. Terence. Four hours credit.

Assistant Professor Meinecke.

3. Horace. Selections from the Odes, Satires, and Epistles, Four

hours credit. Professor Crittenden, and Assistant Professor
Meinecke.
These sections may also be elected as three-hour courses, 3a.



Digiti



ized by Google



294 Culleye of Literature, Science, and the Arts

5/. General Linguistics. A general introduction to the science of
language. Two /tours credit. Professor Meadek.
This course should be elected as General Linguistics and Com-
parative Philology 5/.

[6a. Roman Comedy. Selected plays of Plautus and Terence. Ttvo
hours crrdit. Assistant Proftssor Meinecke. Omitted in 1920-
1921.]

7. Roman Political Institutions. T^vo hours credit. Professor Sa.n-
DERS.

II. Latin Writing. Two hours credit. Professors Sanders and

Meader.
Course 11 is introductory to Course 12. The principal aim is to

secure correctness of expression and a feeling for idiom.
This course is intended for juniors, but sophomores are admitted

by special permission.

13' Juvenal. Interpretations and lectures. Two hours credit. Pro-
fessor Winter.

[13J. Lucretius. Interpretartions and lectures. Two hours credit.
Professor Winter. Omitted in 1920- 192 1.]

[14. Tibullus and Propertius. Interpretations, with lectures on the
Roman elegy. Two hours credit. Professor Winter. Omitted
in 1920-1921.]

[14J. Catullus and Martial. Interpretations and lectures. Two hours
credit. Professor Sanders.

15. Introduction to Latin Palaeography. Two hours credit. Profes-
sor Sanders.
Lectures on the various styles of writing found in Latin manu-
scripts, with exercises in reading from facsimiles.

21. Teachers* Course. Interpretations of Cesar's Gallic War, with
studies in the syntax and military antiquities. T'tco hours
credit. Professor Sanders.
Courses 21, 2\a, and 21^ are open only to those who receive spe-
ciah permission. Those who elect Course 21 are required to
elect also 21a.

2M. Teachers' Course. lectures on the Gallic War. One hour credit.
Professor Sanders.

[21^. Studies in Cxsar. Consultation. Professor Keisev. No credit
is given for this course. Omitted in 1920-1921.]



Digiti



ized by Google



Courses of Instruction 295

35. Reports on the Progress of Research. No credit.

Analysis and criticism of important articles in the domain of
the Latin and Greek languages and literatures, Latin and
Greek grammar and lexicology, Greek and Roman history,
archaeology, and antiquities, by members of the classical faculty
and members of the Latin and Greek Seminaries.

37. Seminary. Propertius, with studies in the Roman Elegy. Tioo
hours credit. Professor Sanders.
Course 27 is open to graduate students only.

SECOND SEMESTER

Z. Elementary Prieparatory Latin. Dr. Buti.er.

Courses Y and Z, running throughout the year, cover the first
two units of the entrance requirement in Latin. Successful
completion of the courses entitles the student to two units for
admission; but no college credit is given. A fee of $10 is
charged for each semester.

A. Selections from Cicero and Sallust. With comparison of ancient
and modern oratory, and collateral work in Roman history
and government. Four hours credit. Professor Crittenden.

3. Livy, Book I or XXL Plautus. Terence. Four hours credit.
Professor Crittenden, and Assistant Professor Meinecke.

4. History of Roman Literature. Four hourr credit. Lectures and
recitations, with readings. Professor Winter, and Assistant
Professor Meinecke.

4a. General Course in Roman Literature. T200 hours credit. Pro-
fessor Winter, and Assistant Professor Meinecke.
This course is designed for students interested in .the general'
subject of literature, who do not wish to make an intensive
• study of Latin. No knowledge of Latin is required. The
Roman literature will be treated in its broad relation to the
Greek literature and to modem literature.

4^. The Letters of Pliny the Younger. Interpretation of selected
letters, with a study of Roman literary and social conditions
at the end of the first century, A. D. Two hours credit. As-
sistant Professor Meinecke.

6^. Comparative Philology. A general introduction to comparative
Indo-European philology. Two hours credit. Professor Mea-
der.
This course should be elected as (jeneral Linguistics and Com-
parative Philology 6^.



Digiti



ized by Google



296 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

7a. Tacitus, Agricola, Germania, and selections. Interpretations and



Online LibraryUniversity of MichiganCatalogue of the University of Michigan → online text (page 26 of 75)